IAP Independent Activities Period
overview participate organize offerings calendar  
for-credit subjects non-credit activities by category non-credit activities by sponsor non-credit activities by date

IAP 2011 Subjects

Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences

12.091
Special Topics in Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences
Introduction to Exploration for Uranium and Geothermal Energy: Focus on Radon Probe
Ila Pillalamarri
Wed Jan 5, Fri Jan 7, Mon Jan 10, Wed Jan 12, Fri Jan 14, 10am-12:00pm, 54-322

Pre-register on WebSIS and attend first class.
Listeners allowed, space permitting
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Level: U 2 units Graded P/D/F Can be repeated for credit   

Laboratory or field work in earth, atmospheric, and planetary sciences. Consult with department Education Office.

Uranium provides nuclear energy to generate electricity, contributing to 8% of total global energy consumed. Exploration for new uranium and alternative thermal energy sources are becoming crucial to meet the growing and projected energy needs globally. What are the explorations strategies? Integrated approaches of geochemistry, geophysics, geology are examined to understand exploration efforts for new and alternative sources.

This is a credit course involving five sessions each of two hours, study assignments, and a case study report and presentation by each student at the end of the course.
Web: http://eapsweb.mit.edu/courses/iap.html
Contact: Ila Pillalamarri, NW13-263, x3-3387, pila@mit.edu

12.093
Special Topics in Geology and Geochemistry
Delivering Energy at Scale: Science, Technology, and Sustainable Development
Rob van der Hilst, David Patrick Murphy, Industry Consultant, Richard A. Sears, Shell International
Mon Jan 24 thru Fri Jan 28, 02-05:00pm, 54-517

Pre-register on WebSIS and attend first class.
Listeners allowed, space permitting
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Level: U 3 units Graded P/D/F Can be repeated for credit   

Laboratory or field work in geology and geochemistry. To be arranged with department faculty. Consult with department Education Office.


Oil and natural gas provide approximately two-thirds of primary energy today, and will continue to be major sources of energy for several decades. The course will introduce today’s energy systems and the state of the art geoscience and engineering approaches necessary to meet current demand. Participants will work in teams, to design and present plans for the development of a multi-billion dollar natural gas project with the potential to supply energy for over three million households. The course will look at how technology, economics, society and sustainability must be balanced to deliver energy efficiently and in a manner that all stakeholders would regard as responsible.


Contact: Rob van der Hilst, 54-522, x3-6977, hilst@mit.edu

12.120
Environmental Earth Science Field Course
Sam Bowring
Mon Jan 3 thru Tue Jan 11, 07am-10:00pm, western U.S., see below

Selection by departmental lottery. Do not pre-register on WebSIS.
No listeners
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Level: U 6 units Standard A - F Grading   
Fee: 300.00 for Travel, food, lodging

Field study to foster understanding of natural hazards and human influence on the environment. Class conducted in the western United States, at locations such as Death Valley and the White Mountain Research Station in Bishop California. Topics include water use and availability, climate change, earthquakes and faulting, and landslides. Also examines volcanic hazards and geothermal power, effects of river diversion, and the geology of the Yucca Mountain facility for the storage of radioactive waste. Students partially responsible for travel expenses. Designed to follow 12.001 or 12.102; other students will be accepted when space is available.


Students will fly from Boston to Las Vegas on January 3, returning Jan 11. Intro to the broad field of environmental geology, natural hazards, and geothermal power. Interested students should contact Prof. Bowring. The group will camp 5 nights and stay in dormitory-style lodgings 2 nights

For this class, "department lottery" means that you need to contact Prof. Bowring to register. Registration is now open. Making an early commitment is important. Registration after Dec. 5 is on a space-available basis.


