Aeronautics and Astronautics

AIAA 11th Annual Paper Airplane Contest
Thomas Wong

TBA.

Students get a chance to fly as many paper airplanes as they can make in Lobby 7. Students can bring pre-made paper airplanes or make them with provided supplies. Prizes will be awarded in several categories. Sponsor: Aeronautics and Astronautics. Contact: Thomas Wong (tomwong@mit.edu), 15 Fulkerson St., Cambridge, MA 02141, 497-4367.


Autonomous Aerial Robotics Contest
Prof. John Hansman, Bill Hall, Paul Debitetto

TBA. Preregister by Dec 17.

Help build MIT's aerial robot to be entered in the '95 Aerial Robotics Contest. Work is hands-on hardware construction, sensor integration, electronics design and packaging, software development, and systems testing. All welcome. Sponsor: Aeronautics and Astronautics. Contact: Bill Hall (whall@draper.com), Draper 3H, x8-2416.


16.600
Computational Tools For Engineering

Prof. Kenneth Breuer, Steve Ellis

TBA. Preregister immediately. Not recommended for freshmen. Enrollment limited to 60 people. Preference: department majors. Prereq: 16.010, 16.020, or equivalent. 6 units. P/D/F grading.

Introduction to computational tools and their use in solving engineering problems, analyzing data and presenting scientific results. Covers techniques for the practical use of spreadsheets (XESS), MATLAB, symbolic algebra (MAPLE) and other Athena-based packages. Introduces concepts in numerical solutions to equations, accuracy, interactive techniques, etc. Emphasizes problem solving, not programming or algorithmic development. Contact: Jean Sofronas (jeans@mit.edu), 33-217, x8-5548.


Defense Conversion And Commercialization
Robert Weiss

TBA.

Significant attention has been given to defense conversion in the aerospace industry. These lecures will discuss the approach taken by a relatively small company that had traditionally performed research and development for the Department of Defense, NASA, and other federal agencies. The transition to a more diversified company with significant commercial revenues will be described, with several exampls of the overall strategies and tactics employed. Sponsor: Aeronautics and Astronautics. Contact: Jaime Peraire (peraire@mit.edu), 37-451, x3-1981.


Draper Laboratory Tour
Prof. Wallace VanderVelde, John Sweeney

TBA. Preregister by Jan 4. Enrollment limited to 35 people. Preference: preregistration order. Prereq: Must be US citizen or have a valid Green Card.

We will begin with a film on the history of the Draper Laboratory and its major projects, including the guidance system for the Apollo moon-landing program. We will then visit several areas of the laboratory. Sponsor: Aeronautics and Astronautics. Contact: Luzette Alvarado (alva@mit.edu), 9-327, x3-3518.


Evolutionary Considerations In Mathematics Pedagogy
Alan Natapoff

TBA.

We will demonstrate, using live subjects, a line of evolutionary research into higher brain functions and the pedagogical methods for mathematics that go with it. Sponsor: Aeronautics and Astronautics. Contact: Alan Natapoff, 37-219, x3-7757.


Highlights Of Aeronautics And Astronautics
Prof. Jaime Peraire, Prof. Eric Feron, Marie Stuppard

TBA.

A series of lectures on the activities of the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics will cover areas of interest and research, with oral presentation, films, and/or demos and examples. Sponsor: Aeronautics and Astronautics. Contact: Prof. Eric Feron, 33-107, x3-1991.


Hybrid Finite Element Methods
Prof. Theodore H. H. Pian

TBA. Prereq: knowledge of elementary finite element methods.

We will cover the formulation of finite element methods using multi-field variational principles. Lectures on solid and structural mechanics will include the evolution and recent advances in the construction of element stiffness matrices by the assumed stress hybrid finite element method, and special and effective methods for determining stress intensity factors for 2-D and 3-D fracture problems. Examples in fluid mechanics will include analyses of incompressible viscous flow problems. Sponsor: Aeronautics and Astronautics. Contact: Luzette Alvarado (alva@mit.edu), 9-327, x3-3518.


16.952
Management Topics In Engineering

Dr. Joseph Yamron

TBA. Prereq: permission of instructor. 6 units. A-F grading.

Directed toward the student seeking a career in engineering leading to management, this course provides opportunities to examine topics relating to the conduct of engineering activities within a total management environment with emphasis on cost and risk. Special attention is given to the role of technical staff in the acquisition of new business and long-range planning. Seminar format based on current industrial practice. Contact: Marie Stuppard (mas@mit.edu), 33-208, x3-2279.


Private Pilot Ground School
Nicholas J.M. Patrick

TBA. Preregister immediately.

This is a preparatory course for the FAA's private-pilot written exam. In addition to the basic aeronautical knowledge required by the FAA, which includes meteorology, aircraft performance, navigation, regulations, and physiology, we will present practical operational information. Sponsor: Aeronautics and Astronautics. Contact: Jennifer Leith (jennie@mit.edu), 33-111, x3-4926.


The Uncertain Cosmic Threat
Dr. George Friedman

TBA.

Jupiter was bombarded last summer. Is the Earth next and should we worry? It is a fact that sometime the Earth will be struck by asteroids or comets sufficiently energetic to destroy the human race and another million species. When, how often and how threatening might these objects be? Can they be deflected or intercepted? What is being done and what should be done? Sponsor: Aeronautics and Astronautics. Contact: Prof. Jack Kerrebrock (kerbrock@mit.edu), 33-411, x3-2486.

Evidence Of A Dangerous Universe®ŇTues, Jan 17, 10-11 am in 37-212®ńFirst Major Response To A Cosmic Threat®ŇWed, Jan 18, 10-11 am in 9-150®ńToday's Exciting Levels Of Activities®ŇThurs, Jan 19, 10-11 am in 37-212®ńThe Imbalances And How To Fix Them®ŇFri, Jan 20, 10-11 am in 37-212

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Architecture

4.280
Architecture Internship

Prof. Ann Pendelton-Jullian, Elizabeth Reed, Janet Woods

TBA. Preregister immediately. No listeners. Prereq: 4.125, 4.126. 6 units. P/D/F grading.

Work in an architecture office, gain experience, improve skills, learn about professional practice and the role of construction documents in getting a project built. All participants will be required to attend a weekly morning workshop session on construction documents conducted by two MIT alumni who are practicing architects. IAP interns work in small, medium and large firms, and in public and private agencies. Interns must commit to full-time work throughout IAP. Sponsor: Architecture. Contact: Elizabeth Reed, 12-170, x3-4733.


4.23J
Field-Based SIGUS Workshop On Rebuilding Communities in Belfast, Northern Ireland

Prof. Reinhard Goethert

TBA in Belfast. Preregister immediately. Enrollment limited to 10 people. Preference: students from the School of Architecture and Planning. No listeners. Fee: $1,000 approximately, for travel and living expenses. Prereq: permission of instructor. 3 units. P/D/F grading. H-level Graduate credit.

The workshop will test rapid assessment and planning techniques in the context of a low income neighborhood in Belfast. A five-part process will be tested: understanding problems and opportunities, documentation of key information, development of a community map, identifying a set of actions and tasks, and development of a plan for implementation. Intensive, all-day sessions will feature joint student and community teams with each team charged with assessing and developing viable alternative strategies with the community. A final presentation will be made to government officials, community members and professional planning sectors. Sponsor: Special Interest Group in Urban Settlements (SIGUS). Contact: Prof. Reinhard Goethert (rkg@mit.edu), N5-471A, x3-2402.


4.23J
Sustainable Design For Third World Settlement Planning

Prof. Reinhard Goethert

TBA in Oxford, England. Students should plan to arrive by Jan 15. Preregister immediately. Enrollment limited to 5 people. Preference: students from the School of Architecture and Planning. No listeners. Fee: $1,000 approximately, for airfare, accommodations, and meals. Prereq: permission of instructor. 3 units. P/D/F grading. H-level Graduate credit.

This course will explore key design issues in the provision of settlements for low income housing through institutional intervention. Basic tools and techniques of physical planning appropriate to Third World housing situations will be stressed, structured around four areas: basic measurement, prediction of uses, modeling and design. Conducted in a hands-on workshop format, with groups of students exploring a project of their choice. Offered with the Center for Development and Emergency Planning (CENDEP), Oxford Brookes University, and the Development Planning Unit (DPU), England. Sponsor: Special Interest Group in Urban Settlements (SIGUS). Contact: Prof. Reinhard Goethert (rkg@mit.edu), N5-471A, x3-2402.

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Biology

7.57/HST 180
Genetics And Molecular Medicine

Prof. David Houseman, Prof. Cliff Tabin

TBA. Prereq: 7.012 or 7.013 or 7.014, 7.05. 12 units. Arranged grading.

Introduction to central issues in medical genetics. Significance of karyotypic analysis in clinical genetics and oncology. In-depth consideration of well-defined, genetically based illnesses including cystic fibrosis, muscular dystrophies, and Huntington's diseases. Includes patient presentations, consideration of genetic counseling issues, and the likely clinical impact of new genetic diagnostic techniques. Contact: Erica Beade, E17-543, x3-3016.

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Brain and Cognitive Studies

9.95
Cognitive Science: The Sequel

Prof. Edward Gibson

TBA. 4 units. P/D/F grading.

We will address some interesting topics in cognition that there isn't time to cover in the fall introductions to psychology and cognitive sciences. Attendance required at all sessions for credit. Contact: Robin Fincke (ren@psyche.mit.edu), E10-008, x3-0482.


9.94
Psychology: The Rest Of It

Prof. Alan Hein

TBA. Prereq: 9.00 or equivalent. 3 units. P/D/F grading.

We will review basic and applied components of the field of psychology not addressed in the subject "Introduction to Psychology." Contact: Robin Fincke (ren@psyche.mit.edu), E10-008, x3-0482.

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Chemical Engineering

10.491
Integrated Chemical Engineering II: Statistics

Prof. Herbert Sawin

TBA. Preregister immediately. Enrollment limited to 40 people. Preference: preregistration order. Prereq: 10.490. 4 units. A-F grading.

Students who will be taking 10.491 during the spring term, 1995, may elect to take one of three modules during IAP. The subject of this module will be the statistical analysis of experimental data. Contact: Prof. Herbert Sawin, 66-505, x3-4570.


10.001
Introduction To Computer Methods

Prof. Gregory Rutledge, Jonathan Tan

TBA. Preregister by Nov 30 for Course 10 majors, Dec 1 for freshmen, Dec 2 and later for all others. 6 units. A-F grading.

This course provides an introduction for chemical engineers to the use of computers, software tools and problem solving using Athena. Emphasis is placed on a hierarchy of computational methods, including the basics of C programming, elementary numerical analysis, data visualization, and Maple for symbolic computing. Contact: Linda Mousseau, 66-350, x3-4562.

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Chemistry

Basic Machine Shop
John Annese

TBA. Enrollment limited to 8 people.

Learn the skills needed to safely operate a lathe, drill press, milling machine, and other common machines in a machine shop. Sponsor: Chemistry. Contact: John Annese, 6-023, x3-4509.

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Civil and Environmental Engineering

Beer Tasting
Alain Lavelanet

TBA. Preregister by Dec 11. Enrollment limited to 20 people. Fee: $50 for materials. Prereq: must be 21 or older.

