The 1996 IAP Guide

Academic Survival Skills

1
The Art of Studying Smarter, Not Harder

Ida Faber

Mon, Jan 22, 4-5 pm in 8-105.

Learn the study skills techniques that generations of MIT students have learned before you; join in the tradition! Sponsor: Undergraduate Education and Student Affairs. Contact: Ida Faber (ifaber@mit.edu), 7-103, x3-6786.


2
Better Grades Guaranteed!

Dr. William Kettyle

Wed, Jan 17, 4-5 pm in 1-190.

You're working hard, staying up late, but still making B's and C's. Come and learn why the "Law of Diminishing Returns as Applied to Academics" applies to you (your money back if you're not making better grades within 6 months of applying these time-tested techniques). Sponsor: MIT Medical. Contact: Sally Ciampa, E23-205, x3-1316.


3
Blast Your Way Through the Aerospace Information: Learn To Use the Auerospace Database on CD-ROM

Eileen Dorschner

Tues, Jan 16, 2-3 pm or Wed, Jan 24, 11 am-12 noon in 33-316.

Learn how to find journal articles, conference papers, and technical reports using the Aerospace Index on CD. Also learn how to modify and narrow a search and how to download results. Sponsor: Aeronautics and Astronautics, Libraries. Contact: Eileen Dorschner (edorsch@mit.edu), 33-316, x3-5666.


4
Choice of Majors Fair

Ida Faber

Wed, Jan 24, 4:30-5:30 pm in 10-105.

Undecided on what major to choose? Get a clue! Choice of Major Mentors, upperclassmen who have volunteered to act as departmental resources, will informally gather to explain the "ins and outs" of all the majors. Come get the answers to the questions you were afraid to ask. Sponsor: Undergraduate Education and Student Affairs. Contact: Ida Faber (ifaber@mit.edu), 7-103, x3-6786.


5
Rotch Library and the Internet

Michael Leininger

Rotch Libraries will introduce research skills for Rotch subjects via internet access. Searchable databases and World-Wide-Web sites will be examined at a beginners level. Sponsor: Libraries. Contact: Michael Leininger (mjl@mit.edu), 7-238, x8-5595.


6
Go Look it Up… But Where?

Anthony Ku

Thurs, Jan 18, 10:30 am in Lobby 10 for first meeting only.

This activity seeks to explore the problems and solutions to the age-old problem of finding information. We will consider the traditional resources such as libraries and databases, as well as try some less orthodox approaches. Sponsor: Experimental Study Group. Contact: Anthony Ku (ayku@mit.edu), x3-2843.


7
How to Do Your Bibliography Electronically

Margret Lippert, Carol Robinson

Wed, Jan 31, 1-4 pm in 14-0645. Preregister immediately.

Come discover the pros and cons of different bibliographic software packages used to compile and manipulate bibliographic data for your thesis. Learn the essential elements of citations for different sources of information. Sponsor: Libraries. Contact: Carol Robinson (csrobins@mit.edu), 10-500, x3-7749.


8
How to Hang Loose in an Uptight World

Ida Faber, Yvonne Givens, Tracy Desovich

Wed, Jan 17, 4-5 pm in Twenty Chimneys, Student Center.

A once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to hear from Institute-renowned stress busters, money managers and study skills aficionados. Sponsor: Undergraduate Education and Student Affairs, MIT Medical. Contact: Ida Faber (ifaber@mit.edu), 7-103, x3-6786.


9
Introduction to FirstSearch: Twenty Databases

Rae Jean Wiggins, Nina Davis-Mills

Thurs, Jan 11, 10 am-12 noon in 14-0637. Preregister by Jan 10 with Jim Eggleston (jceggles@mit.edu), 14S-200, x3-5673. Enrollment limited to 16 people. Prereq: registered Athena account holders.

The FirstSearch databases via Athena cover a broad range of topics from art to business to medicine. Hands-on training at this session will enable you to work magic from your desktop computer. Sponsor: Libraries. Contact: Rae Jean Wiggins (raewig@mit.edu), E53-100, x3-0787.


10
Keys to Success

Nancie Barber

Mon, Jan 22, 1-2 pm in 10-105.

We will listen to an audio tape featuring Dennis P. Kimbro, who has interviewed many of Black America's most notable achievers. He has appeared on the major TV talk shows and has been featured in Black Enterprise and Essence magazines, the New York Times, Newsday, and USA Today, sharing the keys of success and achievement. Sponsor/contact: Nancie Barber (nbarber@mit.edu), W59-222, x3-8217.


11
Pointers for Post Docs

Christine Sherratt

Thurs, Jan 18, 3:30-5 pm in 10-280. Preregister by Jan 16. Enrollment limited to 22 people.

Postdoctoral staff often have specific questions about the library services and collections at MIT. This informal seminar will include discussion on the topics of online searching options, finding journal literature, using Barton, current awareness products, and access to other libraries in the Boston area. Sponsor: Libraries. Contact: Christine Sherratt (gcsherra@mit.edu), 14S-134, x3-5648.


12
Remedial Math with Crayons

Ingrid Ulbrich

Tues, Jan 23, 7 pm in 4-145.

Can you add, subtract, multiply, and divide? Neither can I. Join me with a couple of boxes of crayons and some elementary school worksheets to relearn some basic math skills. Sponsor/contact: Ingrid Ulbrich (sesamest@mit.edu), 734-9211.


14
Time Management: The Miracle Cure

Ida Faber

Tues, Jan 9, or Thurs, Feb 1, 4-5 pm in 8-105.

How effectively do you organize the time you are not in class? Are 24 hours a day simply not enough? Time management should help you to prioritize your commitments and survive with style at MIT. Sponsor: Undergraduate Education and Student Affairs. Contact: Ida Faber (ifaber@mit.edu), 7-103, x3-6786.


Athletics and Fitness

15
A Beginner's Guide to Finishing the 100th BAA Marathon

Robert Clifford

Wed, Jan 10, 31, 12 noon-1:30 pm in 1-190.

Session one will provide the general principles involved in designing a 3+ month preparation to run the 1996 Boston Marathon. Individual strategies and goals will be discussed. Session two will serve as reinforcement and provide specific tips on the Hopkinton-to-Boston course. The level of information will be unsophisticated, but aimed at people who receive a lottery entry or who plan to run as a "bandit." Sponsor: MIT Medical. Contact: Sally Ciampa, E23-205, x3-1316.


16
Field Neurological/Oxygen Instructor Training

Andrea Vaseres

TBA. Preregister immediately. Fee: $585 for equipment, materials, and certification.

The Field Neuro/Oxygen Instructor Training is an intensive five-day program conducted very much like ITC or IDC/IE, the difference being the information covered. Graduates of this program report that the learning and teaching concepts, the hands-on skills, and the knwledge gained have caused significant improvement in all the dive programs they teach. The most common comment on course evaluation forms is "all instructors should be required to take this program!" Courses may be taken separately (Fees: $125 for Field Neuro Evaluation Program, $350 for Field Neuro Evaluator Instructor Training Course, $110 for Lifeguard Systems FN/O2 Instructor Training) Sponsor: Scuba Club. Contact: Anthony Joseph (adj@mit.edu), x3-7328.


17
Beginning Kali-Silat and Self-Defense

Arno Klein

Sun, Jan 14-28, 7-9 pm in DuPont Exercise Room. Preregister immediately. Fee: $15 (optional) for rattan sticks.

Basic Filippino stick fighting and self-defense. We will practice drills with and without rattan sticks. The sessions will be very informal and fun. Sponsor/contact: Arno Klein (arno@media.mit.edu), E15-422, x3-0375.


18
Outing Club Winter School

Luke Sosnowski, Cathy Lavelle

Mon, Wed, Jan 8-31, 7-9:30 pm in 3rd floor, Student Center. Fee: $7 (optional) for manual.

Introduction to self-propelled wilderness winter travel. Two nights per week of lecture, plus trips every weekend for people who have been to all the classes (gear rental not included). Topics progress from daytime trips to winter climbing and mountaineering, and include talks on winter natural history, basic meteorology, and cold weather injuries. Hiking and camping experience preferred for participants in weekend trips. Sponsor: Outing Club. Contact: Luke Sosnowski (lukesos@mit.edu), W71-275, x5-8922.


19
Cross-Country Skiing

Bob Cunkelman

Fri, Jan 26, 10 am in Lobby 13. Preregister by Jan 10. Enrollment limited to 6 people. Preference: students. Prereq: experienced skiers only.

A day of cross-country skiing in Lincoln, Massachusetts. There is no trail fee and skis may be rented at Lincoln Guide Service for a nominal fee. Bring your own lunch. We will be back at MIT no later than 5 pm. No first-time skiers, please. Sponsor: Physical Plant. Contact: Bob Cunkelman (rpc@mit.edu), E18-260, x3-6371.


20
Figure Skating Lessons

Bonny Kellerman, Esther Horwich, Sally DeFazio

Sat, Jan 13-27, 8-10 am in MIT Skating Rink, Johnson Athletics Center.

Small group instruction will be provided to those with figure skates who can skate forwards and backwards. Learn to jump, spin, and perform other fun maneuvers. Sponsor: Figure Skating Club. Contact: Kamyar Ghandi (kghandi@mit.edu), x3-5488.


21
Ice Dancing Lessons

Esther Horwich

Sat, Jan 13-27, 4-6 pm in MIT Skating Rink, Johnson Athletics Center.

Do you have figure skates and know how to skate forwards and backwards? Would you like to learn something new and interesting? Try ice dancing. We'll provide instruction for basic ice dance steps and help you learn some dance patterns. Singles and couples welcome. Sponsor: Figure Skating Club. Contact: Kamyar Ghandi (kghandi@mit.edu), x3-5488.


22
Introduction to Aikido

Prof. Dick Stroud

Thurs, Jan 18, 5:30-7 pm in Exercise Room, DuPont Gym.

Aikido, a martial art, means "the way of harmony through action." The underlying philosophy is one of non-aggression; its practice leads to heightened reflexes, increased strength, and balance in both body and spirit. Wear loose clothing and let your body learn a movement or two. Sponsor: MIT Japan Program. Contact: Cornelia Robart (robart@mit.edu), E38-754, x3-2839.


23
Tae Kwon Do: Get Your Kicks

Ron Gans

Tues, Thurs, Jan 9-Feb 1, 7-9 pm in DuPont Dance Studio. Sun, Jan 7-28, 6-8 pm in DuPont T-Club.

Join us as we practice traditional Tae Kwon Do and learn self-defense techniques. We build speed, power, focus, accuracy, and balance the safe, no-contact way. Classes are taught by experienced black belt instructors. No experience necessary. For more information, see our web page at http://www.mit.edu:8001/activities/mitkkc/mitkkc.html. Sponsor: Korean Karate Club. Contact: Ron Gans (gans@mit.edu ), 4-134, x3-2382.


24
Pro Wrestling: Sport, Spectacle or Social Aberration

Stephan Driscoll

Tues, Thurs, Jan 16-18, 2-3:30 pm in Conference Room, DuPont Athletic Center.

Get the real insight into the phenomenon of "wrestle-mania" with insiders from the business. Sponsor: Athletics. Contact: Physical Education Office, W32-127, x3-4291.


25
Swimming Stroke Analysis

John Benedick

Wed, Jan 17, 24, or 31, 10 am-12 noon in Alumni Pool. Limited to one session per person. Preregistrations can be made beginning Jan 3. Enrollment limited to 12 people.

Each participant will be videotaped for analysis by the head coach of swimming, with an eye to improving his/her technique. Sponsor: Athletics. Contact: Physical Education Office, x3-4291.


Careers

26
Consulting and Construction Careers in CEE

Prof. John Miller, Charles Helliwell

Tues, Thurs, Jan 23-Feb 1, 10:30 am-12 noon in 1-236. Preregister by Dec 15 with Jan Messinger (messi@mit.edu), 1-172, x3-6256.

Meet civil and environmental engineers who have made consulting or construction into careers. Exchange information and learn about opportunities in consulting and construction. Sponsor: Civil and Environmental Engineering. Contact: Prof. John Miller (jbmiller@mit.edu), 1-172, x3-4192.


27
The Consulting Business

Michael Mohr

Thurs, Jan 11, 2-4 pm in 66-110.

Selling consulting services is a significant and growing business. The consulting profession will be described, along with its joys and problems. Sponsor: Chemical Engineering. Contact: C. Michael Mohr, 66-305, x3-2015.


28
Demystifying the Job Interview

Hillary De Baun

Tues, Jan 23, 3-5 pm in E51-345.

How can you prepare for the all-important interview, be successful negotiating its hurdles, and emerge victorious from round one? Are you aware of the differences between structured and unstructured interviews, or of open and closed interview schedules? Find out all you can before you start interviewing. This activity, designed for undergraduates, will clear up misconceptions about interviewing. Includes a slide presentation and a question and answer session. Sponsor: Sloan School of Management. Contact: Sloan Undergraduate Office (skarkut@mit.edu), E52-101A, x3-8614.


29
Finding a Job

Anita Perkins

Open during library hours in Dewey Library, E53-100.

Topics include job applications, career development, resumé writing, interviewing, the US and international job markets, salaries and benefits, and company information. Job search books, pamphlets, journal articles, and refernce materials will also be available. Sponsor: Libraries. Contact: Anita Perkins (perkins@mit.edu), E53-100, x2-1510.


30
Foreign Nationals: How to Start Your Own High-Tech Company in the US

Milena Levak

Wed, Jan 24, 1-3 pm in 66-110.

Boston attorneys, experienced in immigration law, technology start-up companies, and intellectual property, will present for international graduates a seminar on the basics of starting technology businesses and protecting proprietary inventions and research results. Sponsor: Undergraduate Education and Student Affairs. Contact: Maria Brennan (mariab@mit.edu), 5-106, x3-3795.


31
How to Knock 'Em Dead in 6A Interviews : Secrets Used by Top 6A Applicants

Henry Tang

Mon, Jan 22, 2 pm-3 pm, 34-301.

Susan Dacy and Henry Tang will share with you their secrets of success. Topics include an overview of 6A process, interviewing skills, resume writing, how to market yourself, traps to avoid, and winning techniques. Sponsor: Eta Kappa Nu. Contact: Henry Tang (htang@mit.edu), C-123, x5-9291.


32
IAP Externship Program

Theresa Lee

Preregister immediately.

This is a great opportunity for sophomores and juniors to shadow an alumnus/a in his/her workplace to get a feel for what a career in a particular field might be like. Shadowing will be scheduled during the weeks of January 15-19 and January 22-26. Students who are interested are encouraged to pick up an application in 10-140. Sponsor: Alumni/ae Association, Student Alumni/ae Council. Contact: Theresa Lee, 10-140, x3-8280.


33
IEEE Interview Workshop Series

Daniel Jiang

Fri, Jan 26, 1:30-3:30 pm in 34-401. Preregister by Dec 31. Enrollment limited to 100 people.

In this interview workshop, senior recruiters from major companies, such as HP and Motorola, will present important interview techniques. Sample interviews with student volunteers will be given during the workshop. Sponsor: Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. Contact: Daniel Jiang (xjiang@rle-vlsi.mit.edu), 36-886, x5-1602.


34
Life After MIT: A Woman's Perspective

Nancie Barber, Joan Coyne

Mon, Jan 22, 7-9 pm in 10-105.

Wondering if there's life after MIT? Still deciding what to major in? Come eat pizza and talk to some MIT alumnae about their post-MIT experiences in the real world. They'll try to answer your questions about careers and life. Sponsor: Alumni/ae Association. Contact: Nancie Barber, W59-222, x3-8217.


35
Marketing Your Skills: How to Write a Resume and Cover Letter

Hillary De Baun

Thurs, Jan 18, 3-5 pm in E51-345.

How do you market yourself? Can you use more than one kind of resume? What do you list as your career objective if you are unsure? What is wrong with an all-purpose cover letter? Should you include your GPA? All these questions, and more, will be discussed in a two-hour session designed primarily for upperclass undergraduates. Sponsor: Sloan School of Management. Contact: Sloan Undergraduate Office (skarkut@mit.edu), E52-101A, x3-8614.


36
MIT Skills on the Trading Floor

Robert Weatherall

Thurs, Jan 11, 9 am-4 pm in 4-159. Preregister by Dec 18, sending a note explaining why you are interested.

Learn how mathematics and computer technology have created a new breed of trader. A panel of MIT alumni from Wall Street will discuss today's complex markets and invite you to test your skills in computer simulations of pit trading, foreign exchange trading, and options trading. Open to anyone who wants to know more about the opportunities in trading and wonders where his or her skills would fit. Sponsor: Career Services. Contact: Robert Weatherall (rweather@mit.edu), 12-170, x3-4733.


37
Working After Graduation: Immigration Concerns

Milena Levak

Tues, Jan 23, 3-5 pm in 66-110.

A Boston attorney, specializing in immigration, will present a seminar focusing on rules regulating employment opportunities for international students after graduation. Sponsor: Undergraduate Education and Student Affairs. Contact: Maria Brennan (mariab@mit.edu), 5-106, x3-3795.


38
Public Speaking Workshop

Sirshendu Roopom Baneijee, Don Lacey, Amand Radhakrishnan

Mon, Wed, Fri, Jan 22-29, 6-9 pm in W20-423. Preregister by Jan 5. Enrollment limited to 50 people.

Crucial to success in almost any field is the ability to convey ideas clearly and effectively in a public setting. In these sessions, members of the MIT Debate Team will work with participants to enhance their speaking skills and offer advice on making presentations. Attendance at each session is not required. Sponsor: Debate Team. Contact: Sirshendu Roopom Baneijee (nataraj@mit.edu), W20-423, x5-8343.


39
Resume Workshop

Sharon Belville

Wed, Jan 17, 12 noon-3:30 pm in 1-115. Preregister by Jan 10. Enrollment limited to 22 people.

We will cover writing and formatting a professional resume -- structuring and editing the text, laying out the page, and using templates for software packages such as Word, PageMaker, FrameMaker, or LaTeX. Bring a draft of your resume. Sponsor: Information Systems. Contact: Jeanne Cavanaugh (cavan@mit.edu), 11-301, x3-0852.


40
Workshop on Careers in the Geosciences

Prof. Thomas Jordan, Dan Burns

Wed, Jan 31, 12 noon-4 pm in 54-9th floor.

A workshop for undergraduate and graduate students about the rich career opportunities in Geoscience. Speakers will include company leaders, as well as MIT alumni employed in industry, academia, and government. Lunch will be served. Sponsor: Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences. Contact: Thomas Jordan (thj@mit.edu), 54-918, x3-3382 or Dan Burns (burns@mit.edu), 54-910, x3-3380.


41
Opportunities for PhDs Outside the Laboratory

Robert Weatherall

Career opportunities in research are not what they used to be. What opportunities are there for PhDs outside the laboratory? The program will be a series of five talks by PhDs who have found opportunities in management consulting, finance, environmental consulting, policy analysis for the government, and entrepreneurship. Sponsor: Career Services. Contact: Robert Weatherall (rweather@mit.edu), 12-170, x3-4733.


42
Things that Make You Go Hmmm

Ida Faber

Wed, Jan 24, 2-3:30 pm in 8-105. Enrollment limited to 20 people.

An exercise designed to help you clarify your skills and values, and find the answer to those vexing questions "Who am I?" and "What do I want do do?" Sponsor: Undergraduate Education and Student Affairs. Contact: Ida Faber (ifaber@mit.edu), 7-103, x3-6786.


43
What to Look For in a Company and How to Decide Which One to Accept

Ann Davis Shaw, Marianne Wisheart

Tues, Jan 23, 2-3 pm in 4-270.

This session will introduce students to some factors to consider in making decision of which companies to work for. Topics include salary, profit sharing, cost of living, benefits, etc. Sponsor: Career Services. Contact: Marianne Wisheart (wisheart@mit.edu), 12-170, x3-4733.


44
Space in Your Future

Donald Kutyna

Wed, Jan 24, 4 pm in 37-252.

A review of career opportunities in civil, military, and commercial space. Sponsor: Aeronautics and Astronautics. Contact: Prof. Daniel Hastings (hastings@mit.edu), 33-207, x3-0906.


Computer Languages and Applications

Athena Minicourses
Gary Dryfoos

Enrollment limited to 60 people.

Each minicourse consists of a short lecture and pertinent examples, including interesting, useful, and even fun things about Athena. There will be ample opportunity to ask questions, and free handouts of all materials will be distributed. Fourteen different one-hour courses will be offered during IAP. All minicourses are taught in 3-343. Athena(R) is a registered trademark of MIT. Sponsor: Information Systems. Contact: Jeanne Cavanaugh, 11-301, x3-0852.


45
A Crash Course in C

Anand Mehta

Tues-Fri, Jan 9-19, 10 am-12 noon in 4-270, or Mon-Fri, Jan 23-Feb 1, 10 am-12 noon in 4-270. No preregistration. Enrollment is unlimited. Prereq: some programming experience (i.e., BASIC).

Want to learn C but don't have time for 1.00? This activity will cover the basics of C programming: writing simple programs, functions, pointers, arrays, structures, input/output, and files. For more information and handouts, see the URL http://www.mit.edu:8001/afs/sipb/project/www/iap/iap-c3.html. Sponsor: Student Information Processing Board. Contact: Anand Mehta (amehta@mit.edu), 6-110, 441-0427.


46
Excel Quick Start

Jeff Pankin

Fri, Jan 26, 12:15-1 pm in 11-206. Enrollment limited to 20 people.

Topics include creating a spreadsheet, typing in text, numbers, and formulas, saving documents, and using the online help and the tutorial. Sponsor: Information Systems. Contact: Jeanne Cavanaugh (cavan@mit.edu), 11-301, x3-0852.


48
Cyber-Politics in International Relations

Prof. Nazli Choucri, John Mallory, Roger Hurwitz

Jan 11, 10 am-12 noon, 1-3 pm in E51-057.

The purpose of this seminar is to show how political scientists can think about sustainability issues in international relations. This component also addresses development issues and dilemmas of analysis and access to electronic information and uses of the World Wide Web. Sponsor: Political Science. Contact: Nazli Choucri (nchoucri@mit.edu), E53-493, x3-6198.


49
Developer's Introduction to Secure Client Server Computing

Jeff Schiller, Scott Thorne, Ted Tso

Mon-Thurs, Jan 29-Feb 1, 9 am-5 pm in 3-133. Preregister by Jan 19. Enrollment limited to 60 people.

This class will focus on how to develop client server applications for the MITnet computing environment. Topics include: security risks of networks, three-tier database architecture, network authentication and use of encryption, different kinds of encryption technology, Kerberos and how to use it, PGP and where it fits in, examples of working systems, and other security techniques, such as firewalls. Sponsor: Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Information Systems. Contact: Jeanne Cavanaugh (cavan@mit.edu), 11-301, x3-0852.


50
Dynamo: WWW Server Tools

Derek Lindner, Bob Mason

Thurs, Jan 11, 1 pm-4 pm in 14-0637. Enrollment limited to 15 people. Prereq: knowledge of WWW.

Do you run a web server or create WWW content? Do you want to integrate databases, build pages dynamically from templates, even embed scheme in HTML directly? Come learn about Dynamo, a powerful new WWW server extension available free to the MIT community! Sponsor/contact: Derek Lindner (buddha@mit.edu), 492-6983.


51
Introduction to Eudora E-Mail for Mac and Windows

Carol Elder

Wed, Jan 17, 12 noon-1:30 pm in E40-302. Enrollment limited to 30 people.

What do you need to use Eudora on your PC or Macintosh? How does Eudora compare to TechMail? See the features of Eudora, the contrasts and comparisons with TechMail and configuration techniques. Sponsor: Information Systems. Contact: Jeanne Cavanaugh (cavan@mit.edu), 11-301, x3-0852.


52
FileMaker Tricks

Debi Fuchs

Thurs, Feb 1, 12 noon-1:30 pm in E40-302. Enrollment limited to 30 people.

Participants will explore ten clever features of the MIT Microcomputing Help Line's call-tracking database. These undocumented, non-obvious "tricks" will help you turn your database into a more powerful tool. Sponsor: Information Systems. Contact: Jeanne Cavanaugh, 11-301, x3-0852.


53
FileMaker User Group

Joni Bubluski

Thurs, Jan 11, 12 noon-1 pm in E40-302. Enrollment limited to 30 people.

Join other members of the MIT community who use the popular database program, FileMaker. Experienced and novice users welcome. Share techniques, tips, and shortcuts; see demos of advanced features. Sponsor: Information Systems. Contact: Jeanne Cavanaugh, 11-301, x3-0852.


54
Hacking through ANSI C: Programming on the Edge of Understanding

Miroslav Jursic, Sara Pickett

Mon, Wed, Fri, Jan 8-Feb 2, 9 pm-12 midnight in 14-0637. Enrollment limited to 7 people. Preference: freshmen. Prereq: knowledge of PASCAL, coding experience.

Clueless about C? Don't worry, so are we. We won't have an instructor either. But, within two months, things will change (insert Twilight Zone theme here). Come become clueful with us over IAP. Spend three nights a week hacking through C in a small group of at most nine people. See http://www.mit.edu:8001/people/meeroh/c-hack/ for more information. Sponsor: Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. Contact: Miroslav Jursic (c-hack@mit.edu).


55
Using PGP to Protect Your Privacy

Jeff Schiller

Tues, Jan 23, 1-3 pm in 3-133. Enrollment limited to 60 people.

PGP is a program, available for DOS, MacOS and most UNIX systems, that permits you to protect both files and electronic e-mail against unauthorized interception and modification. This class will focus on what PGP is, how it works, and how you can use it. Sponsor: Information Systems. Contact: Jeanne Cavanaugh (cavan@mit.edu), 11-301, x3-0852.


56
Web: Quick Start Class

Janet Daly

Wed, Jan 10, 12 noon-1 pm in 3-133, or Wed, Jan 24, 12 noon-1 pm in E40-302. Enrollment limited to 60 people.

This class will concentrate on introducing new users to the World Wide Web and available browsers. Users will be shown how to start the browser, configure it for their own use, and move around the Web. Seating limited. Sponsor: Information Systems. Contact: Jeanne Cavanaugh, 11-301, x3-0852.


57
Introduction to Programming Threads

Chris Provenzano

TBA. Enrollment limited to 60 people.

For the intermediate to advanced programmer, this course introduces threads and gives basics for programming the POSIX 1003.4A draft 8 thread standard. Includes creating and destroying threads, mutexes, condition variables, thread-specific data, I/O, debugging techniques, and C library issues. For more info, type "add sipb; iap" on Athena. Sponsor: Student Information Processing Board. Contact: Chris Provenzano (proven@mit.edu), W20-557, x3-7788.


58
Introduction to UNIX Software Developemt

Erik Nygren, Michael Whitson

Wed, Thurs, Jan 17-18, 7-9 pm in 1-390. Prereq: basic knowledge of C and UNIX.

Learn to better manage UNIX software projects. Topics include multiple-file C programs, Makefiles, revision control systems, and more. Useful for programming UROPs and classes. For more info, type "add sipb; iap" on Athena. Sponsor: Student Information Processing Board. Contact: Erik Nygren (nygren@mit.edu), W20-557, x3-7788.


59
LaTeX: Mathematical Text Formatting

Anand Mehta

Thurs, Jan 11-18, 1-3 pm in 2-131.

LaTeX, a text formatter available on Athena, simplifies writing papers with math. The first class covers the basics of LaTeX, and the second covers more advanced features including tables, figures, bibliographies, and macros. For more information, and handouts, see the URL http://www.mit.edu:8001/afs/sipb/project/www/iap/iap-LaTeX.html. Sponsor: Student Information Processing Board. Contact: Anand Mehta (amehta@mit.edu), 6-110, 441-0427.


60
Programming in PostScript

Tom Yu

Mon-Thurs, Jan 8-11, 7-9 pm in 1-115. Enrollment limited to 40 people. Prereq: moderate to substantial programming experience. Athena experience preferred.

Learn to program in PostScript, a powerful graphics language understood by many laser printers and graphics devices. Use PostScript to create novel graphical effects, as well as to do other tasks such as making posters. The first class will cover the basics, and the succeeding classes will build on these. Attendance at the first session will almost certainly be necessary in order to comprehend the topics presented later. Sponsor: Student Information Processing Board. Contact: Tom Yu (tlyu@mit.edu), W20-557, x3-7788.


61
NetBSD: A UNIX for Your i386-based PC

John Hawkinson

As the scheduling is still uncertain, interested users should send mail to netbsd-help@mit.edu.

Want an Athena workstation at home? NetBSD/Athena provides a cluster-like UNIX environment for your i386, i486, or Pentium -based PC. We'll show you how to set it up and install it, plus question and answer. NetBSD runs binaries for Linux, BSDI, SCO UNIX, as well as most Athena software, including Xess, Matlab, and Maple. Sponsor: Student Information Processing Board. Contact: John Hawkinson (netbsd-help@mit.edu), W20-557, x3-7788.


62
Programming Language Exploration

Thomas Minka, Martin Szummer

Tues, Fri, Jan 12-Feb 2, 11 am-12 noon in 1-390. Prereq: extensive language experience.

A self-motivated whirlwind tour of contemporary research languages. Participants will study, experiment with, and present ultra-modern object-oriented, functional, and logic languages available freely on the net, from Self to Haskell to lambda-Prolog. Includes issues in real-world design like virtual machines and garbage collection. See http://www-white.media.mit.edu/~tpminka/PLE for more information. Sponsor: Media Arts and Sciences. Contact: Thomas Minka (tpminka@media.mit.edu), E15-389, x3-9610.


63
Word for The Mac: Quick Start Class

Jeff Pankin

Fri, Jan 19, 12:15-1 pm in 11-206. Enrollment limited to 20 people.

Topics will include starting up Word, the components and tools of the Word window, entering text, navigating around the document, selecting text, saving a document, opening an existing document, and printing a document. Sponsor: Information Systems. Contact: Jeanne Cavanaugh, 11-301, x3-0852.


Computers: General

64
Affective Computing

Prof. Rosalind Picard

Tues, Jan 23, 4-5:30 pm in E15-054.

Computers are beginning to acquire the ability to express and recognize affect, and they may soon be given the ability to have "emotions." Recent evidence points to an essential role of emotion in even the most rational of human decision-making. This presentation on "affective computing," computing that relates to, arises from, or influences emotions, will describe research in this area and potential applications in computer assisted learning, perceptual information retrieval, arts and entertainment, and human health and intelligence. Affective computers should not only lead to better human-machine communication, but also may enhance computers' abilities to make decisions. Sponsor: Media Arts and Sciences. Contact: Prof. Rosalind Picard, E15-392, x3-0611.


65
Algorithmic Probability: Theory and Practice

Ray Solomonoff

Thurs, Jan 11-25, 7-9 pm in NE43-8th floor playroom.

Algorithmic probability makes predictions by finding short codes for data. We will discuss its theoretical basis and apply it to machine learning, linear prediction, financial markets, quantum computers, and philosophy of science. Sponsor: Artificial Intelligence Laboratory. Contact: Ray Solomonoff (rjs@world.std.com).


66
Barton Uncovered

Christa Miniuks, Margo Miller

Jan 24, 2-3pm in 14-0645. Enrollment limited to 12 people.

Learn the secrets of Barton in this hands-on exploration class. Particular emphasis will be placed on locating conference proceedings and other "tricky" materials in the engineering and science disciplines. Sponsor/contact: Christa Minikus (cminikus@mit.edu), 10-500, x3-9363.


67
Computer Graphics Workshop

Kenneth Russell, Thad Starner

Mon, Wed, Fri, Jan 8-Feb 2, 3-4 pm in 4-035. Tues, Jan 16, 3-4 pm in 4-035. No class on Mon, Jan 15. Preregister immediately. Enrollment limited to 19 people. Prereq: 6.001.

This course will cover the basics of 3-D computer graphics using the Open Inventor graphics tool kit. Class will be tought in the Scheme programming language. Text: The Inventor Mentor. Sponsor: Media Arts and Sciences, MIT Computer Graphics Society. Contact: Kenneth Russell (kbrussel@mit.edu), E15-394, x3-0366.


68
Computer Interface Workshop

Pushpinder Singh, Randy Sargent

Wed, Jan 10-17, 10 am-6 pm, Fri, Jan 17-26, 10 am-2 pm. Preregister immediately. Fee: $10 for materials.

How can you use your computer to report on the weather over zephyr? Turn on and off your lights? Wake you up at 9 am by blasting your stereo? Zephyr you at Athena if someone opens your fridge? Sign up for this workshop, run by the Robotics and Electronics Cooperative and find out now. See http://www.mit.edu:8001/activities/rec for more information. Sponsor: Edgerton Center. Contact: Pushpinder Singh (push@mit.edu).


69
CWIS User Group

Suzana Lisanti

Thurs, Jan 25, 12 noon-1:30 pm in E40-302. Enrollment limited to 30 people.

CWIS-PUB is a forum for MIT community members to discuss evolving technologies and business opportunities in electronic publishing via the MIT Campus Wide Information System. Meets monthly. Sponsor: Information Systems. Contact: Jeanne Cavanaugh, 11-301, x3-0852.


70
Digital Camera to World-Wide-Web

Prof. Kim Vandiver

Thurs, Jan 18, 3-5 pm in 4-405. Preregister by Dec 15. Enrollment limited to 21 people.

Demonstration and tutorial on using a point-and-shoot digital camera to quickly acquire images, and then add them to your Web page. Images could also be used for technical reports and other applications. Sponsor: Edgerton Center. Contact: Cindy Dernay (cdernay@mit.edu), 4-405, x3-4629.


71
Electronic Access to High Technology Information

Linda Martinez, RaeJean Wiggins

Mon, Jan 29, 10 am-12 noon in 1-115. Preregister by Dec 29. Enrollment limited to 19 people. Preference: MIT only.

A combination of lecture/demonstration and hands-on instruction on electronic databases covering the areas of high technology. Part one will highlight FirstSearch and part two will cover Dialog. We will focus on technical and business databases. Sponsor: Libraries. Contact: Linda Martinez (bookworm@mit.edu), 10-500, x3-9370.


72
FileMaker Quick Start

Tawney Wray

Tues, Jan 23, 12 noon-1 pm in E40-302. Enrollment limited to 30 people.

Topics include an introduction to database terms, creating a simple database, and the six modes of FileMaker. FileMaker databases are demonstrated to show various ways in which the software can be used. Sponsor: Information Systems. Contact: Tawney Wray (wray@mit.edu), 11-301, x3-7685.


73
Georef: Down to Earth

Katherine Keefe , Garrett Eastman

Tues, Jan 9, 2-3 pm in 54-200.

Delve into the literature of the geosciences using Georef on CD-Rom. This hands-on instruction session will cover quick searching tips; techniques for using the indexes and the thesaurus; customizing, printing, and e-mailing citations to your network account. Sponsor: Libraries. Contact: Katherine Keefe (kvkeefe@mit.edu), 54-200, x3-5679.


74
Hands-on Computer Mapping to Inform the New T Line

Barbara Barros

Tues, Jan 30, 9:30 am-12 noon in 9-536. Preregister immediately.

Try out easy-to-use computer mapping tools and contribute user info to the next big metro-Boston planning project. The Urban Ring, a transit and development corridor, will link UMass, Roxbury, Longwood Hospitals, BU, MIT, and the airport. Sponsor: Urban Studies and Planning. Contact: Barbara Barros (bbarros@mit.edu), 9-514, 482-7458.


75
HTML Demo

Kevin Cunningham

Tues, Jan 9, 9 am-12 noon in 3-133, or Mon, Jan 22, 9 am-12 noon in E40-302. Enrollment limited to 60 people.

The HyperText Markup Language (HTML) is the standard for publishing on the World-Wide Web. This session gives an overview of the "electronic publishing" process and demonstrates how to code in HTML. Sponsor: Information Systems. Contact: Jeanne Cavanaugh (cavan@mit.edu), 11-301, x3-0852.


76
OS/2 User Group

Kent Lundberg

Thurs, Jan 18, 5-7 pm in 6-120.

Join other MIT community members interested in learning more about the OS/2 operating system. Ask and answer questions, see demos, and pick up information. Meets monthly. Sponsor: Information Systems. Contact: Jeanne Cavanaugh, 11-301, x3-0852.


77
Interactive Media and Learning: Open House

Members of the Foreign Languages and Literatures Section

Wed, Jan 24, 2-5 pm in 20C-134.

Participants can watch, explore, and play with applications for foreign language and humanities learning that make use of the latest interactive technologies. Programs for French, Spanish, Japanese, Literature, and Film Studies have been developed at the Laboratory for Advanced Technology in the Humanities. Participants will learn about pedagogical concepts, interactive technologies, and digital media used for development. The open house will end with an interactive contest. Sponsor: Foreign Languages and Literatures. Contact: Cara Cheyette (carache@mit.edu), 14N-310, x3-4550.


78
Introduction to Microsoft Windows: Quick Start Class

Jeff Pankin

Fri, Jan 12, 12:15-1 pm in 11-206. Enrollment limited to 20 people.

Topics will include: starting Windows; Windows terminology; working with the mouse; menus and icons; file management; starting applications and switching among them; and accessing and using on-line help. Sponsor: Information Systems. Contact: Jeanne Cavanaugh, 11-301, x3-0852.


79
Introduction to the Macintosh: Quick Start Class

Jeff Pankin

Mon, Jan 8, 12 noon-1 pm in E40-302, or Fri, Feb 2, 12:15-1 pm in 11-206. Enrollment limited to 30 people.

Topics will include hardware basics, starting your computer, window terminology, working with menus and icons, and file management. The class also covers starting applications, safely shutting down, and making the best use of the manual. Sponsor: Information Systems. Contact: Jeanne Cavanaugh, 11-301, x3-0852.


80
Introduction to the World Wide Web

Linda Martinez, RaeJean Wiggins

Wed, Jan 17, 10 am-12 noon in 14-0637. Preregister by Dec 29. Enrollment limited to 19 people. Preference: MIT only.

A gentle overview of the World Wide Web with demonstrations and the opportunity for hands-on exploration. Library resources on the Web will be highlighted. Sponsor: Libraries. Contact: Linda Martinez (bookworm@mit.edu), 10-500, x3-9370.


81
Introduction to the X Windows Systems

Gary Dryfoos

Tues-Thurs, Jan 30-Feb 1, 2-5 pm in 1-115. Preregister by Jan 13. Enrollment limited to 22 people. Preference: preregistration order. Fee: $25 for materials.

Learn about working in the X Window system. Each session will include a video lesson, workbook exercises, and an instructor-led Q&A session. Sponsor: Information Systems. Contact: Jeanne Cavanaugh (cavan@mit.edu), 11-301, x3-0852.


82
LaTeX Made Easier

Robert Becker

Mon-Thurs, Jan 8-11, 5:30-7:30 pm in 2-105. Preregister by Jan 4 by e-mail or phone. Enrollment limited to 60 people. Prereq: familiarity with computers.

