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Reinhart

Thigh Pack

Reinhart When Kelly Reinhart was six-years old, she had an idea that would launch her into a kind of life that few children get to experience: that of a successful entrepreneur, inventor, and V.I.P.

It all started when Kelly's parents asked each of their seven children to draw a picture that represented an idea for a new product, just for fun. Kelly, after having seen cowboys wearing holsters in Westerns she had seen on TV, drew a picture of a person wearing a holster—like thigh pack, which she thought would be useful for carrying portable video games and such. The rest, as they say, is history.

Today, at 9 years old, Kelly is a fourth—grader at Atkinson Elementary in North Andover, Massachusetts and she serves as the chairperson of TPak International, a company with nearly $1 million in orders for the thigh packs Kelly designed. "I had no idea this was going to be such a success," she said.

The thigh packs took off after Kelly's parents had a prototype made which they later developed into a design that could be mass produced with the help of a friend in China. Meanwhile, Kelly took the pack to school to do some marketing research by getting thoughts and reactions from her friends. Several improvements were made before the Reinharts patented the design, had 100 packs made, and sold them at a flea market. Gradually they realized there was quite a lot of interest in the thigh packs, especially after they were asked to supply orders of 20,000 to 100,000 pieces after presenting them at trade shows in Atlantic City and Las Vegas.

That's when the Reinharts looked for some help. The Massachusetts Manufacturers Partnership Program sent them to Ron Marfione, who owns a promotional marketing company in nearby North Reading, Massachusetts. Marfione became an equal partner with Kelly and Bob Reinhart. The team isn't sure at this point whether they'll continue to manufacture the thigh packs or sell the idea to another party in the future.

Meanwhile, however, Kelly has been busy talking about her product and her future plans with the likes of Massachusetts Congressman John Tierney and Pentagon officials, including the Secretary of the Army. She even met President Bush between meetings.

"I met with [The Pentagon] to see if the army can use my invention for military purposes," said Kelly. "They liked my idea so much, they set up an appointment with special operations at MacDill Air Force Base in Tampa, Florida. I flew down there and met with many military professionals. They are looking into giving me a research and development contract ."

Kelly is also attending college classes at Merrimack College, which gave her a special grant to attend classes for free. In addition, she has started a foundation for kids who wish to pursue their dreams, and she's also authored a book, "This Little Pack Goes to the Market," which she hopes will help kids to realize that "every idea is a good idea."

"The advice I can give to other kids is let their parents know or an adult that they have an idea," Kelly said. "If the adult does not pursue anything with it, then put the idea in a folder for a later day until [the child is] old enough to bring up again or when they know who to approach."

About her future plans, Kelly said, "I want to be a senator so I can help people and educate them on the process of business and help make it easier to find money for making dreams come true."

[September 2001]

 

 

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