We will discuss the differences between types of beer, breweries, and ingredients. We will tour several of the local microbreweries, including some not open to the general public. You will also have the opportunity to taste beers of all styles from around the world. Sponsor: Civil and Environmental Engineering. Contact: Alain Lavelanet (alainl@mit.edu), 1-235, x3-5321.


1.991
Concrete Canoe Contest

Dr. Jack Germaine

TBA. Preregister by Jan 9. Arranged units. P/D/F grading.

Welcome all to the Concrete Canoe Contest. We will be designing, constructing and using a concrete canoe for the ASCE Concrete Canoe Race in the spring of 1996. Bring your ideas and your friends to help build the canoe and even stick with it through the race. All portions of the construction process will need help! Listeners encouraged. Contact: Dr. Jack Germaine (jgermain@mit.edu), 1-353, x3-7113.


Die Brucke: Bridge Design Competition
Prof. Christopher Leung

TBA. Preregister by Dec 20. Enrollment limited to 20 people. Preference: preregistration order. Fee: $20 for materials.

Participants will design and build a model bridge from a furnished kit of parts (wood, wire, glue, etc.). Specifications for the design will be given at the first meeting. Sponsor: Civil and Environmental Engineering. Contact: Prof. Christopher Leung, 1-280, x3-3544.


Ecology Of The Nile River: Big Dams, Big Canals, And Big Problems
Prof. Elfatih Eltahir

TBA.

The development of large, often international, river basins is a major and exciting challenge for civil engineers and planners.Experience in the Nile River Basin with several large dams and canals will be used to demonstrate the excitment of large-scale conceptual planning, the historical benefits realized by these projects, and several unforseen problems. Sponsor: Civil and Environmental Engineering. Contact: Elfatih Eltahir (eltahir@mit.edu), 48-207, x3-6596.


1.992
Introduction to C++

Prof. Feniosky Pena-Mora

TBA . Preregister immediately. Enrollment limited to 20 people. Preference: course 1 students. 6 units. A-F grading.

This class will focus on the syntactic building blocks for the implementation of computer programs in C++. The concepts covered are abstraction, inheritance, encapsulation, and polymorphism. In addition, this class will cover the use of make files, multiple source files, and debuggers. Compilation in different computer architectures will also be covered. Contact: Prof. Feniosky Pena-Mora (feniosky@mit.edu), 1-253, x3-7142.

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Concourse

345
Problem Solving In Science And Technology

Prof. Robert Rose, Dr. Yuri Chernyak

TBA. Preregister immediately with Cheryl Butters in 20C-224, x3-3200. Enrollment limited to 15 people. Preference: Concourse students. No listeners. Prereq: 8.01 or 8.012, 18.01. 12 units. P/D/F grading.

This special course, referred to by some as "From Russia With Love," originates from past Concourse IAP presentations and has been recognized with an award from the MIT Class of '51 and by Science magazine. It is a very intense experience. The basis of the problems will be the first-term science core at MIT. Dr. Yuri Chernyak, senior research fellow in Harvard/HST, was an associate professor of Physics, Moscow State University. Contact: Cheryl Butters (cbutters@mit.edu), 20C-224, x3-3200.

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Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences

12.213
Alternate Energy Sources

Prof. M. Nafi Toksoz, Prof. F. Dale Morgan

TBA. Also two or three all-day field trips and lab time expected. Optional five-day field trip to California or the Carribean ($250 fee). Preregister immediately with Dan Burns (burns@mit.edu), 54-910, x3-3380. Enrollment limited to enrollmant limited people. Preference: preregistration order. 6 units. P/D/F grading.

Subject explores alternate energy sources and the environmentally friendly use of fossil fuels. Topics include: solar energy, wind power, nuclear and geothermal energy, and removal, disposal, and use of CO2 from fossil fuel plants. Field trips to local power plant sites. Contact: Prof. M. Nafi Toksoz, E34-440, x3-7852.


12.31
An Introduction To Weather Forecasting

Dr. Lodovica Illari

Mon, Wed, Fri, Jan 17-Feb 2, 10:30 am-12 noon in 54-1615. Preregister by Dec 13. Prereq: 8.01, 18.01. 6 units. P/D/F grading.

This will be an introductory subject covering the principles of synoptic meteorology (weather patterns) and weather forecasting. Analysis of hourly weather data and numerical weather prediction models will also be covered. Regular preparation of weather forecasts will be performed. Contact: Dan Burns (burns@mit.edu), 54-910, x3-3380.


12.411
Astronomy Field Camp

Prof. James Elliot

Mon-Fri, Jan 6-31 in Arizona. Preregister immediately with Ginny Siggia in 54-410, x3-9317. Enrollment limited to 6 people. No listeners. Fee: $150. Prereq: 12.410J or 8.287J. 9 units. P/D/F grading.

Learn how professional astronomers carry out their research by participating in a UROP-style project under the supervision of a Lowell Observatory staff member. Participants will use the Lowell 1.1-meter and 1.8-meter telescopes and do extensive data analysis. Requires a written report. Contact: Prof. James Elliot, 54-422, x3-6308.


12.313
Climate Change: Past, Present, and Future

Prof. Maureen Raymo

Mon-Fri, Jan 22-Feb 2, time and place TBA. Preregister by Jan 1. 6 units. P/D/F grading.

The human race is now a significant factor influencing global changes in the Earth's environment and climate. This course will provide a historical (as in geological) context within which to think about global climate change. We will cover the entire spectrum of climate variations, from the formation of the Earth's early atmosphere 4.6 billion years ago, to the ice ages, to the role of CO2 variations in natural climate change, to temperature trends in this century. Contact: Prof. Maureen Raymo (raymo@mit.edu), E34-254, x3-0474 or Dan Burns (burns@mit.edu), 54-910, x3-3380.


12.312
Climate System Computer Lab

Prof. Jochem Marotzke

Jan 8-19, time and place TBA. Preregister by Jan 5 with Dan Burns. Enrollment limited to 15 people. Preference: freshmen. 6 units. P/D/F grading.

Design and use simple models of the atmosphere, the oceans, ice, the carbon cycle, and see how they interact. Create an ice age (or prevent one). See the greenhouse effect at work. This is a hands-on introduction to climate dynamics, with simulations on Macintosh computers (one per participant). No programming experience necessary. Written report required for credit. Contact: Prof. Jochem Marotzke (jochem@sound.mit.edu), 54-1514, x3-5939 or Dan Burns (burns@mit.edu), 54-910, x3-3380.


12.141
Electron Microprobe Analysis

Prof. Tim Grove, Dr. Nilanjan Chatterjee

Tues, Thurs, Jan 9-18, time TBA in 54-1221. Preregister by Jan 5. Enrollment limited to 16 people. 6 units. P/D/F grading.

Introduction to the theory of X-ray microanalysis through Electron Microprobe; lab sessions including analysis of materials with hands-on use of the Electron Microprobe; analytical methods include energy and wavelength dispersive spectrometry, backscattered and secondary electron imaging, X-ray mapping and image analysis will be covered. Recommended reading: Scanning Electron Microscopy and X-ray Microanalysis, Goldstein et al., Plenum Press. Contact: Neel Chatterjee (nchat@mit.edu), 54-1216, x3-1995.


12.12
Environmental Earth Science Field Course

Prof. Sam Bowring

Mon-Fri, Jan 8-17. Return date subject to change. Preregister immediately. Enrollment limited. Fee: $150. Prereq: 12.001 or 12.102. 6 units. A-F grading.

Introduction to the methods of geologic mapping; practical experience in selecting sites for hazardous waste disposal, assessing hazards in seismically and volcanically active areas, and understanding the three-dimensional character of dissected alluvial deposits. The class will travel to Las Vegas, Nevada for the entire duration of the course. Contact: Dan Burns (burns@mit.edu), 54-910, x3-3380 or Sam Bowring (sbowring@mit.edu), x3-3775.


12.311
Experimental Oceanography

Prof. Marcia McNutt, Prof. John Marshall, Prof. John Edmond

Mon-Fri, Jan 22-26, 9 am-5 pm at MIT/WHOI. Preregister by Jan 5. 6 units. P/D/F grading.

This course is an intensive introduction to experimental oceanography, specifically in the areas of marine geology and geophysics, physical oceanography, and chemical oceanography. Includes tour of Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and participation in a research cruise. Transportation is provided. Contact: Dan Burns (burns@mit.edu), 54-910, x3-3380.


12.115
Geology Field Camp

Prof. Clark Burchfiel

Mon-Sun, Jan 8-Feb 2 in Nevada. Preregister immediately. No listeners. Fee: $150. 12 units. A-F grading. H-level Graduate credit.

We will conduct a geological study of a selected field area in southern Nevada, including preparation of maps, field reports, and laboratory analysis of samples. Students are expected to register for 12.115 again in the spring. Contact: Prof. Clark Burchfiel (bcburch@mit.edu), 54-1010, x3-7919.


1222
Hands-On Astronomy

Prof. Chuck Counselman

Mon-Thurs, Jan 8-25, 7 pm-10 pm in 37-562. Preregister immediately by e-mail. A lottery will be conducted and preregistrants will be informed by e-mail before Christmas. Enrollment limited to 18 people. Preference: given to freshmen. 6 units. P/D/F grading.

See and photograph solar system, galactic, and extragalactic objects yourself using six 8-inch telescopes, CCD cameras and computers. Complementary lectures and demonstrations on astronomical objects, motions, coordinates, observing techniques, instrumentation, and current research. Daily reading, problem sets and attendance required. Final quiz. Text: Universe by Kaufmann. Contact: Prof. Chuck Counselman (ccc@space.mit.edu), 37-552, x3-7902.


12.221
Measuring Post-Seismic Deformation And Tectonic Motions In Southern California Using GPS

Prof. Tom Herring, Prof. Brad Hager, Bob King

Mon-Fri, Jan 22-Feb 2 in Southern California. Organizational meeting Dec 18, 5 pm in 54-611. Preregister immediately with Dan Burns, 54-910, x3-3380. Enrollment limited to 10 people. Fee: $150. 6 units. P/D/F grading.

We will observe the fault offsets that occurred during the 1992 Landers earthquake, the results of multiple earthquakes on the nearby San Andreas fault and other active tectonic features. We will perform high-precision GPS experiments to measure post-seismic motion. Upon return to MIT we will analyze the data and discuss the principles and applications of GPS and the dynamics of the earthquake cycle. Contact: Prof. Tom Herring, 54-618, x3-5941.


12.553
Readings in Inverse Theory

Prof. F. Dale Morgan, Dr. William Rodi

TBA. Preregister by Jan 5. 3 units. P/D/F grading. H-level Graduate credit.

Review and discussion of key papers in inverse thoery and applications. Outside readings and in-class presentations expected. Contact: Dan Burns (burns@mit.edu), E34-254, x3-3380.

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Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

6.190
6.270: Tenth Annual Autonomous Robot Design Competition

Bill Baker, Sanjay Vakil, Scott Wilcox, Prof. Leonard Gould

January 8-Feb 2. Schedules TBA.. Preregister by Oct 15. Enrollment limited to limited people. Fee: $50 for materials. 6 units. P/D/F grading.

"6.270" is a class in the mold of Mechanical Engineering's classic 2.70, in which teams of students build machines for a course-consummating competition in 26-100, with the distinction that 6.270's robots are autonomous -- that is, not human-controlled. The class is usually over-subscribed, so a lottery will be held to select participants on October 15. You may enter the lottery as a two- or three-person team or as an individual. Participation in the class is open to the MIT community, and viewing the competition is open to the public. For more information on registering, read the Athena file /mit/6.270/HOW_TO_REGISTER. Contact: Bill Baker (6.270-organizers@mit.edu).