Learn {\LaTeX} for work and fun from a {\TeX} User Group instructor. Typesetting gorgeous documents with {\LaTex} is easier than you think. This series will cover the basics of putting words on a page, using some interesting equations, and including PostScript graphics on DOS, Unix, and Macintosh computers. Sponsor: Mathematics. Contact: Robert Becker (robertb@mit.edu), 2-332, x3-2797.


83
Making Linux Work for You

Jered Floyd

Mon-Fri, Jan 15-19, 5-6 pm in 3-133. Prereq: basic knowledge of UNIX.

Linux is a fully functional, stable, and free UNIX clone for x86-based PCs. Using it can give your computer partial Athena functionality ranging from zephyr to AFS to gcc. Topics will include whether Linux is right for you, system requirements, installation, configuration, use, maintenance, and more. For more info, type "add sipb;iap" on Athena. Sponsor: Student Information Processing Board. Contact: Jered Floyd (jered@mit.edu), W20-557, x3-7788.


84
MITnet: The Campus Computer Network

Jeff Schiller

Thurs, Jan 18, 11 am-1 pm in 10-250.

MIT's Network Manager will describe MITnet, the campus computer network. He will discuss its history, technology, and plans for future growth. Sponsor: Information Systems. Contact: Jeanne Cavanaugh (cavan@mit.edu), 11-301, x3-0852.


86
IEEE Lecture Series

Bradford McKesson

Thurs, Jan 11-Feb 1, 2 pm in 34-101.

This series of four lectures covers interesting developments in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. Topics include information security and semiconductor fabrication. Sponsor: Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. Contact: Bradford McKesson (bwmck@mit.edu), N43-626.


87
Sky's the Limit

Katherine Keefe, Garrett Eastman

Tues, Jan 9, 10-11 am in 54-200.

Weather the literature of the atmospheric sciences using the Meteorological and Geoastrophysical Abstracts CD-Rom index. Navigate through the MGA interface, browse the index, learn how to search for related material and how to print and download citations. Sponsor: Libraries. Contact: Katherine Keefe (kvkeefe@mit.edu), 54-200, x3-5679.


88
Touch Typing

Mary Ellen Bushnell

Mon, Wed, Jan 8-31, 5-6 pm in 11-206. No class on Jan 15. Preregister by Jan 3. Enrollment limited to 12 people.

Learn to touch type or improve your typing speed using the typing program Mavis Beacon Teaches Typing. Someone will assist you in getting started with this popular, self-paced software in the IS computer training lab. Sponsor: Information Systems. Contact: Mary Ellen Bushnell (bushnell@mit.edu), 11-315, x3-7709.


89
Tour MIT's Data Center

Dave Lambert

Thurs, Jan 25, 2-4 pm in W91 Lobby. Preregister by Jan 13. Enrollment limited to 40 people.

Join us for a tour of MIT's Data Center, hidden away on west campus in W91 and housing MIT's administrative computer systems as well as most of the Internet equipment used for New England internet traffic. Sponsor: Information Systems. Contact: Jeanne Cavanaugh, 11-301, x3-0852.


90
Upgrading to Windows 95

Gail Garfield Neuman

Tues, Jan 16, 12 noon-1:30 pm in E40-302, or Wed, Jan 31, 1-2:30 pm in E40-302. Enrollment limited to 30 people.

A presentation followed by discussion of things you need to think about before, during and after upgrading to Windows 95. Sponsor: Information Systems. Contact: Jeanne Cavanaugh (cavan@mit.edu), 11-301, x3-0852.


91
Wearable Computing

Thad Starner

Thurs, Feb 1, 11 am in E15-301.

Computers should not be limited to the desktop; instead they should be personal agents, continuously available, and as unobtrusive as our clothing. Three years of work on this paradigm will be shown. Sponsor: Media Arts and Sciences. Contact: Thad Starner (testarne@media.mit.edu), E15-394, x3-0384.


92
Word Equation Editor

Bruce Wedlock

Tues, Jan 30, 12 noon-1:30pm in E32-117. Enrollment limited to 20 people.

This hands-on seminar is intended for both Word for the Mac and Windows users. Learn template techniques for creating graphic equation and matrix images, appropriate paragraph formatting, automatic numbering, and automatic cross-referencing. Sponsor: Information Systems. Contact: Jeanne Cavanaugh (cavan@mit.edu), 11-301, x3-0852.


Crafts, Hobbies, and Do-It-Yourself

93
All About Plants

Norman Magnuson, Ernest Morrison, Kenneth Manning

Wed-Thurs, Jan 17-18, 11 am-2 pm in NW62-250.

Basic techniqes will be taught and discussed for the care of trees, shrubs, lawns, and house plants. Sponsor: Physical Plant. Contact: Norman Magnuson (nmagnuson%mitppl@mitvma.mit.edu), NW62-232, x3-6350.


94
Home Improvement I

Pat Mullins

Thurs, Jan 18, 12 noon-2 pm in E18-121.

Basic carpentry for beginners. Bring your questions and problems, and we will attempt to deal with them. Sponsor: Physical Plant. Contact: Pat Mullins, E18-121, x3-6353.


95
Home Improvement II

Pat Mullins

Fri, Jan 19, 12 noon-2 pm in E18-121.

More intense carpentry for the students bored with Home Improvement I. Bring your questions. Sponsor: Physical Plant. Contact: Pat Mullins, E18-121, x3-6353.


96
Indoor Bonsai

Alix Van Geel

Mon, Jan 29, 6-9:30 pm in 68-180. Preregister by Jan 17. Fee: $20 for materials.

We will begin with an introduction to indoor bonsai – the care, art, and techniques involved. Afterwards, we will have a workshop where participants can create their own indoor bonsai. Sponsor/contact: Alix Van Geel (avangeel@mit.edu), 68-288D, x3-0809.


97
Chinese Knots

Jane Chang

Thurs, Jan 25, 7-8 pm in 4-153. Preregister immediately.

No, no, this class is not a Chinese scout camp. Chinese Knots are gorgeous ornaments made out of silken ropes. They make great traditional gifts when decorated with jade and beads! Come to this one-hour introductory class. Make charm bracelets, and, perhaps, gratuitously cute fish. Sponsor: Chinese Students Association. Contact: Flora Sun (sunflora@mit.edu).


98
Glass Cutting and Glazing

Arthur Pitari, Gary Cunha

Thurs, Fri, Jan 11-12, 9 am-12 noon in E18-169. Enrollment limited to 15 people.

Glazing windows, cutting glass and plexiglass, screening windows, and how to apply caulking will be covered. Sponsor/contact: Arthur Pitari, E18-169, x3-6355.


99
Basic Machine Shop

John Annese

Mon, Jan 8, 1 pm in 6-023 for first meeting only. Enrollment limited to 8 people.

Learn the skills needed to safely operate a lathe, drill press, milling machine, and other common machines in a machine shop. Sponsor: Chemistry. Contact: John Annese, 6-023, x3-4509.


100
Home Repair and Improvements

Carmen Lepore, Joe Vella, Pat Mullins

Thurs-Fri, Jan 18-19, 12 noon-2 pm in E18-021.

We will cover basic residential construction and maintenance. Demonstrations will include the installation of locksets, roofs, and floor tiles. Please bring your questions. Sponsor: Physical Plant. Contact: Carmen Lepore, E18-121, x3-6353.


101
Introduction to Bonsai

Peter Medaglia

Mon, Jan 29, 5-9:30 pm in 4-231. Preregister by Jan 20. Enrollment limited to 15 people. Fee: $20 for materials. Prereq: love of plants.

Brief slide presentation of major Bonsai styles, after which we will create a bonsai. Also covered: maintenance, care, selection, and housing. Sponsor: Campus Activities Complex. Contact: Ellen Schemerhorn (eds@mit.edu), W20-500, x8-8429.


102
Introduction to Topiary

Peter Medaglia

Tues, Jan 30, 5-9:30 pm in 4-231. Preregister by Jan 20. Enrollment limited to 15 people. Fee: $20 for materials. Prereq: love of plants.

Topiary is the art of sculpting plants into whimsical geometric or symbolic forms. It is enjoying a resurgence in popularity not seen since Victorian days. Join us for a look at the state of this art and then roll up your sleeves to create two windowsill versions for your apartment or dorm. Sponsor: Campus Activities Complex. Contact: Ellen Schemerhorn (eds@mit.edu), W20-500, x8-8429.


103
Introduction to Woodworking

Kim Schmahmann

Tues-Thus, Jan 9-25, 6-8 pm in MIT Hobby Shop, W31-031. Preregister immediately. Enrollment limited to 10 people. Fee: $17 for MIT community, $40 for others. Additional cost for materials. Prereq: Hobby Shop membership (discounted with class: $10 student, $20 nonstudent).

Learn basic woodworking skills by building a CD storage tower. From rough-sawn hardwood lumber to finished furniture, you will be shown safe operation of major woodworking machines in a fully equipped shop. Your choice of wood will determine material cost. The instructor is a furniture artist. Sponsor: Hobby Shop. Contact: Ken Stone, W31-031, x3-4343.


104
Machine Shop

Jim Byrnes

Mon, Wed, Jan 8-31 in 38-017. Section 1 meets 8 am-12 noon. Section 2 meets 12:30-4:30 pm. Preference: undergraduates.

Pre-UROP machine shop experience, including: shop safety; sharpening bits and other machine tools; operating drill presses, lathes, milling machines; and working on your own projects. Sponsor: Edgerton Center. Contact: Tony Caloggero, 4-409, x3-9782.


105
Plumbing and Steam Fitting

Jack Narcotta, Chuck Katin

Thur, Jan 18-25, 10-11 am in E19-127.

Basic plumbing and heating issues for home and MIT. Hands-on participation is encouraged. Sponsor: Physical Plant. Contact: Chuck Katin, E19-138, x3-4748.


106
Private Pilot Ground School

Nicholas Patrick

Mon, Wed, Jan 8-Feb 1, 4-6 pm in 33-419. No class on Jan 15. Preregister immediately.

This is a preparatory course for the FAA's private-pilot written exam. In addition to the basic aeronautical knowledge required by the FAA, which includes meteorology, aircraft performance, navigation, regulations, and physiology, we will present practical operational information. Sponsor: Aeronautics and Astronautics. Contact: Jennifer Leith (jennie@mit.edu), 33-111, x3-4926.


107
Residential Wiring

Tom Reynolds, Jim Hunt

Thurs-Fri, Jan 25-26, 12:30-2:30 pm in E18-021. Preregister immediately. Enrollment limited to 25 people. Preference: preregistration order.

Basic house, apartment, and condo wiring will be explained. Electrical fundamentals, safety, wiring devices, and techniques will be demonstrated. Sponsor: Physical Plant. Contact: Nicole McKenna (nmckenna@mit.edu), E19-139E19-139, x3-6351.


108
Roses for Valentine's Day

Irene Yeh

Wed, Jan 31, 2 pm-4 pm in 20C-112.

Fold an origami rose that will never fade away. This workshop will teach Kawasaki's rose, complete with calyx, stem, and leaf. Because of the complexity of the model, previous experience with origami is recommended. Sponsor: Integrated Studies Program. Contact: Irene Yeh (pprflder@mit.edu), x5-8486.


109
Top Ten MIT Hacks of All Time

Diego Garcia

Fri, Jan 26, 2-3 pm .

Everything you ever wanted to know about hacks, but were afraid to ask – crammed into one dizzying hour. Sponsor: MIT Museum. Contact: Diego Garcia (dmgarcia@mit.edu), N52-2ND, x8-9118.


Design

110
Boot-Strapping the Space Industry with Tethers and Regolith Rockets

Bruce Mackenzie

Tues, Jan 16, 12 noon-2 pm in W20-445.

How show should we start industry and self-sufficient settlements in space, for less initial cost than the space station? Hint, use long tethers of Lunar fiberglass and "Regolith Rockets" fueled with dirt, then burn rocks. Sponsor: Students for the Exploration and Development of Space. Contact: Bruce Mackenzie (bmackenzie@draper.com), Draper MS 15, 258-2828.


111
Can the Edgerton Center Help Your Project?

Charles Mazel

Wed, Jan 24, 3-4 pm in 4-402.

The Edgerton Center is dedicated to facilitating hands-on activities at MIT. If you are a student, staff, or faculty member with a need to access equipment, working space, or advice – perhaps to offer a seminar you've long been interested in, or to overcome a stumbling block in a UROP project – we may be able to help. This will be an informal session to introduce you to the mission, facilities, and capabilities of the Edgerton Center. Sponsor: Edgerton Center. Contact: Cindy Dernay, 4-405, x3-4629.


112
Design Studio of the Future

Prof. Herbert Einstein, Prof. John Williams

Fri, Jan 12, 10 am-12 noon in 1-350 for first meeting only. Enrollment limited to 5 people.

The design studio of the future (DSOF) will be a combination of old style drafting room, computer facility, people, and projects. The IAP activity will be geared toward selection of case studies and making them suitable for use by students. Sponsor/contact: Prof. Herbert Einstein (einstein@mit.edu), 1-342, x3-3598.


113
Die Brücke: Bridge Design Competition

Prof. Christopher Leung

Tues, Jan 16, 10 am-12 noon in 1-047 for first meeting. Bridge testing: Fri, Feb 2, 11 am-2 pm in Lobby 10. Preregister by Dec 15. Enrollment limited to 30 people. Fee: $20 for materials.

Participants will design and build a model bridge from a furnished kit of parts (wood, wire, glue, etc.) to satisfy specific structural performance requirements. The bridges will be tested to failure on Feb 2, and the bridge with the highest performance/weight will be the winner of the contest. Sponsor: Civil and Environmental Engineering. Contact: Prof. Christopher Leung, 1-280, x3-3544.


114
Dwellings

Onyekachi Akoma

TBA. Enrollment limited to 20 people.

This project will explore the architecture of home and work spaces through advances in computer technology. Participants will be exposed to ideas and images relating to visionary architecture and will see examples of work in this area. In the lab half of the workshop participants will be given drawing media and will create and compare impressions of visionary architecture. Sponsor: Office of the Arts. Contact: Maureen Costello (costello@media.mit.edu), E15-205, x3-4004.


115
Extreme Tent Design

Cameron Abnet

Mon, Wed, Fri, Jan 22-26, 1-3 pm in 5-134.

Design and construction of a prototype tent frame intended for extreme weather conditions. Sponsor: Mechanical Engineering. Contact: Cameron Abnet (ccabnet@mit.edu), 36-834, x3-6978.


116
Publishing on The Web: Lessons from the 'City Of Bits' Project

Rae Jean Wiggins, Linda Martinez, Terry Ehling, Dan Stevenson

Fri, Jan 19, 1:30-3:30 pm in 3-133.

The MIT Press broke new ground last summer when it published City of Bits on the World Wide Web and in print. The creators of the Web site will discuss their experiences and demonstrate the site. Sponsor: Libraries. Contact: Rae Jean Wiggins (raewig@mit.edu), E53-100, x3-0787.


117
Ecology of Large-Scale Water Resource Projects: Big Dams, Big Canals, and Big Problems

Prof. Elfatih Eltahir, Bill Jobin, James McGuire

Tues-Fri, Jan 23-26, 10 am-5 pm in 48-316.

This activity is organized in collaboration with Harvard University and a private consulting firm. The focus of this short course is the environmental health impact of large-scale water resources projects and canals. Examples from the Nile River, the Senegal River, and the Panama Canal will be discussed. Sponsor: Civil and Environmental Engineering. Contact: Elfatih Eltahir (eltahir@mit.edu), 48-207, x3-6596.


Engineering

119
America's Cup: The Sport, the Art, and the Technologies

Prof. Paul Sclavovnos

Thurs, Jan 18-25, 2-3:30 pm in 9-150. Preregister by Jan 8 with Barbara Lobbregt (barbaral@mit.edu), 5-326, x8-9131.

A two-lecture series, intended for a general audience, on the history of the America's Cup competition as a sport, the art of yacht design, and design as a recent testbed of advanced technologies. The first lecture is an account of early competitions until the victory of Australia II in 1983. The onset and role of technology in America's Cup Yacht designs will be highlighted in the second lecture. The evolution of IACC yacht designs will be presented and possible future design tends will be speculated on. Sponsor: Ocean Engineering. Contact: Prof. Paul Sclavovnos (pds@argo.mit.edu), 5-326C, x3-4364.


120
Draper Laboratory Tour

Prof. Wallace VanderVelde, John Sweeney

Wed, Jan 17, 2-4 pm in Draper Reception Lobby. Preregister by Jan 10 with Jennifer Leith (jennie@mit.edu), 33-111, x3-4926. Enrollment limited to 35 people. Prereq: Must be US citizen or have a valid Green Card.

We will begin with a film on the history of the Draper Laboratory and its major projects. We will then visit several areas of the laboratory and see some of its project activities. Sponsor: Aeronautics and Astronautics. Contact: Prof Wallace VanderVelde (wallyvv@mit.edu), 9-321, x3-7541.


121
Highlights of Aeronautics and Astronautics

Prof. Jaime Peraire, Prof. Eric Feron, Marie Stuppard

A series of lectures on the activities of the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics. It will cover areas of interest and research, with oral presentation, films, and/or demos and examples. Sponsor: Aeronautics and Astronautics. Contact: Prof. Eric Feron, 33-107, x3-1991.


122
Draper Robotics for Unmanned Exploration of Planets, Oceans, and Hazardous Areas

David Kang

Thurs, Jan 11, 7:30-9 pm in NE43-800.

Come learn about (and hopefully see) autonomous vehicles designed at Draper Lab, including a planetary rover, underwater vehicles, a sensor testbed, and a helicopter for an aerial contest. Sponsor: Students for the Exploration and Development of Space. Contact: Bruce Mackenzie (bmackenzie@draper.com), Draper MS 15, 258-2828.


123
Condition Assessment of Civil Infrastructure Systems

Prof. Shi-Chang Wooh, Prof. Oral Buyukozturk, Hong Rhim, Prof. Chris Leung

Role of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) in civil infrastructure condition assessment and renewal engineering will be discussed. Three major NDE methods (ultrasonics, radar, and optical fiber sensors) will be reviewed. Sponsor: Civil and Environmental Engineering. Contact: Prof. Shi-Chang Wooh (scwooh@mit.edu), 1-272, x3-7134.


125
Hot Topics in Transportation

Prof. Joseph Sussman

Mon-Thurs, Jan 22-25, 2-4 pm in 1-350.

A series of related seminars on important current topics in the field of transportation. Speakers from inside and outside MIT will participate. This year's theme is "The Future of Transportation: A View from the Transportation Consulting Community." Sponsor: Civil and Environmental Engineering, Center for Transportation Studies. Contact: Terri Lehane (terri@mit.edu), 1-163, x3-5197.


126
Laboratory For Information and Decision Systems Student's Conference

Jinane Aboundai, Seema Jaggi, Rachel Learned, Yannis Paschalidis

Tues-Wed, Jan 23-24, 9 am in 34-401.

The students of the Laboratory for Information and Decision Systems invite you to learn about their work through a series of 30-minute student talks geared toward a general scientific audience. Topics include control, communications, computer networks, identification, multiscale models, large-scale optimization, stochastic signal processing. Sponsor: Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Laboratory for Information and Decision Systems. Contact: Kathleen O' Sullivan (lidsconf@lids.mit.edu), 35-310, x3-2183.


127
MITEE Mouse: Racing Robot

David Otten, Tony Caloggero

Mon, Jan 29, 4-5pm in 1-390.

This overview will include videotaped and live demos of the international sport of micromouse racing. A micromouse is a small, self-contained, computer-controlled robot that competes against the clock to solve and navigate a 10'x10' maze. Sponsor: Edgerton Center. Contact: Cindy Dernay (cdernay@mit.edu), 4-405, x3-4629.


128
Nuclear Reactor Laboratory

Edward Lau, Thomas Newton, Frank Warmsley

Fri, Jan 12, 10 am-12 noon in NW12-116. Preregister immediately. Enrollment limited to 30 people.

This activity will show you how the MIT 5MW Research Reactor is operated and used. Emphasis will be on interdisciplinary research such as medical research, solid state materials, environmental research, and trace analysis. Sponsor: Nuclear Reactor Lab. Contact: Edward Lau, NW12-116, x3-4211.


129
Ocean Engineering Undergraduate Open House

Jean Sucharewicz

Thurs, Feb 1, 2-4 pm in 5-314.

Come meet students and faculty to discuss career opportunities in Ocean Engineering. The presentation will include models, slide shows, experiments, etc. Questions and answers, as well as ideas about research, will be exchanged. Refreshments available. Sponsor: Ocean Engineering. Contact: H. Sharon Trohon (strohon@mitvma.mit.edu), 5-228, x3-4330.


130
Power System Reliability

Prof. James Kirtley

Preregister immediately. Enrollment limited to 6 people. Prereq: 6.041.

This is a "study group." We will learn about the reliability of electric supply systems and apply this to the MIT system. Schedule will be made after we know who is participating. Sponsor: Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. Contact: Prof. James Kirtley (kirtley@mit.edu).


131
Superfund Remediation: A Case Study and Site Visit

Prof. Kenneth Smith

Thurs, Feb 1, 9 am-12 noon in 66-154 for first meeting only. Preregister immediately. Enrollment limited to 10 people.

The Gilson Road Site on the New Hampshire/Massachusetts border was the 23rd designated for cleanup under the Superfund program. A tour of the pump-and-treat facility operated by Roy Weston, Inc. is planned for Feb 2, following a discussion on Feb 1 of Superfund legislation, history of the Gilson Road Site contamination of the aquifers, and the design and operation of the treatment facility. Sponsor: Chemical Engineering. Contact: Prof. Kenneth Smith, 66-540, x3-1973.


132
Technical Seminar Series

Gary Hackett

Lincoln Laboratory has pioneered in advanced electronics since its origin in 1951 as a federally funded research center of MIT. The Laboratory's fundamental mission is to apply science, by means of advanced technology, to critical problems involving space surveillance, ballistic missile defense, tactical battlefield systems, communications, and air traffic control systems. Sponsor: Lincoln Laboratory. Contact: Gary Hackett (hackett@ll.mit.edu), LIN-A-128, 981-7056.


133
Transportation Research Board's Annual Meeting

Carl Martland

Thurs, Jan 4, 18, 25, 3-5 pm in 1-236.

This is for students, faculty, and staff who are interested in the 1996 Annual Meeting of TRB, to be held in Washington, Jan 7-11. There will be a pre-conference meeting to prepare a strategy for obtaining the maximum amount of information from the meeting, and two post-trip meetings in which attendees will summarize what they have learned. Sponsor: Center for Transportation Studies. Contact: Carl Martland, 1-153, x3-5326.


Engineering: Hands-on

134
Design and Build the First Lunar-Fueled Rocket

Bruce Mackenzie

Wed, Jan 10-31, 12 noon-2 pm in W20-445.

Can you refuel a rocket on the Moon? What happens if you mix cold gas with hot dust? Can six students change the future course of history by showing how to economically settle the solar system? To answer these questions, come help design and build the solar system's first ever Regolith Rocket. Sponsor: Students for the Exploration and Development of Space. Contact: Bruce Mackenzie (bmackenzie@draper.com), Draper MS 15, 258-2828.


135
Autonomous Aerial Robotics Contest

Prof. John Hansman, Bill Hall, Paul Debitetto

Wed, Jan 10, 5:30 pm in 33-015 for first meeting only. Preregister by Dec 17.

Help build MIT's aerial robot to be entered in the '95 Aerial Robotics Contest. Work is hands-on hardware construction, sensor integration, electronics design and packaging, software development, and systems testing. All welcome. Sponsor: Aeronautics and Astronautics. Contact: Paul Debitetto (pdebitetto@draper.com), Draper 3430, 258-2468.


136
Campus Power Distribution

Bill Wohlfarth

Wed, Jan 10, 11 am-12 noon in E18-021. Preregister by Jan 8.

An overview of the campus-wide underground 13.8 kv and 2.4 kv distribution system, generation of electrical power and the central utilities plant, and specific calculations, equipment types, and codes. Sponsor: Physical Plant. Contact: Bill Wohlfarth (wpwohlfa@mit.edu), E18-260, x3-1741.


137
Hybrid Finite Element Methods

Prof. Theodore Pian

Mon-Fri, Jan 22-26, 10-11:30 am in 37-187. Preregister by Jan 18. Prereq: knowledge of elementary finite element methods.

We will cover the formulation of finite element methods using multi-field variational principles. Lectures on solid and structural mechanics will include the evolution and recent advances in the construction of element stiffness matrices by the assumed stress hybrid finite element method, special and effective methods for determining stress intensity factors for 2-D and 3-D fracture analyses, and analyses of heterogenous elastic materials and flow of rigid-plastic material. Sponsor: Aeronautics and Astronautics. Contact: Prof. Theodor Pian (thhpian@mit.edu), 9-347, x3-2425.


138
Make a Motor

Prof. Steven Leeb

Wed, Jan 17, 31, 8:30 am-5 pm in 10-050. Preregister immediately. Enrollment limited to 6 per day people. Preference: students taking Advanced Mechatronics Project Lab in the spring.

In this seminar you will design and construct your own small DC motor. You'll learn how to use machine tools like the lathe, bandsaw, and milling machine. Sponsor: Lab for Electromagnetic and Electronic Systems. Contact: Steven Leeb (sbleeb@mit.edu), 10-069, x3-9360.


139
Nuclear Power Plant Field Trip

Emmanuella Binello

Preference: Nuclear Engineering students.

Depending on interest, one or two field trips to area nuclear power plants will be arranged. Announcements of time and place will be made during IAP. Sponsor: Nuclear Engineering, American Nuclear Society. Contact: Emanuella Binello (ebinello@mit.edu).


140
Professional Engineering

Bill Wohlfarth

Wed, Jan 10, 10-11 am in E18-021. Preregister by Jan 8.

An introduction to the position of Registered Professional Engineer, use of the P.E. title, signing and stamping construction drawings, and legal responsibilities. Sponsor: Physical Plant. Contact: Bill Wohlfarth (wpwohlfa@mit.edu), E18-260, x3-1741.


Film, Photography, and Television

141
22nd Annual Student Academy Awards Compilation Film

Chris Pomiecko

Wed, Jan 17, 7 pm in 66-110.

This 90-minute compilation film represents the best of the 22nd Annual Student Academy Awards competition. It includes gold medal award-winners in animation, documentary, and dramatic short categories. Sponsor: Film and Media Studies. Contact: Chris Pomiecko (cpomieko@mit.edu), 14N-430, x3-3599.


142
A Critic Looks at MTV

Mike Saunders

TBA.

Are you aware of the extent to which MTV is changing the face of the media? It is a serious economic arena, supporting musicians, videographers, writers, directors, producers and many other artists who are changing the face of the music industry, TV and the media. Mike Saunders, Boston Globe journalist, student of popular culture, and critic, plus a guest speaker from MTV invite MIT students to a lively discussion of the single most important force in the music business. Sponsor: Office of the Arts. Contact: Maureen Costello (costello@media.mit.edu), E15-205, x3-4004.


143
Beyond Dracula: A Bela Lugosi Film Series

Chris Pomiecko

The ultimate irony: Martin Landau winning the Academy Award last year for playing Bela Lugosi, an actor who, in his 21-year career in Hollywood, was typecast, shunned, and ultimately forgotton. Come celebrate this cult actor in some of his most interesting and little-seen roles. Supernatural? Perhaps. Baloney? Perhaps not. Sponsor: Film and Media Studies. Contact: Chris Pomiecko (cpomieko@mit.edu), 14N-430, x3-3599.


144
Animation 101

Prof. Henry Jenkins

Discover the amazing world of animation as the Film and Media Studies program screens cartoons from around the world and throughout history over two evenings. First night salutes American studio era cartoons, ranging from silent era to present. Second night offers an international of some of the world's best animators. Sponsor: Film and Media Studies. Contact: Chris Pomiecko (cpomieko@mit.edu), 14N-430, x3-3599.


145
Basic Darkroom Techniques

Thery Mislick, Ed McCluney

Tues, Jan 9-30, 7:30-10 pm in W20-429. Preregister immediately. Enrollment limited to 16 people. Fee: $40 for MIT students, $60 otherwise.

Learn your way around a darkroom, how to develop film and print photographs. Non-class darkroom use included. Bring an exposed, unprocessed roll of black-and-white film to first class. Sponsor: Student Art Association. Contact: Ed McCluney (dsa_0002@mit.edu), W20-429, x3-7019.


146
Basic Photography

Thery Mislick, Phil Tuths, Ed McCluney

Wed, Jan 10-31, 2-5 pm in W20-429 or Thurs, Jan 11-Feb 1, 6:30-9 pm in W20-429. Preregister immediately. Enrollment limited to 16 people. Fee: $40 for MIT students, $60 otherwise.

Introduction to photography. Will cover the camera, darkroom, and shooting techniques. Bring camera and an unexposed roll of Kodak Tri-X or Kodak TMAX 400 film to first meeting. Students supply camera, film, and paper. Non-class darkroom use included. Sponsor: Student Art Association. Contact: Ed McCluney (dsa_0002@mit.edu), W20-429, x3-7019.


148
Digital Photography

Thery Mislick, Ed McCluney

Mon, Jan 8-29 in W20-429. Preregister immediately. Enrollment limited to 10 people. Fee: $40 for MIT students, $60 otherwise.

Introduction to concepts and methods. Sponsor: Student Art Association. Contact: Ed McCluney (dsa_0002@mit.edu), W20-429, x3-7019.


149
The Contemporary Cinema: The "Good Parts" Edition

Prof. Henry Jenkins

Fri, Jan 19, 1 pm in 2-105.

This one-day program is designed for MIT professors (and others) who are too busy to go to the movies. Prof. Henry Jenkins will show clips from almost 50 contemporary films and explain why they matter. Topics covered include Quentin Tarantino, Spike Lee, the Hong Kong and Chinese cinemas, and the impact of morphing technology. Sponsor: Film and Media Studies. Contact: Henry Jenkins (henry3@mit.edu), 14N-437, x3-3068.


150
Digital Imaging: It's Only as Good as the Output

Pat Leehey

Wed, Jan 10, 11 am-1 pm in 4-405.

Although digital imaging has caught the attention of many, and great strides have been made in image modification and creative enhancement, the principal limitations to its widespread adoption lie in input and output. Scanners and digital cameras on input, and digital printers on output, will be discussed, and comparisons made with the results of conventional film methods. Sponsor: Edgerton Center. Contact: Cindy Dernay (cdernay@mit.edu), 4-405, x3-4629.


151
Eighties Movie Nights

Rajiv Manglani

Cool eighties movies! Sponsor/contact: Rajiv Manglani (rajiv@mit.edu), x5-6181.


152
Film Series: Love and Race

Prof. Stephen Tapscott

A series of lectures, films, and discussions centering around questions of love, racial difference, cultural constructions of romance, and difference. A faculty member will give a short lecture/introduction to a film, and will show the film. Audience members are invited to remain for discussion after each film. Sponsor: Literature. Contact: Chris Pomiecko (cpomieko@mit.eud), 14N-430, x3-3599.


153
Exploring Films and Videotapes at MIT and Beyond

Katherine Poole, Merrill Smith

Thurs, Jan 18, 10:30 am-12 noon in 7-304 or Tues, Jan 23, 10:30 am - 12 noon. Preregister by Jan 10. Enrollment limited to 15 people.

Introduction to resources for information about films, videodiscs, and videotapes, as well as how to locate these media at MIT. Coverage includes reference works, indexes, and electronic resources, such as Barton, and internet sources, such as the World-Wide-Web. Lecture, discussion, and hands-on activities. Sponsor: Libraries, Rotch Library Visual Collections. Contact: Katherine Poole (kkpoole@mit.edu), 7-304, x3-7098.


154
Flash! The Photographs of Doc Edgerton

Prof. Kim Vandiver

Tues, Jan 30, 4-5 pm in 34-101.

A variety of slides and video will be shown to illustrate the photographic contributions of Doc and his followers. The talk will include a brief history of the development of high-speed photography. Sponsor: Edgerton Center. Contact: Cindy Dernay (cdernay@mit.edu), 4-405, x3-4629.


155
Freedom on My Mind: What the History Books Left Out

Tobie Weiner

Wed, Jan 24, 7-10 pm in 6-120.

What does Mississippi in the 1960's have to do with MIT in the 1990's? What can we learn from the civil rights movement about freedom, change, and empowerment? Join us for a riveting documentary on the people who led the Mississippi movement at the local level. Stay after the film for a discussion with some of the people featured in the film. Sponsor: Political Science. Contact: Tobie Weiner (iguanatw@mit.edu), E53-460, x3-3649.


156
The Future of Film Education

Prof. Henry Jenkins, Prof. Peter Donaldson

Wed, Jan 24, 8 pm in 14E-310.

Come, see, and participate in demonstratijons of new interactive programs, developed by MIT faculty, to facilitate film education. Re-edit Psycho. See how different directors tackle Shakespeare. Sponsor: Literature. Contact: Prof. Henry Jenkins (henry3@mit.edu), 14N-437, x3-3068.


157
How to Make a Ride Film in Your Garage

Tim Anderson

Wed, Jan 24, 7:30 pm in 20B-119. Enrollment limited to 15 people.

When you're strapped to a moving platform that moves in sync to a projected image, you can feel what it's like to be an eagle swooping through the Grand Canyon. Or a flying packrat swooping through the halls of MIT. Immersive stimulation can be used to aid in researching healthy mental/emotional states. Use motors and other sources of stimulus to move a chair in sync with video and audio, engage all the senses of the viewer. Sponsor: Electronic Research Society. Contact: Tim Anderson (robot@media.mit.edu), x3-2060.


158
High-Speed Video Analysis

Charles Mazel, Tony Caloggero

Thurs, Jan 25, 3-4 pm in 4-402.

Demonstration of two high-speed video imaging systems, one capable of 1,000-12,000 and the other of 4,000-40,000 frames per second. Many research efforts have already been assisted, and systems may be available for use in your lab. Sponsor: Edgerton Center. Contact: Cindy Dernay (cdernay@mit.edu), 4-405, x3-4629.


159
Hong Kong Fever

Greg Dancer

Wed, Jan 31, 7 pm-10 pm in 2-105.

A fast and furious overview of recent Hong Kong cinema will be accompanied by a horde of clips form your HK favorites. Then we'll watch Wing Chun – if you didn't see Michelle Yeoh steal the finale of Super Cop from Jackie Chan, you must see this film. Sponsor: Film and Media Studies. Contact: Greg Dancer (filmduck@mit.edu), 14N-424, x3-3616.


160
Learning to See

Dennis Stein, Ed McCluney

Wed, Jan 10-31, 7:30-9:30 pm in W20-429. Preregister immediately. Enrollment limited to 16 people. Fee: $40 for MIT students, $60 otherwise.

Develop your ability to see what's interesting and what isn't. Learn how to photograph people in ways that are compositionally better. Using still video and traditional camera, we explore the geometry of the image space. Bring camera and film to first class. Sponsor: Student Art Association. Contact: Ed McCluney (dsa_0002@mit.edu), W20-429, x3-7019.


161
Mathematics Movie Mini-Marathon

Jessica Wong

Mon, Jan 29, 7-10 pm in 6-120 or Tues, Jan 30, 7-10 pm in 6-120.

How can you turn a sphere inside out without getting kinky? What can flying through hyperbolic space teach us about linked circles in Euclidean space? Learn the answers to these and other questions from some of the best math movies ever made. Sponsor: Mathematics. Contact: Jessica Wong (aster@mit.edu), 437-1043.


162
Non-Class Darkroom

Thery Mislick, Ed McCluney

Mon, Jan 7, 5:30 pm in W20-429 for first meeting only. Preregister immediately. Enrollment limited to 15 people. Fee: $35 for MIT students, $55 otherwise.

Use of the SAA darkroom, including equipment and selected chemicals for black-and-white film developing and printing. Users assist in maintaining the darkroom. Sponsor: Student Art Association. Contact: Ed McCluney (dsa_0002@mit.edu), W20-429, x3-7019.


163
Japanese Film Series: The Most

Cornelia Robart

Most memorable. Most beautiful. Funniest. Six films illustrate the Japanese cineasts' art in these categories. We consider them to be the best available films we have seen. Do you agree? Join us for our Friday film series. Sponsor: MIT Japan Program. Contact: Cornelia Robart (robart@mit.edu), E38-754, x3-2839.


164
Prisoner Marathon

Patrick LoPresti, Dave Hollingsworth

Sat-Sun, Jan 20-21, 10 am-7 pm in 2-105.

The Prisoner is a unique television series from the sixties. It is complete, consisting of 17 one-hour episodes which we will view in two marathon sessions. On the surface, it is a well done (if somewhat surreal) action/suspense show, but closer inspection reveals many levels of meaning. Reminiscent of Huxley and Orwell, it is a refreshing change from the mindless sludge so common on modern television. Sponsor/contact: Patrick LoPresti (patl@eiffel.lcs.mit.edu), NE43-62a, x3-6028.


165
Technique Yearbook 1996

Lori Maiorino, Ana Echaniz

Mon, Wed, Fri, Jan 8-Feb 2, 12 noon-8 pm in W20-451.

Technique, MIT's yearbook will be doing final book production during all of IAP. Photographers are welcome to take, develop, and print photographs. Beginners are welcome to come and learn to print high-quality photography. Layout designers and writers are also needed. Technique provides a fun and friendly atmosphere for students to participate in the creation of MIT's finest publication. Food will be provided. Sponsor: Technique. Contact: Lori Maiorino (technique@mit.edu), x3-2980.


166
Slow Motion Action: Capturing the Whole Image

Tony Caloggero

Fri, Jan 26, 3-5 pm in 4-402.

A good opportunity to catch things that move quicker than the eye on video. The high-speed video camera will allow you to catch fast-moving objects at one-thousand frames per second. Bring an object of your desire (within reason) and a blank videocassette to capture your slow motion moment. Sponsor: Edgerton Center. Contact: Charles Mazel (chm@mit.edu), 4-406, x3-4629.


167
Those Magnificent Men in Their Flying Machines

Prof. Dave Wilson

Fri, Feb 2, 6:30-8 pm in 1-390.

Japan International Birdman Competition 1994 for student-built gliders and human-powered planes. Hilarious, heart-warming, suspenseful video showing launchings – and landings – of homemade craft. In Japanese with English commentary. Sponsor: Mechanical Engineering, MIT Japan Program. Contact: Cornelia Robart (robart@mit.edu), E38-754, x3-2839.


168
Video Festival

Tracy Pierce

Tues-Fri, Jan 30-Feb 1, 9 am-5 pm in 9-450. Discussion sessions, 12 noon-1 pm in 9-250.

