Inventing Modern America: From the microwave to the mouse buy the book about the book links and resources about the Lemelson-MIT program games
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Doug Engelbart
Thomas Fogarty
Ashok Gadgil
Stephanie Kwolek
Doug Engelbart Biography The first mouse, built by Doug Engelbart in the mid-1960s. Two wheels kept track of the device's movements. Patents In 1968, Engelbart donned a headset microphone and demonstrated his oNLine System (NLS) to a crowd of computer scientists. The NLS also included a new kind of keyboard—users typed letters by striking a combination of its five keys. Videos The first mouse was a simple hollow-out wooden block, with a single push button on top.
Doug Engelbart at work in his office in 1974, using his first personal workstation.

Doug Engelbart at work in his office in 1974, using his first personal workstation.
When he was just 25, Doug Engelbart had an epiphany about his life's purpose. "If you could do something to improve human capability to deal with the increasing complexity of the world," he thought, "then you'd really contribute something basic." Almost 20 years later, Engelbart unveiled the result of that idea: a graphic computer system, controlled by a special keyboard and something called a mouse, that would let people work together on documents, manipulate complex ideas, even from far-flung locales.

The idea of the graphic computer, in 1950
"It just went together within an hour or two, about what computers could do," Engelbart remembers. "Because I'd been a radar technician I knew how radar made images on the oscilloscope, and also how radar electronics could change things on the screen. I knew that if a computer could punch cards or print on paper, it could draw things on the screen."
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Doug Engelbart Thomas Fogarty Ashok Gadgil Stephanie Kwolek Paul MacCready
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