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Experimental Study Group

How To Use A Slide Rule
Craig Watkins

TBA.

Back in the old days, you had to know math to do arithmetic. We will see how slide rules work and why they are useful (No electricity? No problem!), and why slide rules are great fun at parties. Some slide rules will be provided; bring your own if you have one. Sponsor: Experimental Study Group. Contact: Craig Watkins, 24-611, x3-2872.

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Foreign Languages and Literatures

Can We Learn Japanese By Computer?
Prof. Takako Aikawa, Anne LaVin

TBA.

This workshop introduces the tools and the computer-assisted materials available on Athena for learning Japanese. We focus on advanced level students of Japanese who are interested in developing reading skills (e.g., reading newspapers, magazines) and writing skills (e.g., using Japanese word processing software, writing e-mail in Japanese). The workshop will take place at one of the Athena-equipped rooms so that students can actually use and explore our materials. Sponsor: Foeign Languages and Literatures. Contact: Cara Cheyette (carache@mit.edu), 14N-405, x3-4550.


21F 301
French I

TBA

TBA. Preregister by Dec 8 in 14N-305. Enrollment limited to 25 people. 12 units. A-F grading.

Introduction to French language and culture. Emphasis on the acquisition of vocabulary and grammatical concepts through active communication. Immediate exposure to authentic French via video sources and printed materials. Develop cultural awareness as well as linguistic proficiency. Coordinated language lab program. Contact: Cara Cheyette (carache@mit.edu), 14N-310, x3-4550.


21F 401
German I

TBA

TBA. Preregister by Dec 8 in 14N-305. Enrollment limited to 25 people. 12 units. A-F grading.

Introduction to listening, speaking, reading, and writing German. Course will emphasize the use of fundamental grammar in active communication. Language laboratory program supplements class work. This course is a full-time occupation for IAP. Contact: Cara Cheyette (carache@mit.edu), 14N-310, x3-4550.


21F 499
Germany Today: Intensive German Language And Culture

Barbara Hyams

TBA. Preregister by Dec 8 in14N-305, x3-4771. Enrollment limited to 15 people. No listeners. Prereq: four semesters of college-level German. 12 units. A-F grading.

This subject will help students perfect their communication skills and prepare them for working and living in German-speaking countries. Topics include: current political debates, Germany in its European context, scientific and business communities, influence of the media, business German, and the contemporary artistic and cultural scene. Activities: lectures and presentations by German professionals and advanced independent study of the German language using the latest media resources. Contact: Cara Cheyette (carache@mit.edu), 14N-410, x3-4550.


21F 399
Intensive French Language And Culture: Preparing To Work In France

Shoggy Waryn

TBA. Preregister by Dec 8 in 14N-305. Enrollment limited to 15 people. Prereq: seniors, master's and doctoral candidates who are preparing to go to France to do an internship. 12 units. A-F grading.

Learn to express yourself fluently and function in a French work environment. General review of grammar and communication skills, a series of presentations on French science and technology, independent study of French language with an emphasis on science and technology, and an introduction to historical and contemporary aspects of French cultural life. Help will be given to students who do not already have plans through their own departments to secure internships in French companies. Interested students must have contacted Shoggy Waryn by the preregistration date. Contact: Shoggy Waryn (shoggy@mit.edu), 14N-427, x3-9777.


Interactive Media And Learning: Open House
Members of the Foreign Languages and Literatures Section

TBA.

During the Open House, participants can watch, explore, and play with applications for foreign language and humanities learning that make use of the latest interactive technologies. Members of Foreign Languages and Literatures will present programs for French, Spanish, Japanese, Literature, and Film Studies developed at the Laboratory for Advanced Technology in the Humanities. Participants will learn about pedagogical concepts. interactive technologies, and digital media used for development. The Open House will end with an interactive contest. Sponsor: Foreign Languages and Literatures. Contact: Cara Cheyette (carache@mit.edu), 14N-310, x3-4550.


Japanese Language Workshop: Conflict Management and Resolution
Yoshimi Nagaya

Thurs-Fri, Jan 25-26, 10 am-12 noon. Location TBA.. Enrollment limited to 15 people. Prereq: Japanese IV.

Learn how to negotiate and contradict in Japanese in various personal as well as professional situations. How do you disagree with your colleague without offending him/her? How do you confront your friend? How do you give support to the opinion presented, or express doubt about it? This course will teach you useful and culturally appropriate expressions and attitudes on such occasions. Students who plan to go to work or study in Japan are encouraged to take this workshop to acquire these important skills. Students must contact Yoshimi Nagaya (yoshimi@mit.edi) before preregistering for this class. Sponsor: Foreign Languages and Literatures. Contact: Cara Cheyette (carache@mit.edu), 14N-305, x3-4550.


Origami: The Japanese Art of Paper Folding
Anne LaVin

You thought origami was a martial art? Really an ancient Japanese art, origami lets you create a paper model of just about anything, using no scissors or glue. The mastery of a few simple folds and a bit of imagination is all it takes. Folders of all levels are welcome at all sessions, but beginners are encouraged to attend the first session to pick up the basics. There are no prerequisites but a willingness to come and have fun! Local origami artist Michael LaFosse will come and display his amazing origami sculptures, and teach a simple model to the class. His models are incredibly lifelike and have to be seen to be believed! Sponsor: Foreign Languages and Literatures. Contact: Anne LaVin (lavin@mit.edu), E40-359B, x3-0510.

Beginning Origami
Monday, Jan 22, 5-7 pm in TBA

Continuing Origami
Tues, Jan 23, 5-7 pm

Advanced Origami
Wed, Jan 24, 5-7 pm

Guest Speaker - Michael LaFosse
Thurs, Jan 25, 5-7 pm


21F 701
Spanish I

TBA

TBA. Preregister by Dec 8 in 14N-305. Enrollment limited to 25 people. Prereq: must plan to continue Spanish. 12 units. A-F grading.

Introduction to understanding, speaking, reading, and writing Spanish. Maximal use of fundamentals of grammar in active communication. Audio- and video-based language laboratory program coordinated with and supplementary to class work. Contact: Cara Cheyette (carache@mit.edu), 14N-310, x3-4550.


The Kimono
Prof. Shigeru Miyagawa

TBA.

A demonstration and lecture on the Japanese kimono – types of kimono, how to wear one, and the historical and cultural context. The presentation will be given by members of the Hakubi Kimono School, the largest kimono school in Japan. Sponsor: Foreign Languages and Literatures. Contact: Cara Cheyette (carache@mit.edu), 14N-305, x34771.

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Health, Science and Technology

HST 141
The Molecular And Biochemical Basis Of Some Clinical Disorders

Paul Gallop, Prof. Irving London

Tues, Thurs, Jan 9-Feb 1, 9 am-12 noon in TBA. Preregister immediately. Prereq: 7.05. 10 units. A-F grading. H-level Graduate credit.

Study a variety of human diseases and the underlying molecular and biologic basis for the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of the disorders. Lectures by faculty and seminars conducted by students with tutorials and supervision by faculty. Whenever possible, appropriate patients will be presented and discussed. Appropriate for students who have had a course in biochemistry and/or molecular biology. Contact: Paul Gallop, E25-519, 735-6838.

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Literature

Fifth Annual (But Who's Counting) Salute To The Wacky Wonderful Doctor Seuss
Prof. Henry Jenkins

TBA.

Are you ready for some "fun that is fun?" Do you want it in a box or with a fox? Do you want to learn more about the master of nonsense who remains perhaps the most important children's writer of the post-war era? Do you want to see films, such as Five Thousand Fingers of Dr. T, listen to stories, and perhaps, by accident, learn something about the history of American childhood? Then, the Seuss Salute's for you. Bring friends of all ages. Sponsor: Literature. Contact: Prof. Henry Jenkins, 14N-437, x3-3068.

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Sloan School of Management

A Brief Introduction To Law
Dr. Jeffrey Meldman

TBA.

During its 26 years with IAP, this popular series has introduced more than 2,000 participants to fundamental aspects of American law. Four attorneys who teach at MIT will speak. No preregistration. You may attend any sessions you choose. Sponsor: Sloan School of Management, Political Science, Office of Career Services and Preprofessional Advising. Contact: Dr. Jeffrey Meldman (jmeldman@mit.edu), E56-290B, x3-4932.


Demystifying The Job Interview
Hillary De Baun

TBA.

How can you prepare for the all-important interview, be successful negotiating its hurdles and emerge victorious from round one? Are you aware of the differences between structured and unstructured interviews, or of open and closed interview schedules? Find out all you can before you start interviewing. This activity, designed for undergraduates, will clear up misconceptions about interviewing through a slide presentation and questions and answers. Sponsor: Sloan School of Management. Contact: Sloan Undergraduate Office (skarkut@mit.edu), E56-290, x3-8614.


15.952/15.973
Foreign Currency Exchange Bourse Game

Prof. Jiang Wang

Tues-Fri, Jan 16-20, 8:30 am-5 pm in TBA. Attendance at all meetings is required.. Preregister by Dec 8. Enrollment limited to 28 people. No listeners. 3 units. P/D/F grading. H-level Graduate credit.

This realistic simulation game provides hands-on experience in the trading of international currencies. Students compete in teams, using special computer, audio-visual, and communications technology designed by a major international bank for training its professional traders. Students will meet with the staff from this bank for training lectures and discussions. Teams will be composed of management and non-management students. Contact: David Weber (dweber@mit.edu), E52-171, x3-7161.


Marketing Your Skills: How To Write A Resume And Cover Letter
Hillary De Baun

TBA.

How do you market yourself? Can you use more than one kind of resume? What do you list as your career objective if you are unsure? What is wrong with an all-purpose cover letter? Should you include your GPA? All these questions, and more, will be discussed in a two-hour session designed primarily for upperclass undergraduates. Sponsor: Sloan School of Management. Contact: Sloan Undergraduate Office (skarkut@mit.edu), E52-101A, x3-8614.

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Materials Science and Engineering

In Vino Veritas
Prof. Linn Hobbs

TBA. Enrollment limited to 64 people. Fee: $TBA for materials. Prereq: must be 21 or older.

Harvard cannot lay claim to all the verities! This introductory class in wine appreciation, now in its 15th year, with over 700 enthusiastic alumni/ae, will acquaint participants with the truth about wines from around the world through comparative tastings of about 50 fine wines. Enrollment is limited and this offering is perennially oversubscribed, so immediate registration with payment of class fee is advised. Sponsor: Materials Science and Engineering. Contact: Prof. Linn Hobbs (hobbs@mit.edu), 13-4062, x3-6970.

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Mathematics

Bridge Tournament
Prof. Tom Leighton

TBA.

The Mathematics Department challenges all MIT bridge players to a team-of-four tournament. Refreshments offered, prizes awarded. Come and have a good time. Sponsor: Mathematics. Contact: Prof. Tom Leighton (ftl@math.mit.edu), 2-377, x3-3662.


Choreographic Topology
Prof. Jim Propp, Steve Sawin

TBA.

We will study knots and their deformations into one another by linking hands to form knots. We'll start with the isotopy between the figure-eight knot and its mirror-image. Participants are welcome to suggest their own experiments. Sponsor: Mathematics. Contact: Prof. Jim Propp (propp@math.mit.edu), 2-363, x3-6544.