During the last week of IAP, the Center for Advanced Educational Services will be providing daily programming on MIT Cable. Selections from the entire archive of MIT Video Courses and Video Productions will be showcased in this first-time-ever-on-campus video festival. Daily program schedules will be posted in Lobby 7 and at http:// www-caes.mit.edu. Lunchtime viewing and discussion groups will be held in 9-250. Sponsor: Center for Advanced Educational Services. Contact: Tracy Pierce (caes-courses@mit.edu), 9-234.


Food and Beverage

169
Taste Sensation

Prof. John de Monchaux

Wed, Jan 17, 11 am-12 noon in Mezzanine Lounge, Student Center. Enrollment limited to 50 people.

By a technique that ensures a level of representativeness across the MIT lunchtime community, up to fifty consumers will be given vouchers to purchase a lunch from any of the outlets in the Student Center. Each consumer will bring that lunch to the Mezzanine Lounge to join others in small groups to enjoy their lunch and offer comments verbally and on a brief questionnaire. The complaints and reactions will be analyzed systematically and provided as input to those responsible for food services on the MIT campus. Sponsor: Committee on Student Affairs. Contact: John de Monchaux (demon@mit.edu), x3-8299.


170
Art You Can Eat: Dinner in the Classical French Tradition

Mary Karen Powers

Thurs, Feb 1, 5 pm in W11. Preregister by Jan 12. Enrollment limited to 35 people. Fee: $20 for dinner.

Practice your Charm School skills while lingering over formally served French cuisine at the Newbury College School of Culinary Arts in Brookline. An MIT grad calls it "art you can eat," delicious food in a delightful setting. Sponsor: Tech Catholic Community. Contact: Mary Karen Powers (mkp@mit.edu), W11-012, x2-1779.


171
Chili Chemistry: Lab I

Prof. William Orme-Johnson

Wed, Jan 10, 1-5 pm in Bexley Basement. Preregister immediately. Enrollment limited to 12 people. Fee: $3 for materials. Prereq: Interest in cooking.

We will review the basic categories of chilis with fresh examples, and proceed to the construction of a classic West Texas Cowboy chili "Buzzard's Breath"! If participants indicate a preference for vegetarian cuisine, we will prepare Mama Iguana's (NYC) "Veg Chili." Tasting will conclude the event. Sponsor: Chemistry. Contact: Prof. William Orme-Johnson (whoj@mit.edu), 18-023, 253-1862.


172
Chili Chemistry: Lab II

Prof. William Orme-Johnson

Wed, Jan 17, 1-5 pm in Bexley Basement. Preregister Immediately. Enrollment limited to 12 people. Fee: $3 for materials. Prereq: Chili Lab I.

We'll learn to prepare three classics of Southwestern Hispanic cuisine: Enchiladas, Chilis Rellenos, and Quesadillas. A life-transforming experience, perhaps. At 5 pm we will eat the results of our labors, con cerveza (Ńun pococito para los mas de 21!) con leche (Ńpara los ninos!) Sponsor: Chemistry. Contact: Prof. William Orme-Johnson (whoj@mit.edu), 18-023, x3-1862.


173
Beer Tasting

Alain Lavelanet

Thurs, Jan 11-Feb 1, 6-8 pm in1-236. Preregister by Dec 11. Enrollment limited to 20 people. Fee: $50 for materials. Prereq: must be 21 or older.

We will discuss the differences between types of beer, breweries, and ingredients. We will tour several of the local microbreweries, including some not open to the general public. You will also have the opportunity to taste beers of all styles from around the world. Sponsor: Civil and Environmental Engineering. Contact: Alain Lavelanet (alainl@mit.edu), 1-235, x3-5321.


174
Bread Making for Beginners

Prof. Stephen Ansolabehere, Kathy Hess, Laurie Gould

Thurs, Jan 18, 6-9 pm in McCormick Hall Master's House. Preregister immediately. Enrollment limited to 12 people.

What makes sourdough sour and shortbread short? Find out all you knead to know to get started on a great hobby – breadmaking. Sponsor: Political Science. Contact: Stephen Ansolabehere (sda@mit.edu), E53-402, x3-5326.


175
The Great Ice Cream Contest

Anne Marie Dirks

Tues, Jan 23, 3-5 pm in 24-612. Preregister immediately. Enrollment limited to 12 people.

Come explore Boston's best ice cream! Preregister to be on a panel of twelve judges who shall conduct a scientific ice-cream tasting experiment to discover the best ice cream in Boston. Audience welcome (audience members will be given any extra ice cream). Sponsor: Experimental Study Group. Contact: Anne Marie Dirks (adirks@mit.edu), 24-612, x3-7787.


176
How to Achieve World Peace Using Common Kitchen Utensils – Again

Noémi Giszpenc

Wed, Jan 10-31, 11:30 am in 24-612. Preregister by immeditely (optional).

If you think that cooking good food in a large kitchen with a bunch of intelligent, friendly people, and sitting down and enjoying the meal and a lively discussion about politics/philosophy/everything else seems like a valuable thing to do, then come and do it. Everyone welcome. Sponsor: Experimental Study Group. Contact: Noémi Giszpenc (noemi@mit.edu), 24-612, x3-7787.


177
In Vino Veritas

Prof. Linn Hobbs

Mon, Wed, Fri, Jan 10-19, 8-11 pm in 6-321. Enrollment limited to 64 people. Fee: $100 for materials. Prereq: must be 21 or older.

Harvard cannot lay claim to all the verities! This introductory class in wine appreciation, now in its 16th year, with over 700 enthusiastic alumni/ae, will acquaint participants with the truth about wines from around the world through comparative tastings of about 50 fine wines. Enrollment is limited and this offering is perennially oversubscribed, so immediate registration with payment of class fee is advised. Sponsor: Materials Science and Engineering. Contact: Prof. Linn Hobbs (aafonso@mit.edu), 13-4062, x3-6970.


178
Sushi Party

Mitsuko Barker

Wed, Jan 31, 3-5 pm in E38-6th floor conference room. Preregister by Jan 26. Enrollment limited to 60 people. Fee: $5 a plate.

With members of the Japan Friendship Association of MIT, learn to make sushi in the way the Japanese do at home. Sprinkle, smooth, roll, slice, enjoy. Sponsor: MIT Japan Program, MIT Japan Friendship Association. Contact: Cornelia Robart (robart@mit.edu), E38-754, x3-2839.


179
Vegetarian Cooking Class

Beth Emery, Matt Krom, Ed Piekos

Preregister immediately. Enrollment limited to 15 people. Fee: $5 for food costs.

Are you overwhelmed by the thought of vegetarian cooking? Come to our cooking classes and learn how to stock your pantry. Plan healthy, inexpensive meals, shop for quality ingredients, and prepare mouthwatering, low-fat, vegetarian food. Sponsor: Vegetarian Support Group, MIT Food Service. Contact: Beth Emery (emery@mit.edu), W20-507, x3-2813.


180
Jewish Cooking and the Folklore of Jewish Food

Rabbi Josh Plaut, Prof. Peter Temin, Bob Simha

Preregister by Jan 15. Enrollment limited to 20 people.

Learn Jewish cooking with MIT professors and staff who will teach participants how to bake the traditional Jewish Hallah bread and age-old foods associated with the Spanish-Jewish (Sephardi) heritage. In each class we will study the social and religious history of the foods we prepare and then eat. Sponsor: Hillel. Contact: Beth Meltzer (bmeltzer@mit.edu), W11-039, x3-2982.


Foreign Languages

181
Japanese Language Workshop: Conflict Management and Resolution

Yoshimi Nagaya

Mon-Tues, Jan 29-30, 10 am-12 noon in 14E-310. Preregister by Dec 15. Enrollment limited to 15 people. Prereq: Japanese IV.

Learn how to negotiate and contradict in Japanese in various personal as well as professional situations. How do you disagree with your colleague without offending him/her? How do you confront your friend? How do you give support to the opinion presented, or express doubt about it? This course will teach you useful and culturally appropriate expressions and attitudes on such occasions. Students who plan to go to work or study in Japan are encouraged to take this workshop to acquire these important skills. Sponsor: Foreign Languages and Literatures. Contact: Yoshimi Nagaya (yoshimi@mit.edu), 14N-236, x3-4775.


182
Simple Chinese Characters

Julie Sussman

Tues, Jan 30 or Wed, Jan 31, 3-5 pm in 24-121.

Next time you go to Chinatown, the writing on the walls needn't be all "Chinese" to you. Come and learn the meaning of some simple Chinese characters. No knowledge of Chinese or facility with languages required. Sponsor: Prof. Gerald Sussman. Contact: Julie Sussman (jems@martigny.ai.mit.edu), NE43-408, 646-6825.


183
Taiwanese Class

Richard Huang, Jen-diann Chou

Wed, Jan 10, 2 pm in 1-132.

Students will learn about basic conversations in Taiwanese. Different phrases will be mixed in with cultural background. Will have different levels of classes if there's a need. Sponsor: Association of Taiwanese Students. Contact: Richard Huang (ryhuang@mit.edu), x5-8856.


184
Can We Learn Japanese by Computer?

Prof. Takako Aikawa, Anne LaVin

Tues, Jan 30, 12 noon-2 pm in 1-115. Preregister by Dec 15. Enrollment limited to 22 people. Prereq: 2 years training in Japanese.

This workshop introduces the tools and the computer-assisted materials available on Athena for learning Japanese. We focus on advanced-level students of Japanese who are interested in developing reading skills (e.g., reading newspapers, magazines) and writing skills (e.g., using Japanese word processing software, writing e-mail in Japanese). Sponsor: Foreign Languages and Literatures. Contact: Takako Aikawata (taikawa@mit.edu), 14N-330, x3-0109 or Anne LaVin (lavin@mit.edu), 14N-238, x8-7940.


185
Hebrew Reading Literacy in Eight Hours

Hasia Richman

Wed-Thurs, Jan 31-Feb 1, 4-9 pm in W11-Small Dining Room. Preregister by Jan 20. Enrollment limited to 20 people. Fee: $15 for registration and course materials.

Be part of an eight-hour adult Hebrew reading marathon. Take a great first step on the journey to Hebrew literacy. In this eight-hour reading marathon you will learn the alepbeth of Hebrew reading, become familiar with 150 key words for Jewish living, and develop a love and appreciation for Hebrew. No background necessary. Sponsor: Hillel. Contact: Beth Meltzer (bmeltzer@mit.edu), W11-039, x3-2982.


186
Hindi Conversation

Neeraj Karhade

Mon, Wed, Fri, Jan 8-26, 1-3:30 pm in 2-105. Preregister by Jan 1.

Don't understand Hindi film songs? Find it hard to converse whn you go to India? Well, this class in Hindi conversation is for you. We will cover enough conversation for you to be able to speak the basics. Sponsor: SANGAM. Contact: Neeraj Karhade (archanak@mit.edu), Baker 419, x5-7169.


187
Russian on Athena

Michael Decerbo

Tues, Jan 30, 7 pm in 1-115.

Just about anything you'd want to do on Athena can be done in Russian. This informal overview will get you started using Athena in Russian to do word processing, zwrite, read netnews, surf the Web, and more, and show you where to find more information. Sponsor/contact: Michael Decerbo (mike@mit.edu), 873-4443.


188
Yiddish Language and Culture

Betty Silberman

Tues, Thurs, Jan 11-Feb 1, 2:30-4 pm in W11-Small Dining Room. Preregister by Jan 9. Enrollment limited to 20 people.

Come learn a bisl (a little) Yiddish. This intensive course covers Yiddish language and culture. Beginners welcome. Text can be purchased the first day of class. Sponsor: Hillel. Contact: Beth Meltzer (bmeltzer@mit.edu), W11-039, x3-2982.


Games and Tournaments

189
17th Annual IAP Mystery Hunt

David Reiley

Fri, Jan 12, 12 noon in Lobby 7. Debriefing Sun, Jan 14, 7 pm in 35-225. Preregistration is optional.

Do you like puzzles and mysteries? Then come participate in one of the world's most amazing treasure hunts! In this annual IAP tradition, participants compete in teams to find a special coin which has been hidden somewhere on the MIT campus. At the opening ceremonies, participants will receive puzzle packets containing clues to the location of the coin, and at the debriefing session we will all learn how the hunt was finally solved. See http://www.mit.edu:8001/activities/puzzle/home.html for more information. Sponsor/contact: David Reiley (puzzle@mit.edu), E56-345, x3-7353.


190
The First Annual XEvil Tournament

Stephen Hardt

Sat, Jan 20, 11 am-3 pm in 1-115. Preregister by Jan 18. Enrollment limited to 30 people. Prereq: must have played XEvil.

Do you know Ninjas from ChopperBoys, flamethrowers from chainsaws, Dopplegangers from Transmogrifiers? If so, enter the First Annual XEvil Tournament. This will be a double elimination series of one-on-one duels. We may also have some more informal two-on-two games in the background. As an added bonus after the tournament, participants will have a chance to preview XEvil 1.5. See http://theory.lcs.mit.edu/~hardts/xevil.html for more details and current information. Sponsor/contact: Stephen Hardt (hardts@mit.edu), NE43-226, x8-7090.


191
AIAA 11th Annual Paper Airplane Contest

Chris Sanders

Wed, Jan 17, 12 noon-2 pm in Lobby 7.

Students get a chance to fly as many paper airplanes as they can make in Lobby 7. Students can bring pre-made paper airplanes or make them with provided supplies. Prizes will be awarded in several design and performance categories. Sponsor: Aeronautics and Astronautics. Contact: Chris Sanders (sanders@mit.edu), 262-6695.


192
College Bowl Intramural Tournament

Jon Orwant

Mon, Jan 22, 9 am-5 pm in W20-400 (preliminary rounds). Enrollment limited to 16 teams of 4 or 5 players each. Preregister by Jan 19. Fee: $5 per person for materials.

Teams of four players each battle their wits in a preliminary round. Top teams advance to the finals. We want to give each team seven games on Monday! Teams from dorms, frats, ILGs, etc., welcome. Individuals are encouraged to enter and will be matched up. Sponsor: Campus Activities Complex. Contact: Jon Orwant (orwant@media.mit.edu).


193
Bridge Tournament

Prof. Tom Leighton

Fri, Feb 1, 12 noon-6 pm in 2-290.

The Mathematics Department challenges all MIT bridge players to a team-of-four tournament. Refreshments offered, prizes awarded. Come and have a good time. Sponsor: Mathematics. Contact: Prof. Tom Leighton (ftl@math.mit.edu), 2-377, x3-3662.


194
Hearts Tournament

Jude Federspiel

Fri, Jan 19, 2 pm-6 pm in W20-491. Preregister by Dec 13. Enrollment limited to 32 people.

Compete for fame and glory in the IAP Hearts Tournament! A one-hour Hearts lesson will precede the competition. Lesson attendance not required. Contest rules and schedules will be set by the sponsors at the lesson. Sponsor: Christian Student Association. Contact: William Potter (wmvpottr@mit.edu), Baker 103.


195
Integration Bee

Javier Robles

Tues, Jan 23, 1:30-3:30 pm in 34-101. Final competition: Tues, Jan 30, 7:30-10:30 pm in 34-101. Prereq: 18.01.

Preliminary written competition is open to all students. Top ten go on to spelling-bee style contest to find MIT's new Grand Integrator. Only 18.01 skills required. Prizes awarded. Spectators welcome. Sponsor: Mathematics. Contact: Undergraduate Mathematics Office, 2-108, x3-4977.


196
Learn to Play Bridge

Jennifer Heymont

Mon, Thurs, Jan 8-Feb 1, 6-8:30 pm in 33-419. No class on Jan 15.

Amaze your freinds, amaze your parents. Learn to play bridge this IAP. We will be teaching the Audrey Grant Club Course, a nationally acclaimed beginning bridge course, which teaches the basics of bidding, play, and defense. At the end of the course, there will be a mini-tournament, with refreshments. Sponsor: MIT/Draper Lab Bridge Club. Contact: Jennifer Heymont (jleah@bronze.lcs.mit.edu), 726-3966.


197
Learn to Play Better Bridge

Jennifer Heymont

Mon, Thurs, Jan 8-Feb 1, 6-8:30 pm in 33-419. No class on Jan 15.

For those who already know the basics of bridge, or have taken the Audrey Grant Club Course, we are offering th Audrey Grant Diamond Course, which covers more detail and offers more advanced strategies for the play of the hand. Sponsor: MIT/Draper Lab Bridge Club. Contact: Jennifer Heymont (jleah@bronze.lcs.mit.edu), 726-3966.


198
Mah-Jiang Tournament

Angelin Lin

Fri, Jan 19, 7:30 pm in Burton Dining Hall. Preregister immediately. Fee: $2 for refreshments.

Enough said. Just come and grab your corner of the table! No experience needed. Mah-Jiang novices shall have fun. All dollars won and lost will be virtual. Sponsor/contact: Flora Sun (sunflora@mit.edu).


199
Peace in Our Time

Abbe Cohen, Morris Matsa

Fri, Jan 12, 8 pm. Preregister immediately.

Peace In Our Time is a ten-day live-action roleplaying game run under the auspices of the MIT Assassins Guild. Play a character in a world of science fiction, wierdness, politics, economics, subterfuge, war. Take part in this new universe as alien races vie for either domination or peace. Sponsor: Assassins Guild. Contact: Abbe Cohen (peace-gms@mit.edu).


200
Science Treasure Hunt: Alien from the Earth's Deep Interior

Prof. Chris Marone

Wed, Jan 16, 12 noon in 54-715.

Teams of individuals race to find The Alien (a rock statuette hidden on campus). Clues based on MIT, science, computers, and Earth. Win world fame, The Alien, and a semester's worth of ice cream at Toscanini's. Sponsor: Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences. Contact: Prof. Chris Marone (cjm@westerly.mit.edu), 54-724, x3-4352.


Health

201
Adult and Pediatric Heartsaver Course (Level B): Initial CPR

Officer Paul Baratta

Tues, Jan 9-16, 12 noon-4 pm, or Sat, Jan 13-20, 9 am-1 pm. Preregister by Dec 13. Enrollment limited to 16 people. Preference: preregistration order. Fee: $20.

This eight-hour certification course will cover adult resuscitation with one-person techniques, infant resuscitation, and obstructed airways in conscious or unconscious victims. CPR cards will be issued approximately 30 days after successful completion of the course. Sponsor: Campus Police. Contact: Sean Spencer (sspencer@mit.edu), W31-215, x3-9750.


202
Advanced Chilling Out for the Stressed Out

Tracy Desovich

Wed, Jan 24, 5:15-6:15 pm in E25-117.

This workshop offers practical basic tips for creating relaxation in your life. It presents many tools, tips, and useful suggestions for helping you handle the effects of everyday stress. You'll experience the power of breathing exercises and progressive relaxation. Dress in comfortable clothing. Sponsor: MIT Medical. Contact: Tracy Desovich, E23-203, x3-1316.


203
Addictions Awareness: An Informal Discussion About Recovery

Mary Ni, Eve Sullivan, Tony Gray

Wed, Jan 24-31, 4:30-6 pm in 6-120. Preregister by Jan 15.

A chance to talk with people who have "been there, done that." Former sufferers of addictive diseases (alcoholism, eating disorders, gambling) and obessive relationships (involving romance, sex, harassment, or violence) will describe their experiences and answer questions. The first session will have counselors on substance and process addictions; the second, counselors on obsessive relationships and violence in relationships. Participants are encouraged to attend both sessions. Sponsor: Undergraduate Education and Student Affairs. Contact: Mary Ni (mni@mit.edu), W20-549, x3-6777.


204
Alcohol 101 and the Art of Low-Risk Drinking

Tracy Desovich

Wed, January 24, 3:30-5 pm in 1-135.

Learn how alcohol affects your body, your mind, and even your soul. You'll get an in-depth overview about this powerful drug and learn techniques to induce pleasure while reducing harm. Sponsor: MIT Medical. Contact: Sally Ciampa, E23-205, x3-1316.


205
All the Breakfast You Can Carry

Linda Antinoro

Wed, Jan 10, 12 noon-1 pm in 1-150.

Nutrition experts believe that eating breakfast gives the metabolism an indispensable jump-start on the day. A nutritionist offers suggestions on quick and portable breakfasts to munch as you race out the door. Sponsor: MIT Medical. Contact: Sally Ciampa, E23-205, x3-1316.


206
Anxiety and Stress

Marcia Yousik

Tues, Jan 30, 11 am-12 noon in 1-150.

What is the relationship between anxiety and stress? What can you do to help yourself and when do you need to seek professional help? Come join this discussion with a clinical specialist for information and problem solving. Sponsor: MIT Medical. Contact: Sally Ciampa, E23-205, x3-1316.


207
Aspects of Chinese Medicine

Chun Han Zhu, Dr. Elaine Shiang

Wed, Jan 17, 1-2 pm in 1-150.

A New England School of Acupuncture faculty member discusses acupuncture and other components of Chinese medicine, including herbal remedies. An MIT physician provides an introduction and commentary. Sponsor: MIT Medical. Contact: Sally Ciampa, E23-205, x3-1316.


208
Bartender Server Training

Tracy Desovich

Wed, Jan 31, 1-4 pm in Twenty Chimeys, Student Center.

Required for anyone serving alcohol on the MIT campus. Learn about liability issues and ways to keep your guests happy and safe. Sponsor: MIT Medical. Contact: Sally Ciampa, E23-205, x3-1316.


209
Basic Women's Health Examination

Barbara Merrifield

Wed, Jan 17, 1-2 pm in 1-134.

What are the essentials of a routine gynecological examination? A nurse-midwife discusses the physical components of a pelvic exam, pap smears, lab tests to detect minor problems, and what they mean. Sponsor: MIT Medical. Contact: Sally Ciampa, E23-205, x3-1316.


210
The Best of Outdoor Medicine

Dr. Micheal Wiedman, Dr. John Pikula

Wed, Jan 24, 12 noon-2 pm in 1-150.

What can you do when the doctor is more than one day away? Experts discuss medical and surgical emergency care when you're in the wilderness. Hypothermia, exposure, altitude, and hiking problems will be covered. Sponsor: MIT Medical. Contact: Sally Ciampa, E23-205, x3-1316.


211
Biosafety Resources at MIT

Betsy Gilman

Thurs, Jan 25, 12 noon-1 pm in 1-135.

An MIT Biosafety Officer will give an overview of the numerous biosafety resources available to the MIT community. Learn about risk assessment, project registration, OSHA compliance, and analysis of air, water, and environmental samples. Sponsor: MIT Medical. Contact: Sally Ciampa, E23-205, x3-1316.


212
Calling All Nondrinkers: Ready for Some Fun?

Tracy Desovich

Thurs, Feb 1, 1-2 pm in Twenty Chimneys, Student Center.

Want to meet some others who also choose not to drink? Let's get together and plan some fun-filled parties for spring. Sponsor: MIT Medical. Contact: Sally Ciampa, E23-205, x3-1316.


213
Does Your Work Affect Your Health?

Dr. Robert McCunney

Wed, Jan 31, 12 noon-1 pm in 1-135.

Exposure to certain activities and materials at work may have an effect on health. This presentation by a world-reknowned occupational physician will identify typical environmental issues at work or at home (hobbies, repairs) which involve use of substances that need to be handled safely to avoid possible health hazards. Some typical examples include carbon monoxide, lead solvents and thinners, dusts, hobbies… Sponsor: MIT Medical. Contact: Sally Ciampa, E23-205, x3-1316.


214
Cholesterol: The Heart of the Matter

Dr. Leigh Firn

Tues, Jan 16, 1-2 pm in 1-150.

Who needs to be concerned about cholesterol? What can be done about it? When should you try to alter your cholesterol level? A MIT internist gives you the facts about cholesterol, family history and heart disease. Sponsor: MIT Medical. Contact: Sally Ciampa, E23-205, x3-1316.


215
College Students Are Immune from HIV – Or Are They?

Tracy Desovich, Gary Fallas

Wed, Jan 24, 2-3:30 pm in 1-135.

Come find out the actual risk HIV, the virus that causes AIDS, poses to college students of the nineties. Are condoms truly the most effective method of protection? Sponsor: MIT Medical. Contact: Sally Ciampa, E23-205, x3-1316.


216
Contraception in the Nineties

Dr. Annie Liau

Thurs, Feb 1, 3-4 pm in 1-150.

An MIT gynecologist offers an update on exciting improvements in hormonal contraceptive methods, including new types of birth control pills with fewer side effects, injectable Depo-Provera and Norplant. Sponsor: MIT Medical. Contact: Sally Ciampa, E23-205, x3-1316.


217
Controlling Stress

Dr. Margaret Ross

Mon, Jan 22, 12 noon-1:30 pm in 1-150.

Stress is so prevalent in the MIT community that at times it seems to permeate the very air we breathe! What is stress and how do we cope with this major problem of modern life? What is your personal style for dealing with it? Who bears the brunt – you or those around you? This workshop will include a discussion and session in relaxation. Wear comfortable clothing. Sponsor: MIT Medical. Contact: Sally Ciampa, E23-205, x3-1316.


218
Diet and Health: What Have We Learned

Dr. Walter Willette

Tues, Jan 16, 12 noon-1:30 pm in 1-190.

Although we have long suspected that dietary factors may be important in the cause and prevention of cancer and heart disease, only recently have data from large prospective studies become available. The emerging evidence has failed to confirm many widely-held hypotheses, particularly the paramount importance of dietary fat. However, these studies have suggested that inadequate intake of many dietary factors, such as specific antioxidants and folic acid, may contribute importantly to many diseases, including those as diverse as birth defects, cataracts and colon cancer. These findings have important potential implications for the prevention of many diseases that have been thought to be the inevitable consequence of aging. Sponsor: MIT Medical. Contact: Sally Ciampa, E23-205, x3-1316.


219
Diet for a New America

Matthew Krom

Tues, Jan 23, 6-7 pm in 1-390.

Come see a video guaranteed to make you think. Learn how your food choices affect your health, happiness, and the future of life on Earth. Based on the book of the same name by John Robbins. Sponsor: Vegetarian Support Group. Contact: Matthew Krom (krom@mit.edu), E15-368A, x3-0381.


220
Diet, Nutrition, and Cancer: Current Recommendations

Dr. Steve Clinton

Fri, Jan 19, 12 noon-1 pm in 1-150.

An attending physician at the Dana Farber Cancer Institute will review current diet and nutritional guidelines for cancer prevention with an emphasis on new information published over the past twelve months. Sponsor: MIT Medical. Contact: Sally Ciampa, E23-205, x3-1316.


221
Driven to Distraction: Adult Attention Deficit Disorder

Dr. Edward Hallowell

Tues, Jan 9, 12 noon-1:30 pm in 1-190.

How do you know whether you have adult ADD? The symptoms are vague and sometimes apply to us all – difficulty with focus or concentration. Dr. Hallowell will discuss current thinking on the diagnosis and treatment of this "disease of the nineties." Sponsor: MIT Medical. Contact: Sally Ciampa, E23-205, x3-1316.


222
Hypertension

Dr. William Kettyle

Wed, Jan 31, 12 noon-1 pm in 1-150.

Often called a "silent" disease because patients seldom experience symptoms, hypertension affects millions of Americans. An MIT physician describes why high blood pressure causes harm and how it can be managed. Sponsor: MIT Medical. Contact: Sally Ciampa, E23-205, x3-1316.


223
The Hot Zone at MIT: Emerging and Re-emerging Infectious Diseases

Dr. Arnold Weinberg

Tues, Jan 30, 1-2 pm in 1-190.

Outbreak and The Hot Zone have dramatized on the screen and in print the more sensational aspects of viruses. But aside from these exotic and frightening examples, there are questions arising for all of us about these tiny organisms and their effects on our lives . A specialist in infectious diseases (and MIT Medical Director) will discuss the viruses that we might have to battle. Should we immunize everyone against chicken pox? What about Hepatitis A & B? Why can someone who has been immunized as a baby still get measles when he goes to college? Is polio eradicated? Bring your questions and concerns. Sponsor: MIT Medical. Contact: Sally Ciampa, E23-205, x3-1316.


224
Educational Strategies for the Hearing Impaired

Dr. Stephen Glicken

Wed, Jan 24, 12 noon-1 pm in 1-134.

A pediatrician who specializes in the needs of deaf and hearing-impaired children and adolescents, will discuss the history and current thinking on how best to educate these people, and will review the results of different educational strategies (lip reading and American Sign Language) for helping this group learn to communicate effectively. Sponsor: MIT Medical. Contact: Sally Ciampa, E23-205, x3-1316.


225
EMF: Where Have We Been and Where Are We Going

Donald Haes

Mon, Jan 22, 12 noon-1 pm in 1-135.

The debate over hazards from exposure to electric and magnetic fields continues. Past research which has provided much data with often ambiguous results is examined. On-going research hopes to provide a clearer picture of this hotly debated topic. Sponsor: MIT Medical. Contact: Sally Ciampa, E23-205, x3-1316.


226
Global Environmental Change: Why We Don't Get It

Dr. Eric Chivian

Wed, Jan 10, 1-2 pm in 1-135.

A growing body of evidence reveals that we are altering the global environment in ways that may have catastrophic consequences, either by policy makers or the general public. This talk shall examine what prevents us from understanding the implications of our actions and what we can do about it. Sponsor: MIT Medical. Contact: Sally Ciampa, E23-205, x3-1316.


227
Go Away! And Return Home in Good Health

Dr. Leigh Firn

Mon, Jan 8, 1-2 pm in 1-150.

The road to healthy travel begins before you say goodbye. An MIT physician discusses preparations and immunizations; travel precautions with water, food, and insects; and medical checks after you return home. Sponsor: MIT Medical. Contact: Sally Ciampa, E23-205, x3-1316.


228
Going Meatless: How to Be a Smart Vegetarian

Tiana Celesia

Thurs, Jan 11, 12 noon-1:30 pm in 1-190.

Explore how a vegetarian style of eating can help you achieve your health goals. Cutting back on meat can help you lower blood pressure, lose weight, reduce cholesterol, and lower the risk of osetoporosis, heart disease, and some forms of cancer. Learn the important principles to make the transition safely and discover great-tasting economical foods, which will be presented and sampled. Sponsor: MIT Medical. Contact: Sally Ciampa, E23-205, x3-1316.


229
Home Health Hazards: What Everyone Should Know!

Louis DiBerardinis

Tues, Jan 16, 11:30 am-12:30 pm in 1-135.

This workshop will identify potential hazards found in the home and direct the participants to sources of help. Topics covered will include asbestos, lead paint, fiberglass insulation, radon, water, pesticides, and cleaning solutions. Sponsor: MIT Medical. Contact: Sally Ciampa, E23-205, x3-1316.


230
IAP Workshop on Dreams and Dreaming

John Jacobs

Mon, Jan 8, 7 pm in 8-105 for first class only. Preregister by Dec 11. Enrollment limited to 25 people.

Dreams are fun. Dreams are interesting. Dreams are real! In this workshop, we will explore our own dreams as well as established theories on dreaming. Dreaming will be examined from historical, cultural, religious, and scientific perspectives. Learn to use your dreams for information, focus, or entertainment. Sponsor: MIT Medical. Contact: John Jacobs (mart@mit.edu), 424-7989.


231
How to Fit It All In: Good Nutrition on the Go

Melissa Allen

Mon, Jan 8, 11:30 am-12:30 pm in 1-150.

Are you dodging between classes and the library, or the office and day care? Do you need to be mentally alert and physically on top? Learn survival techniques through healthy and delicious nutritional choices. Sponsor: MIT Medical. Contact: Sally Ciampa, E23-205, x3-1316.


232
How to Help a Friend in Distress

Tracy Desovich

Tues, Jan 30, 4-5 pm in 1-190.

Your buddy is passed out cold and you're not sure if he's sleeping or dead drunk. What can you do? Whom can you call and truly trust? You think your friend has an eating disorder. How can you help? Come learn some lifesaving suggestions. Sponsor: MIT Medical. Contact: Sally Ciampa, E23-205, x3-1316.


233
How to Minimize Dental Treatment

Dr. Richard Doff

Mon, Jan 8, 1-2 pm in 1-190.

Decay and gum disease are the two major diseases of the mouth. Learn the cause and prevention of these diseases to minimize the need for dental treatment. Sponsor: MIT Medical. Contact: Sally Ciampa, E23-205, x3-1316.


234
Diseases of the Prostate Gland

Dr.George Reservitz

Mon, Jan 22, 1-2 pm in 1-134.

An MIT urologist discusses the most prevalent diseases of prostate gland with current thoughts on therapies. Sponsor: MIT Medical. Contact: Sally Ciampa, E23-205, x3-1316.


235
Improving Performance and Preventing Injuries in Your Fitness Program

Michael Wood

Fri, Jan 26, 12 noon-1:30 pm in 1-190.

Whether you are running the Boston Marathon or walking for pleasure, injury can often result if your exercise plan is not carefully throught out. An exercise physiologist will discuss how to prepare and train your body for physical activities, describe the use of proper equipment, and instruct in techniques and body mechanics to avoid injury. Sponsor: MIT Medical. Contact: Sally Ciampa, E23-205, x3-1316.


236
The Inside Story on Indoor Air Quality

Richard Fink, Dr. Charles Billings

Tues, Jan 30, 12 noon-1 pm in 1-135.

A discussion on how buildings affect the internal environments, how people affect the indoor environment, how assessments of the indoor air quality are performed and their limitations, what it all means, and case studies. Sponsor: MIT Medical. Contact: Sally Ciampa, E23-205, x3-1316.


237
Introduction to Reiki Healing

Lisa Rung, Erika Baern, Barbara May

Wed, Jan 10, 11:30 am-3:30 pm in 66144, or Fri, Jan 26, 11:30-3:30 pm in 66-144.

Discover this ancient hands-on technique for reducing stress and promoting health. A presentation of the history and theory of Reiki will include time for questions and discussion. Opportunity to experience Reiki will follow lecture. Latecomers welcome. Sponsor/contact: Lisa Rung (lrung@mitsis.mit.edu), E19-334, x8-6433.


238
Is There an Obesity Gene?

Dr. William Dietz

Tues, Jan 9, 12 noon-1 pm in 1-150.

Why are one-third of Americans overweight? Why are we eating less fat as a society, but still gaining? Is it bad to be ten or fifteen pounds over ideal body weight? Is there an obesity gene, and will science be able to help us get our weight under control? How do we know what to believe and how to eat healthily. Sponsor: MIT Medical. Contact: Sally Ciampa, E23-205, x3-1316.


239
Is There Lead in Your Tapwater?

Prof. Phil Gschwend, John MacFarlane

Tues, Jan 16, all day for pickup outside 48-412. Fri, Jan 19, all day for dropoffoutside 48-412. Preregister by Jan 10. Enrollment limited to 50 people.

Participants will be given bottles for sampling their drinking water. These samples will then be analyzed for lead. Results will be tabulated and reported via e-mail. Sponsor: Civil and Environmental Engineering. Contact: John MacFarlane (jmac@mit.edu), 48-412, x3-1638.


240
Lab Safety Self-Audit

Linda Wolfe

Fri, Jan 26, 12 noon-1 pm in 1-135.

Learn how to do your own biological lab inspection. Check-lists, slides of good and better approaches to common problems, where to go for advice and information, and how to help correct problems will be covered. Sponsor: MIT Medical. Contact: Sally Ciampa, E23-205, x3-1316.


241
Laser Safety

William Irwin

Fri, Jan 19, 12 noon-1 pm in 1-135.

As lasers become an integral part of industry, medicine, and academia, their widespread use raises safety concerns. An MIT assistant radiation protection officer discusses safe laser use. Sponsor: MIT Medical. Contact: Sally Ciampa, E23-205, x3-1316.


242
Managing Headaches

Dr. John Boyd

Thurs, Feb 1, 2-3 pm in 1-190.

Having headaches? When should you seek the advice of a health care provider? An MIT neurologist discusses the medical evaluation and treatment of headaches. Sponsor: MIT Medical. Contact: Sally Ciampa, E23-205, x3-1316.


243
Managing Indoor Air Pollution

Louis DiBerardinis, Dr. David Diamond, Robert Cunkelman

Mon, Jan 8, 12 noon-1 pm in 1-135.

This workshop will explore the common IAQ problems encountered at MIT and discuss how personnel can deal with IAQ problems. Case studies of MIT problems and other well-publicized non-MIT problems will be discussed. This is particularly directed at administrative officers, building supervisors, and facilities people. Sponsor: MIT Medical. Contact: Sally Ciampa, E23-205, x3-1316.


244
Managing Your Diabetes

Dr. William Kettyle

Thurs, Jan 25, 12 noon-1 pm in 1-190.

An MIT internist will describe the diagnosis, classification, and current thinking on treatment of diabetes. Bring your questions about how best to manage this illness, research directions, and what the future might hold. It is an illness that many of us grapple with in ourselves, friends, and family, and one that all of us should know more about. Sponsor: MIT Medical. Contact: Sally Ciampa, E23-205, x3-1316.


245
Nervous Stomachs

Dr. Paul Kantrowitz

Tues, Jan 9, 1-2 pm in 1-135.

What is a nervous stomach and what causes it? An MIT gastroenterologist offers his popular presentation on digestive symptoms, what they mean, and what to do about them. Sponsor: MIT Medical. Contact: Sally Ciampa, E23-205, x3-1316.


246
Menopause Symptoms and Treatments

Dr. Lori Ann Wroble

Review of normal menstruation and discussion of changes that take place from the perimenopausal period through menopause. Strategies and medications for treating symptoms and long-term health will be presented. Sponsor: MIT Medical. Contact: Sally Ciampa, E23-205, x3-1316.


247
Navigating Through On-line Health Care Resources

Laurel Simmons, Samantha Scolamierio

Wed, Jan 24, 5:30-8 pm in 1-390.

The advent of the Internet has opened doors to the world of medical information. How do you navigate through available on-line resources to find the information and support groups that you need? Two staff members will discuss and demonstrate their experience in using on-line health care information. This could be a valuable tool for researching an illness in conjunction with information from your physician. Sponsor: MIT Medical. Contact: Sally Ciampa, E23-205, x3-1316.


248
Over-The-Counter Drugs

Dr. Leigh Firn

Wed, Jan 17, 11 am-12 noon in 1-150.

Why are some drugs available only through your doctor's prescription and others available over the counter? More and more drugs are becoming available without prescription – anti-ulcer drugs, pain medications, allergy drugs. How should these be used? When is it appropriate for them to be used? An MIT internist will discuss all these issues. Bring your questions and concerns. Sponsor: MIT Medical. Contact: Sally Ciampa, E23-205, x3-1316.


249
New MedLINK Training

Tracy Desovich

Tues, Thurs, Jan 16-Feb 1, 2-5 pm in E23-297. No class on Tues, Jan 30.

