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IAP 2005 Subjects

Brain and Cognitive Sciences

9.911
Spec Top: Brain & Cog Sci
Responsible Conduct in Science
Matt Wilson
Mon Jan 24 thru Fri Jan 28, 02-04:30pm, E25-117

Selection by departmental lottery. Do not pre-register on WebSIS.
Enter lottery by: 15-Jan-2005
No listeners
Prereq: Limited to BCS Graduate Students
Level: H 3 units Graded P/D/F Can be repeated for credit   

To provide instruction and dialogue on practical ethical issues relating to the responsible conduct of human and animal research in the brain and cognitive sciences. Specific emphasis will be placed on topics relevant to young researchers including data handling, animal and human subjects, misconduct, mentoring, intellectual property, and publication. Preliminary assigned readings, initial faculty lecture followed by discussion groups of four to five students each. A short written summary of the discussions will be submitted at the end of each class.
Contact: Matt Wilson, E18-370, x3-2046, mwilson@mit.edu

9.94
Independent Activities
Recognizing Real-world Scenes: Insights from Behavioral, Computational and Cognitive Neuroscience Research
Aude Oliva
Mon-Fri, Jan 18-21, 24-26, 12-02:00pm, E25-111

Pre-register on WebSIS and attend first class.
Listeners allowed, space permitting
Prereq:
Level: U 3 units Graded P/D/F Can be repeated for credit   

For undergraduates taking Course 9 IAP subjects for credit. See IAP Guide for details. May be repeated for credit.
An introduction to state-of-the-art research on real-world scene comprehension, including the newest developments in human visual cognition, cognitive neuroscience and computational vision. Real-world scenes are 3-dimensional complex visual structures composed of a variety of objects, textures, colors, materials and spatial layouts. Despite this complexity, the human brain understands novel scenes quickly and effortlessly. How is this remarkable feat accomplished? How can we find an object in a cluttered scene? Which strategies does the brain implement to quickly recognize an environment and navigate intelligently? How can we design machine vision systems that are able to recognize complex scenes as humans do?
Contact: Aude Oliva, NE20-463, x2-2492, oliva@mit.edu

9.95
Independent Activities
Research Topics in Neuroscience
Peter Schiller
Mon-Fri, Jan 19-21, 24-28, 10am-12:00pm, E25-117

Pre-register on WebSIS and attend first class.
Listeners allowed, space permitting
Prereq:
Level: U 3 units Graded P/D/F Can be repeated for credit   

For undergraduates taking Course 9 IAP subjects for credit. See IAP Guide for details. May be repeated for credit.
This series of research talks by members of the Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences introduces students to different approaches to the study of the brain and mind. Attendance at all sessions manadatory. There will be an exam on the 28th, required for credit.
Contact: Peter Schiller, E25-634C, x3-5754, phschill@mit.edu

9.97
Independent Activities
Introduction to Neuroanatomy
Rutledge Ellis-Behnke
Fri Jan 14, Tue Jan 18, Wed Jan 19, Thu Jan 20, Fri Jan 21, 12-02:00pm, 6-120

Selection by departmental lottery. Do not pre-register on WebSIS.
Enter lottery by: 13-Dec-2004
Limited to 75 participants.
No listeners
Prereq:
Level: U 3 units Graded P/D/F Can be repeated for credit   

This subject will be an intensive introduction to neuroanatomy, involving lectures, demonstrations, and hands-on laboratories, including a brain dissection. The course will not assume any prior knowledge of neuroanatomy, though some general knowledge of brain structures will be helpful. To register, email jjacobso@mit.edu between December 3rd and 13th. Do not email before December 3rd. Include your name, ID#, year at MIT, and major. Year at MIT will be a determining factor in the lottery, with preference given to upperclass students.
Contact: Rutledge Ellis-Behnke, E25-634, x3-4556, rutledg@mit.edu

9.98
Independent Activities
Language and Mind
Edward Gibson
Mon-Fri, Jan 19-21, 24-28, 03-04:30pm, E25-111

Pre-register on WebSIS and attend first class.
Listeners allowed, space permitting
Prereq:
Level: U 3 units Graded P/D/F Can be repeated for credit   

This subject will address some fundamental points regarding human language: how language is represented in our minds; how language is acquired by children; how language is processed by adults; the relationship between language and thought; exploring how language is represented and processed using brain imaging methods. This subject is intended for undergraduates. No background in psychology or linguistics is required.
Contact: Edward Gibson, NE20-459, x3-8609, egibson@mit.edu


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Last update: 30 September 2004