Integration Bee
Maria Pritykim, Ephrem Paredes

TBA. Prereq: 18.01.

Preliminary written competition is open to all students. Top ten go on to spelling-bee style contest to find MIT's new Grand Integrator. Only 18.01 skills required. Prizes awarded. Spectators welcome. Sponsor: Mathematics. Contact: Undergraduate Mathematics Office, 2-108, x3-4977.


Math Department Music Recital
Julie Rehmeyer

TBA.

This annual concert provides an opportunity for those in the mathematics community, together with family and friends, to perform for one another. Come to play or listen. Sponsor: Mathematics. Contact: Julie Rehmeyer (jjr@mit.edu), 2-229, x3-1589.


18.095
Mathematics Lecture Series

Math Faculty

TBA. Prereq: 18.01. 6 units. P/D/F grading.

This series of lectures will cover a wide range of mathematics topics, focusing on subjects not treated in introductory courses. Accessible to anyone with a calculus background. There will be a weekly problem session in addition to the lectures. Students taking 18.095 for credit are expected to attend regularly and to do supplementary homework. Contact: Prof. Jim Propp, 2-363, x3-6544.


Mathematics Movie Mini-Marathon
Henry Cohn

TBA.

How can you turn a sphere inside out without getting kinky? What can flying through hyperbolic space teach us about linked circles in Euclidean space? Learn the answers to these and other questions from some of the best math movies ever made. Sponsor: Mathematics. Contact: Henry Cohn (cohn@mit.edu), 500 Mem Dr. room 211, x5-8711.


Phase Two Mathematical Writing
Prof. Steve Kleiman

TBA.

Workshop designed to help math majors fulfill Phase II of the Writing Requirement by developing and improving their papers. Sponsor: Mathematics. Contact: Prof. Steve Kleiman (kleiman@math.mit.edu), 2-278, x3-4996.

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Mechanical Engineering

2.67
Mechanical Engineering Tools

Prof. Douglas Hart, Prof. Kevin Otto

TBA. Preregister immediately. Preference: limited to majors. 6 units. P/D/F grading.

Introduces the fundamentals of machine tool and computer use. Students work with a variety of machine tools including the bandsaw, milling machines, and lathe. Instruction given on the use of the Athena network and Athena-based software packages including MATLAB, MAPLE, XESS, and CAD. Emphasis on problem solving, not programming or algorithmic development. Assignments are project-oriented relating to mechanical engineering topics. It is recommended that students take this subject in the first IAP after declaring their major in Mechanical Engineering. Contact: Liv Galendez (livcg@mit.edu) or Stacy Morris (sjm@mit.edu).


2.672
Project Laboratory

Prof. TBA

TBA. Preregister by Dec 14. Enrollment limited to 9 people. No listeners. Prereq: 2.01, 2.02, 2.20, 2.40, 2.671. 6 units. A-F grading.

Engineering laboratory subject with a major emphasis on interplay between analytical and experimental methods in solution of research and development problems. Contact: Peggy Garlick, 3-154, x3-2305.

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Music and Theater Arts

21805
Theater Practicum: Escape From Happiness

Prof. Alan Brody, Bill Fregosi

Rehearsals afternoons and evenings throughout IAP. Preregister by Dec 7 with Anne Richard (arichard@mit.edu), 14N-207, x3-3210. No listeners. Prereq: at least one studio subject or permission of the instructor. 6 units. A-F grading.

Participate in Dramashop's production of Escape From Happiness, by George F. Walker. Directed by Janet Sonnenberg, this production offers design and technical opportunities as well as a chance to act. Contact: Prof. Janet Sonnenberg (json@mit.edu), 14N-233C, x3-4921.

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Nuclear Engineering

22.904
A Hands-On Introduction To Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

Prof. David Cory

TBA. Preregister immediately. Enrollment limited to 8 people. 3 units. A-F grading. H-level Graduate credit.

The course provides a hands-on introduction to nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging, including practical implementation and basic theory. Contact: Prof. David Cory (dcory@mit.edu), NW14-4111, x3-3806.


All You Want To Know About Atomic Simulations
Prof. Sidney Yip, Vasily Bulatov

TBA.

Covers everything from overview to nitty gritties in an informal lecture/seminar/workshop format for curious non-experts to working professionals. Course includes molecular dynamics, cellular automata, parallel computing, and visualization (videos). Invited participants from MIT and elsewhere. Optional second week. A special focus is to promote awareness and discussion of materials research applications in industry. First day attendance particularly recommended Sponsor: Nuclear Engineering. Contact: Sidney Yip (syip@mit.edu), x3-3809, 24-208.


Applications Of The TEMPEST Thermal-Hydraulic Code
Prof. Neil Todreas

TBA.

In this course we will discuss applications of TEMPEST: a digital thermal hydraulic code. Sponsor: Nuclear Engineering. Contact: Prof. Neil Todreas (todreas@mit.edu), 24-219, x3-5296.


Discussion Of Some Of Boltzmann's Contributions To Thermodynamics
Prof. Elias Gyftopoulos

TBA.

Last year marked the 150th anniversary of Boltzmann's birth. In this seminar, we will review Boltzmann's ideas about microscopic versus macroscopic phenomena, reversibility and the age of the universe, and the expression for entropy from a contemporary point of view. Sponsor: Mechanical Engineering, Nuclear Engineering. Contact: Prof. Elias Gyftopoulos, 24-109A, x3-3804.


22.92864
Energy In Perspective

Marvin Miller, Prof. Michael Driscoll, Prof. Richard Lester

TBA. Preregister by Dec 13. 6 units. A-F grading.

An overview of energy production, delivery, transformation and end use in technological, economic, environmental, and sociopolitical dimensions. Special emphasis on greenhouse gas warming, renewable resources, more efficient use of energy, fear of radiation, nuclear proliferation and the future of nuclear fusion power, and technologies of the future, e.g., nuclear fusion and the hydrogen economy. Contact: Richard Lester (rklester@mit.edu), E40-291, x3-7704.


How The Beer Industry Can Improve Nuclear Plant Management
Prof. Kent Hansen, Loren Simons, Michael Turek

TBA. Enrollment limited to 16 people.

Nuclear power plants function in a complex social/political environment. This subject presents a systems dynamics model of their interactions. Participants will play a board game, based on the beer industry, to illustrate complex dynamics. We will then present the nuclear plant model and some quantitative analysis. Sponsor: Nuclear Engineering. Contact: Prof. Kent Hansen, E40-391, x3-7384.


22.903
Neutron And X-Ray Reflectometry

Prof. Xiao-Lin Zhou

TBA. Enrollment limited to 10 people. Preference: graduate students with adequate math background. 3 units. A-F grading. H-level Graduate credit.

Neutron and X-ray reflectometry is a recently developed probe for the investigation of thin films, surfaces, and interfaces. This course will train students in all fundamental aspects of reflectometry so they can understand and use reflectometry for condensed matter and soft condensed matter research. Contact: Prof. Xiao-Lin Zhou (xlzhou@mit.edu), 24-215A, x8-7430.


22.921
Nuclear Power Plant Dynamics And Control

John Bernard, Prof. Allan Henry, Prof. John Meyer

TBA. Preregister by Dec 13. Preference: level of grad credit. 3 units. A-F grading.

Nuclear power plant dynamics involve unique non-linear systems due to delayed neutron effects and to thermally induced feedback effects. Engineers need to understand these effects. The rapid development of digital systems with control applications affords ideal methods for solving the non-linear control problems with systems that are insensitive to human error. Course includes lectures and demonstrations. Contact: Carol Medeiros, NW12-208, x8-5858.


Nuclear Power Plant Field Trip
Jeff Hughes

TBA. Preference: Nuclear Engineering students.

Depending on interest, one or two field trips to area nuclear power plants will be arranged. Announcements of time and place will be made during IAP. Sponsor: Nuclear Engineering, American Nuclear Society. Contact: Jeff Hughes (jchughes@mit.edu), NW12-306B, x3-4218.


The North Korean Weapons Program: Trading Plutonium For Power Plants
Prof. Ronald Ballinger, Warren Stern

TBA.

The Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea (DPRK) has entered into an agreement with the IAEA whereby the metallic uranium fuel that was irradiated in the test reactor at Nyongbyon will be "stabilized" and eventually transferred from the site to the US for disposal. In return, the world community has agreed to supply the DPRK with two 1000 MWe nuclear power plants. Among the issues discussed in this seminar will be the political issues related to the agreement, both historical and current, and issues related to fuel stabilization. The fuel is metallic uranium which has been stored under water and is rapidly degrading by corrosion processes. An effort is now underway to dry out the fuel and to place it into safe containers, both from a corrosion as well as an inspection point of view. Sponsor: Nuclear Engineering. Contact: Ronald Ballinger (hvymet@mit.edu), 24-221, x3-5118.


22.922
Visualization Methods For Evaluation Of Engineering Materials And Structures

Richard Lanza, Eric McFarland

TBA. Preregister by Dec 13. Enrollment limited to 15 people. Prereq: Computer basics. 3 units. P/D/F grading.

The use of computer-based imaging systems for the visualization of complex data and of three-dimensional objects has been applied to fields such as fluid flow and medical imaging. Recently, we have been applying many of the techniques of modern imaging and visualization to non-destructive testing. This course will introduce undergraduate MIT students to imaging technology used to evaluate and test industrial materials and engineering structures rather than for medicine. Non-medical imaging allows a broader range of choices of radiation and imaging methods. Topics include radiography and tomography with X-rays and neutrons, impedance imaging, and magnetic resonance imaging. Examples from current research in areas such as corrosion detection, determination of material properties, and of visualization of material structures will be discussed. Students will also be expected to complete a lab project. Contact: Richard Lanza (lanza@mit.edu), NW13-219, x3-2399.

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Ocean Engineering

Effective Speaking
Barbara Smith

Tues, Thurs, Jan 9-Feb 1, 4-6 pm in TBA. Preregister immediately. No listeners.

Have you always wondered why some people seem at ease in public speaking? Have others told you to speak up because you speak too softly, or perhaps you are self-conscious because of your foreign accent? Well, this course is for you! You will learn the proper techniques for projecting your voice and delivering that talk. Sponsor: Ocean Engineering. Contact: Barbara Smith (bsmith@rainbow.mit.edu), 5-320, x3-0137.


13.465
Ocean Instrumentation Field Laboratory

Prof. Jerome Milgram, Christopher Von Alt

TBA at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute.. Preregister by Dec 13. Enrollment limited to 10 people. Preference: students from MEng program. No listeners. 6 units. A-F grading.

This course offers both a classroom background and hands-on field experience at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute. Emphasis on modern oceanographic instrumentation, including the operation of side scan sonar, conductivity, temperature, depth, and optical backscatter systems; modern underwater acoustic navigation and tracking techniques; underwater systems for coastal research and monitoring; and underwater vehicle operation. Contact: Prof. Jerome Milgram (jmilgram@minnow.mit.edu), 5-318, x3-5943.

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Physics

8.21
Advanced Classical Mechanics

Prof. Michel Baranger

Mon-Fri, Jan 8-Feb 2, three hours per day. . Prereq: 8.033. 6 units. A-F grading.