Not sure how the MIT Medical Departmnent works? Want to help others get connected to the helping resources on campus and work to keep MIT students healthy? Then join MedLINKS. Sponsor: MIT Medical. Contact: Sally Ciampa, E23-205, x3-1316.


250
Oh, My Aching Back!

Dr. Michele Masi

Tues, Jan 30, 12:30-1:30 pm in 1-150.

An MIT neurologist discusses simple strategies for managing chronic neck and back pain. When should you seek medical attention? Bring your questions and concerns. Sponsor: MIT Medical. Contact: Sally Ciampa, E23-205, x3-1316.


251
Melatonin: A Medicine for Jet Lag and Other Maladies of the Nineties

Richard Wurtman

Wed, Jan 24, 12 noon-1 pm in 1-190.

The hormone melatonin is fast becoming today's hottest miracle drug. It regulates circadian rhythms ad individual sleep/wake cycles. It seems to influence the subjective feelings of jet lag and the phase disorders people develop when they work different work shifts. Some claim it may have other therapeutic properties as well. Dr. Wurtman has done major research on the properties of melatonin and will discuss the findings of this work, as well as the potential applications of this naturally occurring hormone in our lives. Sponsor: MIT Medical. Contact: Sally Ciampa, E23-205, x3-1316.


252
Osteoporosis: Who is at Risk? What Can Be Done?

Dr. William Kettyle

Fri, Jan 19, 12 noon-1 pm in 1-190.

Osteoporosis, a bone-thinning condition that develops with aging, affects as many as 24 million Americans, mostly women. How can those at risk reduce the likelihood of developing the debilitating fractures of osteoporosis? What new therapies offer hope? Sponsor: MIT Medical. Contact: Sally Ciampa, E23-205, x3-1316.


253
Patient Empowerment Roundtable

Samantha Scolamiero

Mon, Jan 29 and Wed, Jan 31, 6-8 pm in 66-148.

Knowledge is power. Supplementing what we know about our bodies with reference resources and support groups is very valuable. Let's talk about surviving our health system. Bring strategies, stories, issues, ideas, and enthusiasm, or take what you need. Sponsor/contact: Samantha Scolamiero (samajane@mit.edu), E53-100, x3-5696.


254
Peace with Food and Body Image

Dr. Margaret Ross, Dr. Robin Rosenberg

Thurs, Jan 11-Feb 1, 12 noon-1:30 pm in 1-150.

Do you find yourself worrying more about what you ate for lunch than about your classes? Do you dread an upcoming family reunion because you have gained weight since the last one? Are you preoccupied with your body shape or confused about how to deal with conflicting reports on what is actually healthy. You are not alone. Concern about diet, fitness, and body image is epidemic, especially for women, and involving all segments of the population. Yet obesity is continuing to increase, posing threats to emotional and physical health.This four-session workshop including teaching sessions, sharing of experiences, and training in strategies for relaxation and behavior change. Sponsor: MIT Medical. Contact: Sally Ciampa, E23-205, x3-1316.


255
Childhood Attention Deficit Disorder

Dr. Elizabeth Childs

Fri, Jan 12, 11:30 am-12:30 pm in 1-150.

An MIT psychiatrist discusses the signs, symptoms, and treatment of this condition as it appears in children. Sponsor: MIT Medical. Contact: Sally Ciampa, E23-205, x3-1316.


256
Planning for Pregnancy: Thinking Ahead

Karen Halvorson

Wed, Jan 24, 2-3:30 pm in 1-150.

More planning is involved with pregnancy than tossing out the birth control. An MIT nurse will discuss nutrition, age, fertility, alcohol, tobacco and drug use, along with environmental and genetic factors. Sponsor: MIT Medical. Contact: Sally Ciampa, E23-205, x3-1316.


257
Preventative Eye Care

Dr. Anthony Cavallerano

Wed, Jan 17, 1:30-2:30 pm in 1-135.

This course considers the four important causes of serious vision loss: diabetic eye disease, age-related macular degeneration, cataracts, and glaucoma. Emphasis is placed on understanding risk factors, prevention and current treatment. Sponsor: MIT Medical. Contact: Sally Ciampa, E23-205, x3-1316.


258
Preventing Repetitive Strain Injuries

Martha Loss

Tues, Jan 16, 9 am-12 noon in 10-105. Preregister by Jan 8. Enrollment limited to 20 people.

This seminar clearly defines Repetitive Strain Injuries (RSIs) and provides information on how to prevent their onset. Test your office ergonomics IQ, find out about suspected risk factors, learn how to adjust furniture and equipment, and practice prevention strategies for common physical problems. Sponsor: Information Systems. Contact: Jeanne Cavanaugh (cavan@mit.edu), 11-301, x3-0852.


259
Role of Heredity in the Susceptibility of Cancer

Dr. Irene Kuter

Mon, Jan 22, 12 noon-1 pm in 1-190.

Breast cancer affects one in eight women. This is a startling statistic. Research efforts to understand the causes and treatment of this disease have increased dramatically in response to what has been called an epidemic. One of the new findings to emerge is that there are genes for breast cancer responsible for transmission of the disease in a small, but significant, number of cases. An oncologist from MGH will discuss these findings, and describe what is known about inherited suceptibility and the role of genetics and family history in determining who might be at risk. Sponsor: MIT Medical. Contact: Sally Ciampa, E23-205, x3-1316.


260
Radiation Exposure to the Near-Radiation Worker

Frank Masse

Thurs, Jan 18, 12 noon-1 pm in 1-135.

A discussion on radiation exposure to the general public, including natural radiation sources and radon, enhanced natural radiation such as air travel, medical exposures including mammography, and general public exposure due to man-made sources. Levels of exposure and associated risks will be discussed. Sponsor: MIT Medical. Contact: Sally Ciampa, E23-205, x3-1316.


261
Radon

Mitchell Galanek

Tues, Jan 23, 12 noon-1 pm in 1-135.

Radon is estimated to be the second leading cause of lung cancer in the United States. It contributes the largest fraction of environmental radiation exposure to individuals. Come learn more about where radon comes from, how to test for radon levels, and what to do if you have elevated radon levels. Free home radon test to attendees. Sponsor: MIT Medical. Contact: Sally Ciampa, E23-205, x3-1316.


262
Reversing Heart Disease, Preventing Cancer: The New Scientific Breakthroughs

Laura Dilley, Matt Krom

Thurs, Jan 18, 1pm-2:30 pm in 1-390.

Find out about what recent scientific studies reveal about how what we eat affects our health. We will explore the ongoing China Study of 6,500 Chinese citizens, the Harvard-based Framingham Heart Study, and studies by Dr. Dean Ornish on reversing heart disease, among others. Sponsor/contact: Laura Dilley (elsiedee@mit.edu), 36-597, x5-8340.


263
The Role of Stress in Temporomandibular Joint Pain and Dysfunction

Dr. Edward Seldin

Thurs, Jan 18, 12 noon-1 pm in 1-190.

MIT's oral surgeon discusses this painful condition as a manifestation of stress. Included in this discussion will be new information based on recent MIT research. Sponsor: MIT Medical. Contact: Sally Ciampa, E23-205, x3-1316.


264
Zzzzzz: Everything You Want to Know about Sleep

Dr. John Winkelman

Fri, Jan 12, 12 noon-1 pm in 1-190.

Sleep. Those who have no trouble with it absolutely take it for granted. You lie down, you close your eyes and… But, for many people, sleep is anything but routine and stress-free. There are people who can't sleep at all, who fall asleep at inappropriate and inopportune times, and who wake up miserable at 3 am and can't fall back to sleep. There are people who walk in their sleep, who raid the refrigerator, and who carry on conversations they won't remember in the morning. An expert on sleep will discuss insomnia, unusual sleep patterns, conditions that interfere with sleep, and current thinking on diagnostic and treatment techniques. Sponsor: MIT Medical. Contact: Sally Ciampa, E23-205, x3-1316.


265
RSI: Give Your Wrist a Break!

Dr. David Diamond

Tues, Jan 16, 11:30 am-12:30 pm in 1-150.

Why do over-extended computer users develop repetitive strain injuries (RSI)? An MIT physician discusses the cause of RSI, offers expert advice onhow to avoid the problem, and answers your questions. Sponsor: MIT Medical. Contact: Sally Ciampa, E23-205, x3-1316.


266
Safer Sex: How Much Protection Do You Really Need?

Dr. Mark Goldstein

Fri, Jan 12, 1-2 pm in 1-150.

What are the most effective means of preventing pregnancy and avoiding sexually transmitted diseases? Do risks of contracting STDs differ between women and men? A physician discusses combining methods of contraception and safer sex to reduce risk. Sponsor: MIT Medical. Contact: Sally Ciampa, E23-205, x3-1316.


267
Seeing Spots and Floaters: When Is it Serious?

Dr. Matthew Garston

Fri, Jan 26, 12 noon-1 pm in 1-150.

An MIT optometrist will examine various causes for these visual phenomena and discuss when they might have serious consequences. Sponsor: MIT Medical. Contact: Sally Ciampa, E23-205, x3-1316.


268
Strength Training for Those Over 40

Cheryl Silva

Fri, Jan 12-19, 1-2 pm in the W23 Weight Room. Enrollment limited. Preregister immediately.

A hands-on course in upper and lower body strength training, including proper techniques for lifting and spotting, and elements of strength training as part of fitness. The two-part series gives you an opportunity to exercise under supervision. Sponsor: MIT Medical. Contact: Sally Ciampa, E23-205, x3-1316.


269
Testicular Self-Examination

Dr. Roderick Crocker

Fri, Feb 2, 1-2 pm in 1-150.

All men between the ages of 18 and 35 should perform testicular self-examination for detection of testicular cancer. An MIT urologist offers information on a simple self-screening process that can save your life. Sponsor: MIT Medical. Contact: Sally Ciampa, E23-205, x3-1316.


270
What Can We Do to Age in Good Health?

Dr. Arnold Weinberg

Tues, Jan 23, 1-2 pm in 1-190.

Students, aging adults, and others in between positively influence many aspects of their own health, while other things happen due to destructive habits, poor genes and bad luck. MIT's Medical Director offers some logic about how we can do best for ourselves. Sponsor: MIT Medical. Contact: Sally Ciampa, E23-205, x3-1316.


271
The Thin, the Fat, and the Normal

Dr, Bruce Biller

Tues, Jan 9, 10-11 am in 1-190.

The review of the thyroid gland's function in health and diseases common in the MIT population. Sponsor: MIT Medical. Contact: Sally Ciampa, E23-205, x3-1316.


272
Twenty Questions about 20/20

Dr. Patti Augeri, Dr. Lynn Wittman

Tues, Jan 23, 12 noon-1 pm in 1-150.

MIT optometrists will discuss a variety of topics related to eye health and vision, including contact lenses, surgical correction of refractive errors, and preventative eye care. Sponsor: MIT Medical. Contact: Sally Ciampa, E23-205, x3-1316.


273
Understanding Fertility and Infertility for the Layperson

Dr. Bruce Biller, Karen Halvorson

Tues, Jan 9, 11 am-12 noon in 1-134.

This workshop will provide the laypersonw ith an understanding of normal male and female reproductive function, and then explain the common problems which cause infertility. The pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment options for both endocrinological and gynecological causes of infertility will be discussed. A question-and-answer period will follow the presentation. Sponsor: MIT Medical. Contact: Sally Ciampa, E23-205, x3-1316.


274
Upfront: Sexual Respect

Tracy Desovich

Tues, Jan 23, 3:30-5 pm in Private Dining Rooms 1&2, Student Center.

A realistic performance on alcohol, date rape, and creating satisfying relationships. Come join the lively discussion. Sponsor: MIT Medical. Contact: Sally Ciampa, E23-205, x3-1316.


275
Using Your Noodle: Carbo-Loading Clarified

Christina Economos

Wed, Jan 17, 12 noon-1 pm in 1-190.

A sports nutritionist and exercise physiologist describes nutrition strategies for athletes in training and competition and for those physically active people who do not compete. Sponsor: MIT Medical. Contact: Sally Ciampa, E23-205, x3-1316.


276
Workaholism at MIT: An Informal Conversation

Amanda Xu, Eve Sullivan, Rosemary Murphy

Tues, Jan 9, 12 noon-1 pm in 6-103.

A brown-bag lunch to discuss the question: How can we reduce the negative effects of workaholism at MIT without compromosing the quality of our work? Participants in the session will define the term "workaholism" and identify its negative effects through some case studies. Sponsor: Libraries. Contact: Eve Sullivan (annals@mit.edu), 6-318A, x3-7182.


277
What Is Depression, and How Do You Treat it?

Dr. David Henderson

Mon, Jan 29, 12 noon-1 pm in 1-150.

Depression is a common medical illness. This workshop will discuss the symptoms of depression, the types of depression, and related problems. We will also discuss the types of treatments, including psychotherapy, cognitive therapy, behavioral therapy, and medication. We will discuss the different types of antidepressants and their side effects. Sponsor: MIT Medical. Contact: Sally Ciampa, E23-205, x3-1316.


Law

278
A Brief Introduction to Law

Jeffrey Meldman

For a quarter century, this popular series has introduced more than 2,000 participants to fundamental aspects of American law. Four attorneys who teach at MIT will speak. No preregistration. You may attend any sessions you choose. Sponsor: Sloan School of Management, Political Science, Career Services. Contact: Jeffrey Meldman (jmeldman@mit.edu), E56-290B, x3-4932.


Life Sciences

279
Altering Genes in Mammals by Gene Targeting

Prof. Rudolf Jaenisch

Tues, Jan 9, 12 noon in 68-180.

This new approach to study the development of mammals as well as mechanisms of human genetic diseases is becoming a powerful tool. Genetic manipulation of mammals is now as useful as with lower organisms. Sponsor: Biology. Contact: Gerry Kemske, Whitehead 467, x8-5189.


280
Antibiotics, Sex Hormones, Toxins: Functions and Biology

Prof. Arnold Demain

Fri, Feb 2, 11 am in 68-180.

We will examine secondary metabolites and their functions of the organisms that produce them. Sponsor: Biology. Contact: Prof. Arnold Demain, 68-223, x3-1711.


281
Building a House for Bacteria: Nitrogen-Fixing Nodules

Prof. Graham Walker

Thurs, Jan 11, 3 pm in 68-180.

Plants cannot use atmospheric nitrogen. Some plants cleverly use bacteria to convert atmospheric nitrogen to fertilizer. We know something about the interaction between bacteria and plants that gives rise to specialized nodular structures where this conversion takes place. Sponsor: Biology. Contact: Marianne White, 68-633, x3-6711.


282
Finding Errors in Human Genes

Prof. Leonard Lerman

Tues, Jan 23, 1 pm in 68-180.

We can examine human DNA with great sensitivity, readily detecting small defects and carrying out pre-natal tests. Sponsor: Biology. Contact: Prof. Leonard Lerman, 68-630, x3-6658.


283
Genes that Determine Sex

Prof. David Page

Wed, Jan 24, 12 noon in 68-180.

Many sexual decisions are necessary to make a human being. Sponsor: Biology. Contact: Amy Daigle, Whitehead 429, X8-5472.


284
The Genetics of Cancer

Prof. Tyler Jacks

Wed, Jan 24, 2 pm in 68-180.

Some cancers come in families. Many different genes are involved. Recent advances in breast and colon cancer will be discussed. Sponsor: Biology. Contact: Prof. Tyler Jacks, E17-517A, x3-0262.


285
Heart Attacks: The Cholesterol Condition

Prof. Monty Krieger

Wed, Jan 10, 12 noon in 68-180.

The normal functions of cholesterol and lipo-proteins and their roles in arteriosclerosis and heart attacks will be reviewed. The molecular basis for current treatments for hypercholesterolemia will be discussed. Sponsor: Biology. Contact: Prof. Monty Krieger, 68-483, x3-6793.


286
How Cells Commit Suicide

Prof. Hermann Stellar

Tues, Jan 9, 2 pm in 68-180.

During the development of all multicellular animals, large numbers of cells undergo programmed cell death. These programs are also important in cancer and neurogenerate diseases. Sponsor: Biology. Contact: Prof. Hermann Stellar, E25-435, x3-6359.


287
How Do Viruses Invade Your Cells?

Prof. Peter Kim, Debra Fass

Wed, Jan 24, 10 am in 68-180.

Recent work suggests a clever mechanism that the flu virus uses to get inside you. Sponsor: Biology. Contact: Pamela Baud, Whitehead 667, x8-5194.


288
How Protein Defects Lead to Human Diseases

Prof. Jonathan King

Thurs, Feb 1, 12 noon in 68-180.

A number of rather dramatic human disease conditions, such as skeletal deformities, sickle-cell anemia, and Alzheimer's disease are due to seemingly small changes in the structure of essential proteins. A number of recent discoveries in this area will be discussed. Sponsor: Biology. Contact: Cynthia Wooley, 68-330, x3-4722.


289
How Viruses Elude the Immune System

Prof. Hidde Ploegh

Wed, Jan 17, 10 am in 68-180.

Evolution has taught viruses how to excape from the immune system. Given the time they work at it, they might win. Sponsor: Biology. Contact: Deborah Grupp, E17-322, x3-0519.


290
Memory and Molecules

Prof. William Quinn

Tues, Jan 16, 11 am in 68-180. Preregister by Jan 1.

Computer engineers use various tricks to store bits of information in silicon elements. Biologists are beginning to understand some molecular machinery used by nature to store information in the brain. Sea slugs, flies and humans appear to use many of the same biochemical tricks. Sponsor: Biology. Contact: Courtney Hunter, E25-236, x2-1790.


291
Micro-Electronics in Biology: The Biologist's Toolkit in the 21st Century

Prof. Paul Matsudaira

Tues, Jan 23, 10 am in 68-180.

Biological measurements can be made with micro-fabricated devices. This will transform biology and medicine. Sponsor: Biology. Contact: Laurie Wahl, Whitehead 629, x8-7137.


292
Plasticity of the Mammalian Visual System

Lamberto Maffei, Prof. Emilio Bizzi

Sponsor: Brain and Cognitive Sciences. Contact: Terry Hayward (emilio@ai.mit.edu), E25-526, x3-5687.


293
Premature Aging Diseases: Clues about the Aging Process?

Prof. Leonard Guarente

Wed, Jan 10, 11 am in 68-180.

Genetic diseases can cause premature aging. They may provide clues about the aging process. Sponsor: Biology. Contact: Prof. Leonard Guarente, 68-280, x3-6965.


293.5
Searching Medline for Biology and Neurosciences

Louisa Worthington

Tues, Jan 23, 2-4 pm in 14-0637. Preregister by Jan 22. Enrollment limited to 16 people. Preference: course 7 or 9 majors.

A hands on program providing search strategies for Medline on Willow. Sponsor: Libraries. Contact: Louisa Worthington (elworthi@mit.edu), E25-131, x3-6575.


294
The Riddle of AIDS

Prof. Herman Eisen

Thurs, Jan 25, 3 pm in 68-180.

The responsible agent has been identified, but how it causes the disease remains an enigma. We will look at some of the clues of AIDS. Sponsor: Biology. Contact: Deborah Grupp, E17-128, x3-6435.


295
Using Yeast Genetics to Study Cell Biology

Prof. Chris Kaiser

Thurs, Jan 11, 2 pm in 68-180.

This versatile, higher organism (a eukaryote) is now the workhorse of cell biology. We can use it to answer questions about human biology as well. Sponsor: Biology. Contact: Anne Paulin, 68-571, x3-6077.


296
Why Are You Allergic?

Prof. Lisa Steiner

Thurs, Jan 11, 12 noon in 68-180.

The immune system sometimes goes awry. How does this happen? Sponsor: Biology. Contact: Prof. Lisa Steiner, 68-271, x3-6704.


Linguistics, Philosophy, and Cognition

297
Daoism: The Spirit of Nature

Chen-Hsiang Yeang

Tues, Jan 9-30, 4 pm-5 pm in 4-149. Preregister immediately.

This short course gives an introduction to Daoism, a branch of Chinese philosophy. We will focus on the classis book, Chuang Tze, and discuss the thought of this book and its interesting allegories. We will also compare Daoism with classic philosophies of the Western World and discuss its meaning and influence to contemporary society. Sponsor: Chinese Students Association. Contact: Flora Sun (sunflora@mit.edu).


298
Evolutionary Considerations in Mathematics Pedagogy

Alan Natapoff

Wed, Jan 17, 12 noon-2:30 pm in 37-186.

We will demonstrate, using live subjects, a line of evolutionary research into higher brain functions and the pedagogical methods for mathematics that go with it. Sponsor: Aeronautics and Astronautics. Contact: Alan Natapoff, 37-219, x3-7757.


299
Explaining English Verb Classes

Prof. Alec Marantz

Wed, Jan 10-31, 12 noon-2 pm in 20D-201.

This weekly seminar will explore various approaches to explaining the clusterings of verbs in Beth Levin's English Verb Classes and Alterations (University of Chicago Press, 1993). Participants will be expected to read Levin's book and actively engage in the discussion. Sponsor: Linguistics and Philosophy. Contact: Prof. Alec Marantz (marantz@mit.edu), 20D-209, x3-9373.


300
Lectures in Philosophy

Prof. Irving Singer

Sponsor: Philosophy. Contact: Prof. Irving Singer, 20E-210A, x3-2649.


301
Philosophical Problems in Quantum Mechanics

Prof. Ned Hall

Mon, Wed, Fri, Jan 8-19, 2-4 pm in 37-212. No class on Mon, Jan 15.

Quantum mechanics is one of the crowning achievements of 20th century science. It's also bizarre enough to lead highly intelligent and otherwise sensitive people to claim that the universe is perpetually "splitting," that consciousness can make physical systems "jump" in unpredictable ways, that classical logic must be revised, and much more. This course will examine such implications by focusing on two famous issues: the measurement problem and the existence of "hidden variables." Sponsor: Philosophy. Contact: Prof. Ned Hall (ejhall@mit.edu), 20E-222A, x3-3554.


Literature

302
Attention Closeted Mystery Readers: Come Discuss How Women's Mysteries Have Shaped Your Consciousness

Michele Oshima, Ayida Mthemba

Wed-Fri, Jan 24-26, 5:30-7:30 pm in 14E-310.

Three nights of faciliated discussions on popular women's mysteries. A reading list and syllabus will be available in December. The participants should come prepared to share their thoughts. Sponsor: Women's Studies. Contact: Michele Oshima (mosh@mit.edu), 14E-316, x3-8844.


303
Don't Read This!

Ingrid Ulbrich

Tues, Jan 16, 7 pm in 1-390.

The Young Adult Advisory Board of the Boulder (Colorado) Public Library wrote a play about banned books. The play was scheduled to be performed in several schools, but many principals cancelled the performance after reading the script. Come see the play and discuss the controversy. Sponsor: Libraries. Contact: Ingrid Ulbrich (sesamest@mit.edu), 734-9211.


304
Fifth Annual (But Who's Counting) Salute to the Wacky Wonderful Doctor Seuss

Prof. Henry Jenkins

Wed, Jan 10, 7 pm in 6-120.

Are you ready for some "fun that is fun"? Do you want it in a box or with a fox? Do you want to learn more about the master of nonsense who remains perhaps the most important children's writer of the post-war era? Do you want to see films, such as Five Thousand Fingers of Dr. T, listen to stories, and perhaps, by accident, learn something about the history of American childhood? Then, the Seuss Salute's for you. Bring friends of all ages. Sponsor: Literature. Contact: Prof. Henry Jenkins, 14N-437, x3-3068.


305
Jane Austen's Novels

Prof. James Buzard

Tues, Jan 9, 1 pm in 14N-411 for first meeting. Preregister immediately.

Jane Austen is known for six novels written from the late 18th century to the first decades of the 19th. We'll choose from among Sense and Sensibility, Pride and Prejudice, Mansfield Park, Emma, Northanger Abbey, and Persuasion. I'll provide some historical/literary/cultural contexts for our readings. We'll probably see some movies based on the books as well. You should read at least Pride and Prejudice before we start. Sponsor/contact: Prof. James Buzard (jmbuzard@mit.edu), 14N-411, x3-7649.


306
Tours of the MIT Science Fiction Society Library

Chris Hooker, Toby Elliott

In the MITSFS Library, W20-473. Schedule will be posted on the door of the library, or can be accessed on Athena by "attach mitsfs" or "finger mitsfs[@monk.mit.edu]".

The MIT Science Fiction Library is the largest open-to-the-public collection of science fiction in the world and not to be missed! The tours are an extension of regular library hours to encourage the MIT community to come visit us and browse. Sponsor: Science Fiction Society. Contact: Chris Hooker (cjhooker@mit.edu), W20-473, x8-5126.


Management and Entrepreneurship

307
The Beer Game: Managing Supply Chain Dynamics

Cynthia Closkey, Paul Gifford, Dave Wirth, John Souza

Fri, Jan 12, 1-5 pm in E40-496. Preregister by Jan 10. Enrollment limited to 50 people.

How does variation in demand affect retailers, distributors, and suppliers? What strategies minimize costs? What does this have to do with beer? Join us for an informative game of system dynamics in supply chains. Sponsor: Sloan School of Management. Contact: Cynthia Closkey (ccloskey@mit.edu), E40-422, 497-1023.


308
Everything You Ever Wanted to Know About Patents

Carole Schildhauer, Carol Robinson

Tues, Jan 16, 3-5 pm in 18-490.

Come and hear patent attorney Sam Pasternak of Choate, Hall and Stewart, a representative from the MIT Technology Licensing Office, and Mary Pensyl of the MIT Libraries Document Services Group discuss the ins and outs of the patent process. Sponsor: Libraries. Contact: Carole Schildhauer (catlady@mit.edu), 10-500, x3-9368.


309
What Is Management Science? What Is Operations Research?

Prof. John Little, Prof. Tom Magnanti

Wed-Thurs, Jan 17-18, 10 am-12 noon in 2-105.

Do you enjoy mathematics and computers? Would you like to apply your skills to business, government, and non-proft institutions? Then come and learn about the fields of operations research and management science, a science for improving decisions in organizations. They typically use data, mathematical models, and computer-based information systems. Intended for undergraduates and graduate students considering Operations Research/Management Science as a course of study. Sponsor: Sloan School of Management, Operations Research Center. Contact: Sloan School Undergraduate Office (skarkut@mit.edu), E52-101A, x3-8614 or Tim Kniker (knish@mit.edu), E40-149, x3-6185.


310
Cross-Cultural Team Building

Mary Christie

Thurs, Feb 1, 10 am-12 noon in 14E-310. Preregister immediately. Enrollment limited to 25 people.

Participants, working in teams, will engage in exercises to develop an awareness of their communication and leadership styles. Sponsor: Foreign Languages and Literatures. Contact: Mary Christie (mchris@mit.edu), 14N-229B, x3-8419.


311
Leadership, Coordination, Creativity

Hrand Saxenian

Wed, Jan 17, 2-4pm in 10-105. Preregister by Jan 12. Enrollment limited to 50 people.

Presentation and open discussion of "effectiveness" basic research and H2 practices for improved personal and corporate performance in our exacting Information Age and evermore demanding society Mr. Saxenian is the founder of H2 notes. Sponsor: Alumni/ae Association. Contact: Theresa Lee (tjoyce@mit.edu), 10-140, x3-8280.


312
The Practice of Operations Research and Management Science

Prof. James Orlin, Tim Kniker, Sean Williams

Operations Research is the science of modeling and decision-making. How is it done? What are careers in operations research like? Come hear practitioners in industry, the public sector, and academia discuss their work and today's exciting challenges. Sponsor: Operations Research Center. Contact: Tim Kniker (knish@mit.edu), E40-130, x3-6185.


313
So You Want To Be a Consultant

Fred Aufiero

Tues, Jan 16, 6-9 pm in 3-401. Preregister by Dec 15 with Fang Fang Traves (fft@mit.edu), 7-338, x3-2022.

This course is an overview of the consulting business. We will investigate how consulting differs from other career opportunities. It will explore how to develop and service a client base, particularly in today's competitive market. We will discuss personal satisfaction components, and the pros and cons of consulting. We will include discussion of business issues in one-person businesses and larger organizations. Sponsor: Urban Studies and Planning. Contact: Paula Anzer (anzer@mit.edu), 7-338, x3-2024.


314
Negotiation

Jacob Seid, Simon Liulau

Mon-Fri, Jan 8-12,or Mon-Fri, Jan 15-19, or Mon-Fri, Jan 22-26. Preregister immediately. Enrollment limited to 25 people.

Effective negotiation techniques for getting what you want even if your adversary is hostile, uses dirty tricks, or refuses to listen to your side. Has application to business, engineering, politics, and relationships. If interested, send e-mail with a rank order of session dates by preference. Sponsor/contact: Jacob Seid (jjseid@mit.edu), 661-4111 x209.


315
System Dynamics: Principles and Enterprise Growth

Scott Rockart, Nan Lux

Participate in hands-on simulation games, computer-based case studies, discussions, lectures and other exercises designed to increase your intuitive understanding of complex business systems. No previous computer experience is needed. Any session can be taken alone, although there will be a linkage of concepts throughout the sessions. Just come! Sponsor: Sloan School of Management. Contact: Nan Lux (nlux@mit.edu).


316
Technology and Economic Development

Karl Seidman, Andrew Reamer

Mon-Thurs, Jan 29-Feb 1, 2-4 pm in 3-401. Preregister by Dec 15 with Fang Fang Traves (fft@mit.edu), 7-338, x3-2022.

The class will discuss the role technology is playing in shaping economies and explore strategies that state and local governments have pursued to generate new commercial opportunities from technology resources and to enhance the competitiveness of their manufacturing base. Sponsor: Urban Studies and Planning. Contact: Karl Seidman, 9-521, x3-3964.


MIT Programs and Services

317
Early Action Telethon

Yvonne Romero

Thurs, Jan 11, 5-10 pm in 10-105.

The first opportunity to talk to prospective members of the Class of 2000! Come help the Admissions Office contact admitted students and answer questions about life at MIT. Refreshments. Sponsor: Admissions Office, Alumni/ae Association. Contact: Yvonne Romero (msyvonne@mitvmc.mit.edu), 10-100, x8-5506.


318
Empower Your Teaching with Multimedia and Internet

Prof. Nishikant Sonwalkar, Elizabeth DeRienzo, Lynne Balduc

Tues, Jan 16, 11 am in 68-180. Preregister by Jan 1. Enrollment limited to 30 people.

This workshop will present to faculty members, TA's, and instructors steps involved in the design, development, and deployment of a hypermedia curriculum using an integrated framework "MetaMosaic Interface." You will learn about writing HTML documents, creation of course-related video-clips, their conversion into digital format and integration into the Internet course material, and archiving your hypermedia course on CD-ROM. See http://www-caes.mit.edu/ for more information. Sponsor: Center for Advanced Educational Services. Contact: Dr. Nishikant Sonwalker (nish@mit.edu), 3-253, x8-8730.


319
Employment Regulations for F-1 Students

Milena Levak, Danielle Guichard-Ashbrook

Wed, Jan 17, 3-5 pm in 66-110.

This seminar will focus on on/off-campus work and employment for practical training allowed by current immigration regulations for F-1 visa holders. Sponsor: Undergraduate Education and Student Affairs. Contact: Maria Brennan (mariab@mit.edu), 5-106, x3-3795.


320
Employment Regulations for J-1 Students

Milena Levak

Thurs, Jan 25, 3-5 pm in 66-110.

The International Students Office will present a seminar focusing on employment regulations for J-1 Students as outlined by the United States Information Agency. Sponsor: Undergraduate Education and Student Affairs. Contact: Maria Brennan (mariab@mit.edu), 5-106, x3-3795.


321
Getting a Grant from the Council for the Arts at MIT

Susan Cohen

Tues, Jan 9, 3:30-5 pm in E15-095.

A very informal discussion of the steps involved in applying to the Council for the Arts at MIT Grants Program. Sponsor: Council for the Arts. Contact: Susan Cohen (cohen@media.mit.edu), x3-2372.


322
How to Win an Eloranta Fellowship

Norma McGavern

Wed, Jan 10, 3 pm in 20B-140.

Several $5,000 summer research fellowships will be awarded this spring to undergraduates working on an independent project – a research investigation or creative study that can be described as student-originated or student-directed. The area of study or research can be in any field – science, engineering, the humanities, arts, or social sciences. Stipends can be used to cover living expenses, travel, or materials and services. Proposals are due April 3, 1996. Come and learn how to write a winning proposal. Sponsor: Undergraduate Education and Student Affairs. Contact: Norma McGavern (ngavern@mit.edu), 20B-140, x3-4849.


323
Mediation Training

Carol Orme-Johnson, Mary Rowe, Andy Eisenmann

Mon-Sat, Jan 22-Feb 2, 10 am-1 pm. Preregister by Dec 14. Enrollment limited to 25 people.

Most people who take the training find their views on conflict resolution are permanently changed and their interpersonal communications much improved. Many use their mediating skills daily. Training includes lectures and role-play, with emphasis on active listening, self-awareness, and ethnic diversity. Completion of the course leads to certification under Mass. law (not a license). Attendance is required at all sessions. For more information and an application, see http://web.mit.edu/mediation/www/. Sponsor: Undergraduate Education and Student Affairs. Contact: Carol Orme-Johnson (mediation@mit.edu), x5-9618.


324
The Mysteries of Admissions

Vincent James

Thurs, Jan 18, 2-4 pm in 4-149.

A look at what really happens when decisions are made about who is (and who is not) offered admission to MIT. Bring your questions. Sponsor: Admissions Office. Contact: Yvonne Romero (msyvonne@mitvmc.mit.edu), 10-100, x8-5506.


325
Nightline New Staffer Training

Nightline Staff

Preregister by Dec 8.

Training for new Nightline staffers, aimed at improving listening skills and increasing familiarity with a whole range of student concerns. If you're interested in helping other students, consider joining Nightline. We are available to listen and to talk, whether the topic is stress, insomnia, relationships, depression, harassment, or anything. Sponsor/contact: Nightline, x3-8800.


326
Student Conflict Resolution and Discipline at MIT

Rosalind Williams, Prof. Jed Buchwald

Wed, Jan 31, 2:30-5 pm in 37-252.

Presentation of the revised student conflict resolution and disciplinary system at MIT. Covers philosophy, an overview of the system, options available, how to proceed in the case of a formal charge, the elements of a hearing, roles and responsibilities of hearing participants, and other relevant topics. Of interest to any member of the MIT community involved in student conflict and/or discipline. Sponsor: Undergraduate Education and Student Affairs. Contact: Betty Sultan (sultan@mit.edu), 7-133.


327
Student Ombudsperson Training

John Hollywood

TBA. Preregister immediately. Enrollment limited to 40 people.

Are you interested in helping students (including yourself) navigate through MIT's complex array of agencies, groups, and other problem-solving resources? Then take this course, your first step towards becoming a student ombudsperson and helping students with problems ranging from bank errors to conflicts with faculty. This 15-hour course will include training in mediation theory, listening and questioning skills, the organization of MIT, and MIT's student resources. Sponsor: Institute Foundation. Contact: John Hollywood (jshollyw@mit.edu), x3-8888.


Multicultural Activities

329
A Crash Course in Canadianism

Mark Ottensmeyer, Hussein Waljee, Peter McCorgundale

Fri, Jan 26, 7-9 pm in W20-407.

So, you thought Canada was all snow, polar bears, and mounted police in red uniforms? Well, we've got that and so much more. Come and find out about the world's second largest country. We'll either confirm or dash some stereotypes! Sponsor: Canadian Club at MIT. Contact: Mark Ottensmeyer (markott@mit.edu), 3-347, x3-2256.


330
Abharatanatyam: Indian Classical Dance

Siva Venkatachalam, Ranjana Mitra

Thurs, Jan 18, 4-6 pm.

Bharatanatyam is a form of classical dance which is indigenous to South India. The art form expresses various themes and devotions found in the Hindu Religion. If you are interested in learning more about the history of the dance and its significance attend this workshop. We will even teach you some of the basic steps of Bharatanatyam to get you started on your way. Sponsor: SANGAM. Contact: Siva Venkatachalam (siva@mit.edu).


331
African-American Family History: Tool for Community Unity

Prof. Willard Johnson

Mon, Jan 29, 2-5 pm in E53-482.

Discussion and video regarding use of African-American family history research, exhibits, and celebrations to strengthen community ties and bridge divisions, especially between regions and between African-American and Native American groups. Sponsor: Political Science. Contact: Prof. Willard Johnson (wjohnson@mit.edu), E53-429, x3-2952.


332
The Art of Indian Mannerisms and Customs

Gari Aggarwal, Ritu Gupta

Wed, Jan 17, 3-5 pm. Enrollment limited to 30 people.

Do you know the meaning behind common Indian mannerisms? Know how to wear a sari or a dhothi? No? Well, dig out those beautiful outfits you've been meaning to wear and come join us. Don't worry if you don't have an outfit, one will be provided. Wear a t-shirt and belt, and get psyched to learn about the unique customs of India. Sponsor: SANGAM. Contact: Daisy Paul (dtpaul@mit.edu) or Ritu Gupta (ritgupta@mit.edu).


333
Children in The Himalaya

Prof. Annamaria Torriani

Fri, Jan 12, 12 noon in 68-180.

We will look at the beauty and problems of the high mountains and the interesting lives of the local people. We will show slides, maps, and handicrafts. Sponsor: Biology. Contact: Prof. Annamaria Torriani, 68-371, x3-5135.


334
Authentic Chinese Cooking

Risharng Chiang

Fri, Jan 12, 6 pm-9 pm in Westgate Kitchen. Preregister immediately. Enrollment limited to 25 people. Fee: $5.

Want to abuse small chunks of meat and vegetables for fun? Want to know how to make Goosebeary (and better!) in the comfort of your home? This three hour introductory is just the right thing for you. We'll provide wok, spatula, and everything else. No food will be left unturned. Sponsor: Chinese Students Association. Contact: Flora Sun (sunflora@mit.edu).


335
Be a Chinese Emperor Today

Flora Sun

Mon, Jan 22, 2 pm-5 pm in the Mezzanine Lounge, Student Center. Preregister immediately.

Surely, if you're dressed like an emperor, you'll be one soon. Take a free glamour shot! Then glue it on your mirror and it will inspire you every morning. We have many Chinese costumes and many rolls of film with us. Join us for a festivity woven together by costumes and their tales. Sponsor: Chinese Students Association. Contact: Flora Sun (sunflora@mit.edu).


336
Carnatic Music: A Lecture Demontration

Gnanam Subramanium

Fri-Sun, Jan 19-21, 5-7 pm. Preregister by Jan 1. Enrollment limited to 70 people.

Curious about Carnatic music? Want to know how it's different form Hundustani style? Well this three-day workshop is for you. Experience hands-on the beauty of carnatic music. No previous experience required. Sponsor: SANGAM. Contact: Neeraj Karhade (archanak@mit.edu), Baker 419, x5-7169.