Web: http://eapsweb.mit.edu/courses/iap.html
Contact: Sam Bowring, 54-1120, x3-3775, sbowring@mit.edu

12.141
Electron Microprobe Analysis
Dr. Nilanjan Chatterjee
Tue Jan 18, Thu Jan 20, Tue Jan 25, Thu Jan 27, 01-05:00pm, 54-1221

Selection by departmental lottery. Do not pre-register on WebSIS.
Enter lottery by: 04-Jan-2011
Limited to 8 participants.
Listeners allowed, space permitting
Prereq: —
Level: U 6 units Graded P/D/F   

Introduction to the theory of x-ray microanalysis through the electron microprobe including ZAF matrix corrections. Techniques to be discussed are wavelength and energy dispersive spectrometry, scanning backscattered electron, secondary electron, cathodoluminescence, and x-ray imaging. Lab sessions involve use of the electron microprobe.
This four-session course is offered for undergraduate credit. However, persons interested in an in-depth discussion of quantitative x-ray analysis are invited to participate. Students will be required to complete lab exercises to obtain credit. Please enter lottery by submitting form at [http://web.mit.edu/e-probe/www/courses.shtml] or by contacting Dr. Chatterjee at 617-253-1995 or [nchat@mit.edu].
Text: Class notes and "Scanning Electron Microscopy and X-ray Microanalysis: A Text for Biologists, Material Scientists, and Geologists, Goldstein et al., Plenum Press: New York".
Web: http://web.mit.edu/e-probe/www/courses.shtml
Contact: Dr. Nilanjan Chatterjee, 54-1216, x3-1995, nchat@MIT.EDU

12.310
An Introduction to Weather Forecasting
Lodovica Illari
Mon, Wed, Fri, Jan 12, 14, 19, 21, 24, 26, 28, 01:30-03:00pm, 54-915

Pre-register on WebSIS and attend first class.
Limited to 50 participants.
Listeners allowed, space permitting
Prereq: GIR:PHY1, GIR:CAL1
Level: U 6 units Graded P/D/F   

Basic principles of synoptic meteorology and weather forecasting. Analysis of hourly weather data and numerical weather prediction models. Regular preparation of weather forecasts.
Guest lecture by local TV meteorologist.
Web: http://paoc.mit.edu/synoptic/courses/12.310/12310.htm
Contact: Lodovica Illari, 54-1612, x3-2286, illari@mit.edu

12.312
Understand and Run Your Own Climate Model
Paul O'Gorman
Mon, Wed, Fri, Jan 5, 7, 10, 12, 14, 19, 21, 24, 26, 28, 10am-12:00pm, 54-1615

Pre-register on WebSIS and attend first class.
Limited to 15 participants.
Listeners allowed, space permitting
Prereq: GIR:PHY1, GIR:CAL1
Level: U 6 units Graded P/D/F   

Presents the fundamentals of simulating the Earth's climate and provides a basic background on the processes that maintain it. Students run simple models (e.g., energy balance and radiative-convective equilibrium) in MATLAB and analyze output from the comprehensive climate models used in global warming assessments. Discusses the components of a modern general circulation model. Contact: Paul O'Gorman, 54-1616, x2-3382, pog@mit.edu

12.411
Astronomy Field Camp
Amanda Bosh
Mon Jan 3 thru Sat Jan 22, ??-??:00am, Lowell Observatory, Flagstaff, AZ

Selection by departmental lottery. Do not pre-register on WebSIS.
Enter lottery by: 20-Oct-2010
Limited to 6 participants.
No listeners
Prereq: 12.410J or 8.287J
Level: U 9 units Graded P/D/F Can be repeated for credit   
Fee: 200.00 for partial cost of transportation, food, and lodging

Individual research projects in observational astronomy involving supervised work at Lowell Observatory (located in Flagstaff, AZ). Written and oral reports required. Limited to 6.
Optional activity: Trip to Grand Canyon. Jan. 22-26. Applications (due 10/20) may be obtained from Dr. Amanda Bosh or Ms. Allison Cocuzzo, contact info below. Because of the early deadline each year, please plan ahead.
Contact: Allison Cocuzzo, 54-410, x3-9317, cocuzzo@mit.edu


MIT  
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Home | Overview | Participate | Organize | Offerings | Calendar | Search
Comments and questions to: iap-www@mit.edu Academic Resource Center, Room 7-104, 617-253-1668
Last update: 7 Sept. 2011