Topics to be discussed include Principles of Lagrangian Mechanics (calculus of variations, Hamilton's principle, constraints, continuous media, rigid-body motion), Hamiltonian Mechanics (phase space, Liouville's theorem, symmetries and conservation laws), and integratable vs. non-integratable problems (constants of the motion, phase space trajectories or integratable systems, phase space trajectories of non-integratable systems (numerical study only, no theory!)). Contact: Prof. Michel Baranger (baranger@mitlns.mit.edu), x3-4848.


8.122
Advanced Project Laboratory

Prof. Richard Yamamoto

Tues-Thurs, Jan 9-Feb 2, 10 am-12 noon, 1-5 pm; Fri, Jan 9-Feb 2, 10 am-12 noon, 1-4 pm in TBA. Preregister by Dec 22 in Physics Undergraduate Office, 4-352. Enrollment limited to 10 people. No listeners. Prereq: 8.03. 9 units. A-F grading.

A laboratory subject that offers students the opportunity to carry out experimental physics projects of their own design. Emphasizes contemporary ideas in laboratory techniques and the use of on-line data acquisition whenever possible. Projects designed by students are based on physics phenomena they have encountered in coursework or on their own. Faculty teach students how to use various laboratory instruments, cope with possible systematic errors in their results, and determine statistical errors from numerical data. Contact: Prof. Richard Yamamoto (rky@mitlns.mit.edu), 24-043C, x3-6073.


Feynman Films For Lunch
Mark Bessette

Bring your lunch and watch eight Richard Feynman films. The Last Journey of a Genius is about Feynman's lifelong dream of traveling to Tannu Tuva. Sponsor: Physics. Contact: Mark Bessette, 4-309, x3-4844.

The Law Of Gravitation
Tues, Jan 9, 12 noon-1 pm in 6-120

The Relation Of Mathematics To Physics
Thurs, Jan 11, 12 noon-1 pm in 6-120

The Great Conservation Principles
Tues, Jan 16, 12 noon-1 pm in 6-120

Symmetry In Physical Law
Thurs, Jan 18, 12 noon-1 pm in 6-120

The Distinction Of Past And Future
Tues, Jan 23, 12 noon-1 pm in 6-120

Probability And Uncertainty
Thurs, Jan 25, 12 noon-1 pm in 6-120

Seeking New Laws
Tues, Jan 30, 12 noon-1 pm in 6-120

The Last Journey Of A Genius
Thurs, Feb 1, 12 noon-1 pm in 6-120


Frontiers In Physics For Freshmen
Prof. Earle Lomon

TBA. Prereq: 8.01.

A series of one-hour lectures requiring only a freshman physics background. Sponsor: Physics. Contact: Isabel Cunha-Vasconcelos (isabelcv@mit.edu), x3-4842.


8.20
Introduction To Special Relativity

Prof. Saul Rappaport

Mon-Fri, Jan 8-Feb 2. Time and place TBA.. Preregister by Dec 22. Prereq: 8.01, 8.02, 18.01. 9 units. A-F grading.

Reviews nineteenth-century science leading to special relativity, Einstein's approach to science and postulates of relativity, Lorentz transformation, length contraction and time dilation, four vectors and transformations of four vectors, Lorentz invariants, relativistic energy and momentum, relativistic kinematics and collisions, massless particles, Doppler shift, space-time diagrams, relativity paradoxes, and the impact of relativity. Possible special introductory topics include the principle of equivalence and the general theory of relativity, gravitational redshift, and the bending of light in a gravitational field. This subject is aimed at the freshman and sophomore levels. Contact: Isabel Cunha-Vasconcelos (isabelcv@mit.edu), 4-352, x3-4842.


Physics Research: The Cutting Edge
Prof. Earle Lomon

TBA. Prereq: 8.01.

Physics faculty members who are leaders in their fields will discuss current exciting discoveries. Sponsor: Physics. Contact: Isabel Cunha-Vasconcelos (isabelcv@mit.edu), x3-4842.


8.235
Superconductivity

Prof. A. Nihat Berker

Mon-Fri, Jan 8-19 and Jan 26-Feb 2, 2-3:30 pm in 12-132. Prereq: introductory quantum and statistical mechanics. 6 units. A-F grading.

Topics to be covered include experiments and phenomenology, perfect conductance and perfect dimagnetism, thermodynamics and the energy gap, elecron pairing, Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory, quasiparticles, phase transition and free energy, suppression of Coulomb repulsion, type I and II superconductors, vortices, coherence and penetration lengths, lower and upper critical fields, Landau theory, critical phenomena, Ginzburg criterion and Liquid-crystal analog. Contact: Prof. A. Nihat Berker, x3-2176.

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Political Science

Bread Making
Laurie Gould, Kathy Hess

TBA.

Learn how to bake great homemade bread. Sponsor: Political Science. Contact: Kathy Hess, x5-8106.


17.909
How To Write A Course 17 Thesis: The Basis Of Political Science Research

Prof. Charles Stewart, Eugene Gholz, Jeff Lewis

TBA. 3 units. P/D/F grading.

This course is intended for students who are writing or will write a thesis in Course 17. It will cover research methods, focusing on avoiding common pitfalls in framing questions and collecting evidence. Assigned readings will include examples of both good and bad approaches to social science research. For the last meeting, students will write and present their own research proposals. Contact: Jeff Lewis (jblewis@mit.edu), E53-438, x8-5888.


Malcolm X: Make It Plain: Screening And Discussion
Tobie Weiner

TBA.

Join us as we screen the newest documentary about Malcolm X, Malcolm X: Make it Plain. The film will be followed by open discussion facilitated. Sponsor: Political Science, Office of Minority Education. Contact: Tobie Weiner (iguanatw@mit.edu), E53-460, x3-3649.


17.912
Participation In The Presidential Primaries

Mark Johnson, Prof. Steve Ansolabehere

Mon, Jan 8-22, Tues, Jan 9, Wed, Jan 10, 10-11:30 am in TBA. 6 units. P/D/F grading.

This course is designed around participation by the students in the presidential promary process. It involves lectures regarding the nature of primary political campaigns, a meeting with the different campaign committees for the various candidates at which time the student will choose a campaign to work on, participation with that campaign organization during the remainder of January, and a final report summarizing the experience. Contact: Mark Johnson (markj@mit.edu), 3-264, x3-7604.


17.902
Political Science Internship And Research

Prof. Charles Stewart, Tobie Weiner

Tues, Jan 9, 4 pm in TBA for first meeting only. Individual schedules depending on internship placement. Preregister immediately. 6 units. P/D/F grading.

Supplement your classroom learning with hands-on experience in settings where political activity, policy-making, and implementation actually occur. Placement possibilities include legislators’ offices, legal service organizations, human health agencies, advocacy groups and organizations concerned with issues such as public health, the environment, the homeless and more. Students should expect to continue at least part-time during spring semester. Contact: Tobie Weiner (iguanatw@mit.edu), E53-460, x3-3649.


17.903
Volunteer To Work In A Homeless Shelter Or Other Community Service Organization

Prof. Daniel Kryder, Tobie Weiner, Amy Black

Tues, Jan 9, 3 pm in TBA for first meeting only. Preregister by Dec 6. 3 units. P/D/F grading.

Want to try community service work? Serve dinner to guests in a shelter, tutor or play games with kids, paint a building, work in a food pantry...try something different. Get out in the world and receive MIT credit for it! We'll meet as a group three times during IAP, but you'll choose your service organization and the hours you volunteer (at least 4-6 per week). Contact: Tobie Weiner (iguanatw@mit.edu), E53-460, x3-3649.


Wine Tasting
Prof. Charles Stewart

TBA. Prereq: must be 21 or older.

Discover the joys of wine tasting! Sponsor: Political Science. Contact: Charles Stewart, x3-3127.

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Urban Studies and Planning

11.228
Introduction To Computers In Public Management II

Prof. Joseph Ferreria, Prof. Qing Shen, Laura Lebow

TBA. Prereq: 11.227. 3 units. A-F grading.

This module consists of lectures and laboratory exercises. You will learn how to build and use databases and create clear and factual thematic maps from demographic data. Two-part homework assignment due Feb 2. Course reader available from Graphic Arts Copy Center in Building 11 after Dec 17. Contact: Mary O'Neil, 9-514, x3-0779.


11.957
Intuitively Obvious: Racial Perspectives on Video

Prof. Clarence Williams, Georgiana Rivers

TBA. Preregister by Dec 11. Enrollment limited to 40 people. No listeners. 3 units. P/D/F grading.

The Intuitively Obvious film series was created to help break down cultural and racial barriers on campus. Produced at MIT, it is composed of four videos, each focusing on a different racial group's experiences regarding race matters. Students will be expected to watch, discuss, and write a two-page response to each film. The last student discussion will be taped to produce a fifth video. Contact: Georgiana Rivers (adrivers@mit.edu), x5-7184.


11.956
The Art And Science Of Negotiation

TBA

TBA. Enrollment limited to 36 people. 3 units. P/D/F grading.

This course will help you understand conflict and develop skills to be a more effective negotiator. A series of role-playing games will give you an opportunity to test your skill and understanding and discover firsthand the difficulties and complexities that are involved in negotiations. Contact: Paula Anzer, 7-337, x3-2024.

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Women's Studies

SP 408
Gender Outlaws: Beyond Male And Female

Prof. Mary Parlee

TBA. Preregister by Dec 11. Enrollment limited to 15 people. 3 units. P/D/F grading.

Workshop on transgender, transsexual, intersex challenges to binary sex/gender categories. Readings on historical and anthropological evidence of "third" genders, multiple sexes. Medical and legal constructions of a two-sex, two-gender system in contemporary North America are contrasted with accounts by persons who refuse, or do not fit, this binary sex/gender system. Readings, films, exercises, and guest speakers. Contact: Prof. Mary Parlee (mparlee@mit.edu), E10-044A, x3-7626.

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Program in Writing and Humanistic Studies

21W 733
Experimentation, Expression And Experience: An Intensive Writing Workshop

Christopher Sawyer-Laucanno

TBA. Preregister by Jan 3. Enrollment limited to 15 people. 9 units. A-F grading.

This intensive writing class explores the link between experience and creative expression. Short readings of fiction and non-fiction will demonstrate how a variety of writers have translated their personal experiences into creative work. The writing assignments are aimed at helping you express, in any prose genre, your own observations and experiences. In the morning we will discuss the readings, in the afternoon we will focus on in-class writing, including freewriting, experimentation with forms, and peer critiques of assignments done outside class. Work from this class may be submitted to satisfy Phase I of the Writing Requirement. Contact: Nicholas Altenbernd (altenb@mitvma.mit.edu), 14E-303, x3-7894.


21W 794
Graduate Writing Skills Workshops

David Custer, Prof. James Paradis

Sections TBA. Enrollment limited to 50 people. 2 units. A-F grading.

Draft a thesis proposal, thesis chapter, journal article, progress report, or specification, and review the basics of engineering writing. Sessions will cover the processes of organizing and drafting professional papers, improving writing style and revising documents. Students determine their own projects; each project increment receives instructor's editorial suggestions. Contact: Nicholas Altenbernd (altenb@mitvma.mit.edu), 14E-303, x3-9387.

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Admissions Office

Early Action Telethon
Yvonne Romero

TBA.

The first opportunity to talk to prospective members of the Class of 1999! Come help the Admissions Office contact admitted students. Your help will be invaluable to us and especially to the prospects who may have questions about life at MIT. This is a great way to get a glimpse of the incoming freshman class. Refreshments will be provided for students who work the telethon. Sponsor: Admissions Office, Alumni Office. Contact: Yvonne Romero (yvonne@mitvmc.mit.edu), 10-100, x8-5506.