337
Chinese Calligraphy

Jung-Chi Liao

Wed, Jan 17-31, 4 pm-5 pm in 4-149. Preregister immediately. Enrollment limited to 10 people.

Novices, masters, lefties, and righties are all welcomed to sign up for this Chinese Calligraphy class! You will receive individual attention from the instructor in this 3 hours class (meet one hour for three weeks). You will set your own goal and choose your own exercises, and we will provide all the tools. Come dip some ink with us! Note: This class will be taught in Mandarin. Sponsor: Chinese Students Association. Contact: Flora Sun (sunflora@mit.edu).


338
International Lunch

Cheryl Cagnina

Fri, Feb 2, 12 noon in 26-414. Preregister immediately.

An IAP Favorite. Bring an international entree, side dish or dessert –enough for 20 people. Test the delicacies from around the world. Please submit your recipe to Cheryl Cagnina. Sponsor/contact: Cheryl Cagnina, x3-2394.


339
Chinese Kung Foo

Tung Ching Tseng

Thurs, Jan 11-Jan 18, 6:30-8 pm in PDR 1&2, Student Center. Preregister immediately. Enrollment limited to 25 people.

What's really behind Chinese Kung Fu? You asked. We'll show you how to get benefit from basic trainings like warming up, tendon relaxing, standing posture, and more. We will show a video of different classes of Chinese martial arts. A video tape of a wu-shu (martial arts) competition in Asia will be shown. And, of course, you'll have plenty of time to practice what you learned under the instructor. Make sure to show up on time with exercising clothes. Sponsor: Chinese Students Association. Contact: Flora Sun (sunflora@mit.edu).


340
Chinese Paper Cutting

Jane Chang

Tues, Jan 23, 7 pm-8 pm in 4-153. Preregister immediately.

Let us show you how to summon spring into your own room! The Chinese have doing it since the invention of paper and scissors, and the trick has worked every year. In just an hour, we'll show you how the Chinese cut and paste to bring them luck, longevity, and more. Sponsor: Chinese Students Association. Contact: Flora Sun (sunflora@mit.edu).


341
Haiku

TBA

Wed, Jan 24, 3-4:30 pm in E38-7th floor conference room. Preregister by Jan 23. Enrollment limited to 60 people.

The epigram of choice for a cultivated Japanese to express beauty and feeling, the Haiku form or literature has an ancient histroy but is alive and thriving today. This lecture will show examples of how to appreciate and perhaps even create this short poetry style. Sponsor: MIT Japan Program. Contact: Cornelia Robart (robart@mit.edu), E38-754, x3-2839.


342
Introduction to Indian Cuisine

Asha Shukla

Preregister by Jan 12. Enrollment limited to 20 per session people.

Tired of Healthy Choice meals? In this dynamic crash course in authentic Indian Cuisine, get hands-on experience preparing a variety of North and South Indian delicacies. Don't miss this opportunity to become the next Julia Child! Sponsor: SANGAM. Contact: Monisha Merchant (mmerchant@mit.edu) or Pooja Shukla (pshukla@mit.edu).


343
Let's Sing in Japanese

Mitsuko Barker

Thurs, Jan 11-25, 12:30-1:30 pm in 4-160. Fee: $1 for photocopies.

Ms. Barker, a Vienna-trained musician, will lead us in pronouncing, understanding, and singing beautiful Japanese traditional songs and sentimental Karaoke favorites. Enjoy a single session or come to all three. All welcome! Sponsor: MIT Japan Program. Contact: Cornelia Robart (robart@mit.edu), E38-754, x3-2839.


344
Mexican Pop Culture II

Inaki Gutierrez, Audrey Zarur

Thurs-Fri, Feb 1-2, 5-7 pm in 6-120.

Learn more about Mexico, its people, geography, history, and food. Watch a movie and see pictures of interesting tourist sites. Listen to Mexican students talk about humor, politics, traditions, and any topic you are interested in. Everyone welcome. Los Esperamos. Sponsor: Mexican Students Association. Contact: Inaki Gutierrez (inaki@mit.edu), x5-8768.


345
Miniseries on Chinese Culture

Mia Liu, Lisa Hsieh

Preregister by Jan 14. Enrollment limited to 30 people.

Do you admire Jet Li? Become a kung fu master yourself! Learn the strokes of Chinese calligraphy and classical Chinese paintings. Do you crave Chinese food? Learn to make it and impress your friends! Fold a paper crane or cut a dragon out of a piece of paper. Gift them to the one who cares as a token of your appreciation. And when its all over, join us for a grand finale with performances guaranteed to please! Sign up for any or all events and learn a bit about what 5,000 years of culture can produce! Sponsor: Chinese Students Club. Contact: Alice Wang (ecila@mit.edu), x5-8291.


346
Origami: The Japanese Art of Paper Folding

Anne LaVin

You thought origami was a martial art? Really an ancient Japanese art, origami lets you create a paper model of just about anything, using no scissors or glue. The mastery of a few simple folds and a bit of imagination is all it takes. Folders of all levels are welcome at all sessions, but beginners are encouraged to attend the first session to pick up the basics. There are no prerequisites but a willingness to come and have fun! Local origami artist Michael LaFosse will come and display his amazing origami sculptures, and teach a simple model to the class. His models are incredibly lifelike and have to be seen to be believed! Sponsor: Foreign Languages and Literatures. Contact: Anne LaVin (lavin@mit.edu), 14N-238, x8-7940.


347
Tea Ceremony Demonstration

Glenn Pereira Sorei

Mon, Jan 22, 12 noon-2 pm in E38-7th floor conference room. Preregister by the Wed before the session. Enrollment limited to 35 people. Fee: $1 for materials.

Like King Arthur's Round Table, the Japanese tea ceremony was developed to promote harmony and elevated thinking. A Urasenke tea instructor, and members of the MIT Japan Friendship Association teach you its ancient beauty and etiquette. Sponsor: MIT Japan Program. Contact: Cornelia Robart (robart@mit.edu), E38-754, x3-2839.


348
Tour of Little Tokyo at Porter Square

Takeo Kuraishi

Wed, Jan 17 or Thurs, Feb 1, 10:30 am-12 noon in E38 lobby. Preregister by Jan 16. Enrollment limited to 10 people. Fee: $1.70 subway fare.

Japanese MIT students will guide you to the Japanese bookstore, grocery store, gift boutique and noodle shops, nearly all under one roof. Learn Japanese culture, customs, and culinary delights. Stay for lunch if you like. Exotic, fascinating, delicious, and nearby! Sponsor: MIT Japan Program. Contact: Cornelia Robart (robart@mit.edu), E38-754, x3-2839.


349
World Peace Flag Celebration

Katsuaki Tanaka

Fri, Jan 26, 3-5 pm in W20-491. Enrollment limited to 100 people.

I have 195 flags from different nations. Come join me in waving them as a message of peace to every country. If you are interested in being a flag-bearer, please let me know. Spectators also welcome Sponsor/contact: Katsuaki Tanaka (katsuaki@mit.edu), 38-107, x8-8142.


Music

350
Become a Musical Semi-Conductor

Chad Musser, Larry Isaacson

Tues, Jan 9, 4 pm in Kresge Auditorium. Preregister Immediately. Prereq: Score reading ability.

This is the opportunity you've been waiting for to learn how to become a musical conductor! Larry Isaacson will hold weekly meetings in a seminar style to teach the basics of conducting technique. All participants will receive actual practice in conducting musical groups. Sponsor: Music and Theater Arts. Contact: Chad Musser (cmusser@mit.edu), Bexley, x5-9626.


351
Chamber Music Evenings: Informal Sight-Reading

Forrest Larson

Wed, Jan 17-24, 7-10 pm in 4-149. Preregister by Jan 16. Enrollment limited to 30 people.

An opportunity for competent sight-reading instrumentalists to explore the chamber music literature and meet other instrumentalists at MIT. Two evenings of informal sightreading in a friendly, supportive atmosphere. Music and refreshments provided. Please bring a stand. Sponsor: Music and Theater Arts. Contact: Forrest Larson (twiggy@mit.edu), 14E-109, x3-5689.


352
Change Ringing

Ken Olum

Thurs, Jan 11, 7-9:30 pm in 1-273 for first meeting only.

Learn the traditional English style of bell ringing on handbells and the large tower bells of the Old North Church. You will have the chance during IAP to become proficient on either or both types of bell. Sponsor: Guild of Bellringers. Contact: Ken Olum (kdo@mit.edu), 6-402, x3-5349.


353
Early Music Vocal Group

Holly Sweet

Tues, Jan 9-30, 6 pm in 24-619.

Singers needed for small vocal ensemble. Sight-reading ability helpful. Tenors especially welcome. The group will continue to meet throughout spring term, with a concert at the end. Sponsor: Experimental Study Group. Contact: Holly Sweet (hbsweet@mit.edu), 24-612, x3-7786.


354
Exploring Your Singing Voice: A Voice Class Approach to Singing through Improvisatory Techniques

Nancy Howells

Fri, Jan 5-26, 3-4 pm in 10-105. Class on Fri, Jan 12 meets from 10-11 am.. Preregister immediately. Enrollment limited to 15 people.

This voice class will use improvisatory techniques to learn how to use your voice for more than speech. Explore the range of your voice, sustain pitches, and find out how easy singing can be. Introductory course. Sponsor: Alumni/ae Association. Contact: Nancy Howells (howells@mit.edu), 10-110, x3-8246.


355
IAP Symphony

Lawrence Isaacson, James Li

Tues, Thurs, Jan 9-Feb 2, 7:30-10 pm in Kresge. Performance Feb 2.

A great opportunity to keep up your skills and have a good time too! This orchestra will read a fun repertoire and prepare a concert. Featured work: Beethoven Symphony no. 5. Also music by Copland, Brahms, and Mendelssohn. Sponsor: Music and Theater Arts. Contact: James Li (jamescli@mit.edu), x5-8380.


356
Intro to Classical Chinese Music

Chien Liu

Wed, Jan 10, 10:30 am-12 noon in 4-160. Preregister immediately.

Surely you have always wanted know how to serenade with Chinese instruments? Or learn how one sings Chinese opera? This 1 1/2 hour introductory class will flip through five thousand years of Chinese history and show you the highlights of Chinese music art with pictures and stories "in stereo"! Don't miss the live performance of "dizi", the Chinese flute! Sponsor: Chinese Students Association. Contact: Flora Sun (sunflora@mit.edu).


357
Introduction to North Indian Classical Music

Prof. George Ruckert

Tues, Jan 30, 4-6 pm in 4-364. Preregister by Jan 20. Enrollment limited to 50 people.

This lecture demonstration offers a hands on experience of the origins and fundamentals of Hindustawi classical music. Learn from Sarod Maestro Prof. George Rukert, a student of USTAD Ali Akbar Khansahib. Sponsor: SANGAM. Contact: Neeraj Karhade (archanak@mit.edu), Baker 419, x5-7169.


358
Math Department Music Recital

Julie Rehmeyer

Fri, Jan 19, 3-5 pm in Killian Hall.

This annual concert provides an opportunity for those in the mathematics community, together with family and friends, to perform for one another. Come to play or listen. Sponsor: Mathematics. Contact: Julie Rehmeyer (jjr@mit.edu), 2-229, x3-1589.


359
Middle Eastern Drumming Rhythms

George Kirby

Sun, Jan 21, 8-10 pm in W11- Main Dining Room.

Spend an evening learning Middle-Eastern rhythms on the dara bukka/dumbeg, the hour-glass shaped drum. We will be learning and practicing a variety of rhythms and techniques especially as used for folk dancing. Bring your own drum if you have one. Sponsor: Hillel. Contact: Beth Meltzer (bmeltz@mit.edu), W11-039, x3-2982.


360
Tabla: The Beauty of Rhythm

Nishikan Sonwalkar

Thurs, Feb 1, 4-6 pm in 6-120. Preregister by Jan 1.

Tabla is a percussion instrument used in Hindustani classical music. Come and learn about the beauty of percussion and rhythm. No experience required. Sponsor: SANGAM. Contact: Neeraj Karhade (archanak@mit.edu), Baker 419, x5-7169.


361
Musician Look-Alike Contest

Peter Munstedt

Fri, Jan 26, 2-3 pm in 14E-109.

The Music Library will hold its second annual Musician Look-Alike Contest. Contestants will dress up as their favorite musicians in any field of music. Prizes will be awarded to the winners. This event is open to observers as well as participants. Sponsor: Libraries. Contact: Peter Munstedt (pmunsted@mit.edu), 14E-109, x3-5636.


362
Porgy and Bess

Marshall Hughes

Fri, Jan 26, 8 pm in Kresge Auditorium. Fee: $5 for MIT/Wellesley community, $15 otherwise.

Come enjoy a concert version of one of George Gershwin's most beloved operas. The cast includes Boston based, internationally acclaimed Robert Honeysucker, Andrea Bradford as well as MIT's Pamela Ambush, Phil Lima and Marshall Hughes. Sponsor: Black Student Union. Contact: Marshall Hughes (devil@mit.edu), 7-103, x3-5256.


363
Wagner's "Ring" Marathon

Jeannie Markowitz, Prof. Martin Marks

Sat-Sun, Jan 13-14, 1pm-7 am in 3-133, Wed, Jan 17, 7-10 pm in 4-364.

If you liked Star Wars, you'll love Wagner's Ring! Come watch this cycle of operas on Laserdisc. The Ring has passion, violence, epic drama, suspense and awesome music. Bring a pillow. Spear and Magic Helmet optional! A discussion about these operas, with tea and cookies, will be held on Jan 17. Sponsor/contact: Jeannie Markowitz (jmarkow@mit.edu), x3-8888.


Physical Sciences and Mathematics

364
All You Want to Know about Atomic Simulations

Prof. Sidney Yip, Vasily Bulatov

Mon, Wed, Fri, Jan 29-Feb 2, 9:30-11 am in 24-115.

Covers everything from overview to nitty gritties in an informal lecture/seminar/workshop format for curious non-experts to working professionals. Course includes molecular dynamics, cellular automata, parallel computing, and visualization (videos). Optional second week. A special focus is to promote awareness and discussion of materials research applications in industry. First day attendance particularly recommended. Sponsor: Nuclear Engineering. Contact: Vasily Bulatov (vasily@mit.edu), x3-3809, 24-208.


365
Air, Water, Lasers, and Earth: Applications of Lasers in Science, Technology, and Medicine

Lev Perelman

MIT's G. R. Harrison Spectroscopy Laboratory presents a series of lectures and a laboratory tour. This series will give students a first look at the basic applications of lasers in the modern world. Students will also have the opportunity to explore the wonderful world of lasers and research in physical and biomedical sciences during a laboratory tour. Sponsor: Spectroscopy Laboratory. Contact: Lev Perelman (ltperel@mit.edu), 6-014, x8-7095.


366
Big Rivers of the World

Prof. John Edmond

Wed, Jan 17, 2-3 pm in 54-915.

Amazon. Congo. Nile. Yangtze. The names alone conjure up images of exotic, sometimes dangerous, habitats. All you ever wanted to know about these formidable waterways – but were afraid to ask! Sponsor: Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences. Contact: Prof. John Edmond, E34-266, x3-5739.


367
Feynman Films

Mark Bessette

Watch eight Richard Feynman films. The Last Journey of a Genius is about Feynman's lifelong dream of traveling to Tannu Tuva. No food or beverages allowed. Sponsor: Physics. Contact: Mark Bessette, 4-309, x3-4844.


368
Choreographic Topology

Prof. Jim Propp, Steve Sawin

Thurs, Jan 25-Feb 1, 2-4 pm in 2-255.

We will study knots and their deformations into one another by linking hands to form knots. We'll start with the isotopy between the figure-eight knot and its mirror-image. Participants are welcome to suggest their own experiments. Sponsor: Mathematics. Contact: Prof. Jim Propp (propp@math.mit.edu), 2-363, x3-6544.


369
Frontiers in Chemistry for Freshmen

Prof. Moungi Bawendi

Presentations by MIT faculty on current "hot" topics in chemistry. Topics include drug design, atmospheric chemistry, quantum dots, protein structure, and more. All are welcome. Refreshments provided. Sponsor: Chemistry. Contact: Danielle Schwartz, 6-227, x3-9418.


370
Topology from the Differentiable Viewpoint

Adam Lucas

Tues, Fri, Jan 9-Feb 2, 4-5:30 pm in 2-255. Prereq: 18.701.

Stressing intuition and concrete examples, the foundations for De Rham theory will carefully be layed out. Participants will be encouraged to bring refreshments for breaktime fun. Sponsor: Mathematics. Contact: Adam Lucas (alucas@mit.edu), 2-093, x8-8685.


371
Phase II Mathematical Writing

Prof. Steve Kleiman

Tues, Jan 9-30, 10:30 am-12 noon in 2-147.

Workshop designed to help math majors fulfill Phase II of the Writing Requirement by developing and improving their papers. Sponsor: Mathematics. Contact: Prof. Steve Kleiman (kleiman@math.mit.edu), 2-278, x3-4996.


372
Hot Springs on the Seafloor as Seen by ALVIN

Prof. John Edmond

Wed, Jan 10, 2-3 pm in 54-915.

See what it's like to dive in the mini-sub ALVIN! Huge fields of hot springs, much bigger and hotter than any on land, exist on the seafloor. These springs support dens and thriving colonies of organisms found nowhere else on the planet and they can be seen only from ALVIN, the deep-diving research submarine. Come have a look! Sponsor: Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences. Contact: Prof. John Edmond, E34-266, x3-5739.


373
Frontiers in Physics for Freshmen

Prof. Michel Baranger

Prereq: 8.01.

A series of one-hour lectures requiring only a freshman physics background. Sponsor: Physics. Contact: Isabel Cunha-Vasconcelos (isabelcv@mit.edu), x3-4842 or Prof. Mark Baranger, x3-4848.


374
Introduction to Analytic Number Theory

Tom Weston

Tues, Thurs, Jan 9-Feb 1, 12:30-2 pm in 1-132.

Starting with basic concepts of number theory, we will work towards more advanced results in the subject. We will finish with a proof of Dirichlet's theorem on prime numbers in arithmetic progressions. Topics to be covered include arithmetical functions and their averages, some results on the distribution of prime numbers, and finite abelian groups and their characters. Sponsor: Mathematics. Contact: Tom Weston (chico@mit.edu), 2-106, x5-9462.


375
Clean Energy for a Sustainable Environment: Dilemma or Denouement?

Dr. William Peters

Preregister immediately with Alice Colby (colby@mit.edu), E40-455, x3-8020. Enrollment limited to 35 people.

A major challenge in sustainable development is how to provide energy-intensive services in harmony with pollution prevention and conservation of natural resources. Research is a part of the solution. This course discusses relevant MIT studies, e.g., in CO2 disposal, toxic wastes management, clean vehicles, combustion synthesis, electrochemical processing, and innovative drilling. Lunch provided each day at 12 noon. Sponsor: Energy Laboratory. Contact: William Peters, E40-451, x3-3433.


376
Introduction to Online Searching for Chemists

Margret Lippert

Thurs, Jan 18, 9 am-4 pm. Preregister Immediately. Enrollment limited to 12 people. Prereq: Knowledge of chemistry.

Learn to use the basic command language of STN in the Registry and Chemical Abstracts files, the primary online databases for chemists. You will learn to use chemical names and formulas to find references to and preparations of chemical substances. Sponsor: Libraries. Contact: Margret Lippert (lippertm@mit.edu), 14S-134, x3-1293.


377
Introduction to Surface Analysis

Libby Shaw

Wed, Jan 24-31, 2-5 pm in 13-2137. Preregister by Jan 18.

A general introduction to several useful techniques for looking at the structure and chemical composition of solid surfaces with a sampling depth of a few atomic layers. We will summarize how each technique works, its strengths and limitations, and some of the research questions these methods help to answer. Methods discussed include Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Sponsor: Center for Materials Science and Engineering. Contact: Libby Shaw (elshaw@mit.edu), 13-4149, x3-5045.


378
Mathematical Cosmology and the Geometry of Space-Time

Prof. Irving Segal

Wed, Jan 10, 2-3 pm in 2-255.

Both intuition and microphysics suggest that space-time is isotropic both spatially and temporally, as well as homogeneous. there is a unique maximal such as space-time that is mathematically useful, and provides a simpler and empirically much more effective model than the "Expanding Universe." Sponsor: Mathematics. Contact: Prof. Irving Segal (ies@mit.edu), 2-244, X3-4985.


379
Physics Research: The Cutting Edge

Prof. Michel Baranger

Prereq: 8.01.

Physics faculty members who are leaders in their fields will discuss current exciting discoveries. Sponsor: Physics. Contact: Isabel Cunha-Vasconcelos (isabelcv@mit.edu), x3-4842 or Prof. Michel Baranger, x3-4848.


380
Introduction to Vacuum Technology and Thin Film Deposition

Richard Perilli, Larry Stelmack

Tues-Fri, Jan 16-19, 1-4 pm in 13-2137. Preregister immediately. Enrollment limited to 20 people.

This course is intended for researchers who have had limited exposure to high vacuum and thin film deposition systems. Terminology, types of systems and subsystems (i.e., types of vacuum pumps and various types of deposition systems and techniques), methods, and maintenance of these systems will be discussed. Lectures will be supplemented with relevant lab tours and demonstrations. Sponsor: Center for Materials Science and Engineering. Contact: Richard Perilli (perilli@mit.edu), 13-3022, x3-7653.


381
Plasma Fusion Center Open House

David Rhee, Yuichi Takase, Seth Trotz

This three-day Open house is designed to introduce the MIT community to plasma physics research at the Plasma Fusion Center, and areas of related interest. Refreshments will be served before each talk. A special seminar by the deputy director of the Lawrence Livermore National Lab will conclue the series on Feb 1. Sponsor: Plasma Fusion Center. Contact: Paul Rivenberg (rivenberg@pfc.mit.edu), NW16-284, x3-8101.


382
The Ocean in Climate: Past, Present, and Future

Prof. Ed Boyle, Prof. Carl Wunsch

Tues-Fri, Jan 9-12, 2-3:30 pm in 54-1510.

The ocean is believed to be a major, and perhaps even dominant factor in determining the present climate, and past and future changes. We will discuss the recent wealth of findings about past climate, discuss what is known about the present day ocean circulation and its climate role, and will link these elements to possible future climate states. Sponsor: Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences. Contact: Prof. Ed Boyle, E34-258, x3-3388.


383
Space and the Substitutability of Communication for Transportation

Michael Bernard

Mon, Jan 22, 2-3:30 pm in 4-149.

This lecture-seminar is an extension of previous IAP topics on transportation facilities and space. The interesting consideration of substituting communication for physical transport or movement, and its various implications, will be explored. Sponsor: Center for Transportation Studies. Contact: Michael Bernard, 969-2495 or Carl Martland, 1-176, x3-5326.


384
Techniques of Mathematical Proof

Ben Raphael, Henry Cohn

Tues, Thurs, Jan 9-Feb 1, 1-2 pm in 66-154.

This course is a basic introduction to the techniques that are used to construct mathematical proofs. Topics include proof by induction, construction, contradiction, and dichotomy. This course is intended for students who have minimal experience writing proofs, and who are planning to take mathematics subjects which emphasize proofs, such as 18.700 and 18.100. Problem sets will develop the techniques presented in class. Sponsor: Mathematics. Contact: Ben Raphael (braphael@mit.edu), 500 Mem Dr. Room 508, x5-8858.


385
Tour of WSI

Earle Williams, Dara Entekhabi, Maria Pirone

Mon, Jan 22, 11 am in 48-316 for planning meeting. Trip on Wed, Jan 24, 1 pm. Preregister by Jan 22. Enrollment limited to 25 people.

WSI, Inc, a worldwide weather information service located twenty miles northwest of MIT, currently receives data from all NEXRAD (Next Generation Weather Radar) radars across the United States on a continuous basis. With these measurements, the generate a national precipitation product and use the precipitation measurements in a Virtual Rainage which can be applied to any drainage basin within NEXRAD radar coverage. This activity will involve a tour of the WSI facility in Billerica and a demonstration of the use of large scale distributed rainfall data in practical hydrological applications. Sponsor: Civil and Environmental Engineering, MIT Parsons Laboratory. Contact: Earle Williams (earlew@ll.mit.edu), 48-211, x3-2459.


387
Quantized Brownian Motion and the Statistics of Financial Markets

Prof. Irving Segal

Wed, Jan 17, 2-3 pm in 2-255.

The lack of simultaneous observability of major factors affecting prices are suggestive of quantum theory effects. Quantum variants of the Wiener process are presented, and adapted to quantization of the Black-Scholes equation. Sponsor: Mathematics. Contact: Prof. Irving Segal (ies@mit.edu), 2-244, X3-4985.


388
Videotaping Real World Physics and Other Silly Pursuits

Ben Davis

Thurs, Jan 11, Tues, Jan 16-20, 3-5 pm in 24-612.

Have you ever jumped up and down in an accelerating elevator? Do you like making home videos? Do you subway surf? Do you think physics is interesting? Come join us and film the changes in bathroom scale readings while riding elevators in fancy skyscrapers. Help us film anything big and physics-like that we can find in Boston, or help us write scripts for these films (with sound effects and background music, if we get fancy). Sponsor: Experimental Study Group. Contact: Ben Davis (bendavis@mit.edu), 492-6983.


Physical Sciences: Hands-on

389
Women's Issues in Academic Chemistry

Prof. Marsha Lester, Dora Paolucci

Tues, Jan 16, 12 noon-2 pm in 18-490.

What is it like to be a woman chemist in academia? Marriage, children, and a personal life: is it possible? Gender perceptions in academic job searches and tenure. Both men and women are welcome. Bring a brown-bag lunch. Sponsor: Chemistry. Contact: Prof. Marsha Lester (milester@mit.edu), 6-215, x2-1663.


390
Environmental Research at the Nuclear Reactor Lab

Michael Ames

Wed, Jan 24, 2-3 pm in NW12-222.

This lecture will cover the use of MIT Nuclear Reactor for environmental research. Applications include long-range air transport, global chimate change, and groundwater contamination. A tour of the lab will follow. Sponsor: Nuclear Reactor Lab. Contact: Michael Ames (mrames@mit.edu), NW13-242, x3-5781.


391
Advanced Observing Stars and Planets at Wallace Astrophysical Observatory

Steve Slivan

Tues, Jan 16, 6 pm-2 am in 37-562. Cloud date is Jan 23. Preregister by Dec 17 by e-mail only. Enrollment limited to 8 people. Prereq: 12S 23 or 12S 22. Students may not have taken 12.410J/8.287J.

This 6-hour observing session is intended as a direct follow-on to 12S 23, geared for students who achieved a high degree of competence and confidence at that level and who would enjoy the opportunity to try intermediate or advanced visual observing, astrophotography, or CCD imaging using the larger (14" and 16") telescopes of Wallace Observatory during dark-sky time. Remember to dress warmly, make sure you have a good supper before we head out to observe, and be sure to bring a "night lunch"! Call after 5 pm on the day of the session, or finger slivan@astron.mit.edu for the message with the final go/no-go decision for the night, based on the weather. Sponsor: Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences. Contact: Steve Slivan (slivan@mit.edu), 54-326, x3-4115.


392
High Performance Computing for the Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences

Joe Matarese

Wed, Fri, Jan 10-26, 1-2 pm in E34-4th floor conference room. Preregister by Dec 27. Enrollment limited to 10 people. Preference: departmental majors, not for freshmen.

EAPS faculty and staff with firsthand knowledge of MIT's nCUBE 2 and CM5 parallel computers will share their experiences, give advice, and show you how to get started using these resources. Topics include an overview of high-performance computing technology, an introduction to parallel algorithm development for scientific applications, a short course in "portable" parallel programming with the Message Passing Interface (MPI) standard, and exposure to high perfomance computing resources on the Internet. Sponsor: Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences. Contact: Dr. Joe Matarese (matarese@mit.edu), E34-556, x3-3992.


393
Characterization of Materials in the Scanning Electron Microscope

Michael Frongillo, Dr. Neil Rowlands

Tues-Fri, Jan 16-19, 9 am-12 noon in 13-2137, 1-4 pm in lab.. Preregister by Dec 22. Enrollment limited to 10 people.

The application of state-of-the-art SEMs in the characterization of semiconductors, metals, ceramics, and polymers will be discussed. Instrumental optimization for the analysis of diverse materials will be considered, and the various ancilliary analytical tools that are available for complete chemical and physical characterization will be discussed. Ample hands-on instrument time will be made available. Sponsor: Center for Materials Science and Engineering. Contact: Michael Frongillo, 13-1034, x3-5092.


394
Computer Visualization in Environmental Earth Sciences: GIS, Digital Topography Analysis, and Video Acquisition/Analysis of Experimental Data

Prof. Kelin Whipple

Thurs, Jan 25, 1-3 pm in 54-1017.

An interactive demonstration introducing concepts and capabilities in computer visualization in environmental earth science applications, including GIS, Digital Elevation Model (DEM) analysis, and video acquisition/analysis. Students will get hands-on experience and be introduced to both the computational aspects as well as environmental earth science problems. Sponsor: Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences. Contact: Prof. Kelin Whipple, 54-1016, x3-2578.


395
Hands-on Rock Fracture and the Rock Squeezing Challenge

Gunter Siddiqi, Prof. Chris Marone

Thurs, Jan 18, 2-5 pm in 54-715.

How strong is rock? Can you hear it fail? Tour the Rock Deformation Lab and participate in fracture experiments. Take the Rock Squeezing Challenge: prize for the largest bare-handed deformation of our 1 foot^3 granite block. Participants may bring rock samples or other materials to deform (we'll determine their ultimate strength and elastic moduli). Sponsor: Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences. Contact: Gunter Siddiqi, 54-714, x3-6375.


396
Microwave Remote Sensing in Physical Oceanography

Detlef Stammer

Tues, Thurs, Jan 23-Feb 1, 2-3:30 pm in 54-1411. Preregister by Dec 20. Prereq: Knowledge of physics and physical oceanography.

Principles of microwave remote sensing will be reviewed and applications of microwave remote sensing in physical oceanography will be discussed. Emphasis will be laid on the determination of sea surface winds and currents from space, both quantities of extreme importance in ocean studies. Sponsor: Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences. Contact: Detleg Stammer (detlef@lagoon.mit.edu), 54-1518, X3-5259.


397
Superconductivity, Magnetism, and Other Phenomena

Jagadeesh Moodera, Paul Tedrow, Janusz Nowak

Fri, Jan 26, 1-2:30 pm in NW14-2209.

Experience the excitement of seeing the dramatic property of superconductivity. Phenomena of superconductivity and unique properties will be demonstrated. See the Meissner effect, suspension, and the attempt to show the opening of the superconductive energy gap. Experiments in magnetic thin films, ferromagnetic film tunnel junctions, etc. showing the future READ HEAD computer technology aiming at 110 Gbits.sq in. or more. Sponsor: Francis Bitter Magnet Laboratory. Contact: Irene Ferriabough (ilf@slipknot.mit.edu), NW14-3219, x3-0245.


398
Tour of Wallace Astrophysical Observatory

Heidi Hammel, Maren Cooke

Fri, Jan 26, 6-11 pm at the Wallace Observatory. Check-in 5:30 pm in Lobby 13. Jan 29 is cloud date. Preregister immediately by e-mail only. Transportation will be provided for 15; up to 25 more may attend if they provide their own transportation. Enrollment limited to 40 people. Preference: freshmen.

Come and see the stars! Observe Orion's Nebula! Revel in the rings of Saturn! Look at lunar craters! MIT's Wallace Observatory in Westford, MA, has 24-, 16- and 14-inch telescopes, CCD cameras and computers. In addition to observing, you'll get a brief description of the history of Wallace and the current Observatory research activities. Call after 5 pm on the day of the tour for a taped weather message. Sponsor: Wallace Observatory. Contact: Ginny Siggia (siggia@mit.edu).


399
Transmission Electron Microscopy of Materials

Dr. Anthony Garratt-Reed, Dr. Neil Rowlands

Mon-Fri, Jan 8-12, 9 am-12 noon in 13-2137, 1-4 pm in lab. Preregister by Dec 22. Enrollment limited to 10 people.

A variety of TEM and STEM techniques for the analysis of materials will be discussed. The main themes will be high resolution imaging, electron diffraction methodology, energy dispersive analysis and energy loss spectroscopy. Sample preparation and analysis of such diverse materials as polymers, semiconductors, ceramics, and minerals will be covered. Afternoon sessions will be devoted to equipment demonstration and usage. Sponsor: Center for Materials Science and Engineering. Contact: Dr. Anthony Garratt-Reed (tonygr@mit.edu), 13-1027, x3-4622.


400
Rotating Fluid Experiments

Prof. Glenn Flierl

Wed, Jan 10-Jan 31, 1-3 pm in 54-1510. Enrollment limited to 10 people. Preference: majors preferred.

Rotating fluids can behave quite differently from nonrotating flows and these differences are an essential aspect of atmospheric and oceanic dynamics. Here's a chance to study such flows in a laboratory setting. We will try some experiments to illustrate aspects of rotating flow dynamics and develop some new ones. Sponsor: Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences. Contact: Glan Flierl (glenn@cove.mit.edu), 54-1426, x3-4692.


Political and Social Sciences

401
The African Characteristics of Ancient Egypt

Prof. Willard Johnson

Wed, Jan 31, 2-5 pm in E53-482. Preregister immediately with Lois Malone (lmalone@mit.edu), E53-429, x8-5892.

Discussion and slide show regarding the African components to the population, culture, and history of the ancient Egyptian Empire, from the earliest times through the Nubian dynasty. Guidance to sources, museums, etc. Sponsor: Political Science. Contact: Prof. Willard Johnson (wjohnson@mit.edu), E53-429, x3-2952.


402
An Introduction to Communism

Chris Richardson, Nora Chen, Aaron Goluba

Sat, Jan 13, 3:30-5 pm in 2-105.

We'll begin by watching Road to Revolution IV, a brief introductory propaganda film put out by the Progressive Labor Party. Please come and contribute to the heated discussion that will inevitably follow. Sponsor: Student Pugwash USA. Contact: Chris Richardson (crichard@bio.bu.edu), 536-2047.


403
Counter Insurgency on the Silver Screen

Prof. Barry Posen, Prof. Steve Van Evera

Wed, Fri, Jan 10-12, 1-5 pm in 14E-310. Enrollment limited to 30 people.

The course will view and review two films that attempt to capture preparation for and conduct of "counter insurgency" warfare. Themes to be developed include the transformation peculiar tensions and fears associated with traditional close combat; the political and ethical ambiguities that arise in conflicts that involve a surrounding civilian population. The two candidate films are Full Metal Jacket and Breaker Morant. There will be two class meetings of roughly four hour duration. Sponsor: Political Science. Contact: Prof. Barry Posen (posen@mit.edu), E38-634, x3-8088.


404
Become an Ambassador: Model United Nations Simulation

Marcos Chamon, James Ellison, Ulrica Knirsch

Thurs, Jan 25, 4-6 pm in 1-150.

Discover more about how the U.N. works by participating in a simulated United Nations session. A crash course introduction on model United Nations followed by an actual simulation. Sponsor: International Relations Council. Contact: James Ellison (jellison@mit.edu).


405
Cultural Transmission: An Economic Approach

Prof. Alberto Bisin

Tues, Jan 30, 10:30 am-12 noon in E51-149.

In human populations, behavior is often conditioned by "culture", knowledge which has been learned from previous generations and transmitted to future ones. The "Economic Approach" on cultural transmission, as opposed to the approach taken in biology, postulates that humans are characterized by optimizing behavior. We will deveop the implication of this approach on the dynamic evolution of cultural traits. Sponsor: Economics. Contact: Prof. Alberto Bisin (bisin@mit.edu), E52-262B, x3-2118.


406
Don't Believe the Hype! Documentary Series on America's Wars and the Media

Nora Chen, Aaron Goluba, Mike Liu

Do you believe what you read or hear? These four sessions are film discussions on the media's involvement in past American conflicts. Come share your thoughts! Sponsor: Student Pugwash USA. Contact: Nora Chen (enchen@mit.edu), x5-8507.


407
Economics on Washington

Prof. Peter Diamond, Prof. Jim Poterba

Tues, Jan 9, 1-2:30 pm in E51-345.

This session will discuss two issues of current policy debate. The first is social security reform. The trustees of social security have projected that the trust fund for retirement and disability benefits will run out in 2029. What would it take to fix the problem? What would be the effects of other changes in the structure of social security such as privatization? The second is fundamental tax reform, replacing the progressive income tax with either a flat tax or a consumption tax How would the various alternatives to fix the current tax system work? How might they affect the distribution of tax burdens and various measures of economic activity? Sponsor: Economics. Contact: Daron Acemoglu, x3-1927.


408
Deforestation Dynamics

Aaron Golub

Wed, Jan 10, 10:30 am-12 noon in 2-105.

An environmental, social, and economic investigation into worldwide deforestation, focusing on recent history and present trends. Issues include foreign debt, logging, beef industries, and much more. Sponsor/contact: Aaron Golub (goluba@mit.edu), 3-355A, x3-4156.


409
Executive Pay in America

Prof. Nancy Rose

Mon, Jan 29, 1-2:30 pm in E51-345.

Did Disney's Michael Eisner really earn $525,000 per day in 1992? How much are top executives paid and why? This talk will explore trends in CEO pay over the last 20 years, discuss recent controversies, and describe some of the factor that affect managerial compensation. Come hear how the other .003 percent lives! Sponsor: Economics. Contact: Nancy Rose, E52-434, 253-8956.


410
Financing Infrastructure

Paul Levy

Tues, Jan 9, 6-9 pm in 1-390. Preregister by Dec 15 with Fang Fang Traves (fft@mit.edu), 7-338,x3-2022.

This course traces how communities and public agencies sell municipal bonds to support construction of roads, bridges, waterworks, etc. It investigates the role of underwriters and investors, securitization, and more. Sponsor: Urban Studies and Planning. Contact: Paul Levy (pflevy@mit.edu), 3-415, x3-2053.


411
The Human Consequences of Central American Conflicts

Prof. Martin Diskin, Pat Goudvis, Rolando Lopez

Mon, Wed, Fri, Jan 8-12, Tues, Jan 16, 3-5 pm in 66-110. Enrollment limited to 100 people.

In each of the four days of this activity a film will be shown that illustrates a different aspect of the ongoing human problems created by the Central American conflicts of the eighties. The films will focus El Salvador and Guatemala. One film, concerning children, will be discussed by the filmmaker. For another film, on migration, a Guatemalan analyst of the current situation will lead the discussion. Sponsor: Anthropology. Contact: Martin Diskin (mdiskin@mit.edu), 20D-109, x3-6952.


