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IAP 2006 Subjects

Civil and Environmental Engineering

1.978
Special Graduate Studies in Civil and Environmental Engineering
From Nano to Macro: Introduction to Atomistic Modeling Techniques and Application in a Case Study of Modeling Fracture of Copper
Dr. Markus J. Buehler
Pre-register on WebSIS and attend first class.
Listeners welcome at individual sessions (series)
Prereq:
Level: G 3 units Graded P/D/F Can be repeated for credit   

The objective is to introduce large-scale atomistic modeling techniques and motivate its importance for solving problems in modern engineering sciences. We demonstrate how atomistic modeling can be used to understand how materials fail under extreme loading, involving propagation of cracks and dislocations. Students will learn the basics of atomistic modeling, including choosing interatomic potentials, analysis and visualization of data. In the second part of the class, students will work on a project in our computational lab focusing on modeling fracture of a copper nano-crystal.
Web: http://web.mit.edu/mbuehler/www/Teaching/IAP2006/intro.htm
Contact: Dr. Markus J. Buehler, 1-272, 452-2750, mbuehler@mit.edu

Introduction to Classical Molecular Dynamics
Dr. Markus J. Buehler
Brittle versus ductile materials behavior.
Mon Jan 9, 09-10:30am, Room 1-150

Deformation of Ductile Materials
Dr. Markus J. Buehler
Deformation of ductile materials like metals using billion-atom simulations with massively parallelized computing techniques.
Wed Jan 11, 09-10:30am, Room 1-150

Dynamic Fracture of Brittle Materials
Dr. Markus J. Buehler
How nonlinear elasticity and geometric confinement governs crack dynamics.
Fri Jan 13, 09-10:30am, Room 1-150

Size Effects in Deformation of Materials
Dr. Markus J. Buehler
Size effects in deformation of materials: Smaller is stronger.
Tue Jan 17, 09-10:30am, Room 1-150

Introduction to The Problem Set
Dr. Markus J. Buehler
Atomistic modeling of fracture of copper. All simulation codes and numerical tools will be explained in detail. The codes will be provided to participants.
Thu Jan 19, 09-10:30am, Room 1-150

1.979
Special Graduate Studies in Civil and Environmental Engineering
Transportation Software Packages Workshop
Mikel Murga
Mon-Fri, Jan 9-13, 17-20, 09am-05:00pm, Room 1-371

Pre-register on WebSIS and attend first class.
Limited to 12 participants.
No listeners
Prereq: Permission of instructor Yes
Level: G 4 units Standard A - F Grading Can be repeated for credit   

Graduate subjects taught experimentally; special subjects offered by visiting faculty; and seminars on topics of current interest. 1.978 is taught P/D/F.
This is a two-week workshop on GIS, transportation demand modeling and traffic simulation. The goal is two-fold: (a) to provide hands-on experience with commercial software packages (TransCad, and Corsim, HCS and Vissim) and (b) to present and discuss types and sequences of analytical approaches, data needs and sources, pitfalls and opportunities, ranges of application, sensitivity analyses, calibration and validation exercises, etc. A supplemental bibliography will be provided together with a list of relevant web sites. The workshop will require 60 hours of work.
Contact: Mikel Murga, 1-276, x2-3121, mmurga@mit.edu

1.991
Spec Stud: Civil & Environ Eng
Designing Museum Exhibits to Illustrate Earth System Science and Engineering
Prof. Rafael Bras, Dr. Ari Epstein
Mon Jan 9 thru Fri Jan 13, 11am-05:00pm, Room 16-168

Pre-register on WebSIS and attend first class.
No listeners
Prereq: Terrascope (1.016) Students only
Level: U 3 units Graded P/D/F Can be repeated for credit   

In preparation for 1.016, students will explore how visitors learn in museums and how developers create effective exhibits. Students will also develop concepts for exhibits to be built in 1.016. The class will visit local museums, meeting with designers, observing visitors and brainstorming about best practices. They will draw on their experience in 1.991, and the work they have already done in Mission 2009, to develop ideas for exhibits about Tsunamis and disaster response in the Pacific Basin.
Contact: Prof. Raphael Bras, 48-213, x3-2117, rlbras@mit.edu

1.992
Special Undergraduate Studies in Civil and Environmental Engineering
IAP TREX VII (Traveling Research Environmental Experience)--Hawaii--January, 2006
Sheila Frankel
Tue Jan 17 thru Mon Jan 30, 09am-05:00pm, Hawaii, TBD

Selection by departmental lottery. Do not pre-register on WebSIS.
Enter lottery by: 04-Sep-2005
Limited to 10 participants.
No listeners
Prereq: Permission of instructor Permission of Instructor
Level: U 6 units Standard A - F Grading Can be repeated for credit   
Fee: 500.00 for student's expenses towards trip

Undergraduate subjects taught experimentally; special subjects offered by visiting faculty; and seminars on topics of current interest. 1.991 is taught P/D/F.
We will visit the island of Oahu and the "big" island of Hawaii and our research will be conducted on thermal imaging of freshwater intrusion into the ocean and on the biology and chemistry of fish and anchialine ponds. We will be working at Kokokahi Park in Kaneohe,Oahu and in Kaloko Honkahau National Park in Kona, Hawaii. We will set up a field chemistry lab to use with the park ecologist. Lodging will be provided by the National Park and some of the meals will be included. Sleeping bags will be necessary. Airfare will be subsidized.
Contact: Sheila Frankel, 48-216G, x3-2339, sfrankel@mit.edu


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Last update: 30 September 2004