The Mysteries of Admissions
Vincent James

TBA.

A look at what really happens when decisions are made about who is (and who is not) offered admission to MIT. Bring your questions. Sponsor: Admissions Office. Contact: Yvonne Romero (yvonne@mitvmc.mit.edu), 10-100, x8-5506.

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Campus Police

Adult And Pediatric Heartsaver Course (Level B): Initial CPR
Officer Paul Baratta

TBA. Preregister by Dec 13. Enrollment limited to 16 people. Preference: preregistration order. Fee: $20.

This eight-hour certification course will cover adult resuscitation with one-person techniques, infant resuscitation, and obstructed airways in conscious or unconscious victims. CPR cards will be issued approximately 30 days after successful completion of the course. Sponsor: Campus Police. Contact: Sean Spencer (sspencer@mit.edu), W31-215, x3-9750.


Advanced Rape Agression Defense (RAD)
Sgt. Steve Daley, Sgt. Cheryl Vossmer, Officer Paul Baratta

Mon, Wed, Thurs, Jan 8-11 and Jan 22-Feb 1, 5:30-8 pm. Location TBA. No class on Thurs, Jan 25 or Mon, Jan 29. Attendance is mandatory at all sessions.. Preregister immediately. Enrollment limited to 16 people. Preference: limited to women. No listeners. Fee: $20 for materials. Prereq: basic RAD.

This sixteen-hour advanced course builds upon the basic information on personal safety, awareness, risk reduction and avoidance. Advanced RAD teaches proficient defense techniques. Advanced RAD also offers the opportunity to test these learned skills on real people during a high-level simulation attack. Information on equivalent self-defense classes for men is available from Campus Police. Sponsor: Campus Police. Contact: Campus Police Crime Prevention Unit (crimbite@mit.edu), W31-215, x3-9755.


Defensive Driving
Officer William Smith

TBA. Preregister by Dec 15. Enrollment limited to 20 people. Preference: preregistration order. Fee: $2.50.

This course provides drivers with tips on defensive driving as well as information on the laws against drinking and driving. Upon completion of the course, each participant will receive a certificate from the Massachusetts Safety Council. Sponsor: Campus Police. Contact: Sgt. Cheryl Vossmer (crimbite@mit.edu), W31-215, x3-9755.


Rape Aggression Defense (RAD)
Sgt. Cheryl Vossmer, Officer Paul Baratta, Chief Anne Glavin, Sgt. Stephen Daley

TBA. Attendance at all sessions of a section is mandatory to prepare for simulation training. Preregister immediately. Enrollment limited to 15 people. Preference: limited to women. Fee: $20 for materials.

This twelve-hour course provides basic information on personal safety. Awareness, prevention, risk reduction and avoidance are stressed as women learn to be more aware of their surroundings. RAD teaches practical defensive techniques that require no special skills. RAD also offers women the opportunity to test these techniques on a real person during a simulated attack. Information on equivalent self-defense classes for men is available from Campus Police. Please call for more information. Sponsor: Campus Police. Contact: Sgt. Cheryl Vossmer (crimbite@mit.edu), W31-215, x3-9755.

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Center for Materials Science and Engineering

Characterization of Materials in the Scanning Electron Microscope
Michael Frongillo, Dr. Neil Rowlands

Tues-Fri, Jan 16-19, 9 am-12 noon in 13-2137, 1-4 pm in lab.. Preregister by Dec 22. Enrollment limited to 10 people.

The application of state-of-the-art SEMs in the characterization of semiconductors, metals, ceramics, and polymers will be discussed. Instrumental optimization for the analysis of diverse materials will be considered, and the various ancilliary analytical tools that are available for complete chemical and physical characterization will be discussed. Ample hands-on instrument time will be made available. Sponsor: Center for Materials Science and Engineering. Contact: Michael Frongillo, 13-1034, x3-5092.


Introduction to Surface Analysis
Libby Shaw

Wed, Jan 24-31, 2-5 pm in 13-2137. Preregister by Jan 18.

A general intrduction to several useful techniques for looking at the structure and chemical composition of solid surfaces with a sampling depth of a few atomic layers. We will summarize how each technique works, its strengths and limitations, and some of the research questions these methods help to answer. Methods discussed include Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), and Atomic Force Micronscopy (AFM). Sponsor: Center for Materials Science and Engineering. Contact: Libby Shaw (elshaw@mit.edu), 13-4149, x3-5045.


Introduction To Vacuum Technology And Thin Film Deposition
Richard Perilli, Larry Stelmack

Tues-Fri, Jan 16-29, 1-4 pm in TBA. Preregister immediately. Enrollment limited to 20 people.

This course is intended for researchers who have had limited exposure to high vacuum and thin film deposition systems. Terminology, types of systems and subsystems (i.e., types of vacuum pumps and various types of deposition systems and techniques), methods, and maintenance of these systems will be discussed. Lectures will be supplemented with relevant lab tours and demonstrations. Sponsor: Center For Materials Science and Engineering. Contact: Richard Perilli, 13-3022, x3-7653.


Transmission Electron Microscopy of Materials
Dr. Anthony Garratt-Reed, Dr. Neil Rowlands

Mon-Fri, Jan 8-12, 9 am-12 noon in 13-2137, 1-4 pm in lab. Preregister by Dec 22. Enrollment limited to 10 people.

A variety of TEM and STEM techniques for the analysis of materials will be discussed. The main themes will be high resolution imaging, electron diffraction methodology, energy dispersive analysis and energy loss spectroscopy. Sample preparation and analysis of such diverse materials as polymers, semiconductors, ceramics, and minerals will be covered. Afternoon sessions will be devoted to equipment demonstration and usage. Sponsor: Center for Materials Science and Engineering. Contact: Dr. Anthony Garratt-Reed (tonygr@mit.edu), 13-1027, x3-4622.

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Center for Transportation Studies

Hot Topics In Transportation
Prof. Joseph Sussman

TBA.

This is a series of independent seminars on some of the exciting issues in transportation today. Sponsor: Center for Transportation Studies. Contact: Prof. Joseph Sussman, 1-163, x3-4430.


Space And The Substitutability Of Communication For Transportation
Michael Bernard

TBA.

This lecture-seminar is an extension of previous IAP topics on transportation facilities and space. The interesting consideration of substituting communication for physical transport or movement, and its various implications, will be explored Sponsor: Center for Transportation Studies. Contact: Michael Bernard, 969-2495 or Carl Martland, 1-176, x3-5326.


Transportation Research Board's Annual Meeting
Carl Martland

Thurs, Jan 4, 18, 25, 3-5 pm in 1-236.

This is for students, faculty, and staff who are interested in the 1996 Annual Meeting of TRB, to be held in Washington, Jan 7-11. There will be a pre-copnference meeting to prepare a strategy for obtaining the maximum amount of information from the meeting, and two post-trip meetings in which attendees will summarize what they have learned. Sponsor: Center for Transportation Studies. Contact: Carl Martland, 1-153, x3-5326.

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Edgerton Center

Can The Edgerton Center Help Your Project?
Charles Mazel

TBA.

The Edgerton Center is dedicated to facilitating hands-on activities at MIT. If you are a student, staff or faculty with a need to access equipment, working space or advice – perhaps to offer a seminar you've long been interested in, or to overcome a stumbling block in a UROP project – we may be able to help. This will be an informal session to introduce you to the mission, facilities, and capabilities of the Edgerton Center. Sponsor: Edgerton Center. Contact: Charles Mazel (chm@mit.edu), 4-406, x3-4629.


Catching Bullets, Shock Waves, And Other Elusive Events
Prof. Kim Vandiver

TBA.

A slide presentation of color-schlieren photographs of bullets, bubbles, candles and more. The 45-minute presentation will be followed by an optional laboratory demonstration. Sponsor: Edgerton Center. Contact: Charles Mazel (chm@mit.edu), 4-406, x3-4629.


6.070705
Electronics Project Laboratory

Prof. J. Kim Vandiver

TBA. Preregister immediately. Enrollment limited to 10 people. 6 units. A-F grading.

Familiarization with electronics test equipment such as oscilloscopes, meters (voltage, resistance, inductance, capacitance, etc.), and signal generators. Hands-on format emphasizing individual instruction and development of skills, such as soldering, assembly, and troubleshooting. Each student will build (and keep) an electronics kit, such as AM-FM superhetrodyne radio, to serve as the vehicle for learning about electronics test and measurement equipment. Sponsor: Edgerton Center. Contact: Prof. J. Kim Vandiver (kimv@mit.edu), 5-222.


MITEE Mouse: Racing Robot
David Otten, Tony Caloggero

TBA.

This overview will include videotaped and live demos of the international sport of micromouse racing. A micromouse is a small, self-contained, computer-controlled robot that competes against the clock to solve and navigate a 10'x10' maze. Sponsor: Edgerton Center. Contact: Charles Mazel (chm@mit.edu), 4-406, x3-4629.


Slow Motion Action: Capturing The Whole Image
Tony Caloggero

TBA.

A good opportunity to catch things that move quicker than the eye on video. The high-speed video camera will allow you to catch fast moving objects at one-thousand frames per second. Bring an object of your desire (within reason) and a blank videocassette to capture your slow motion moment. Sponsor: Edgerton Center. Contact: Charles Mazel (chm@mit.edu), 4-406, x3-4629.

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Lincoln Labs

Technical Seminar Series
Gary Hackett

TBA.

Members of the technical staff at Lincoln Laboratory will present technical seminars on current research areas. The Laboratory's fundamental mission is to apply science, by means of advanced technology, to critical problems involving space surveillance, ballistic missile defense, tactical battlefield systems, communications, and air traffic control systems. Sponsor: Lincoln Laboratory. Contact: Gary Hackett (hackett@ll.mit.edu), LIN-A-128, 981-7056.

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MIT-Japan Program

Eats Meets West: Let's Make And Eat Sushi
Debbi Samuels

TBA.

Professional instruction in traditional methods of sushi-making and eating etiquette. In the second session, Japanese women demonstrate how to prepare and enjoy sushi. Attend one or both sessions. Sponsor: MIT Japan Program, MIT Japan Friendship Association. Contact: Cornelia Robart (robart@mit.edu), E38-754, x3-2839.


Introduction To Aikido
Prof. Dick Stroud

TBA.

Aikido, a martial art, means "the way of harmony through action." The underlying philosophy is one of non-aggression; its practice leads to heightened reflexes, increased strength, and balance in both body and spirit. Wear loose clothing and let your body learn a movement or two. Sponsor: MIT Japan Program. Contact: Cornelia Robart (robart@mit.edu), E38-754, x3-2839.


Japanese Film Series: The Best Of...
Cornelia Robart

TBA.

In Japanese with English subtitles. Sponsor: MIT Japan Program. Contact: Cornelia Robart (robart@mit.edu), E38-754, x3-2839.


Japanese Tea Ceremony
Glenn Pereira Sorei

TBA. Preregister by the Wed before the session. Enrollment limited to 35 people. Fee: $1 for materials.

Like King Arthur's Round Table, the Japanese tea ceremony was developed to promote harmony and elevated thinking. A Urasenke tea instructor, and members of the MIT Japan Friendship Association teach you its ancient beauty and etiquette. Sponsor: MIT Japan Program. Contact: Cornelia Robart (robart@mit.edu), E38-754, x3-2839.