412
Implications of Foreign Trade on Employment and Wages

Prof. Robert Solow, Prof. Andrew Bernard, Prof. Jaume Ventura

Tues, Jan 16, 1-2:30 pm in E51-149.

Economic theory and casual observation tell us that foreign trade probably puts downward pressure on below-median wages and employment opportunities in the U.S. They don't tell us how much and even serious research finds the evidence ambiguous. The unglamorous conclusion is that the effects are probably fairly small. Sponsor: Economics. Contact: Robert Solow (abernard@mit.edu), E52-383B, 253-5268.


413
Inside the United Nations

Rebecca Morss, Jim Ellison, Uli Knirsch

Preregister by Jan 10. Fee: $to be determined for transportation and lodging.

Visit the United Nations in New York City in honor of the UN's 50th birthday! MIT's International Relations Council is sponsoring a trip to NYC to get the scoop on how the UN really works. Sponsor: International Relations Council. Contact: Rebecca Morss (mun-request@mit.edu), 54-1611, x3-1984.


414
Is Bigger Really Better?

Daniel Rodriguez

Wed, Jan 24, 1-2:30 pm in E51-149.

Over the last decade, the number of mergers and acquisitions in the U.S. high technology industrial sector has been increasing. CEO's and proponents of such mergers argue that these mergers and acquisitions are necessary due to the increasing economies of scale in research and development. This talk explores recent trends in mergers and acquisitions in the pharmaceutical industry and what impact they have had on the efficiency of innovation. Sponsor: Economics. Contact: Daniel Rodriguez (rod@mit.edu), E52-303, x3-3591.


415
The National Industrial Recovery Act of 1933

Prof. David Genesove

Thurs, Feb 1, 1-2:30 pm in E51-149.

The National Industry Recovery Act (NIRA), enacted in 1933 and declared unconstitutional in 1935, represented the most dramatic deviation of economic policy from laissez-faire in American peacetime history. Its most significant provision provided a mechanism by which industries could construct "codes of conduct" that would allow them to legally collude. Issues to be examined include the political forces that led to NIRA's creation, the personalities involved in it, and the academic assessment of it. Sponsor: Economics. Contact: David Genesove (genesove), E52-3804, 253-8788.


416
New World Order: A Marxist Perspective

Felix Kreisel

A few years ago the world leaders, media and scholarly pundits were celebrating the "collapse of communism" and a "New World Order" of democracy, prosperity and stability. But the crash of Stalinism ushered in a period of generalized crisis of the world capitalist system: economic crises in the advanced countries, famines, wars and a return to colonialism in the backward states. Come hear of the socialist perspective for humanity. Sponsor/contact: Felix Kreisel, NW21-207, x3-8625.


417
Japan and Germany: The Past in the Present

Susan Sherwood, Prof. John Dower, Prof. Bernd Widdig

A seminar on challenges facing Japan and Germany fifty years after World War II. German and Japanese films illustrate different aspects of this unique period of history. Accent will be on history, economics, and their roles in the next century. Sponsor: MIT Japan Program. Contact: Susan Sherwood (sherwood@mit.edu), E38-736, x3-8095.


418
Magic on the Internet: Experimental Tests of Auction Theory

David Reiliey

Fri, Jan 26, 10:30 am-12 noon in E51-149.

Magic: The Gathering, a fantasy card game which is very popular in some MIT circles, has also turned out to be useful in testing the economic theory of auctions. This class will include an introduction to the mathematics of auction theory, as well as discussion of experimental data from real actions run on the Internet for Magic cards. Sponsor: Economics. Contact: David Reiley, E56-345, x3-7353.


419
Major Currency Collapses

Rodrigo Valdes

Thurs, Jan 25, 10:30 am-12 noon in E51-149.

What is behind major currency collapses? we will revisit four major exchange rate collapse episodes trying to understand the common factors behind these crises. We will highlight the role of policy makers, and exchange rate stabilization plan, and the international capital market in the making of a crisis. Sponsor: Economics. Contact: Rodrigo Valdes (rvaldes@mit.edu), E52-243F, 253-8709.


420
On Some Propositions by Krugman

Prof. Rudi Dornbusch

Thurs, Jan 25, 3-5 pm in E51-345.

Topics to be covered include: latin tulips, the Asian Growth Blunder, and is free trade passe? Is competitiveness irrelevant or worse? Sponsor: Economics. Contact: Rudi Dornbusch, E52-357, 253-3648.


421
Overpopulation, Starvation, and Sustainability

Laura Dilley, Matthew Krom

Tues, Jan 9, 2 pm-3:30 pm in 10-280.

Our planet is faced with growing problems of world hunger, overpopulation, and resource depletion. We will present some figures that suggest that a sustainable, plant-based diet may ameliorate problems of hunger and resource use. Sponsor/contact: Laura Dilley (elsiedee@mit.edu), 36-597, x5-8340.


422
What Has the Economy Taught Us about Macroeconomics?

Prof. Paul Samuelson

Wed, Jan 10, 1-2:30 pm in E51-149.

The economic history of the last half century serves as kind of a laboratory – the only laboratory available to the social science of economics – against which we can compare, measure, and evaluate alternative theories of macroeconomics. An attempt to evaluate the merits and demerits of old and new classical theories, of monetarism, and the evolutionary stages of Keynesianism. Sponsor: Economics. Contact: Prof. Paul Samuelson, E52-363A, 253-3362.


423
SPURS International Development Forum

Prof. Ralph Gakenheimer, Rosemary Sandford, Judith Moore

Preregister by Dec 9 (optional) with Nimfa DeLeon (nvdeleon@mit.edi), 10-400, x3-5915.

A three-day forum on international development issues presented by SPURS Fellows, a group of visiting mid-career professionals. Workshops cover macroeconomic reforms, environmental concerns, cultural preservation, effects of political transition and organization of informal sector. Fellows from the former Soviet Union will present issues concerning the newly independent states. Sponsor: Urban Studies and Planning. Contact: Rosemary Sandford (sandford@mit.edu), 10-417, x3-7956.


424
Managing a Citizen Participation Process

Fred Salvucci

TBA. Preregister by Dec 15 with Fang Fang Traves (fft@mit.edu), 7-338, x3-2022.

The former Secretary of Transportation who initiated he Central Artery/Third Harbor Tunnel project, will use this example to discuss how to manage community input in a constructive and efficient way. Sponsor: Urban Studies and Planning. Contact: Fred Salvucci, 1-143C, x3-5378.


425
The North Korean Weapons Program: Trading Plutonium for Power Plants

Prof. Ronald Ballinger, Warren Stern

Wed, Jan 31, 10 am-3 pm in TBA.

The Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea (DPRK) has entered into an agreement with the IAEA whereby the metallic uranium fuel that was irradiated in the test reactor at Nyongbyon will be "stabilized" and eventually transferred from the site to the US for disposal. In return, the world community has agreed to supply the DPRK with two 1000 MWe nuclear power plants. Among the issues discussed in this seminar will be the political issues related to the agreement, both historical and current, and issues related to fuel stabilization. The fuel is metallic uranium which has been stored under water and is rapidly degrading by corrosion processes. An effort is now underway to dry out the fuel and to place it into safe containers, both from a corrosion as well as an inspection point of view. Sponsor: Nuclear Engineering. Contact: Ronald Ballinger (hvymet@mit.edu), 24-221, x3-5118.


426
PET Scans and Personhood: An Introduction to Cyborg Anthropology

Joseph Dumit

Wed, Jan 24, 1-2:30 pm in 2-105.

PET scans promise to provide images of our brains in action, in court as well as hospitals. This multimedia discussion will show how cyborg anthropologists follow facts and images to investigate scientific culture. See http://web.mit.edu/dumit/www/ for more information. Sponsor: Anthropology. Contact: Joseph Dumit (dumit@mit.edu), 20B-131, 547-6955.


427
Why Economists are so Interested in Pharmaceuticals

Prof. Peter Temin, Prof. Sara Ellison

Wed, Jan 17, 1-2:30 pm in E51-419.

We will discuss why economists find the pharmaceutical industry and markets to be such a rich area for research. We will give a brief history of important structural changes in the industry and indicate how recent waves of health care reform might be affecting the pharmaceutical industry. We will also pose questions of interest to economists, indicate how one might answer such questions, and offer a few tentative answers from the previous literature. Sponsor: Economics. Contact: Peter Temin (ptemin@mit.edu), E52-280A, 253-3126.


428
STS Open House

Prof. Kenneth Keniston, Prof. Merritt Smith, Judith Stein, Phyllis Klein

Wed, Jan 10, 2-4 pm in 8-105.

At MIT, where most students do science and technology, the STS program is a place to understand science and technology. How did science and technology evolve? How do they relate to the rest of society? These questions and others will be addressed. Refreshments will be served. Sponsor: Science, Technology, and Society. Contact: Debbie Meinbresse (meinbres@mitvma.mit.edu), E51-185, x3-4062.


429
The Best Way to Elect the President

Alan Natapoff

Thurs, Jan 18, 4-5:30 pm in 37-232.

We will survey some startling fundamentals of mathematical voting power, touch on some beguiling historical curiosities and address the question of which simple voting system is best for American presidential elections. Sponsor: Political Science. Contact: Alan Natapoff, 37-219, x3-7757.


430
Transition in Eastern Europe

Prof. Olivier Blanchard

Wed, Jan 31, 1-2:30 pm in E51-345.

Why is it so hard and painful to move from a bad economic regime to a better one? We shall look at why the cost of transition has been so high, and what is in store in the future for the coutries of Central and Eastern Europe. Sponsor: Economics. Contact: Prof. Olivier Blanchard (blanchar@mit.edu), E52-252A, 253-8891.


Religion and Ethics

431
A Modern Divine Trinity: Ramakrishna, Vivekananda, Sarada Devi

Swami Sarvagatananda

Three great spiritually illumined souls of the 19th century have inspired modern society and helped us to understand the meaning of God, the meaning of religion, and how to lead a good spiritual life. They have presented to us a pattern of life which is universal, impersonal, and eternal. They loved humanity in its totality without distinction of religion or nationality. Sri Ramakrishna's special contribution was to explain the true meaning of God. Swami Vivekananda, the chief disciple of Sri Ramakrishna, explained that religion is indeed a science; more scientific than the physical sciences even, because in religion, the mandate is from within. Sri Sarada Devi, Sri Ramakrishna's divine consort, lived a noble spiritual life which stands before us as an ideal worth emulating. Sponsor: Vedanta Society. Contact: Dr. Cyrus Mehta (mehta@jimmy.harvard.edu), W11-063, x3-2327.


432
Experiments in Faith

Tom Holahan, Dan Burns

Thurs, Jan 11, 12 noon-2 pm in 54-915. Preregister by Jan 9.

A seminar-style discussion about how our faith and our work intersect, or don't! All students, faculty, and staff are welcome. Follow-up or ongoing discussions may occur, based on group interest. Lunch will be provided. Sponsor: Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences, MIT Chaplains. Contact: Tom Holahan (catholic@mit.edu), W11-004, x3-2981 or Dan Burns (burns@mit.edu), 54-910, x3-3380.


433
Introduction to Islam

Wissam Ali-Ammad

A lecture series introducing the fastest-growing religion on Earth! Topics to be covered include beliefs, practices, and history. The course includes a movie presentation and luncheon served after each lecture. Sponsor: Muslim Student Association. Contact: Wissam Ali-Ammad (samaa@mit.edu), E40-370, x3-6010.


434
Jewish Ethics: Societal Issues and Personal Conduct

Rabbi Josh Plaut, Rabbi Danny Landes

Preregister by Jan 22. Enrollment limited to 20 people.

An opportunity to examine the world of Jewish ethics as they reflect on contemporary issues in the realm of medicine, warfare, and personal conduct. The first two sessions will be taught by visiting Jerusalem Rabbi, Danny Landes, Director of Pardes Institute. The final classed, led by Rabbi Plaut will look at the ethics of personal conduct from Maimonides Commentary on Ethics of the Fathers, Pirke Avat. Sponsor: Hillel. Contact: Beth Meltzer (bmeltzer@mit.edu), W11-039, x3-2982.


435
Investigate Bible Discussion

Christopher Tserng, Jimmy Wong, David Shue

Fri, Jan 12, 2-3 pm in 5-232.

The Investigative Bible Discussion is a meeting for people interested in learning more about Christianity. Is is an informal meeting that goes through the book of Mark in the Bible, in 5 1 hour sessions. Questions are encouraged and no background is necessary. At the first meeting, we will discuss the best times for everyone to hold the remaining sessions. Sponsor/contact: Christopher Tserng (freemer@mit.edu), 225-8835.


436
Jewish Women in History

Jane Arnold

Mon, Wed, Jan 17-31, 11:30 am-12:30 pm in W11-Hillel Center. Preregister by Jan 13.

A five-session class on the history of Jewish women from medieval personalities to contemporary feminists. The class will use a variety of texts from these periods to understand the individuals discussed and the times in which they lived. Sponsor: Hillel. Contact: Beth Meltzer (bmeltzer@mit.edu), x3-2982.


437
Make a Mezuzah

Jaymee Alpert, Avi Weiss

Tues, Jan 23, 4:30-5:30 pm in W11-Hillel Center. Preregister by Jan 18. Fee: $3 for materials.

Is there such a thing as a Techie Mezuzah? There is now! Come learn about the Mezuzah (a container holding a parchment with scriptural passages, commonly affixed to the doorpost of Jewish homes), and then make your very own out of a test tube. Sponsor: Hillel. Contact: Jaymee Alpert (jaymee@mit.edu), W11, x3-2982.


438
Marriage Preparation

Ralph Burgess

Tues, Jan 9-30, 7-9 pm in 1-114.

A presentation and discussion of marriage preparation from the vantage point of Biblical teaching. Topics include marriage – its basis and definition, planning for marriage, roles, goals, responsibilities, sex, avoiding problems, eliminating chauvinism and debunking misquoted/misapplied scriptures. Arm yourself to avoid the 50 percent divorce statistic. Valuable also for those not yet seriously considering marriage. Request testimonials. Sponsor: Graduate Christian Fellowship. Contact: Ralph Burgess, 20B-145, x3-8121.


439
Windows Into Heaven: A Study of Orthodox Iconography

Constantine Sapuntzakis

Thurs, Jan 18, time and place TBA.

Iconography is a living art in the church today and holds a special place in our life of prayer. Find out more about iconography, its history, and recent work as well as about the significance of icons in the life of the church. Sponsor: Orthodox Christian Fellowship. Contact: Constantine Sapuntzakis (csapuntz@mit.edu), 5-502, x5-7641.


440
The Poetics of Belief: Religious Experience in Five Modern Poets

Bruce Heggen

Mon, Wed, Fri, Jan 8-Feb 2, 10 am-12 noon in 1-136. No class on Jan 15, 23, 24. Additional class on Thurs, Jan 25. Preregister by Dec 20.

Wallace Stevens writes that although belief in God may be given up, God remains as the fundamental idea of poetry. This class will look at the different expressions of religious belief in the poetry of Dickinson, Hopkins, Eliot, Stevens, and Rilke. Sponsor: Lutheran-Episcopal Ministry at MIT. Contact: Bruce Heggen (heggen@mit.edu), W11-011, x3-2325.


441
Reading the Jewish Bible: Studying the Weekly Torah Portion from the Book of Exodus

Rabbi Joshua Plaut

Thurs, Jan 11-Feb 1, 12 noon-1 pm in W11-Board Room.

Each week we will discuss ideas arising out of the weekly Torah portion from the book of Exodus with commentaries. Each session stands on its own. We will look at issues in the text with a critical eye, examining the Torah portion in terms of law, learning and living. No previous background needed. Sponsor: Hillel. Contact: Beth Meltzer (meltzer@mit.edu), W11-039, x3-2982.


442
Torah Cantillation

Jaymee Alpert

Mon, Thurs, Jan 11-29, 4-5 pm in W11-Hillel Center. No class on Jan 15. Preregister by Jan 8. Fee: $2 for materials. Prereq: must be able to read Hebrew.

Come take part in the very old tradition of chanting Torah. We are offering a mini-course in Torah cantillation. You do not need any previous singing experience. We will work in a group and individually, and you will be able to show off your skill at our Shabbat morning servies during the second term. Sponsor: Hillel. Contact: Jaymee Alpert (jaymee@mit.edu), W11-039, x3-2982.


443
Visions of Jerusalem

Jane Arnold

Mon, Wed, Jan 17-31, 12:30-1:30 pm in W11-Hillel Center. Preregister by Jan 13.

The reality of Jerusalem is as much in the minds of the beholders as it is the physical construction of the city. This five-session class will survey Jewish, Christian, and Muslim visions of Jerusalem from different texts, and examine how these visions affect the current reality of the city. Sponsor: Hillel. Contact: Beth Meltzer (bmeltzer@mit.edu), x3-2982.


444
Women of Woe, Women of Joy: Feminist Bible Study for the Curious

Jane Gould

Tues, Jan 9-30, 3:30-4:45 pm in W11-007.

We'll gather every Thursday afternoon for tea and Bible Study. What does the Bible have to say about, to, and for women? How do we make sense of Eve, the hemorraghing woman, or Paul's household codes? This informal inquiry is open to all the curious. Sponsor: Lutheran-Episcopal Ministry at MIT. Contact: Jane Gould (jsgould@mit.edu), W11-007, x3-2983.


Teaching

445
Better Teaching @ MIT

Peggy Enders

Do you teach? Do you plan on teaching some day? Then check out this monthful of provocative sessions. Open to all: faculty, graduate students, undergraduate students, and staff. Sponsor: Undergraduate Education and Student Affairs. Contact: Jill Pullen (pullenj@mit.edu), 7-133, x3-9419.


446
Become an Educator Against Harassment at MIT

Susan Ipri, Mary Ni, Dan Goldner

Wed, Jan 17, 10 am-5 pm in 8-134, or Tues, Thurs, Jan 30-Feb 1, 6:30-9:30 pm in 8-314. Preregister by Jan 11.

We're looking for students to lead educational sessions for other students about harassment: what it is and what to do about it. You'll learn to lead discussions on harassment based on a provided video. If you're good with groups and interested in improving the cultural climate at MIT, come to one of our training sessions. Attend either the one-day session or both nighttime sessions. Any member of the MIT community is invited to attend. Sponsor: Undergraduate Education and Student Affairs. Contact: Susan Ipri (harg-request@mit.edu), 3-351, x3-3772.


447
Curiosity Education Project

Michael Jacknis

Sun, Jan 14, 3pm in Burton Library for first meeting only.

A vision of an improved educational system whereby arbitrary restirictions are lifted with the help of modern technology. Followed by open discussion and planning for implementation at MIT. Sponsor: Burton-Conner Library Committee. Contact: Michael Jacknis (curiosity-request@mit.edu), W51-451A, x5-8401.


448
Detective Work: Hands-on Marine Archaeological/Historical Research

Charles Mazel

Tues, Jan 23, 12 noon-1 pm in 4-402. Enrollment limited to 20 people.

In 1872, a ship carrying Cypriote archaeological treasures sank somewhere off the coast of Lebanon. Come hear about the research and carve off a piece of the problem for yourself. Questions still to be answered in many disciplines. Possible UROP for credit. Sponsor: Edgerton Center. Contact: Cindy Dernay (cdernay@mit.edu), 4-405, x3-4629.


449
It's Your Idea: Can You Make it Work?

Charles Mazel

Fri, Jan 12, 3-4 pm in 4-405. Enrollment limited to 20 people.

This activity will be an information and planning meeting for the spring seminar SP704, in which you pursue independent research projects of your own creation. Sponsor: Edgerton Center. Contact: Cindy Dernay (cdernay@mit.edu), 4-405, x3-4629.


Theater and Dance

450
Ballroom Dancing

Steve Reid

Fee: $1 for non-members and $0.75 for members per session.

Classes taught at the beginner level –except Swing 2 & 3 which require attendance at Swing 1 or knowledge of basic steps. No partner necessary. Dress is casual. Refreshments will be served. Free general dancing from 8:30-9 pm. Sponsor: Ballroom Dance Club. Contact: MIT BDC Line-of-Dance, x8-6554.


451
Clown Alley

Bill Wohlfarth

Thurs, Jan 11, 10-10:45 am in Westgate Lounge. Thurs, Jan 11, 11-11:45 am in Eastgate Lounge. Preregister by Jan 8.

Join in the fun with Rainbow, a veteran Shriner's clown. Volunteers will be introduced to the fine art of grease paint, juggling and balloon animals. We will discuss makeup, costumes and types of clowns. Bring your children. Sponsor: Physical Plant. Contact: Bill Wohlfarth (wpwohlfa@mit.edu), E18-269, x3-1741.


452
Eben's Harvest: Workshop Production of an Original Musical

Maggie Devine, David Morrow

Sun, Jan 14, 2:30 pm in Killian Hall.

A reading/concert version of an original full-length musical. Book and lyrics by Maggie Devine and music by David Morrow. This unpolished workshop/performance will be open to the MIT community and will be followed by feedback and discussion. Sponsor/contact: Maggie Devine (mdevine@mit.edu), 7-104, x3-4164.


453
Latin-American Dramaturgies: One Play in Search of Three Directors

Brenda Cotto-Escalera, Osvaldo Dragun, Miguel Rubio, Rosa Luisa Marquez

Tues, Jan 16, 8 pm in Kresge Little Theater, and Wed, Jan 17, 9 am-5 pm in Kresge Little Theater. Enrollment limited to 150 people.

A presentation of "The Man Who Became a Dog," directed by Brenda L. Cotto-Escalera, a member of MIT's Music and Theatre Arts faculty. This will be followed by an in depth discussion of Osvaldo Dragun's work within the context of the development of artistic creation methodologies in Latin American Theatre. Mr. Dragun will be present to lead this discussion. On January 17, there will be an all day seminar focused on a practical and theoretical exploration of theatre production processes prevalent in contemporary Latin America. The seminar will focus on the deconstruction of the work done during the rehearsal phase of the project, and will be lead by Osvaldo Dragun, Rosa Luisa Marquez, and Miguel Rubio. Each of these theatre artists, renowned throughout Latin America and the world, will focus on a different mode of theatrical creation. Dragun will focus on the dramatic text; Rubio on the actor, and Marquez on the graphic convergence of performer, object, and space. The seminar will culminate with a discussion about these modes that will include the analysis of issues about community based theatre versus professional theatre practice, the interrelation of theatre and politics in Latin America and its artistic results, and the values of collective and collaborative methods of creating theatre. You must see "The Man Who Became a Dog" to participate in this seminar. Sponsor: Office of the Arts. Contact: Maureen Costello (costello@media.mit.edu), E15-205, x3-4004.


454
Learn to Square Dance, MIT Style

Chris Stacy, Prof. Gerry Sussman, Jen Hammock

Mon, Thurs, Jan 8-Feb 1, 7-10 pm in 12-182.

Modern square dancing is a great way to make friends and provides an intense and invigorating break from homework. It's fun, too. Join us for an MIT-style fast-paced introduction to this fusion of mathematics with the rich cultural tradition of folk dancing. Attendance at each class is recommended. No partner or experience is required. Free food. Sponsor: Prof. Gerald Sussman. Contact: Chris Stacy (cstacy@ai.mit.edu) or Marc Tanner (mdtanner@mit.edu).


455
Play Readings

Karen Mueller Harder

Mon, Jan 8-29, 7-10 pm in 10-280. No class on Jan 15.

Join us for some open play -reading sessions. Take a role or just listen. Plays will be chosen by the start of IAP. Call 253-2530 in January to learn the titles. No preparation necessary- scripts and cookies will be provided. Sponsor: MIT Community Players. Contact: Karen Mueller-Harder (kpmuelle@mit.edu), 7-238, x8-6680.


456
Show and Tell: Open House/Open Mike

Tim Anderson

Fri, Jan 19, 9 pm in 20B-119.

Bring slides, video, poetry, something to read, show, perform, consume. All are welcome. In the words of one participant, "At its dull moments, it resembles a party." Sponsor: Electronic Research Society. Contact: Tim Anderson (robot@media.mit.edu), x3-2060.


457
Showmanship for Performing Sculptures

Tim Anderson

Wed, Jan 10, 7:30 pm in 20B-119.

How do we get computer-controlled pupperts to express themselves in an engaging and effective way? How do we get an electric motor to shrug, blink, and convey a wide range of emotions. Sponsor: Electronic Research Society. Contact: Tim Anderson (robot@media.mit.edu), x3-2060.


458
Son of Improv Comedy Workshop

D. Karl Critz

Wed, Jan 24, 7-10 pm in 10-250. Preference: undergraduates.

Learn the mysteries of improvizational comedy, hone your creativity, and develop your ability to treat the world as a stage. This is a low-key, no experience requires introduction to the art of improv. Please bring a wombat to class. Sponsor: Roadkill Buffet. Contact: D. Karl Critz (dmark@mit.edu).


459
Theatre on the Roof

Jaymee Alpert, Michael Greene

Tues, Jan 30, 7 pm-12 midnight in Kresge Theatre Room A.

Have you always wanted to sing your heart out as Tevya, Golda, or Frumah Sara? Here is your opportunity to act, dance, and sing "Fiddler on the Roof" as it has never been done before! Everyone will be cast in a role as we perform an impromptu version of "Fiddler on the Roof" complete with musical accompaniment. Feel free to bring costumes and props that we'll be able to use in our production. Cast party to follow! Sponsor/contact: Jaymee Alpert (jaymee@mit.edu), W11-039, x3-2982.


460
Viennese Waltz

Stephanie Kong, Victor Rhoads

Wed, Jan 10, 7 pm in Walker Memorial 2nd floor lobby for first meeting only. Fee: $10 to pay instructor.

Learn how to dance on of the most famous and graceful ballroom dances, the Viennese Waltz. Professional Victor Rhoads will teach you, starting from the very basics. No partner or experience necessary. Dress casual. Sponsor: Ballroom Dance Club. Contact: Stephanie Kong, 776-3294.


Visual Arts

461
An Artist Discusses Mixed Race Identity

Kim Yasuda

Sat, Jan 13, 2-4 pm in E15-054.

List Visual Arts Center Artist - In - Residence Kim Yasuda reflects on her art, the "Asia/America: Identities in Contemporary Asain American Art" exhibit, and identity without succumbing to conventional cultural or gender stereotypes. Sponsor: Women's Studies, Office of the Arts. Contact: Michele Oshima (mosh@mit.edu), 14E-316, x3-8844.


462
Basic Drawing

Dick Stroud, Ed McCluney

Mon, Jan 8-29, 7-10 pm in W20-429. Preregister immediately. Enrollment limited to 10 people. Fee: $30 for MIT students, $45 otherwise.

Working from models, develop fresh ways of seeing using mediums on paper. We will study interrelationships between drawing, painting, and design with conventional dry materials. Sponsor: Student Art Association. Contact: Ed McCluney (dsa_0002@mit.edu), W20-429, x3-7019.


463
Basic Life Drawing

Susan Anderson, Ed McCluney

Tues, Jan 9-30, 7-10 pm in W20-429. Preregister immediately. Enrollment limited to 20 people. Fee: $30 for MIT students, $45 otherwise.

The gift of sight is a sense that can be encouraged and developed through practice. Drawing is play that works to open ability in a broad range of disciplines, especially the higher theoretical ones. This brief class is practical for any level of ability, time constraint, and follow-through. Sponsor: Student Art Association. Contact: Ed McCluney (dsa_0002@mit.edu), W20-429, x3-7019.


464
Dancing on the Rocks: Two Sculptors Investigate the Creative Process

Arthur Ganson, Chris Fitch

TBA. Enrollment limited to 30 people.

Every discipline has its unique aspects and its commonality with other disciplines. Perhaps there are underlying truths uniting all disciplines, however diverse and dissimilar they may appear on the surface. Two local sculptors left their sculpture behind in Boston and went to the desert of New Mexico to explore music, dance and nature. Through their investigations, they learned to challenge existing assumptions, patterns, and habits while creating a very personal series of cross-disciplinary exercises that encouraged their own personal creativity. Join these two highly imaginative sculptors in an exploration and discussion of an artistic journey into creativity and inquiry. This workshop is intended for science and engineering students. Sponsor: Office of the Arts. Contact: Maureen Costello (costello@media.mit.edu), E15-205, x3-4004.


465
Beginning Potter's Wheel

Hana Balaban, Jeff Margolin, Erika Hartweig, Ed McCluney

4 sections: Mon, Jan 8-29, 4-6:30 pm in W20-429, or Tues, Jan 9-30, 7:30-10 pm in W20-429, or Wed, Jan 10-31, 4-6:30 pm in W20-429, or Thurs, Jan 11-Feb 1, 4-6:30 in W20-429. Preregister immediately. Enrollment limited to 10 per session people. Fee: $35 for MIT students, $45 otherwise.

Discover the working properties of clay. This intensive course will focus on learning to center on the wheel as the basis for forming round objects such as bowls and cups. Sponsor: Student Art Association. Contact: Ed McCluney (dsa_0002@mit.edu), W20-429, x3-7019.


466
Carving Clay

Jeff Margolin, Ed McCluney

Wed, Jan 10-31, 7-10 pm in W20-429. Preregister immediately. Enrollment limited to 10 people. Fee: $35 for MIT students, $45 otherwise.

No experience required! Less messy than throwing. Traditional and abstract techniques will be taught for the decoration of functional and non-functional clay. Tangible results guaranteed. Sponsor: Student Art Association. Contact: Ed McCluney (dsa_0002@mit.edu), W20-429, x3-7019.


467
Treasures in The Attic: MIT's Architectural Drawings Collection

Kimberly Shilland

Discover one of MIT's best-kept secrets: the Architectural Drawings Collection, one of the finest collections in the world. Works include pieces from famous architects, as well as the whimsical work of students going back to 1840. Sponsor: MIT Museum. Contact: Kimberly Shilland (ksas@mit.edu), N52-2nd floor, x8-9106.


468
Holography: The Rain Forest Project

Betsy Connors

Thurs, Jan 11-25, 10:30 am-12 noon in MIT Museum Holography Gallery (N52-2nd floor). Preregister by Jan 7. Enrollment limited to 15 per session people.

Over the next year, a holographic rain forest will be constructed in the walls, ceiling and floor of a specially designed room at the MIT Museum. This IAP lecture will introduce the project and invite student participation. This lecture will repeat three times during IAP and include a general introduction to holography, viewing of the MIT Museum collection, and an introduction to the project. Sponsor: Media Arts and Sciences. Contact: Betsy Connors (bconn@media.mit.edu), E15-416, x3-1828.


469
Intaglio

Ed McCluney

Wed, Jan 10-31, 4-7 pm in W20-429. Preregister immediately. Enrollment limited to 10 people. Fee: $30 for MIT students, $45 otherwise.

Etching is a technique where multiple reproductions of the same marks from a master plate are created using acid. This class starts with dry point on zinc plates. The class will then create intaglio plates which combine multiple materials, methods, and the acid bath. Experimentation encouraged. Sponsor: Student Art Association. Contact: Ed McCluney (dsa_0002@mit.edu), W20-429, x3-7019.


470
Intermediate Potter's Wheel

Tsuya Chin, Ed McCluney

Thurs, Jan 11-Feb 1, 7-10 pm in W20-429. Preregister immediately. Enrollment limited to 10 people. Fee: $35 for MIT students, $45 otherwise. Prereq: Beginning Potter's Wheel.

An opportunity for potters with prior experience to add to their technical and creative abilities. Sponsor: Student Art Association. Contact: Ed McCluney (dsa_0002@mit.edu), W20-429, x3-7019.


471
Life Drawing

Zrinka Orr, Ed McCluney

Wed, Jan 10-31, 6:30-9:30 pm in W20-429. Preregister immediately. Enrollment limited to 20 people. Fee: $30 for MIT students, $45 otherwise.

The focus of this course is on developing the ability to record what one sees. A variety of media will be used, including pencil, charcoal, and colored pencils. Sponsor: Student Art Association. Contact: Ed McCluney, W20-429, x3-7019.


472
Non-Class Clay

Ed McCluney

Mon, Jan 8, 6:30 pm in W20-429 for first meeting only. Preregister immediately. Enrollment limited to 20 people. Fee: $20 for MIT students, $40 otherwise. Prereq: Beginning Potter's Wheel.

Use of the ceramics studio outside of class time. Includes clay, glazes, firing. Users assist in maintaining studio. Sponsor: Student Art Association. Contact: Ed McCluney (dsa_0002@mit.edu), W20-429, x3-7019.


473
Comic Creators Consortium

Jimmy Lin

Wed, Jan 10, 7 pm in Baker Commons. Preregister by Jan 10.

The consortium will serve as a place for aspiring comics writers and artists to meet and match up. Each pair will prepare a short feature that will be published in a collection at the end of IAP and distributed to the MIT community. Sponsor/contact: Jimmy Lin (jimlin@mit.edu), Baker 229, x5-7229.


474
Open Life Drawing

Susan Anderson, Ed McCluney

Sun, Jan 14-Feb 4, 7-10 pm in W20-429. Preregister immediately. Enrollment limited to 20 people. Fee: $5 for MIT students, $7 otherwise per session. Prereq: some drawing experience.

Posed session with models mostly 1-25 minutes, setups, lighting, mixed music; bring tapes. Cooperation encouraged; minimum supervision. Sponsor: Student Art Association. Contact: Ed McCluney (dsa_0002@mit.edu), W20-429, x3-7019.


475
Sculpture

Bob Wilt, Ed McCluney

Mon, Jan 8-29, 7-10 pm in W20-429. Enrollment limited to 12 people. Fee: $35 for MIT students, $45 otherwise.

Techniques of handbuilding will be explored, along with using and testing low-fire glazes and clay. Focus on creativity, color, and finishing pieces. Learn to create vessels, boxes, masks, jewelry, toys, figures, and whatever else you desire. Sponsor: Student Art Association. Contact: Ed McCluney, W20-429, x3-7019.


476
Slab Building

Robert Wilt, Ed McCluney

Mon, Jan 8-29, 7-10 pm in W20-429. No class on Mon, Jan 15. Preregister immediately. Enrollment limited to 10 people. Fee: $35 for MIT students, $45 otherwise.

An intensive class that involves building with slabs. Students can make things such as bowls, masks, mugs, vases, tiles, boxes, and sculptures; any level of ability is accepted. Sponsor: Student Art Association. Contact: Ed McCluney (dsa_0002@mit.edu), W20-429, x3-7019.


477
Watercolor

Valerie Jayne, Ed McCluney

Tues, Jan 9-30, 5-7 pm in W20-429. Preregister immediately. Enrollment limited to 12 people. Fee: $30 for MIT students, $45 otherwise.

Introductory watercolor techniques using opaque and transparent paint. Work mainly from studio setups plus your imagination. Color theory and brush work will be explored. Open to all levels. Some materials extra. Sponsor: Student Art Association. Contact: Ed McCluney (dsa_0002@mit.edu), W20-429, x3-7019.


Women's/Men's Issues

478
Rape Aggression Defense (RAD)

Sgt. Cheryl Vossmer, Officer Paul Baratta, Chief Anne Glavin, Sgt. Stephen Daley

Mon, Jan 8, 12 noon in W31-017. Attendance at all sessions of a section is mandatory to prepare for simulation training. Preregister immediately. Enrollment limited to 15 people. Preference: limited to women. Fee: $20 for materials.

This twelve-hour course provides basic information on personal safety. Awareness, prevention, risk reduction and avoidance are stressed as women learn to be more aware of their surroundings. RAD teaches practical defensive techniques that require no special skills. RAD also offers women the opportunity to test these techniques on a real person during a simulated attack. Information on equivalent self-defense classes for men is available from Campus Police. Please call for more information. Sponsor: Campus Police. Contact: Sgt. Cheryl Vossmer (crimbite@mit.edu), W31-215, x3-9755.


479
Advanced Rape Agression Defense (RAD)

Sgt. Steve Daley, Sgt. Cheryl Vossmer, Officer Paul Baratta

Mon, Wed, Thurs, Jan 8-11 and Jan 22-Feb 1, 5:30-8 pm in West Lounge, Student Center. No class on Thurs, Jan 25 or Mon, Jan 29. Attendance is mandatory at all sessions.. Preregister immediately. Enrollment limited to 16 people. Preference: limited to women. No listeners. Fee: $20 for materials. Prereq: basic RAD.

This sixteen-hour advanced course builds upon the basic information on personal safety, awareness, risk reduction and avoidance. Advanced RAD teaches proficient defense techniques. Advanced RAD also offers the opportunity to test these learned skills on real people during a high-level simulation attack. Information on equivalent self-defense classes for men is available from Campus Police. Sponsor: Campus Police. Contact: Campus Police Crime Prevention Unit (crimbite@mit.edu), W31-215, x3-9755.


480
Gender Issues in Leadership

Margaret Jablonski

Thurs, Jan 11, 2-4 pm in Twenty Chimneys, Student Center. Enrollment limited to 40 people.

Do you believe that differences exist in how men and women lead organizations? This program will take a look at some of the current literature on women and leadership, and the changing nature of leadership in business and academia. We will discuss our opinions on successful leadership and acknowledge our differences where necessary. Both men and women are welcome. Sponsor: Undergraduate Education and Student Affairs. Contact: Margaret Jablonski (mjab@mit.edu), W20-549, x3-6777.


481
Can We Talk? A Communication Workshop for Men and Women

Holly Sweet, Lee Perlman

Thurs, Jan 18, 3 pm-5 pm in PDR 1&3. Preregister immediately. Enrollment limited to 30 people.

Come join us for an afternoon of role-playing and discussion about how men and women can communicate more effectively about personal and professional issues. Aimed primarily at grad students. Sponsor: Experimental Study Group. Contact: Holly Sweet (hbsweet@mit.edu), 24-612, x3-37786.


482
Graduate Women: Meeting Academic, Professional and Personal Challenges

Jackie Simonis, Lynn Roberson

Wed, Jan 10-31, 3-4:30 pm. Preregister immediately.

Would you like to connect with other graduate women students who are also encountering the opportunities and stressors of graduate life? Join us for a weekly, informal and enjoyable discussion group. Topics determined by the participants, possibly including working with advisors, building professional alliances, creating a personal life amidst academic demands, and more. Sponsor: Undergraduate Education and Student Affairs. Contact: Lynn Roberson (roberson@mit.edu), 20B-140, x3-7979.


483
Keys to Empowering Youth (KEYs)

Lynn Nelson, Emily Sandberg

Sat, Jan 20, 9 am-4 pm in 10-105. Preregister immediately. Enrollment limited to 30 people. Preference: women only. Fee: $5 for 11-13 year olds.

