IAP Independent Activities Period
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IAP 2012 Subjects

Brain and Cognitive Sciences

9.S911
Special Subject in Brain and Cognitive Sciences
Responsible Conduct in Science
Matthew Wilson
Mon Jan 23 thru Fri Jan 27, 02-05:00pm, 46-1015

Selection by departmental lottery. Do not pre-register on WebSIS.
Enter lottery by: 03-Jan-2012
No listeners
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Level: H 2 units Graded P/D/F Can be repeated for credit   

Advanced graduate study in brain and cognitive sciences; covers material not offered in regular curriculum. 9.S911 is graded P/D/F.
To provide instruction and dialogue on practical ethical issues relating to the responsible conduct of human and animal research in the brain and cognitive sciences. Specific emphasis will be placed on topics relevant to young researchers including data handling, animal and human subjects, misconduct, mentoring, intellectual property, and publication. Preliminary assigned readings, initial faculty lecture followed by discussion groups of four to five students each. A short written summary of the discussions will be submitted at the end of each class.
Contact: Matthew Wilson, 46-5233, x3-2046, mwilson@mit.edu

9.S93
Special Subject in Brain and Cognitive Sciences
Mriganka Sur, Sami El-Boustani
Wed Jan 11, 18, 25, Feb 1, 02-03:30pm, 46-3015, 2/1/12 meet in 46-4062

Pre-register on WebSIS and attend first class.
Listeners allowed, space permitting
Prereq:
Level: U 1 units Graded P/D/F   

For undergraduate study in brain and cognitive sciences during Independent Activities Period; covers material not offered in regular curriculum. See IAP Guide for details.
The recent rise of multi-scale experimental techniques ie multi-electrode recordings or calcium imaging has offered unprecedented ways to see the brain in action. Data usually involve quite large neuron populations that require new concepts & analysis to understand how changes in the sensory environment relate to specific patterns of neuron responses in vivo. Model-based approaches have been very successful in capturing specific aspects of functional organization such as contrast adaptation, context-dependent sensory integration, population coding & functional connectivity. Some of these techniques will be introduced, ranging from single-cell to network models including Reverse Correlation analysis, Generalized Linear Models, Maximum Likelihood Estimation, Maximum Entropy models & Bayesian approaches. Class aims at providing an extensive toolbox to be used by undergraduate or graduate students in research projects. Recent studies in which these approaches have been used will be discussed & reviewed as assignment.
Contact: Sami El-Boustani, 46-6227, x3-8785, elbousta@mit.edu

9.S94
Special Subject in Brain and Cognitive Sciences
Connectomics Lab: Neural Circuits of the Retina
Sebastian Seung
Mon-Thu, Jan 9-12, 17-19, 23-26, 30-2, 02-03:00pm, 46-5056

Pre-register on WebSIS and attend first class.
Listeners allowed, space permitting
Prereq:
Level: U 6 units Graded P/D/F Can be repeated for credit   

For undergraduate study in brain and cognitive sciences during Independent Activities Period; covers material not offered in regular curriculum. See IAP Guide for details.
This intensive class will combine education and research in the emerging field of connectomics, focusing on the mouse retina. Students will read and discuss recent scientific literature, and will collectively analyze retinal data acquired with two advanced technologies: two-photon calcium imaging and serial electron microscopy. Ideally, the class will culminate in new discoveries (and publications) about the neural circuits of the retina.

Prerequisites
Students should have a keen eye for observation, be comfortable with extended use of computers, enjoy collaborating with others, and be highly motivated to make discoveries. Basic knowledge of visual neuroscience, such as that provided by 9.01 Introduction to Neuroscience, will be helpful. No knowledge of computer programming is required. (Students with programming skills will have the option to exercise them, if they like.)
Web: http://sightwire.org/
Contact: Sebastian Seung, 46-5065, x2-1693, seung@mit.edu

9.S95
Special Subject in Brain and Cognitive Sciences
Peter Schiller
Mon-Fri, Jan 23-27, 30-31, 10am-12:00pm, 46-3310

Pre-register on WebSIS and attend first class.
Listeners allowed, space permitting
Prereq:
Level: U 2 units Graded P/D/F Can be repeated for credit   

For undergraduate study in brain and cognitive sciences during Independent Activities Period; covers material not offered in regular curriculum. See IAP Guide for details.
For undergraduates taking Course 9 IAP subjects for credit.

Research Topics in Neuroscience

A series of seven sessions consisting of six lectures followed by an exam will be offered. The lectures will be given by faculty members of the Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences who carry out research in various fields of neuroscience. In each lecture a specific area of brain research will be examined, delineating the issues, methods and findings pertinent to the topic.

Students who are taking the course for credit must take a final exam on the last day of class.
Contact: Peter Schiller, 46-6041, x3-5754, phschill@mit.edu

9.S97
Special Subject in Brain and Cognitive Sciences
Introduction to Neuroanatomy
Rutledge Ellis-Behnke
Tue Jan 17 thru Fri Jan 20, 10am-01:00pm, 46-3002, W & R class will meet 10-12

Pre-register on WebSIS and attend first class.
Limited to 100 participants.
Listeners allowed, space permitting
Prereq:
Level: U 2 units Graded P/D/F Can be repeated for credit   

For undergraduate study in brain and cognitive sciences during Independent Activities Period; covers material not offered in regular curriculum. See IAP Guide for details.
This subject will be an intensive introduction to neuroanatomy, involving lectures, demonstrations, and hands-on laboratories, including a brain dissection. This course will not assume any prior knowledge of neuroanatomy, though some general knowledge of brain structures will be helpful.
Contact: Rutledge Ellis-Behnke, 46-6021, x3-4556, rutledg@mit.edu


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Massachusetts Institute of Technology
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Last update: 7 Sept. 2011