Let's Sing In Japanese
Mitsuko Barker, Miko Sato

TBA. Enrollment limited to 25 people. Fee: $1 for photocopies.

Professional singer Miko Sato and members of the MIT Japan Friendship Association will teach traditional Japanese songs and world favorites in Japanese. Come to any and all sessions. Bring a pencil. No expertise required. Sponsor: MIT Japan Program. Contact: Cornelia Robart (robart@mit.edu), E38-754, x3-2839.


Seminar On Japan And Germany: Fifty Years After World War II – What Roles For The New Century?
Cornelia Robart

TBA in E38-7th floor conference room.

Lectures by specialists on topics of interest to Japan-aware students, teachers, and practitioners of science, technology, and/or management. Sponsor: MIT Japan Program. Contact: Cornelia Robart (robart@japan.mit.edu), x3-2839.


Those Magnificent Men In Their Flying Machines
Prof. Dave Wilson

TBA.

Japan International Birdman Competition 1994 for student-built gliders and human-powered planes. Hilarious, heart-warming, suspenseful video showing launchings – and landings – of homemade craft. In Japanese with English commentary. Sponsor: Mechanical Engineering, MIT Japan Program. Contact: Cornelia Robart (robart@mit.edu), E38-754, x3-2839.


Tour Of Little Tokyo At Porter Square
Takeo Kuraishi

TBA. Enrollment limited to 10 people. Fee: $1.70 subway fare.

Japanese MIT students will guide you to the Japanese bookstore, grocery store, gift boutique and noodle shops, nearly all under one roof. Learn Japanese culture, customs, and culinary delights. Stay for lunch if you like. Exotic, fascinating, delicious, and nearby! Sponsor: MIT Japan Program. Contact: Cornelia Robart (robart@mit.edu), E38-754, x3-2839.

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Operations Research Center

The Practice Of Operations Research
Prof. James Orlin, Tim Kniker, Sean Williams

TBA.

Operations research is the science of modeling and decision-making. How is it done? What are careers in operations research like? Come hear practitioners in industry, the public sector, and academia discuss their work and today's exciting challenges. Sponsor: Operations Research Center. Contact: Tim Kniker (knish@mit.edu), E40-130, x3-6185.


What Is Operations Research?
Prof. Jim Orlin

TBA.

Operations research is the scientific approach to decision-making and resource allocation. Faculty of MIT's Operations Research Center present their perspectives. Intended for undergrads and grad students considering operations research as a course of study or career. Sponsor: Operations Research Center. Contact: Tim Kniker (knish@mit.edu), E40-130, x3-6185.

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Physical Plant

All About Plants
John Butts, Rob Lyons

TBA.

Drop in with questions concerning all phases of home gardening. We will cover topics such as indoor and outdoor plant and shrub care and lawn maintenance. We will also demonstrate the tools and techniques to successfully propagate and repot your plants. Sponsor: Physical Plant. Contact: John Butts, W59-104, x3-6350.


Basic Plumbing And Pipe Fitting
Jack Narcotta, Chuck Katin

TBA.

We will present an overview of the capabilities of the pipe and plumbing shop, including how to solder copper pipe, cut and thread iron pipe, repair a toilet tank, and repair kitchen and bathroom faucets. Sponsor: Physical Plant. Contact: Jack Narcotta (jnarcotta%mitppl@mitvma.mit.edu), E19-129, x3-4748.


Clown Alley
Bill Wohlfarth

TBA. Preregister by Jan 8. Preference: Technology Children's Center members.

Join in the fun with Rainbow, a veteran Shriner's clown. Volunteers will be introduced to the fine art of grease paint, juggling and balloon animals. We will discuss makeup, costumes and types of clowns. Bring your children. Sponsor: Physical Plant. Contact: Bill Wohlfarth (wpwohlfa@mit.edu), E18-269, x3-1741.


Confined-Space Rescue: Living On The Edge!
David Barber

TBA.

This demonstration will provide a look at Physical Plant's confined-space rescue team and its capabilities. A brief overview of the OSHA confined-space standard will be offered prior to continuous varied rescue simulations. Sponsor: Physical Plant. Contact: David Barber (dbarber@mit.edu), E18-263A, x3-8022.


Cross-Country Skiing
Bob Cunkelman

TBA. Preregister by Jan 5. Enrollment limited to 6 people. Preference: students. Prereq: experienced skiers only.

Day trip to conservation land in Lincoln, MA. Transportation provided. Bring equipment or rent for approximately $5/hour. Bring your own lunch. If there is no snow we will go mountain biking instead. Sponsor: Physical Plant. Contact: Bob Cunkelman (rpc@mit.edu), E18-260, x3-6371.


Home Repair And Improvements
Carmen Lepore, Joe Vella, Pat Mullins

TBA.

We will cover basic residential construction and maintenance. Demonstrations will include the installation of locksets, roofs, and floor tiles. Please bring your questions. Sponsor: Physical Plant. Contact: Carmen Lepore, E18-121, x3-6353.


Residential Wiring
Steve Miscowski, Tom Reynolds

TBA. Preregister by Jan 17. Enrollment limited to 25 people. Preference: preregistration order.

Basic house, apartment and condo wiring will be explained. Electrical fundamentals, safety, wiring devices and techniques will be demonstrated. Sponsor: Physical Plant. Contact: Steve Miscowski (smiscowski%mitppl@mitvma.mit.edu), E19-139, x3-6302.


Window Glazing
Arthur Pitari, Paul Rudack

TBA.

We will discuss basic window replacement, types of windows, caulking, heat loss and energy conservation. Sponsor: Physical Plant. Contact: Arthur Pitari, E18-169, x3-6355.

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Undergraduate Education and Student Affairs

Charm School
Alberta Lipson

Tues, Jan 30, 12 noon-4 pm in Lobby 7.

How do I ask for a date? What do I do when I walk into a party and I don't know anyone? How can I get to know my professors? How can I interview better? These questions and many more will be answered at Charm School. This will be the fourth year of this highly successful event which is meant to be fun as well as informative. Contact Alberta Lipson (20B-140, 3-8604) for further information, to help with planning, or to volunteer for a "faculty" position Sponsor: Undergraduate Education and Student Affairs. Contact: Alberta Lipson (lipson@mit.edu), 20B-140, x3-8604.


Employment Regulations for F-1 Students
Milena Levak, Danielle Guichard-Ashbrook

TBA.

This seminar will focus on on/off-campus work and employment for practical training allowed by current immigration regulations for F-1 visa holders. Sponsor: Undergraduate Education and Student Affairs. Contact: Maria Brennan (mariab@mit.edu), 5-106, x3-3795.


How To Win An Eloranta Fellowship
Norma McGavern

TBA.

Several $5,000 summer research fellowships will be awarded this spring to undergraduates working on an independent project – a research investigation or creative study that can be described as student-originated or student-directed. The area of study or research can be in any field – science, engineering, the humanities, arts, or social sciences. Stipends can be used to cover living expenses, travel, or materials and services. Proposals are due April 3, 1995. Come and learn how to write a winning proposal. Sponsor: Undergraduate Education and Student Affairs. Contact: Norma McGavern (ngavern@mit.edu), 20B-140, x3-4849.


J-1 Visa Workshop
Milena Levak

TBA.

The International Students Office will present a workshop focusing on employment regulations, medical insurance, and the two-year home residency requirement for J-1 students as outlined by the United States Information Agency. Sponsor: Undergraduate Education and Student Affairs. Contact: Maria Brennan (mariab@mit.edu), 5-106, x3-3795.


Puppets And Little People: A Bird's Eye View Of The Magic Flute
Marshall Hughes

TBA.

This is the third year for this visually and vocally delightful project for MIT preschoolers. Grownups will prepare the puppets, but kids from MIT daycare and selected area elementary schools will paint the sets and then enjoy seeing their sets in use. Dragons, castles, and royalty abound, but the sense of accomplishment and enjoyment in the kids' eyes is the best rush ever. Sponsor: Undergraduate Education and Student Affairs. Contact: Marshall Hughes (devil@mit.edu), 7-103, x3-1668.


UROP Exploration: How To, When To, Why To, Where To, Who To
Debbie Shoap

TBA.

A comprehensive discussion and question-answer session about UROP – its philosophy, goals, and role within the context of the undergraduate educational experience. Sponsor: Undergraduate Education and Student Affairs. Contact: Debbie Shoap (shoap@mit.edu), 20B-140, x3-8801.


Working After Graduation: Immigration Concerns
Milena Levak

TBA.

A Boston attorney, specializing in immigration, will present a seminar focusing on rules regulating employment opportunities for international students after graduation. Sponsor: Undergraduate Education and Student Affairs. Contact: Maria Brennan (mariab@mit.edu), 5-106, x3-3795.

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Wallace Observatory

Tour Of The Wallace Observatory
Heidi Hammel, Maren Cooke

Fri, Jan 26, 6-11 pm at the Wallace Observatory. Jan 29 is cloud date. Preregister immediately by e-mail only. Transportation will be provided for 15; up to 25 more may attend if they provide their own transportation. Enrollment limited to 40 people. Preference: freshmen.

Come and see the stars! MIT's own astronomical observatory in Westford, MA, has 24-, 16- and 14-inch telescopes, CCD cameras and computers. Call after 5 pm on the day of the tour for a taped weather message. Sponsor: Wallace Observatory. Contact: Ginny Siggia (siggia@astron.mit.edu), 54-410, x3-9317.

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Athletics and Fitness

Figure Skating Lessons
Bonny Kellerman, Esther Horwich, Sally DeFazio

TBA in MIT Skating Rink, Johnson Athletics Center.

Small group instruction will be provided to those with figure skates who can skate forwards and backwards. Learn to jump, spin, and perform other fun maneuvers. Sponsor: MIT Figure Skating Club. Contact: Kamyar Ghandi (kghandi@mit.edu), Ashdown 212D, x5-9584.


Ice Dancing Lessons
Esther Horwich

TBA in MIT Skating Rink, Johnson Athletics Center.

Do you have figure skates and know how to skate forwards and backwards? Would you like to learn something new and interesting? Try ice dancing. We'll provide instruction for basic ice dance steps and help you learn some dance patterns. Singles and couples welcome. Sponsor: MIT Figure Skating Club. Contact: Kamyar Ghandi (kghandi@mit.edu), Ashdown 212D, x5-9584.

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Careers

IAP Externship Program
Barbara Luby

TBA. Preregister by October 13.

This is a great opportunity for sophomores and juniors to shadow an alumnus/a in his/her workplace to get a feel for what a career in a particular field might be like. It will be scheduled during the weeks of January 15-19 and January 22-26. Students who are interested are encouraged to pick up an application from the bulletin board outside 10-140. Sponsor: MIT Alumni/ae Association, Student Alumni/ae Council. Contact: Barbara Luby, 10-140, x3-0708.

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Computer Languages and Applications

A Crash Course in C
Anand Mehta

TBA. No preregistration. Enrollment is unlimited. Prereq: some programming experience (i.e., Basic).

Want to learn C but don't have time for 1.00? This activity will cover the basics of C programming: writing simple programs, functions, pointers, arrays, structures, input/output, and files. For more information and handouts, see the URL http://www.mit.edu:8001/afs/sipb/project/www/iap/iap-c3.html Sponsor: Student Information Processing Board. Contact: Anand Mehta (amehta@mit.edu), 6-110, 441-0427.