MIT students will be matched as mentors to 11-13 year old female children from the MIT community for a day-long program including discussions on women in engineering and science, visits to laboratories, and workshops on creativity, problem-solving, and communication skills, which are important for all career interests. Girls, come spend the day at MIT, meet new friends, and have fun while seeing how to make a hologram or train to be an astronaut. MIT students, share your MIT experiences with junior high school students. Sponsor: Public Service Center. Contact: Carrie Metzger (keys@media.mit.edu), 3-123, x3-0742.


484
An Introduction to Change for the Homosexual and the Ex-Gay Movement

Peter Robicheau

Thurs, Jan 11, 12 noon-2 pm in 26-414.

The class will go over the origins of homosexuality, looking at both genetic and environmental theories. It will deal with the reality of change, the change process, and will go over what resources are available. The class is for anyone who is struggling with homosexuality and for those who want more information on the ex-gay movement. Sponsor/contact: Peter Robicheau (robicheau@mitlns.mit.edu), 26-516, x3-2326.


485
Strategizing for a Women's Center

Tova Peltz, Michele Oshima

Mon, Jan 8-29, 12 noon-2 pm in 14E-316. Preregister immediately. Enrollment limited to 10 people.

Brown-bag lunches to discuss coalition building across diverse women's communities on campus to build a committe to start a Women's Center. Use the Women's Studies resource files compiled by former lecturer Ann Russo. Sponsor: Women's Studies. Contact: Tova Peltz (tov@mit.edu), 14E-316, x3-8844.


Writing and Speaking

486
Alumni/ae Relations for Student Organizations

Theresa Lee, Monica Niles, Carol Lademan

Wed, Jan 24, 2-4 pm in 10-105. Preregister by Jan 19. Enrollment limited to 50 people.

Learn how to facilitate relationships with your alumni. From the drama club to a fraternity or sorority, this workshop will help all student organizations communicate and network with their alumni. Alumni relations ideas, newsletter writing, and more! Sponsor: Alumni/ae Association. Contact: Theresa Lee (tjoyce@mit.edu), 10-140, x3-8280.


487
Effective Speaking

Barbara Smith

Tues, Thurs, Jan 9-Feb 1, 4-6 pm in 1-390. Preregister immediately. No listeners.

Have you always wondered why some people seem at ease in public speaking? Have others told you to speak up because you speak too softly, or perhaps you are self-conscious because of your foreign accent? Well, this course is for you! You will learn the proper techniques for projecting your voice and delivering that talk. Sponsor: Ocean Engineering. Contact: Barbara Smith (bsmith@rainbow.mit.edu), 5-320, x3-0137.


488
How to Give a Conference Talk

Prof. Edward Adelson

Thurs, Jan 18, 4-5 pm in E25-117.

A conference talk should be clear and compelling, and yet it must fit into about fifteen minutes. Learn some techniques for giving good presentations, and learn to avoid the pitfalls. Sponsor: Brain and Cognitive Sciences. Contact: Greta Buck (greta@psyche.mit.edu), E10-019A, x3-5703.


489
How to Speak

Prof. Patrick Winston

Fri, Feb 2, 11 am-12 noon in 6-120.

You can improve your speaking ability by observing a dozen or so heuristic rules. This collection of rules is presented along with observations about their application in the classroom and in oral examinations. Sponsor: Artificial Intelligence Laboratory. Contact: Patrick Winston (phw@ai.mit.edu), NE43-816, x3-6754.


490
Individual Consultations at the Writing Center

Steven Strang

Mon-Fri, Jan 8-Feb 2, 10 am-12 noon, 1-4 pm in the Writing Center.

The Writing Center will continue to offer free consultations and advice on any writing problem, including finding a topic, generating ideas, overcoming writer's block, grammar, sentence and paragraph structure, organization, and the use of evidence. We can help with Phase I and Phase II papers, with theses, graduate school and job applications and resumes, as well as papers for any course. If possible, please phone for an appointment. Otherwise, just drop in. Sponsor: Writing and Humanistic Studies, Writing Center. Contact: Steven Strang (smstrang@mit.edu), 14N-317, x3-3090.


491
Introduction to Oral Presentation

David Breakstone

Tues, Jan 23, 10 am-12 noon, Wed, Jan 24, 9:30 am-12 noon in E56-249. Preregister immediately. Enrollment limited to 25 people.

This workshop will cover effective preparation and delivery of oral presentations. Topics include preparation, rehearsal and delivery, design and use of visual aids, and handling stage fright. Participants will prepare and deliver a short presentation which will be evaluated. Sponsor: Sloan School of Management. Contact: Sloan Undergraduate Office (skarkut@mit.edu), E52-101A, x3-8614.


492
Phase One Writing Workshop

Dean Leslie Perelman, Steve Strang, Nancy Mulford

Wed-Fri, Jan 17-19, 10 am-12 noon in 36-156. Preregister immediately. Enrollment limited to 30 people.

Students will have the opportunity to write a paper suitable for Phase One of the Writing Requirement in the context of three morning sessions and a visit to the Writing Center. The workshop will include exercises in exploring a topic, expanding an argument, and revising the structure, language, and mechanics of a paper. The workshop is open only to freshmen and transfer students who have not completed Phase One of the Writing Requirement. Sponsor: Writing and Humanistic Studies. Contact: Annie Publow (ajpublow@mit.edu), 20B-140, x3-3039.


493
Preparing Your Thesis: An Explanation of Specifications for Thesis Preparation

J. Darcy Duke, Helen Samuels

Tues, Jan 9, 11 am-12 noon in 4-163.

The requirements for the physical preparation of the thesis document are described in Specifications for Thesis Preparation. The thesis processor will answer questions about the specifications and offer guidance on specific problems. Sponsor: Libraries. Contact: J. Darcy Duke (darcy@mit.edu), 14N-118, x3-5690.


494
Presentation Skills: A Toastmasters Demonstration Meeting

Rob Clark, Jr.

Fri, Jan 26, 12 noon-1:30 pm in 37-252.

Do you want to learn about one of the most effective means to improve your presentation skills? Attend this demonstration meeting of Toastmasters at MIT to see what this organization can do for you. Sponsor: Toastmasters at MIT. Contact: Rob Clark, Jr. (clarkjr@mit.edu), E19,655, x3-4136.


495
Presentation Skills: Gaining Self-Confidence

Kim Watson, Chris Gerstner

Thurs, Jan 18, 10 am-12 noon in E19-220.

In this workshop on public speaking, we'll share tips on keeping your nervousness under control and delivering your speech with confidence. We'll talk about how to prepare for a presentation, how to deliver it, and how to make it even better the next time. Participants will have opportunities to practice these skills during the workshop. Sponsor: Toastmasters at MIT. Contact: Phyllis Crerie (crerie@mit.edu), 11-305, x3-0736.


496
Presentation Skills: Visual Aids

Vincent James, Kevin Carlson

Thurs, Feb 1, 10-12 noon in E19-220. Preregister by Jan 31. Enrollment limited to 35 people.

This session discusses the Do's and Don'ts of incorporating and effectively using visual aids of all types in your speeches. Audience involvement is encouraged. The seminar covers flip charts, overhead projection, and "high tech" computer images. Sponsor/contact: Phyllis Crerie (crerie@mit.edu), 11-305, x3-0736.


497
Tomorrow's News Today

Dan Stevenson, Scott Deskin

Tues, Jan 9-30, 8 pm-1 am in W20-483.

How do we do it? Come and watch the staff of The Tech write, edit, and lay out an issue of MIT's oldest and largest newspaper. You'll watch the news progress from raw information to organized prose and finally to the black and white of our paste-up boards. Come and get a scoop on the rest of campus (and, if we finish early, a scoop of Tosci's as well). Sponsor: The Tech. Contact: Dan Stevenson (daniels@the-tech.mit.edu), W20-483, x3-1541.


498
Writing a Thesis or Project Report: The Longer Paper

Anne Hunter

Mon, Jan 22, 2-4 pm in 34-101.

Entertaining talks by EECS and Writing Program faculty on writing a good longer paper. Special handouts. All students welcome: students writing theses or project reports this year strongly encouraged to attend. Sponsor: Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. Contact: Anne Hunter (anneh@mit.edu), 38-476, x3-4654.


499
You're on the Air!

Justine Song

Preregister by Jan 16.

Learn the basics of being a radio announcer. We'll cover WMBR's Announcer Guidelines, and give suggestions on how to improve your presentation. Sponsor: WMBR. Contact: Justine Song (taipei@mit.edu), x5-8864.


328
Graduate Students: Reengineering Affects You

Bonnie Souter

Tues, Jan 20, 4-6 pm in 50-100.

After a brief introduction, trained students will lead group discussions on aspects of reengineering that directly affect graduate students, such as publishing, travel, procurement cards, the electronic catalogue, etc. Sponsor: Graduate Student Council. Contact: Maria Raposo (gsc-admin@mit.edu), 50-222, x3-2195.


Miscellaneous

500
Burton Library Purge

Michael Jacknis

Sun, Jan 21, 5 pm in Burton Library.

Free books and magazines! The Burton-Conner library is making available interesting old materials that are taking up too much space. Sponsor/contact: Michael Jacknis (mjacknis@mit.edu), W51-451A, x5-8401.


501
Charm School

Alberta Lipson

Tues, Jan 30, 12 noon-4 pm in Lobby 7 and Lobby 10.

No, it's not a joke. Tongue-tied when talking to strangers at parties? Perpetually confused about which fork to use for salads? Can't figure out what to wear for that job interview? Need some ideas on how to deal with a difficult roommate? Wondering how to ask for an extension? These etiquette enigmas and more will be answered in one afternoon of interesting and informative events. Successfully complete the required number of Charm School subjects and you will receive a prestigious diploma (B.A., M.A., or Ph.D. in Charm) suitable for framing. Come see why Charm School has drawn rave reviews from hundreds of participants and achieved nationwide fame (including a spot on Good Morning America) for the past three years. Manners have never been so much fun. Sponsor: Undergraduate Education and Student Affairs. Contact: Rosanne Swire (rswire@mit.edu), 20B-140, x3-7642.


502
Complete Make-Over

Jaymee Alpert

Wed, Jan 17, 1-9 pm. Preregister by Jan 1. Enrollment limited to 6 people.

Are you looking for the perfect way to break the winter blues? Join me, your personal fashion consultant, for a full day make-over. With new clothes from the Cambridgeside Galleria and new hair from Newbury Street, you will discover a brand new you. We will end our day of fashion success with coffee at Sonsie. So come enjoy a self-indulgent day, and don't forget your checkbook and credit-cards. Sponsor: Jewish Campus Service Corps Fellow. Contact: Jaymee Alpert (jaymee@mit.edu), W11-039, x3-2982.


503
Confined-Space Rescue: Living on the Edge!

David Barber

Tues, Jan 23, 10 am-2 pm in E23-Atrium Lobby.

This demonstration will provide a look at Physical Plant's confined-space rescue team and its capabilities. A brief overview of the OSHA confined-space standard will be offered prior to continuous varied rescue simulations. Sponsor: Physical Plant. Contact: David Barber (dbarber@mit.edu), E18-263A, x3-8022.


504
Dealing With Difficult Interactions at Library Service Desks

Leslie Stebbins, Linda Becker, Stephen Skuce

Tues, Jan 9, 10 am-12 noon in 18-490.

Geared toward "frontliners" working in public service areas of campus libraries. The workshop leader, from Brandeis, will discuss defusing anger, controlling the situation, and coping effectively. Sponsor: Libraries. Contact: Stephen Skuce (skuce@mit.edu), 14E-210B, x3-0654.


505
Decision Making and the Axioms Of Rational Behavior

Al Drake

Wed, Jan 17, 8:30-11:30 am in 34-307. Preregister by Jan 12 by e-mail. Prereq: willingness to get up early.

What could be less humble than to propose a set of axioms for rational decision making in the presence of uncertainty? We'll present and interpret these axioms and their implementation, a topic called "Decision Analysis". If you come, please come on time. Sponsor: Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Operations Research Center. Contact: Al Drake (drake@mit.edu), 35-212, x3-7348.


506
Defensive Driving

Officer William Smith

TBA. Preregister by Dec 15. Enrollment limited to 20 people. Preference: preregistration order. Fee: $2.50.

This course provides drivers with tips on defensive driving as well as information on the laws against drinking and driving. Upon completion of the course, each participant will receive a certificate from the Massachusetts Safety Council. Sponsor: Campus Police. Contact: Sgt. Cheryl Vossmer (crimbite@mit.edu), W31-215, x3-9755.


507
Global Warming

Prof. Dick Eckaus

Thurs, Jan 11, 1-2:30 pm in E51-345.

Although there are many uncertainties of the current and future dimensions of global warming, the possibilities are so significant and warrant careful analysis of the costs of mitigating the emissions of greenhouse gases. There have been a number of studies of these costs with rather different results, depending on the methods used and the countries studied. The lecture will review the methods and results and their significance. Sponsor: Economics. Contact: Prof. Dick Eckaus (eckaus@mit.edu), E52-371B, x3-3367.


508
How to Use a Slide Rule

Craig Watkins

Wed, Jan 10, 4-5 pm in 24-619.

You have to know math to use a slide rule. And nobody ever forgot a password. Find out how to decipher those tiny lines, numbers, and symbols. Some slide rules will be provided. Sponsor: Experimental Study Group. Contact: Craig Watkins (watko@mit.edu), 24-611, x3-2872.


509
Freemasonry Explained

E. Donald Weiner, Bruce Wedlock

Tues, Jan 9, 12 noon-1:30 pm in 1-390.

Ever wonder what Masons and Masonic Lodges are all about? This program, open to all, will cover some of the history, purposes, and current activities of Freemasonry. Come and meet some of the members of the Richard C. Maclaurin Lodge, the MIT Masonic Lodge. Find out why and how one becomes a Mason and what goes on behind the square and compasses. Sponsor: Richard C. Maclaurin Lodge of Masons at MIT. Contact: E. Donald Weiner (donw@mit.edu), 33-015, x3-7726.


510
MIT Traditions

Warren Seamans

Tues, Jan 9, 2-3 pm in N52-2nd floor or Tues, Jan 16, 2-3 pm in N52-2nd floor. Enrollment limited to 80 people.

MIT is a school rich in myth and tradition. Find out the strange and wonderful root of those traditions. Do you know why the beaver was chosen as mascot? It's time you did. This talk is packed with fun facts. Sponsor: MIT Museum. Contact: Warren Seamans (seamans@mit.edu), N52-2nd floor, x3-4494.


511
Movement Dynamics Workshop

Valerie Acquaviva

Thurs, Jan 11, 1:30-4 pm in E40-298. Preregister by Jan 8. Enrollment limited to 25 people.

Participate in a creative workshop to enhance your leadership and teamwork skills. The workshop is a fun, yet powerful way to explore the benefits of creativity at school, work, or home. The movement workshop is part of the LFM Program's "Universe Within" orientation for newly admitted Fellows. Sponsor: Leaders for Manufacturing Program. Contact: Valerie Acquaviva (vacqua@mit.edu), E40-426, x3-1662.


512
Palmistry

Mary Mullowney

Sat, Jan 13, 12:30-4:30 pm in 1-134. Preregister by Jan 12. Enrollment limited to 20 people. Preference: students.

Palmistry is an ancient art, spanning many cultures and many centuries. This course offers a brief introduction to the meanings of the lines, shapes, and markings on the hands--with a focus on palmistry as a tool to learn more about yourself and other people. The instructor is a professional palm reader who has appeared on network television. A mini-reading of each student's hand is included. Sponsor: Ocean Engineering. Contact: Mary Mullowney (mamullow@mit.edu), 5-228, x3-4330.


513
Ten Cool Explorations

Marshall Hughes

Wed, Jan 24, 10 am-2 pm in TBA.

Get your VIP pass to tenof MIT's coolest "hot spots" – labs, departments, and programs. A must for freshmen! Sponsor: IAP Student Board. Contact: Marshall Hughes (iap-board@mit.edu), 7-103, x3-5256.


514
Rights and Responsibilities in Advisor-Student Relationships: A Panel Discussion

Ann Park

Tues, Jan 23, 4-6 pm in 6-120.

A panel of faculty members and graduate students, moderated by Dr. Caroline Whitbeck, will discuss problematic scenarios that may arise in advisor – student relationships. The goal of this session is to facilitate open discussion between faculty and students on potentially sensitive topics. Sponsor: Graduate School Council. Contact: Ann Park (apark@mit.edu), 16-115, x3-5808.


515
Listening Beyond Words: A Skill to Live By

Mary Ni, Dierdre Lawrence

Tues, Jan 9-16, 2-4:30 pm in W20-549 or Thurs, Jan 11-18, 2-4:30 pm in W20-549. Preregister by Jan 9. Preference: mit students.

The workshop will focus on the many qualities of listening that transcend just hearing words. It will emphasize the connection of listening to healing emotional pain, building relationships across gender, race and cultural differences. Sponsor: Undergraduate Education and Student Affairs. Contact: Mary Ni (mni@mit.edu), W20-549, x3-6777.


516
ER Comes to MIT

Bonnie Walters

Wed, Jan 24, 6-7 pm in 4-163.

So you want to be a doctor (or do you just want to play one on tv)? Find out from tried-and-true experts how to get into medical school and stay there. Sponsor: Undergraduate Education and Student Affairs. Contact: Bonnie Walters (bon@mit.edu), 7-104, x3-6771.


517
Starting and Running a High-Tech Company

Karen Mathiasen

Speakers and examples from diverse technologies provide practical advice on fund raising, finding good people, marketing and sales, and on dealing with the many pitfalls of new ventures. Sponsor: Enterprise Forum. Contact: Caitlin McCarthy (mitefcmb@mit.edu), 3-8240.


518
Germany Today: A Series of Talks

Prof. Bernd Widdig, Barbara Hyams, Monika Totten

As a new Europe is emerging, the role of a unified Germany is at the center of many discussions. This series of talks focuses on recent social, political, and cultural developments in Germany and Europe. Sponsor: Foreign Languages and Literatures. Contact: Prof. Bernd Widdig (bwiddig@mit.edu), 14N-320, x3-3925.


519
Open Masonic Installation

Bruce Wedlock, E. Donald Weiner

Wed, Jan 17, 6:30 pm in Masonic Temple, Porter Square.

Public installation of officers at MIT's Masonic Lodge. An exemplification of the ritual of Masonic meetings, followed by a buffet, entertainment, and fellowship. RSVP, if possible, for dinner count. Sponsor: Richard C. MacLauren Lodge of Masons at MIT. Contact: Bruce Wedlock (wedlock@mit.edu), E32-105, x3-4895.


520
Modern Dance

Beth Soll

Fri, Jan 12-Feb 2, 10 am-12 noon in T-Club Lounge, duPont gym.

An intermediate class for students with two to three years of previous training. The class content is drawn from traditional and experimental styles. Sponsor: Physical Education. Contact: Physical Education Office, x3-4291.


521
Scuba Refresher

Boris Golubovic

Mon, Wed, Jan 8-10, 12 noon-3 pm in 16-134. Enrollment limited to 10 people. Fee: $20 for scuba club members, $25 otherwise. Prereq: current open water certification.

Get ready for Spring by checking gear, reviewing drills, and buoyancy skills. All necessary equipment provided. Sponsor: Physical Education, Scuba Club. Contact: Physical Education Office, x3-4291.


522
General Thermodynamics

Prof. Elias Gyftopoulos

Mon-Tues, Jan 8-9, 2-5 pm in 24-213.

Discussion of a novel understanding of thermodynamics as a quantum-theoretic, nonstatistical theory taht applies to all physical phenomena - microscopic and macroscopic, equilibrium and nonequilibrium - and that includes as special cases all branches of physics, suh as conventional quantum mechanics, classical thermodynamics, heat transfer, and fluid mechanics. The novel understanding creates opportunities for contributions to the foundations of natural science, such as the discovery of the complete equation of motion of physics, and for novel approaches to applications in nuclear technologies and other fields. Sponsor: Nuclear Engineering. Contact: Prof. Elias Gyftopoulos, x3-3804.


523
Skeet Shooting

Debbie Fonda

Tues, Jan 16, 10 am-12 noon in 4-145 and Wed, Fri, Jan 17-19, 10 am-2 pm at the skeet range. Enrollment limited to 20 people. Fee: $20-30 for materials.

Leran how to shoot skeet. First we'll watch a video covering the basics of shooting skeet and the safe handling and use of shotguns. Later, we will go to the skeet range and shoot 50-100 targets. Students must provide transportation. Sponsor: Biology. Contact: Debbie Fonda (dafonda@mit.edu), 68-074, x3-3205.



Courses for Credit

Aeronautics and Astronautics

16.600
Computational Tools for Engineering

Prof. Kenneth Breuer, Steve Ellis

Tues-Fri, Jan 9-Feb 3, 10-11 am in 1-390. Preregister immediately. Not recommended for freshmen. Enrollment limited to 60 people. Preference: department majors. Prereq: 16.010, 16.020, or equivalent. 6 units. P/D/F grading.

Introduction to computational tools and their use in solving engineering problems, analyzing data and presenting scientific results. Covers techniques for the practical use of spreadsheets (XESS), MATLAB, symbolic algebra (MAPLE) and other Athena-based packages. Introduces concepts in numerical solutions to equations, accuracy, interactive techniques, etc. Emphasizes problem solving, not programming or algorithmic development. Contact: Jean Sofronas (jeans@mit.edu), 33-217, x8-5548.


16.682/16.983
Preparing for Your Future in Aerospace

Prof. Daniel Hastings, Prof. Earll Murman

Tues, Thurs, Jan 9-Feb 1, 10:30 am-12 noon in 37-212. Preregister by Dec 8 with Lori Martinez (dragonl@mit.edu), 33-207, x3-2608. Enrollment limited to 40 people. Preference: course 16 . No listeners. 3 units. A-F grading.

This seminar class will address both opportunities and mechanics for post-graduate placement in the U.S. aerospace enterprise. For undergraduates, it will focus on careers in industry as well as choices for graduate school. For graduate students it will include careers in industry, government, and universities. The seminar will cover the basics of searching for opportunities, preparing applications, and interviewing. Students will complete projects in each of these areas. Contact: Prof. Daniel Hastings, 33-207, x3-0906.


16.952
Management Topics in Engineering

Joseph Yamron

Tues, Thurs, Jan 9-Feb 1, 1-3:30 pm in 37-186. Prereq: permission of instructor. 6 units. A-F grading.

Directed toward the student seeking a career in engineering leading to management, this course provides opportunities to examine topics relating to the conduct of engineering activities within a total management environment with emphasis on cost and risk. Special attention is given to the role of technical staff in the acquisition of new business and long-range planning. Seminar format based on current industrial practice. Contact: Marie Stuppard (mas@mit.edu), 33-208, x3-2279.


Architecture

4.23J
Field-Based SIGUS Workshop on Rebuilding Communities in Belfast, Northern Ireland

Prof. Reinhard Goethert

Mon-Fri, Jan 29-Feb 2 in Belfast. Preregister immediately. Enrollment limited to 12 people. Preference: students from the School of Architecture and Planning. No listeners. Fee: $1,000 approximately, for travel and living expenses (partial subsidy possible). Prereq: permission of instructor. 3 units. P/D/F grading. H-level Graduate credit.

The workshop will test rapid assessment and planning techniques in the context of a low income neighborhood in Belfast. A five-part process will be tested: understanding problems and opportunities, documentation of key information, development of a community map, identifying a set of actions and tasks, and development of a plan for implementation. Intensive, all-day sessions will feature joint student and community teams with each team charged with assessing and developing viable alternative strategies with the community. A final presentation will be made to government officials, community members and professional planning sectors. Sponsor: Special Interest Group in Urban Settlements (SIGUS). Contact: Prof. Reinhard Goethert (rkg@mit.edu), N5-471A, x3-2402.


4.23J
Sustainable Design for Third World Settlement Planning

Prof. Reinhard Goethert

Mon-Fri, Jan 15-19 in Brookes University, Oxford, England.. Preregister immediately. Enrollment limited to 7 people. Preference: students from the School of Architecture and Planning. No listeners. Fee: $1,000 approximately, for airfare, accommodations, and meals (partial subsidy possible). Prereq: permission of instructor. 3 units. P/D/F grading. H-level Graduate credit.

This course will explore key design issues in the provision of settlements for low income housing through institutional intervention. Basic tools and techniques of physical planning appropriate to Third World housing situations will be stressed, structured around four areas: basic measurement, prediction of uses, modeling and design. Conducted in a hands-on workshop format, with groups of students exploring a project of their choice. Offered with the Center for Development and Emergency Planning (CENDEP), Oxford Brookes University, and the Development Planning Unit (DPU), England. Sponsor: Special Interest Group in Urban Settlements (SIGUS). Contact: Prof. Reinhard Goethert (rkg@mit.edu), N51-471A, x3-2402.


4.280
Architecture Internship

Prof. Ann Pendelton-Jullian, Elizabeth Reed, Owiso Makuka

Preregister immediately. No listeners. Prereq: 4.125, 4.126. 6 units. P/D/F grading.

Work in an architecture office, gain experience, improve skills, learn about professional practice and the role of construction documents in getting a project built. All participants will be required to attend a weekly morning workshop session on construction documents conducted by two MIT alumni who are practicing architects. IAP interns work in small, medium and large firms, and in public and private agencies. Interns must commit to full-time work throughout IAP. Contact: Elizabeth Reed, 12-170, x3-4733.


4.292
Architectural Design Workshop: Cusco

Prof. Anne Pendleton-Jullian

Mon, Jan 8, 11 am in N51-Lyons X for first meeting only. Preregister by Dec 15. Preference: students in 4.182 or students preregistered for 4.156. Fee: $1,900 for travel and lodging (partial subsidy possible). Prereq: permission of the instructor. 9 units. P/D/F grading.

The intention of this workshop is to focus, though design and on-site experimentation, questions about the inter-relationship of mental space and physical space as it relates to the city of Cusco, Peru. We will refer to discoveries and maps generated in the fall workshop on Cusco. Days 1-5 of the workshop will take place in Boston to determine the strategy of the project which will be built full scale on site in Cusco during the following three weeks. Contact: Anne Pendleton-Jullian (annpjul@mit.edu), N51-336, x3-1391.


4.398
Foundations in Metalworking

David Smith

Mon, Wed, Fri, Jan 8-26, 12 noon-6 pm in N51. Enrollment limited to 16 people. Preference: course 4 students. Fee: $25 for materials. 3 units. P/D/F grading.

This course will cover all aspects of basic metalworking principles as they pertain to the architect/artist in the development of models and/or marquettes. It is designed to give the student a good working knowledge of metal in form and fabrication, leading to a better understanding of not only its principles, but its potential applications. Contact: David Smith (dbsmith@mit.edu), N51-134.


4.399
The Computer as a Presentation Tool

Prof. Edward Levine

Mon-Fri, Jan 8-Feb 2, 9 am-1:30 pm in N51-315. No class on Jan 15. Classes from Jan 16-19 meet until 12:30 pm. Preregister by Dec 13 with Linda Woolford (woolford@mit.edu), N51-315, x3-5229. Enrollment limited to 10 people. Preference: course 4 students. No listeners. Prereq: Macintosh literacy and architecture background. 12 units. P/D/F grading. H-level Graduate credit.

Course explores the computer as a way of thinking about and presenting aesthetic ideas. Investigates potential of the computer to augment traditional modes of presenting ideas and realizes different ways of clarifying the creative intention of aesthetic ideas. The course investigates ways to visualize and embody ideas about scale, time and history in presentations. The relationship of image to the existential and the role of media to experience will play an important part in this course. Contact: Prof. Edward Levine (harpo@mit.edu), N51-315, x3-3086.


Biology

7.57J/HST 180
Genetics and Molecular Medicine

Prof. David Houseman, Prof. Cliff Tabin

Mon, Wed, Thurs, Jan 8-Feb 1, 4:30-7:30 pm in E25-111. Prereq: 7.012 or 7.013 or 7.014, 7.05. 12 units. Arranged grading.

Introduction to central issues in medical genetics. Significance of karyotypic analysis in clinical genetics and oncology. In-depth consideration of well-defined, genetically based illnesses including cystic fibrosis, muscular dystrophies, and Huntington's diseases. Includes patient presentations, consideration of genetic counseling issues, and the likely clinical impact of new genetic diagnostic techniques. Contact: Erica Beade, E17-543, x3-3016.


Brain and Cognitive Studies

9.93
Developmental Cognitive Science

Adele Diamond

Mon, Wed, Thurs, Jan 22-Feb 1, 11:30 am-1 pm in E10-010A. Preregister by Dec 13 with Robin Fincke (ren@psyche.mit.edu), E10-008, x3-0842. Prereq: 9.130 or one neuroscience class plus one cognitive science class. 3 units. P/D/F grading.

We will address som topics that there wasn't time to cover in the seminar this past semester, topics such as the development and neural basis of sensory integration and the visual guidance of movement. Attendance at all sessions is required. Contact: Adele Diamond (diamond@psyche.mit.edu), E10-044, x3-5768.


9.94
Psychology: The Rest Of It

Prof. Alan Hein

Preregister by Dec 13. Prereq: 9.00 or equivalent. 3 units. P/D/F grading.

We will review basic and applied components of the field of psychology not addressed in the subject "Introduction to Psychology." Contact: Robin Fincke (ren@psyche.mit.edu), E10-008, x3-0482.


9.95
Cognitive Science: The Sequel

Prof. Edward Gibson

Preregister by Dec 13. 4 units. P/D/F grading.

We will address some interesting topics in cognition that there isn't time to cover in the fall introductions to psychology and cognitive sciences. Attendance required at all sessions for credit. Contact: Robin Fincke (ren@psyche.mit.edu), E10-008, x3-0482.


9.96
Neuroscience: Brain Development and Learning

Prof. Mriganka Sur

Preregister by Dec 13 with Robin Fincke (ren@psyche.mit.edu), E10-008, x3-0482. 3 units. P/D/F grading.

Mechanisms underlying learning and memory in the mature brain may share significant features in common with mechanisms that underlie the formation of connections in the developing brain. We will discuss different approaches to clarifying the rules of development, plasticity and learning in both simple and complex nervous systems. Contact: Mriganka Sur (msur@wccf.mit.edu), E25-618A, x3-8784.


9.97
Introduction to Neuroanatomy

Prof. Ann Graybiel, Brad Postle, Chris Moore, Mandar Jog

Preregister by Dec 13 with Robin Fincke (ren@psyche.mit.edu), E10-008, x3-0482. 3 units. P/D/F grading.

This course will introduce participants to the anatomy of the mammalian brain through lectures, demonstrations, and hands-on dissection experience. Participants will also have access to interactive sheep brain dissection software. A quiz will be offered during the last session. Contact: Robin Fincke (ren@psyche.mit.edu), E10-008, x3-0482.


9.98
Learning, Networks and Approximation Theory

Prof. Tomaso Poggio, Federico Girosi, Emanuela Bricolo, Partha Niyogi

Tues-Thurs, Jan 16-18, 10 am-1 pm in E25-401. Preregister by Dec 13 with Robin Fincke (ren@psyche.mit.edu), E10-008, x3-0482. Prereq: Appropriate mathematics background. 3 units. P/D/F grading.

An introduction, from the computational and biological points of view, to the problem of learning from examples. We discuss motivations and examples of practical applications, including face and object recognition/detection, time series prediction and graphics. We introduce basic theory and a number of learning techniques, including radical basis functions and neural networks, as well as human psychophysics of object recognition and monkey neurophysiology data. Contact: Tomaso Poggio (tp-temp@ai.mit.edu), E25-218, x3-5230.


9.99
A Big Methodological Problem in the Social Sciences, and Some Solutions

Prof. Geoffrey Loftus

Tues-Thurs, Jan 16-18, Mon, Wed, Fri, Jan 22-26, 1-2:30 pm in E10-013. Preregister by Dec 13 with Robin Fincke (ren@psyche.mit.edu), E10-008, x3-0482. 3 units. P/D/F grading.

We will focus on how to measure things in the social sciences, how problems in measuring things lead researchers astray, and how to deal with these problems. Topics will include: misinterpretation of statistical interactions, equivalence techniques, evaluating forgetting curves, why its hard to see slides when the room lights are still on, and measuring the form of iconic decay. A quiz will be given during the last meeting. Contact: Prof. Geoffrey Loftus (gloftus@psyche.mit.edu), E10-016, x3-8946.


Chemical Engineering

10.001
Introduction to Computer Methods

Prof. Gregory Rutledge, Jonathan Tan

Mon-Fri, Jan 16-26, 9-10:30 am in 1-115, 11 am-12 noon in 54-100, 4-9 pm in 1-115. Preregister by Dec 5 for course 10 majors (in 66-350) and course 3 majors (in 8-303). Dec 6 for freshmen (in 66-350). Dec 7 for all others (in 66-350). 6 units. A-F grading.

This course provides an introduction for chemical engineers to the use of computers, software tools, and problem solving using Athena. Emphasis is placed on a hierarchy of computational methods, including the basics of C programming, elementary numerical analysis, data visualization, and Maple for symbolic computing. Contact: Linda Mousseau, 66-350, x3-4562.


10.491
Integrated Chemical Engineering II: Statistics

Prof. Herbert Sawin

Mon-Fri, Jan 8-19. Section 1: 10 am-12 noon in 66-154. Section 2: 2-4 pm in 66-154. No class on Jan 15. Preregister immediately. Enrollment limited to 40 people. Preference: preregistration order. Prereq: 10.490. 4 units. A-F grading.

Students who will be taking 10.491 during the spring term, 1995, may elect to take one of three modules during IAP. The subject of this module will be the statistical analysis of experimental data. Contact: Prof. Herbert Sawin, 66-505, x3-4570.


Civil and Environmental Engineering

1.970
Stochastic Self-Similarity: Concepts, Models, and Applications

Prof. Daniele Veneziano

Mon-Fri, Jan 8-12, 2:30-4 pm in 1-132. Prereq: 1.151 or equivalent. 4 units. A-F grading.

Self-dililar sets and functions look statistically the same when viewed through magnifying or contracting lenses. Examples are random fractal sets, Brownian motion, and multiplicative cascades. The course introduces various notions of stochastic self-similarity, discusses ways to construct self-similar models, and presents applications. A short report is required. Up to four additional units can be arranged. Familiarity with the notion of random process is useful. Contact: Daniele Veneziano (venezian@mit.edu), 1-348, x3-7199.


1.991
Concrete Canoe Contest

Dr. Jack Germaine

TBA. Preregister by Jan 9. Arranged units. P/D/F grading.

Welcome all to the Concrete Canoe Contest. We will be designing, constructing and using a concrete canoe for the ASCE Concrete Canoe Race in the spring of 1996. Bring your ideas and your friends to help build the canoe and even stick with it through the race. All portions of the construction process will need help! Listeners encouraged. Contact: Dr. Jack Germaine (jgermain@mit.edu), 1-353, x3-7113.


1.992
Introduction to C++

Prof. Feniosky Pena-Mora, Lucio Soibelman, Karim Hussein, Jen-Diann Chiou

Mon-Fri, Jan 16-Feb 2, 10:30 am-12 noon in 1-115. Preregister immediately by e-mail. Enrollment limited to 20 people. Preference: course 1 students. 6 units. A-F grading.

This class will focus on the syntactic building blocks for the implementation of computer programs in C++. The concepts covered are abstraction, inheritance, encapsulation, and polymorphism. In addition, this class will cover the use of make files, multiple source files, and debuggers. Compilation in different computer architectures will also be covered. Contact: Prof. Feniosky Pena-Mora (feniosky@mit.edu), 1-253, x3-7142.


1.996
Teaching Civil and Environmental Engineering in Local Elementary Schools

Prof. Ole Madsen, Linda Tsang

Tues, Thurs, Jan 9-Feb 1, 3-5 pm in 48-308. Preregister by Dec 13. Preference: juniors/seniors. 3 units. P/D/F grading.

Learn to plan, design, and rehearse a presentation on an engineering science topic for fourth and fifth grade students. During IAP we will meet to decide on topics, select teams (minimum two MIT students on each team for each particular subject), prepare presentations, and rehearse. Subject will continue during spring term for an additional three units with students going to a local elementary school to teach. Contact: Prof. Ole Madsen (ohm@mit.edu), 48-319, x3-2721.


Concourse

SP 345
Problem Solving in Science and Technology

Prof. Robert Rose, Dr. Yuri Chernyak

Mon-Fri, Jan 8-23, 10 am-12 noon and 1-3 pm in 20C-221. No class on Jan 10 or Jan 15. Preregister immediately with Cheryl Butters in 20C-224, x3-3200. Enrollment limited to 15 people. Preference: Concourse students. No listeners. Prereq: 8.01 or 8.012, 18.01. 12 units. P/D/F grading.

This special course, referred to by some as "From Russia With Love," originates from past Concourse IAP presentations and has been recognized with an award from the MIT Class of '51 and by Science magazine. It is a very intense experience. The basis of the problems will be the first-term science core at MIT. Dr. Yuri Chernyak, senior research fellow in Harvard/HST, was an associate professor of Physics, Moscow State University, and the last chairman of the Moscow Refusenik Seminar. Contact: Cheryl Butters (cbutters@mit.edu), 20C-224, x3-3200.


Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences

12.115
Geology Field Camp

Prof. Clark Burchfiel

Mon-Sun, Jan 8-Feb 2 in Nevada. Preregister immediately. No listeners. Fee: $150. 12 units. A-F grading.

We will conduct a geological study of a selected field area in southern Nevada, including preparation of maps, field reports, and laboratory analysis of samples. Students are expected to register for 12.115 again in the spring. Contact: Prof. Clark Burchfiel (bcburch@mit.edu), 54-1010, x3-7919.


12.120
Environmental Earth Science Field Course

Prof. Sam Bowring

Mon-Fri, Jan 8-17. Return date subject to change. Preregister by Dec 8 (late registration subject to a higher fee for airfare). Enrollment limited. Fee: $150. Prereq: 12.001 or 12.102. 6 units. A-F grading.

Introduction to the methods of geologic mapping; practical experience in selecting sites for hazardous waste disposal, assessing hazards in seismically and volcanically active areas, and understanding the three-dimensional character of dissected alluvial deposits. The class will travel to Las Vegas, Nevada for the entire duration of the course. Contact: Dan Burns (burns@mit.edu), 54-910, x3-3380 or Sam Bowring (sbowring@mit.edu), x3-3775.


12.141
Electron Microprobe Analysis

Prof. Tim Grove, Dr. Nilanjan Chatterjee

Tues, Thurs, Jan 9-18, 1-5 pm in 54-1221. Preregister by Jan 5. Enrollment limited to 16 people. 6 units. P/D/F grading.

Introduction to the theory of X-ray microanalysis through Electron Microprobe; lab sessions including analysis of materials with hands-on use of the Electron Microprobe; analytical methods include energy and wavelength dispersive spectrometry, backscattered and secondary electron imaging, X-ray mapping and image analysis will be covered. Recommended reading: Scanning Electron Microscopy and X-ray Microanalysis, Goldstein et al., Plenum Press. Contact: Neel Chatterjee (nchat@mit.edu), 54-1216, x3-1995.


12.213
Alternate Energy Sources

Prof. M. Nafi Toksoz, Prof. F. Dale Morgan

Mon, Wed, Fri, Jan 8-24, 10 am-12 noon in E34-430. Local day-long field trip and lab time expected. Optional five-day field trip to California or the Carribean ($250 fee). Enrollment limited. Preregister immediately with Dan Burns (burns@mit.edu), 54-910, x3-3380. Preference: preregistration order. 6 units. P/D/F grading.

Subject explores alternate energy sources and the environmentally friendly use of fossil fuels. Topics include: solar energy, wind power, nuclear and geothermal energy, and removal, disposal, and use of CO2 from fossil fuel plants. Field trips to local power plant sites. Contact: Prof. M. Nafi Toksoz, E34-440, x3-7852.


12.221
Measuring Post-Seismic Deformation and Tectonic Motions in Southern California using GPS

Prof. Tom Herring, Prof. Chris Marone, Bob King

Mon-Fri, Jan 22-Feb 2 in Southern California. Organizational meeting Dec 18, 5 pm in 54-611. Preregister by Dec 15 with Dan Burns, 54-910, x3-3380 (late registration subject to a higher fee to cover airfare). Enrollment limited to 10 people. Fee: $150. 6 units. P/D/F grading.

We will observe the fault offsets that occurred during the 1992 Landers earthquake, the results of multiple earthquakes on the nearby San Andreas fault and other active tectonic features. We will perform high-precision GPS experiments to measure post-seismic motion. Upon return to MIT we will analyze the data and discuss the principles and applications of GPS and the dynamics of the earthquake cycle. Contact: Prof. Tom Herring, 54-618, x3-5941.


12.310
An Introduction to Weather Forecasting

Dr. Lodovica Illari

Mon, Wed, Fri, Jan 17-Feb 2, 10:30 am-12 noon in 54-1615. Preregister by Dec 13. Prereq: 8.01, 18.01. 6 units. P/D/F grading.

This will be an introductory subject covering the principles of synoptic meteorology (weather patterns) and weather forecasting. Analysis of hourly weather data and numerical weather prediction models will also be covered. Regular preparation of weather forecasts will be performed. Contact: Dan Burns (burns@mit.edu), 54-910, x3-3380.


12.311
Experimental Oceanography

Prof. Marcia McNutt, Prof. John Marshall, Prof. John Edmond

Mon-Fri, Jan 22-26, 9 am-5 pm at MIT/WHOI. First meeting in 54-915. Preregister by Jan 5. 6 units. P/D/F grading.

This course is an intensive introduction to experimental oceanography, specifically in the areas of marine geology and geophysics, physical oceanography, and chemical oceanography. Includes tour of Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and participation in a research cruise. Transportation is provided. Contact: Dan Burns (burns@mit.edu), 54-910, x3-3380.


12.312
Climate System Computer Lab

Prof. Jochem Marotzke

Mon, Tues, Thurs, Fri, Jan 8-19, 10 am-12 noon in 2-032. Preregister by Jan 5 with Dan Burns. Enrollment limited to 15 people. Preference: freshmen. 6 units. P/D/F grading.

Design and use simple models of the atmosphere, the oceans, ice, the carbon cycle, and see how they interact. Create an ice age (or prevent one). See the greenhouse effect at work. This is a hands-on introduction to climate dynamics, with simulations on Macintosh computers (one per participant). No programming experience necessary. Written report required for credit. Contact: Prof. Jochem Marotzke (jochem@sound.mit.edu), 54-1514, x3-5939 or Dan Burns (burns@mit.edu), 54-910, x3-3380.


12.313
Climate Change: Past, Present, and Future

Prof. Maureen Raymo

Mon-Fri, Jan 22-Feb 2, 10 am-12 noon in E43-430. First meeting is in E34-300. Preregister by Jan 1. 6 units. P/D/F grading.

The human race is now a significant factor influencing global changes in the Earth's environment and climate. This course will provide a historical (as in geological) context within which to think about global climate change. We will cover the entire spectrum of climate variations, from the formation of the Earth's early atmosphere 4.6 billion years ago, to the ice ages, to the role of CO2 variations in natural climate change, to temperature trends in this century. Contact: Prof. Maureen Raymo (raymo@mit.edu), E34-254, x3-0474 or Dan Burns (burns@mit.edu), 54-910, x3-3380.


12.411
Astronomy Field Camp

Prof. James Elliot

Mon-Fri, Jan 6-31 in Arizona. Preregister immediately with Ginny Siggia in 54-410, x3-9317. Enrollment limited to 6 people. No listeners. Fee: $150. Prereq: 12.410J or 8.287J. 9 units. P/D/F grading.

Learn how professional astronomers carry out their research by participating in a UROP-style project under the supervision of a Lowell Observatory staff member. Participants will use the Lowell 1.1-meter and 1.8-meter telescopes and do extensive data analysis. Requires a written report. Contact: Prof. James Elliot, 54-422, x3-6308.


12.484
Directed Field Studies

Prof. Clark Burchfiel, Prof. Kip Hodges

Mon-Sun, Jan 8-Feb 2. Preregister by Dec 8. Fee: $150 for travel costs. Prereq: permission of instructor. 6 units. A-F grading.

Intensive training in field geological methods. Includes specific exercises selected to complement the backgrounds of the students entrolled and provides supervised experience in applying field analytical techniques to geological problems. Contact: Clark Burchfiel (bcburch@mit.edu), 54-1010, x3-7919.


12.571
Readings in Inverse Theory

Prof. F. Dale Morgan, Dr. William Rodi

Tues, Thurs, Jan 9-Feb 1, 1-3 pm in E34-430. Preregister by Jan 5. Prereq: 18.075 or 18.085 or permission of the instructor. 6 units. P/D/F grading. H-level Graduate credit.

Review and discussion of key papers in inverse thoery and applications. Outside readings and in-class presentations expected. Contact: Dan Burns (burns@mit.edu), E34-254, x3-3380.


12S22
Hands-On Astronomy

Prof. Chuck Counselman

Mon-Thurs, Jan 8-25, 7 pm-10 pm in 37-562. Preregister immediately by e-mail. A lottery will be conducted and preregistrants will be informed by e-mail before Christmas. Enrollment limited to 18 people. Preference: given to freshmen. 6 units. P/D/F grading.

See and photograph solar system, galactic, and extragalactic objects yourself using six 8-inch telescopes, CCD cameras and computers. Complementary lectures and demonstrations on astronomical objects, motions, coordinates, observing techniques, instrumentation, and current research. Daily reading, problem sets and attendance required. Final quiz. Text: Universe by Kaufmann. Contact: Prof. Chuck Counselman (ccc@space.mit.edu), 37-552, x3-7902.


Edgerton Center

6.070J/SP 705J
Electronics Project Laboratory

Bruce Wedlock, Anthony Caloggero

Wed, Fri, Jan 10-Feb 2, 2-4 pm. Preregister by Jan 1. Enrollment limited to 10 people. 6 units. A-F grading.

This course is intended as a preparation for students who have had little or no experience with electronics. If you have already taken 6.071 or 6.002, then this subject is not appropriate for you. The course includes familiarization with electronics test equipment such as oscilloscopes, meters (voltage, resistance, inductance, capacitance, etc.), and signal generators. Hands-on format emphasizing individual instruction and development of skills, such as soldering, assembly, and troubleshooting. Each student will build (and keep) an electronics kit to serve as the vehicle for learning about electronics test and measurement equipment. Include your name, year, course and prior experience in your preregistration e-mail. Sponsor: Edgerton Center. Contact: Cindy Dernay (cdernay@mit.edu), x3-4629.


Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

6.190
6.270: Tenth Annual Autonomous Robot Design Competition

Bill Baker, Sanjay Vakil, Scott Wilcox, Prof. Leonard Gould

January 8-Feb 2.. Preregister by Oct 15. Fee: $50 for materials. 6 units. P/D/F grading.

"6.270" is a class in the mold of Mechanical Engineering's classic 2.70, in which teams of students build machines for a course-consummating competition in 26-100, with the distinction that 6.270's robots are autonomous – that is, not human-controlled. Participation in the class is open to the MIT community, and viewing the competition is open to the public. Contact: Bill Baker (6.270-organizers@mit.edu).


6.194
Waveguides and Fiber Optic Sensors

John Farah

Mon-Fri, Jan 8-12, 10 am-12 noon in 13-4101. 3 units. P/D/F grading.

The following topics will be covered: Gaussian beams, the propagation of light in waveguides, the confinement condition, wave modes and shapes, metal and dielectric waveguides, planar vs. channel waveguides, fiber couplers and prism couplers, laser diodes and photodetectors, fiber sensors, bias circuits, phase modulators, integrated optics, interference and interferometer signal processing. Contact: John Farah, 38-476, 374-9363.


Foreign Languages and Literatures

21F 301
French I

Sabine Levet

Mon-Fri, Jan 8-31, 10 am-1 pm. Mon-Wed in 20C-122. Thurs-Fri in 14N-313. Preregister by Dec 8 in 14N-305. Enrollment limited to 25 people. Preference: freshmen. 12 units. A-F grading.

Introduction to French language and culture. Emphasis on the acquisition of vocabulary and grammatical concepts through active communication. Immediate exposure to authentic French via video sources and printed materials. Develop cultural awareness as well as linguistic proficiency. Coordinated language lab program. Contact: Sabine Levet (slevet@mit.edu), 14N-429, x3-3462.


21F 399
Intensive French Language and Culture: Preparing to Work in France

Shoggy Waryn

Tues-Fri, Jan 9-31, 10 am-1 pm in 20C-124. Preregister by Dec 8 in 14N-305. Enrollment limited to 16 people. Fee: $10 for photocopies. Prereq: French IV or equivalent. 12 units. A-F grading.

Learn to express yourself fluently and function in a French work environment. General review of grammar and communication skills, a series of presentations on French science and technology, independent study of French language with an emphasis on science and technology, and an introduction to historical and contemporary aspects of French cultural life. Help will be given to students who do not already have plans through their own departments to secure internships in French companies. Interested students must preregister Contact: Shoggy Waryn (shoggy@mit.edu), 14N-427, x3-9777.


21F 401
German I

William Carroll

Mon-Fri, Jan 8-Jan 31, 9am-12 noon in 14N-225. Preregister by Dec 8 in 14N-305. Enrollment limited to 25 people. 12 units. A-F grading.

Introduction to listening, speaking, reading, and writing German. Course will emphasize the use of fundamental grammar in active communication. Language laboratory program supplements class work. This course is a full-time occupation for IAP. Contact: William Carroll (wfcarrol@fas.harvard.edu), 14N-224, x3-4312.


21F 499
Germany Today: Intensive German Language and Culture

Barbara Hyams, Monika Totten

Tues-Fri, Jan 9-31, 10 am-1 pm in 4-249. Preregister by Dec 8 in14N-305. Enrollment limited to 15 people. No listeners. Fee: $10 for photocopies. Prereq: German IV or equivalent. 12 units. A-F grading.

This subject will help students perfect their communication skills and prepare them for working and living in German-speaking countries. Topics include: current political debates, Germany in its European context, scientific and business communities, influence of the media, business German, and the contemporary artistic and cultural scene. Activities, lectures and presentations by German professionals and advanced independent study of the German language using the latest media resources. Contact: Cara Cheyette (carache@mit.edu), 14N-310, x3-4550.


21F 701
Spanish I

Margarita Ribas Groeger

Mon-Fri, Jan 9-Feb 1, 9:30 am-12:30 pm. Mon-Wed in 14N-313, Thurs-Fri in 20C-122. Preregister by Dec 8 in 14N-305. Enrollment limited to 25 people. 12 units. A-F grading.

Introduction to understanding, speaking, reading, and writing Spanish. Maximal use of fundamentals of grammar in active communication. Audio- and video-based language laboratory program coordinated with and supplementary to class work. Contact: Margerita Groeger (mgroeger@mit.edu), x3-4778.


Health Sciences and Technology

HST 141
The Molecular and Biochemical Basis of Some Clinical Disorders

Paul Gallop, Prof. Irving London

Tues, Thurs, Jan 9-Feb 1, 9 am-12 noon in MEC 209, Harvard Medical School. Preregister immediately. Prereq: 7.05. 10 units. A-F grading. H-level Graduate credit.

Study a variety of human diseases and the underlying molecular and biologic basis for the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of the disorders. Lectures by faculty and seminars conducted by students with tutorials and supervision by faculty. Whenever possible, appropriate patients will be presented and discussed. Appropriate for students who have had a course in biochemistry and/or molecular biology. Contact: Paul Gallop, E25-519, 355-6838.


Sloan School of Management

15.952/15.973
Foreign Currency Exchange Bourse Game

Prof. Jiang Wang

Tues-Fri, Jan 16-20, 8:30 am-5 pm. Attendance at all meetings is required.. Preregister by Dec 8. Enrollment limited to 28 people. No listeners. 3 units. P/D/F grading. H-level Graduate credit.

This realistic simulation game provides hands-on experience in the trading of international currencies. Students compete in teams, using special computer, audio-visual, and communications technology designed by a major international bank for training its professional traders. Students will meet with the staff from this bank for training lectures and discussions. Teams will be composed of management and non-management students. Contact: Jessica Balaban (jessi@mit.edu), E52-101, x3-1510.


15.974
Personal Entrepreneurial Strategy and Preliminary Venture Analysis

Prof. Russ Olive

Tues-Fri, Jan 10-19, 10 am-12 noon in E52-175. Preregister immediately. Enrollment limited to 60 people. 3 units. P/D/F grading.

Are you entrepreneurial and wish to strengthen your skills in business startups? We will develop your personal entrepreneurial career strategy and perform a preliminary venture analysis to determine if your idea is a high-potential business opportunity. This course is a solid starting point for preparing a Business Plan Executive Summary for the upcoming MIT $10K Entrepreneurial Business Plan Competition. Contact: Sydney Edwards (pva-request@mit.edu), 441-7901.


15.976
The Nuts and Bolts of Preparing Business Plans

Joseph Hadzima

Tues, Thurs, Jan 16-Feb 1, 6:30-8 pm in 10-250, Mon, Jan 29, 6:30-8 pm in 10-250. No class on Jan 30. Preregister immediately. Enrollment limited to 250 people. 6 units. P/D/F grading.

Explore the nuts and bolts of preparing a business plan. This series is particularly recommended for people interested in starting up and/or improving a new business. Undergraduate and graduate students planning to enter the MIT $10K Entrepreneurial Competition should find the series particularly useful. Students taking the course for credit will submit 2-3 page Business Plan Executive Summaries. Contact: Wes Sonnenreich (sonny@mit.edu), 236-0738.


Mathematics

18.095
Mathematics Lecture Series

Math Faculty

Mon, Wed, Fri, Jan 8-31, 1-2:30 pm in 2-190, Thurs, Jan 11-Feb 1, 1-3 pm in 2-136. Class on Jan 26 meets in 4-270. Prereq: 18.01. 6 units. P/D/F grading.

This series of lectures will cover a wide range of mathematics topics, focusing on subjects not treated in introductory courses. Accessible to anyone with a calculus background. There will be a weekly problem session in addition to the lectures. Students taking 18.095 for credit are expected to attend regularly and to do supplementary homework. Contact: Undergraduate Math Office, 2-108, x3-4977.


Mechanical Engineering

2.670
Mechanical Engineering Tools

Prof. Douglas Hart, Prof. Kevin Otto

Mon-Fri, Jan 8-19, 8 am-5 pm, or Mon-Fri, Jan 22-Feb 2, 8 am-5 pm. Preregister immediately. Preference: limited to majors. 6 units. P/D/F grading.

Introduces the fundamentals of machine tool and computer use. Students work with a variety of machine tools including the bandsaw, milling machines, and lathe. Instruction given on the use of the Athena network and Athena-based software packages including MATLAB, MAPLE, XESS, and CAD. Emphasis on problem solving, not programming or algorithmic development. Assignments are project-oriented relating to mechanical engineering topics. It is recommended that students take this subject in the first IAP after declaring their major in Mechanical Engineering. Contact: Liv Galendez (livcg@mit.edu) or Stacy Morris (sjm@mit.edu).


2.672
Project Laboratory

Prof. Peter Griffith

Mon-Fri, Jan 8-26, 9 am-4 pm in 3-062. No class on Fri, Jan 12 or Mon, Jan 15. Preregister by Dec 14. Enrollment limited to 9 people. No listeners. Prereq: 2.01, 2.02, 2.20, 2.40, 2.671. 6 units. A-F grading.

Engineering laboratory subject with a major emphasis on interplay between analytical and experimental methods in solution of research and development problems. Contact: Peggy Garlick, 3-154, x3-2305.


Media Arts and Sciences

MAS 963
The Wired Enterprise

Prof. John Kao

Tues, Thurs, Jan 16-25, 4-5:30 pm in E15-301. 3 units. A-F grading.

The mission of this course is to explore the "wired enterprise," businesses reshaped by enabling technology that allows new types of "virtual" organizational forms, new modes of collaboration via netweorks, and new capabilities that facilitate organizational creativity, knowledge management, and entrepreneurship. Three short thought/research pieces will be required. Contact: Karen Modrak (kmodrak@media.mit.edu), E15-212, x3-5776.


MAS 964
Expressive Typography and New Media

Angelynn Grant

Mon, Wed, Fri, Jan 8-31, 1-5 pm in E15-301. No class on Jan 15. Preregister by Dec 8. Enrollment limited to 12 people. Prereq: expreience with typography, knowledge of programming, or familiarity with HTML. 6 units. A-F grading.

Students will explore the effect of expressive typography on perceived meaning and messages in literature, using new technologies (hypertext, multimedia). Students will create an experimental "book" in a studio setting, discussing issues of typography, visual metaphors, and the act of "reading." Contact: Karen Modrak (kmodrak@mit.edu), E15-212, x3-0477.


Music and Theater Arts

21M 805
Theater Practicum: Escape from Happiness

Prof. Alan Brody, Bill Fregosi

Rehearsals afternoons and evenings throughout IAP. Preregister by Dec 7 with Anne Richard (arichard@mit.edu), 14N-207, x3-3210. No listeners. Prereq: at least one studio subject or permission of the instructor. 6 units. A-F grading.

Participate in Dramashop's production of Escape From Happiness, by George F. Walker. Directed by Janet Sonnenberg, this production offers design and technical opportunities as well as a chance to act. Contact: Prof. Janet Sonnenberg (json@mit.edu), 14N-233C, x3-4921.


Nuclear Engineering

22.902
Medical Imaging

Prof. Gordon Brownell

Tues, Thurs, Jan 9-Feb 1, 11 am-12:30 pm in 66-156. 3 units. P/D/F grading.

Introduction to principles and applications of medical imaging. Contact: Prof. Gordon Brownell (gob@five11.mgh.harvard.edu), 726-6756.


22.903
Neutron and X-ray Reflectometry and Small Angle Scattering

Prof. Xiao-Lin Zhou

Mon, Wed, Fri, Jan 8-26, 10:30 am-12 noon in 24-115. Enrollment limited to 15 people. Preference: graduate students with adequate math background. 3 units. A-F grading. H-level Graduate credit.

Neutron and X-ray reflectometry is a recently developed probe for the investigation of thin films, surfaces, and interfaces. This course will cover all fundamental aspects of reflectometry. The theory and applications of small angle scattering will also be introduced. Contact: Prof. Xiao-Lin Zhou (xlzhou@mit.edu), 24-215A, x8-7430.


22.904
A Hands-on Introduction to Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

Prof. David Cory

Tues, Thurs, Jan 9-Feb 1, 10:30-11:30 am in NW14-2209. Preregister immediately by e-mail. Enrollment limited to 8 people. 3 units. A-F grading. H-level Graduate credit.

The course provides a hands-on introduction to NMR for those people who wish to have a background in both the classical theory and in the instrumentation. The course will be run as a series of 8 lectures, each of which will be followed by laboratory experiments to both demonstrate the ideas that were presented during the lecture and to familiarize students with state of the art NMR instrumentation. The experiments will cover topics ranging from spin dynamics to spectroscopy, and will include imaging. Contact: Prof. David Cory (dcory@mit.edu), NW14-4111, x3-3806.


22.921
Nuclear Power Plant Dynamics and Control

Dr. John Bernard, Prof. Allan Henry, Prof. John Meyer

NW12-222. Preregister by Dec 13. Preference: level of grad credit. 3 units. A-F grading.

Nuclear power plant dynamics involve unique non-linear systems due to delayed neutron effects and to thermally induced feedback effects. Engineers need to understand these effects. The rapid development of digital systems with control applications affords ideal methods for solving the non-linear control problems with systems that are insensitive to human error. Course includes lectures and demonstrations. Contact: Carol Medeiros, NW12-208, x8-5858.


22.926
Environmental Applications of Plasma

Prof. Kevin Wenzel, Emanuel Chaniotakis

Tues, Thurs, Jan 9-Feb 1, 2-4 pm in NW16-213. Prereq: 8.03. 4 units. A-F grading.

Course introduces the concepts of plasma technology applied to remediation and monitoring of environmental problems. As most environmental applications involve the use of atmospheric pressure plasmas, the fundamental concepts of weakly ionized plasmas are covered. Plasma chemistry and plasma sources are described. Thermal and non-thermal treatment of hazardous materials are illustrated with industrial examples. Contact: Prof. Kevin Wenzel (wenzel@pfc.mit.edu), NW16-162, x3-0571.


22.928J/TPP 64J
Energy in Perspective

Dr. Marvin Miller, Prof. Michael Driscoll

Tues-Fri, Jan 16-Feb2, 1-3 pm in 24-115. Preregister by Dec 13. 6 units. A-F grading.

An overview of energy production, delivery, transformation and end use in technological, economic, environmental, and sociopolitical dimensions. Special emphasis on greenhouse gas warming, renewable resources, more efficient use of energy, fear of radiation, nuclear proliferation and the future of nuclear fusion power, and technologies of the future, e.g., nuclear fusion and the hydrogen economy. Contact: Dr. Marvin Miller (marvmill@mit.edu), 24-109C, x3-3848.


Ocean Engineering

13.704
Design a Better Bailer

Prof. Jerome Milgram, Prof. A. Douglas Carmichael

Mon, Tues, Wed, Fri, Jan 8-Feb 2, 1-3 pm in 5-231. Enrollment limited to 6 people. No listeners. 6 units. P/D/F grading.

This project is to design improved hydrodynamically operated small boat bailers. These are typically used in small racing sailboats and are lowered through to bottom to remove water from the cockpit. The subject will include design sessions and experiments on prototype designs in the MIT water tunnel. A successful design may be used in the upcoming Olympic games. Contact: Mizuho Akiba (makiba@mit.edu), 5-318, x3-3465.


Physics

8.122
Advanced Project Laboratory

Prof. Richard Yamamoto

Tues-Thurs, Jan 9-Feb 2, 10 am-12 noon, 1-5 pm; Fri, Jan 9-Feb 2, 10 am-12 noon, 1-4 pm in 4-355. Preregister by Dec 29 in Physics Undergraduate Office, 4-352. No listeners. Prereq: 8.02. 9 units. A-F grading.

A laboratory subject that offers students the opportunity to carry out experimental physics projects of their own design. Emphasizes contemporary ideas in laboratory techniques and the use of on-line data acquisition whenever possible. Projects designed by students are based on physics phenomena they have encountered in coursework or on their own. Faculty teach students how to use various laboratory instruments, cope with possible systematic errors in their results, and determine statistical errors from numerical data. Contact: Prof. Richard Yamamoto (rky@mitlns.mit.edu), x3-6073.


8.20
Introduction to Special Relativity

Prof. Saul Rappaport

Mon-Fri, Jan 8-Feb 2, 2-3:30 pm in 6-120. Preregister by Dec 29 in Physics Undergraduate Office, 4-352. Prereq: 8.01, 8.02, 18.01. 9 units. A-F grading.

Reviews nineteenth-century science leading to special relativity, Einstein's approach to science and postulates of relativity, Lorentz transformation, length contraction and time dilation, four vectors and transformations of four vectors, Lorentz invariants, relativistic energy and momentum, relativistic kinematics and collisions, massless particles, Doppler shift, space-time diagrams, relativity paradoxes, and the impact of relativity. Possible special introductory topics include the principle of equivalence and the general theory of relativity, gravitational redshift, and the bending of light in a gravitational field. This subject is aimed at the freshman and sophomore levels. Texts: Basic Concepts in Relativity and Early Quantum Theory by Resnick and Halliday, Special Relativity by French. Contact: Isabel Cunha-Vasconcelos (isabelcv@mit.edu), 4-352, x3-4842.


8.21
Advanced Classical Mechanics

Prof. Michel Baranger

Mon-Fri, Jan 8-Feb 2, 10:30 am-12 noon in 4-149. Preregister by Dec 29 in Physics Undergraduate Office in 4-352. Prereq: 8.033. 6 units. A-F grading.

Topics to be discussed include Principles of Lagrangian Mechanics (calculus of variations, Hamilton's principle, constraints, continuous media, rigid-body motion), Hamiltonian Mechanics (phase space, Liouville's theorem, symmetries and conservation laws), and integratable vs. non-integratable problems (constants of the motion, phase space trajectories or integratable systems, phase space trajectories of non-integratable systems (numerical study only, no theory!)). Contact: Prof. Michel Baranger (baranger@mitlns.mit.edu), x3-4848.


8.235
Superconductivity

Prof. Nihat Berker

Mon-Fri, Jan 8-19 and Jan 26-Feb 2, 2-3:30 pm in 12-132. Prereq: introductory quantum and statistical mechanics. 6 units. A-F grading.

Topics to be covered include experiments and phenomenology, perfect conductance and perfect dimagnetism, thermodynamics and the energy gap, elecron pairing, Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory, quasiparticles, phase transition and free energy, suppression of Coulomb repulsion, type I and II superconductors, vortices, coherence and penetration lengths, lower and upper critical fields, Landau theory, critical phenomena, Ginzburg criterion and Liquid-crystal analog. Contact: Prof. Nihat Berker, x3-2176.


Political Science

17.912
Crisis '96

Yale Zussman

Preregister immediately. 4 units. P/D/F grading.

CRISIS is a political-military-economic simulation of world affairs conducted for high school students by the Educational Studies Program. Participants will be trained to work with a team, as their resource person during preparation and as 'public opinion' during the event. Out of class time will be spent researching the countries and roles assigned, and interaction with the high-school students. Contact: Yale Zussman (ymz@bronze.lcs.mit.edu), W20-467, x3-4882.


17.902
Political Science Internship and Research

Prof. Charles Stewart, Tobie Weiner

Tues, Jan 9, 4 pm in 5-134 for first meeting only. Individual schedules depending on internship placement. Preregister immediately. 6 units. P/D/F grading.

Supplement your classroom learning with hands-on experience in settings where political activity, policy-making, and implementation actually occur. Placement possibilities include legislators’ offices, legal service organizations, human health agencies, advocacy groups and organizations concerned with issues such as public health, the environment, the homeless and more. Students should expect to continue at least part-time during spring semester. Contact: Tobie Weiner (iguanatw@mit.edu), E53-460, x3-3649.


17.903
Volunteer to Work in a Homeless Shelter or other Community Service Organization

Prof. Daniel Kryder, Tobie Weiner, Amy Black

Tues, Jan 9, 3 pm in 5-134 for first meeting only. Preregister by Dec 6. 3 units. P/D/F grading.

Want to try community service work? Serve dinner to guests in a shelter, tutor or play games with kids, paint a building, work in a food pantry… try something different. Get out in the world and receive MIT credit for it! We'll meet as a group three times during IAP, but you'll choose your service organization and the hours you volunteer (at least 4-6 per week). Contact: Tobie Weiner (iguanatw@mit.edu), E53-460, x3-3649.


17.909
How to Write a Course 17 Thesis: The Basis of Political Science Research

Prof. Charles Stewart, Eugene Gholz, Jeff Lewis

Tues, Jan 9, 4 pm in 5-134 for first meeting only. 3 units. P/D/F grading.

This course is intended for students who are writing or will write a thesis in Course 17. It will cover research methods, focusing on avoiding common pitfalls in framing questions and collecting evidence. Assigned readings will include examples of both good and bad approaches to social science research. For the last meeting, students will write and present their own research proposals. Contact: Jeff Lewis (jblewis@mit.edu), E53-438, x8-5888.


17.912
Participation in the Presidential Primaries

Mark Johnson, Prof. Steve Ansolabehere

Mon-Thurs, Jan 8-11, 10-11:30 am in 4-153, Mon, Jan 22, 10-11:30 am in 4-153. Class on Jan 10 meets in 4-163. 6 units. P/D/F grading.

This course is designed around participation by the students in the presidential primary process. It involves lectures regarding the nature of primary political campaigns, a meeting with the different campaign committees for the various candidates at which time the student will choose a campaign to work on, participation with that campaign organization during the remainder of January, and a final report summarizing the experience. Contact: Mark Johnson (markj@mit.edu), 3-264, x3-7604.


Division of Toxicology

TOX 200
Toxicology Seminar

Prof. Peter Dedon, Prof. David Schauer, John Wishnok

Wed, Jan 10-31, 12 noon-1 pm in 16-318. Preference: toxicology students. 3 units. P/D/F grading.

Weekly seminars with presentation by toxicology students, alumni, and other invited speakers. The IAP '96 seminars will focus on issues related to a career in Toxicology. Contact: Prof. Peter Dedon, 16-336, x3-8017.


Urban Studies and Planning

11.228
Introduction to Computers in Public Management II

Prof. Joseph Ferreria, Prof. Qing Shen, Someeta Srinavasan

Tues-Fri, Jan 23-26, 8:30 am-5:30 pm in 1-390. Preregister immediately. Enrollment limited to 60 people. Prereq: 11.227. 3 units. A-F grading.

This module consists of lectures and laboratory exercises. You will learn how to build and use databases and create clear and factual thematic maps from demographic data. Two-part homework assignment due Jan 31. Course reader available from Graphic Arts Copy Center in building 11. Contact: Mary O'Neil (roneil@mit.edu), 9-514, x3-0779.


11.941
Wires and Pipes

Prof. Paul Levy

Mon-Fri, Jan 8-12, 9 am-3 pm in 1-242. Preregister by Dec 11 with Fang Fang Traves (fft@mit.edu), 7-338, x3-2022. Enrollment limited to 20 people. 3 units. P/D/F grading.

Electricity and natural gas utilities provide essential energy services. We will review the unique characters of these industries that have, for years, given them the status of "natural monopolies", and the elements of regulatory policies that have evolved over the years. As utilities face increased competition, the regulatory system must adjust to make it possible for the benefits of competition to reach the public. The class will include tours of local utility facilities. Contact: Prof. Paul Levy (pflevy@mit.edu), 3-415, x3-2053.


11.956
Intuitively Obvious: Racial Perspectives on Video

Prof. Clarence Williams, Georgiana Rivers

Tues, Thurs, Jan 16-Feb 2, 5-7 pm in 4-145. Preregister by Dec 11. Enrollment limited to 40 people. No listeners. 3 units. P/D/F grading.

The Intuitively Obvious film series was created to help break down cultural and racial barriers on campus. Produced at MIT, it is composed of four videos, each focusing on a different racial group's experiences regarding race matters. Students will be expected to watch, discuss, and write a two-page response to each film. The last student discussion will be taped to produce a fifth video. Contact: Georgiana Rivers (adrivers@mit.edu), x5-7184.


11.956
The Art and Science of Negotiation

David Laws

Tues-Fri, Jan 16-19, 1:30-5 pm in 3-343. Preregister by Dec 11 with Fang Fanf Traves (fft@mit.edu), 7-338, x3-2022. Enrollment limited to 36 people. Fee: $20 for materials. 3 units. P/D/F grading.

This course will help you understand conflict and develop skills to be a more effective negotiator. A series of role-playing games will give you an opportunity to test your skill and understanding and discover firsthand the difficulties and complexities that are involved in negotiations. Contact: David Laws (dlaws@mit.edu), 7-335, x3-2084.


11.957
Fundraising for Non-Profits

Prof. Bish Sanyal, Pat Libby

Thurs, Jan 11-Feb 1, 1-5 pm in 5-217. Preregister by Dec 15 with Fang Fang Traves (fft@mit.edu), 7-338, x3-2022. 3 units. P/D/F grading.

This course will cover some of the fundraising strategies used by non-profits, including corporate and foundation fundraising and government grants. It will also provide a brief overview of program budgeting. Contact: Paula Anzer (anzer@mit.edu), 7-338, x3-2024.


11.957
Introduction to Teaching: A Crash Course for TAs

Brian White

Mon-Fri, Jan 16-25, 1-3 pm in 16-141. Preregister by Dec 12. Enrollment limited to 8 people. Preference: first-time TAs. 3 units. P/D/F grading.

An intensive, subject-independent, introduction to teaching recitation sections: lecturing, leading discussions, problem-solving, writing and grading problem sets and exams, and dealing with common classroom situations. We will focus on learning by discussion of others' teaching. We will begin each topic by discussing of basic principles and techniques, participants will then take turns giving a lecture, leading a discussion, etc., followed by class discussion and critique. Attendance at all sessions is required. Contact: Brian White (btwhite@mit.edu), 68-120C, x3-1734.


11.960
Statistics for Real Estate Analysis

Prof. William Wheaton

Mon-Fri, Jan 8-12, 9:30 am-12:30 pm in W31-301. Preregister by Dec 15. Enrollment limited to 35 people. Preference: MSRED students have priority. 3 units. P/D/F grading.

This course covers real estate applications of the following topics: descriptive statistics, hypothesis testing, functions, relationships, graphs, and regression analysis. Strongly recommended for those planning to take 11.433 (Real Estate Economics) in the Spring. Course includes exercises using spreadsheets and statistical packages. Homework assignments required for credit. Sponsor: Center for Real Estate Development. Contact: Ben Brophy (benbr@mit.edu), W31-310, x3-8308.


Writing and Humanistic Studies

21W 733
Experimentation, Expression and Experience: An Intensive Writing Workshop

Christopher Sawyer-Laućanno

Mon-Thurs, Jan 8-18, 10 am-12 noon and 1-4 pm in 14N-325. Preregister by Jan 3. Enrollment limited to 15 people. 9 units. A-F grading.

This intensive writing class explores the link between experience and creative expression. Short readings of fiction and non-fiction will demonstrate how a variety of writers have translated their personal experiences into creative work. The writing assignments are aimed at helping you express, in any prose genre, your own observations and experiences. In the morning we will discuss the readings, in the afternoon we will focus on in-class writing, including freewriting, experimentation with forms, and peer critiques of assignments done outside class. Work from this class may be submitted to satisfy Phase I of the Writing Requirement. Contact: Nicholas Altenbernd (altenb@mitvma.mit.edu), 14E-303, x3-7894.


21W 794
Graduate Writing Skills Workshops

David Custer, Prof. James Paradis

Enrollment limited to 50 people. 2 units. A-F grading.

Draft a thesis proposal, thesis chapter, journal article, progress report, or specification, and review the basics of engineering writing. Sessions will cover the processes of organizing and drafting professional papers, improving writing style and revising documents. Students determine their own projects; each project increment receives instructor's editorial suggestions. Contact: Nicholas Altenbernd (altenb@mitvma.mit.edu), 14E-303, x3-9387.


Wellesley

WC JA 101
Beginning Japanese

Eiko Torii, Yasuhiro Omoto

Mon-Fri, Jan 3-30, 9:30 am-4 pm in Pendleton West 202, Wellesley. Preregister by Dec 8. Enrollment limited to 15 people. 12 units. A-F grading.

The object of the course is to build a solid foundation of basic grammar in all four skills – speaking, listening, reading, and writing. The Hiragana and Katakana symbols will be introduced first, and Chinese characters will be gradually introduced. Students who complete the course will be eligible to continue in the regular 102 class for the second semester. Contact: Eiko Torii (etorii@wellesley.edu), Wellesley College, x187-3166.


WC FR 101
Intensive Elementary French

Armelle Crouzieres, Sylvaine Egron-Sparrow

Mon-Fri, Jan 3-30, 9:30 am-12:30 pm (class) and 1:30-3:30 pm (language lab) in Founders 225, Wellesley. Preregister immediately. 12 units. A-F grading.

An intensive introductory course which will include the work of one full semester of French 101. Both class meetings and labs are required. The meetings include audiovisual presentations of the videos French in Action, daily written testing, oral testing, written exercises and lab instructions. There will be a daily video and audio assignment in the language lab. Contact: Wellesley College French Department, Green 228, Wellesley College, 283-2403.


WC GE 101
Intensive Elementary German

Jean Laventhal, Margaret Ward

Mon-Fri, Jan 3-26, 9:30 am-12:30 pm, 1:30-3 pm in Wellesley.. Preregister by Dec 8. 12 units. A-F grading.

This course covers a complete semester of German 101. Afternoons will be occupied with conversation and review work. Contact: Wellesley College German Department, x187-2584.


WC SP 101
Intensive Elementary Spanish

Joy Renjilian-Burgy

Mon-Fri, Jan 3-30, 8:30 am-1 pm in Green Hall 330 (Wellesley). No class on Jan 16. Preregister immediately. 12 units. A-F grading.

An intensive introductory course equivalent to one full semester of Spanish 101, during which you will acquire listening, speaking, reading and writing skills within a cultural context. The course will include written work, lab instruction, testing, exercise correction, tutorial aid and exams. Daily attendance required. Contact: Joy Renjilian-Burgy (jrenjilianbu@lucy.wellesley. edu), Wellesley College, 283-2400 or 235-2700 (leave name, address and phone).


WC RU 101
Intensive Russian 101

Elena Semeka-Pantrokov

Mon-Thurs, Jan 4-30, 11:30 am-3:30 pm in Founders 417, Wellesley. Preregister immediately. 12 units. A-F grading.

Wintersession Russian 101 is an intensive four-week course which covers all the material normally covered during Fall semester: basic grammar, syntax, vocabulary and pronunciation. The Russian language is presented against the background of Russian culture, and examples from literature, art, music and film are frequently used in class. We warmly invite you to seize this opportunity to enjoy the intellectual and linguistic comradeship of Wellesley's congenial Russian Department! Contact: Thomas Hodge (aweiner@lucy.wellesley.edu), Founders 414, Wellesley, 283-3563.


WC HE 201
Modern Hebrew

Frances Malino

Mon-Thurs, Jan 3-30, 9 am-3 pm in Founders 207, Wellesley. Preregister immediately. Prereq: Hebrew experience. 12 units. A-F grading.

Modern Hebrew language and literature will be covered. It is equivalent to a third semester of Hebrew. Contact: Frances Malino, 283-2633.