Introduction To Programming Threads
John Hawkinon

TBA.

For the intermediate to advanced programmer. Introduces threads and gives basics for programming the POSIX 1003.4A draft 8 thread standard. Includes creating and destroying threads, mutexes, condition variables, thread-specific data, I/O, debugging techniques, and C library issues. For more info, type "add sipb; iap" on Athena. Sponsor: Student Information Processing Board. Contact: John Hawkinson (jhawk@mit.edu), W20-557, x3-7788.


LaTeX: Mathematical Text Formatting
Anand Mehta

TBA.

LaTeX, a text formatter available on Athena, simplifies writing papers with math. The first class covers the basics of LaTeX, and the second covers more advanced features including tables, figures, bibliographies, and macros. For more information, and handouts, see the URL http://www.mit.edu:8001/afs/sipb/project/www/iap/iap-LaTeX.html. Sponsor: Student Information Processing Board. Contact: Anand Mehta (amehta@mit.edu), 6-110, 441-0427.

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Computers - General

Computer Graphics Workshop
Kenneth Russell, Thad Starner

TBA. Enrollment limited to 20 people. Prereq: 6.001.

This course will cover the basics of 3-D computer graphics using the Open Inventor graphics tool kit. Class will be tought in the Scheme programming language. Text: The Inventor Mentor. Sponsor: MIT Computer Graphics Society. Contact: Kenneth Russell (kbrussel@mit.edu), E15-394, x3-0366.


Linux on MITnet
John Hawkinson

TBA. Prereq: basic knowledge of UNIX.

Linux is a fully functional, stable, and free UNIX clone for x86-based PCs. Using it can give your computer partial Athena functionality ranging from zephyr to AFS to gcc. Topics will include whether Linux is right for you, system requirements, installation, configuration, use, maintenance, and more. For more info, type "add sipb;iap" on Athena. Sponsor: Student Information Processing Board. Contact: John Hawkinson (jhawk@mit.edu), W20-557, x3-7788.


Making NetBSD Work For You
John Hawkinson

TBA. Five one-hour sessions. Prereq: basic knowledge of UNIX.

NetBSD is a freely available UNIX-like operating system which runs on several types of computers. If your computer is connected to Resnet, you can add basic Athena software to NetBSD and make it act much like an Athena workstation. This course will cover why you might want to run NetBSD, where to get it, how to install and configure it, and how to manage it. It will include demonstrations of NetBSD on a 486. Sponsor: Student Information Processing Board. Contact: John Hawkinson (jhawk@mit.edu), W20-557, x3-7788.

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Film, Photography, and Television

Basic Darkroom Techniques
Thery Mislick, Ed McCluney

See SAA brochure. Enrollment limited to 16 people. Fee: $40 for MIT students, $60 otherwise.

Learn your way around a darkroom, how to develop film and print photographs. Non-class darkroom use included. Bring exposed, unprocessed roll of black-and-white film to first class. Sponsor: Student Art Association. Contact: Ed McCluney, W20-429, x3-7019.


Basic Photography
Thery Mislick, Phil Tuths, Ed McCluney

See SAA brochure. Enrollment limited to 16 people. Fee: $40 for MIT students, $60 otherwise.

Introduction to photography. Will cover the camera, darkroom, and shooting techniques. Bring camera and an unexposed roll of Kodak Tri-X or Kodak TMAX 400 film to first meeting. Students supply camera, film and paper. Non-class darkroom use included. Sponsor: Student Art Association. Contact: Ed McCluney, W20-429, x3-7019.


Learning To See
Thery Mislick, Ed McCluney, Dennis Stein

See SAA brochure. Enrollment limited to 16 people. Fee: $40 for MIT students, $60 otherwise.

Develop your ability to see what's interesting and what isn't. Learn how to photograph people in ways that are compositionally better. Using still video and traditional camera, we explore the geometry of the image space. Bring camera and film to first class. Sponsor: Student Art Association. Contact: Ed McCluney, W20-429, x3-7019.


Non-Class Darkroom
Thery Mislick, Ed McCluney

See SAA brochure. Enrollment limited to 15 people. Fee: $35 for MIT students, $55 otherwise.

Use of the SAA darkroom, including equipment and selected chemicals for black-and-white film developing and printing. Users assist in maintaining darkroom. Sponsor: Student Art Association. Contact: Ed McCluney, W20-429, x3-7019.


Prisoner Marathon
Patrick LoPresti, Dave Hollingsworth

Sat-Sun, Jan 20-21,10 am-7 pm in TBA.

The Prisoner is a unique television series from the sixties. It is complete, consisting of 17 one-hour episodes which we will view in two marathon sessions. On the surface, it is a well done (if somewhat surreal) action/suspense show, but closer inspection reveals many levels of meaning. Reminiscent of Huxley and Orwell, it is a refreshing change from the mindless sludge so common on modern television. Sponsor/contact: Patrick LoPresti (patl@eiffel.lcs.mit.edu), NE43-62a, x3-6028.


Technique Yearbook 1996
Lori Maiorino, Ana Echaniz

Mon, Wed, Fri, Jan 8-Feb 2, 12 noon-8 pm in W20-451.

Technique, MIT's yearbook will be doing final book production during all of IAP. Photogrpaers are welcome to take, develop, and print photographs. Beginners are welcome to come and learn to print high-quality photography. Layout designers and writers are also needed. Technique provides a fun and friendly atmosphere for students to participate in the creation of MIT's finest publication. Food will be provided. Sponsor: Technique. Contact: Lori Maiorino (technique@mit.edu), x3-2980.

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Literature

Tours Of The MIT Science Fiction Society Library
Chris Hooker, Toby Elliott

In the MITSFS Library, W20-473. Schedule will be posted on the door of the library, or can be accessed on Athena by "attach mitsfs" or "finger mitsfs[@monk.mit.edu]".

The MIT Science Fiction Library is the largest open-to-the-public collection of science fiction in the world and not to be missed! The tours are an extension of regular library hours to encourage the MIT community to come visit us and browse. Sponsor: MIT Science Fiction Society. Contact: Chris Hooker (cjhooker@mit.edu), W20-473, x8-5126.

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MIT Programs and Services

Nightline New Staffer Training
Nightline Staff

TBA. Preregister by Dec 8.

Training for new Nightline staffers, aimed at improving listening skills and increasing famjiliarity eith a whole range of student concerns. If you're interested in helping other students, consider joining Nightline. We are available to listen and to talk, whether the topic is stress, insomnia, relationships, depression, harassment, or anything. Sponsor/contact: Alice Man (DO NOT PRINT), 66-353, x3-8800.

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Multicultural Activities

Miniseries On Chinese Culture
Alice Wang

TBA.

Ever had a craving for Chinese food? Learn how to make it yourself! Then, go with us to Chinatown to see how the professionals do it! Or, learn some chinese calligraphy and impress your friends. Too active for you? Come by and fold paper cranes or cut dragons out of a piece of paper! And when it's all over, join us for a grand finale guaranteed to please! (Watch for postings.) Sign up for any/all of the events and learn a bit about what 5,000 years of culture can produce! Sponsor: Chinese Students Club. Contact: Alice Wang (ecila@mit.edu), x5-8291.

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Visual Arts

Basic Drawing
Dick Stroud, Ed McCluney

See SAA brochure. Enrollment limited to 10 people. Fee: $30 for MIT students, $45 otherwise.

Working from models, develop fresh ways of seeing using mediums on paper. We will study interrelationships between drawing, painting, and design with conventional dry materials as well. Sponsor: Student Art Association. Contact: Ed McCluney, W20-429, x3-7019.


Basic Life Drawing: From Klutz To Genius
Susan Anderson, Ed McCluney

See SAA Brochure. Enrollment limited to 20 people. Fee: $30 for MIT students, $45 otherwise.

The gift of sight is a sense that can be encouraged and developed through practice. Drawing is play that works to open ability in a broad range of disciplines, especially the higher theoretical ones. This brief class is practical for any level of ability, time constraint, and follow-through. Sponsor: Student Art Association. Contact: Ed McCluney, W20-429, x3-7019.


Beginning Potter's Wheel
Hana Balaban, Jeff Margolin, Erika Hartweig, Ed McCluney

See SAA brochure. Enrollment limited to 10 people. Fee: $35 for MIT students, $45 otherwise.

Discover the working properties of clay. This intensive course will focus on learning to center on the wheel as the basis for forming round objects such as bowls and cups. Sponsor: Student Art Association. Contact: Ed McCluney, W20-429, x3-7019.


Intaglio
Ed McCluney

Thurs, Jan 12-Feb 2, 6:30-9:30 in W20-429. Enrollment limited to 10 people. Fee: $30 for MIT students, $45 otherwise.

Etching is multiple reproductions of the same marks from a master plate created using acid. This class starts with dry point on zinc plates. The class will then create intaglio plates which combine multiple materials, methods and the acid bath. Experimentation encouraged. Sponsor: Student Art Association. Contact: Ed McCluney, W20-429, x3-7019.


Intermediate Potter's Wheel
Tsuya Chin, Ed McCluney

See SAA brochure. Enrollment limited to 10 people. Fee: $35 for MIT students, $45 otherwise.

An opportunity for potters with prior experience to add to their technical and creative abilities. Sponsor: Student Art Association. Contact: Ed McCluney, W20-429, x3-7019.


Life Drawing
Zrinka Orr, Ed McCluney

See SAA Brochure. Enrollment limited to 20 people. Fee: $30 for MIT students, $45 otherwise.

The focus of this course is developing the ability to record what one sees. A variety of media will be used, including pencil, charcoal, and colored pencils. Sponsor: Student Art Association. Contact: Ed McCluney, W20-429, x3-7019.


Non-Class Clay
Ed McCluney

See SAA brochure. Enrollment limited to 20 people. Fee: $20 for MIT students, $40 otherwise.

Use of the ceramics studio outside of class time. Includes clay, glazes, firing. Users assist in maintaining studio. Sponsor: Student Art Association. Contact: Ed McCluney, W20-429, x3-7019.


Sculpture
Bob Wilt, Ed McCluney

See SAA brochure. Enrollment limited to 12 people. Fee: $35 for MIT students, $45 otherwise.

Techniques of handbuilding will be explored, along with using and testing low-fire glazes and clay. Focus on creativity, color, and finishing pieces. Learn to create vessels, boxes, masks, jewelry, toys, figures, and whatever else you desire. Sponsor: Student Art Association. Contact: Ed McCluney, W20-429, x3-7019.


Tacky Ceramics
Irene Abrams, Ed McCluney

See SAA brochure. Enrollment limited to 10 people. Fee: $35 for MIT students, $45 otherwise.

Greenware shops slipcast all sorts of interesting shapes, from Thanksgiving turkeys to Venus de Milo to Elvis busts. In this four-week class we will purchase some of these unconventional forms, decorate them with low fire glazes and end up with some fun and unusual sculptures. Please bring $15 to the first class to pay for supplies. Sponsor: Student Art Association. Contact: Ed McCluney, W20-429, x3-7019.


Watercolor
Valerie Jayne, Ed McCluney

See SAA brochure. Enrollment limited to 12 people. Fee: $30 for MIT students, $45 otherwise.

Introductory watercolor techniques using opaque and transparent paint. Work mainly from studio setups plus your imagination. Color theory and brush work will be explored. Open to all levels. Some materials extra. Sponsor: Student Art Association. Contact: Ed McCluney, W20-429, x3-7019.