Library
lbgtstudent
Collection Total:
887 Items
Last Updated:
Mar 4, 2011
Let Our Voices Be Heard!: Christians Lesbians in Europe Telling their Stories
Say it Loud I'm Black and I'm Proud: Black Pride Survey 2000
Kindred Spirits: An Anthology of Gay and Lesbian Science Fiction
Worlds apart: An anthology of lesbian and gay science fiction and fantasy
Long Time Passing
MAKING WAVES (Asian American Studies/Women's Studies)
Gay and Lesbian Poetry in Our Time
Word of Mouth: 150 Short-Short Stories by 90 Women Writers (v. 1)
Hidden from History: Reclaiming the Gay and Lesbian Past (Meridian)
Hidden from History: Reclaiming the Gay and Lesbian Past (Meridian)
Hidden from History: Reclaiming the Gay and Lesbian Past (Meridian)
How Do I Look: Queer Film and Video
Women's Glibber: State-of-the-Art Women's Humor
Kadinlarin bellegi: Uluslararasi Kadin Kutuphaneleri Sempozyum tutanaklari, 8-10 Ekim 1991, Istanbul = Women's memory : proceedings of the International ... Eserleri Kutuphanesi ve Bilgi Merkezi Vakfi)
Write from the Heart: Lesbians Healing from Heartache : An Anthology
This book speaks to the human condition, the sorrows and losses, disappointments and fears. Poetry, pose, Q & A sections, and diary-type entries fill this anthology about the losses of woman/woman relationships, whether by break-up or death.
Angry Women (Re/Search ; 13)
16 cutting-edge performance artists discuss a wide range of topics—from menstruation, masturbation, vibrators, S&M and spanking to racism, failed Utopias and the death of the Sixties. Armed with total contempt for dogma, stereotype and cliche, these creative visionaries probe deep into our social foundation of taboos, beliefs and totalitarian linguistic contradictions from whence spring (as well as thwart) our theories, imaginings, behavior and dreams.
Barrack Buddies and Soldier Lovers: Dialogues With Gay Young Men in the U.S. Military (Haworth Gay and Lesbian Studies) (Haworth Gay and Lesbian Studies)
Among all the literature published on gays in the military, Steven Zeeland?s first book remains one of a kind. Barrack Buddies and Soldier Lovers is a raw, unsanitized personal record of conversations the author had with young soldiers and airmen stationed in Frankfurt, Germany. Zeeland?s intimate involvement with these men enabled him to document in honest, visceral terms the day-to-day reality of gay military men?s lives and how they work, play, and, in many instances, how the military actually helped them come out. 

Ironically, despite the military?s antigay policies, these men found that military service placed them in environments where they had to come to terms with their erotic feelings for other men, and sent them overseas to places where they found greater freedom to explore their sexuality than they could have back home. While a few of Zeeland?s buddies were targeted for discharge, most portray an atmosphere of sexually tense tolerance and reveal a surprising degree of openness with straight co-workers and roommates.

The 16 fascinating interviews in Barrack Buddies and Soldier Lovers challenge popular assumptions and stereotypes about gay men in the military and provide significant information on: gay military sexual networksmale sexual fluidity in barracks lifestrategies for survival as a gay or bisexual male in the U.S. militaryGerman-American relationsattitudes toward the gay ban

The casual, conversational structure of Barrack Buddies and Soldier Lovers makes it a richly entertaining read. No other book provides such a warm and intimate portrait of the lives of young gay soldiers and airmen.

Visit Steven Zeeland at his home page: http://www.stevenzeeland.com
Gays in the Military: The Moral and Strategic Crisis (A Caveat Collection)
Lotus Of Another Color
Becoming Visible: A Reader in Gay and Lesbian History for High School and College Students
Becoming Visible is a one-of-a-kind resource for teachers and students interested in gay and lesbian history. Editor Kevin Jennings, a high school history teacher who cofounded the Gay, Lesbian, and Straight Teachers Network in 1990, has collected a series of engaging and insightful readings, many recently published, that help to place the present-day struggles of gays and lesbians in the United States in a broad historical context. Jennings identifies two primary audiences for this reader: 1) teachers and students in high schools and colleges seeking primary and secondary materials about gay and lesbian history; and 2) general readers in search of a thoughtful introduction to gay and lesbian history.                     Jennings provides a succinct and informative introduction for each of the seventeen chapters in the reader. For those interested in using Becoming Visible in the classroom, Jennings also includes a set of "important terms," discussion questions, and activities for each chapter. A six-page appendix also features brief notes for teachers specifically geared to each chapter in the book.
Bi Any Other Name: Bisexual People Speak Out
Bi Any Other Name: Bisexual People Speak Out, an anthology edited by Loraine Hutchins and Lani Ka'ahumanu, is one of the seminal books in the history of the modern bisexual rights movement. It holds a place that is in many ways comparable to that held by Betty Friedan's The Feminine Mystique in the feminist movement.

The book comprises fiction and non-fiction pieces, poetry and art created by a diverse group of over seventy (70) bisexual people speaking about their lives.

To quote Wendy Curry, longtime bisexual rights activist and current president of the American national bisexual civil rights group BiNet USA:

“ This groundbreaking book gave voice to a generation of previously unseen bisexuals. Rather than arguing statistics or debating the sexuality of long dead celebrities, Hutchins and Ka'ahumanu gave a space to normal bisexuals who told their lives. This created a new genre for books on bisexuality. ”

This book is cited in at least thirty-five (35) other works, helped spark at least ten (10) other books (many by its own contributors), was named one of Lambda Book Report's Top 100 Queer Books of the 20th century, has been reprinted three (3) times since 1991, has almost 30,000 copies in circulation, and is still in demand. It also frequently appears on numerous LGBT reading lists, from assistance in coming out[6] to queer studies curriculum guides.
Growing Up Gay/Growing Up Lesbian: A Literary Anthology
Growing up Gay, Growing up Lesbian is the first literary anthology geared specifically to gay and lesbian youth. It includes more than fifty coming-of-age stories by established writers and teenagers and has been hailed by writers, educators, activists, booksellers, and the press as an essential resource for young people—and not-so-young people—seeking to understand the gay and lesbian experience. The anthology includes selections by James Baldwin, Rita Mae Brown, David Leavitt, Jeanette Winterson, Audre Lorde, and others.
Sister & Brother: Lesbians & Gay Men Write About Their Lives Together
Ex-Lover Weird Shit: A Collection of Short Fiction, Poetry, & Cartoons by Lesbians & Gay Men
Lavender Mansions: 40 Contemporary Lesbian and Gay Short Stories
George Stambolian, Terri de la Pena, Audre Lorde, Paul Monette, Edmund White, and James Manrique are just six of the writers represented in this collection of contemporary lesbian and gay fiction. Zahava has compiled a unique and necessary collection, selecting stories for their artistic power and treatment of topics that are significant in lesbian and gay life and politics today.
Lavender Mansions: 40 Contemporary Lesbian and Gay Short Stories
George Stambolian, Terri de la Pena, Audre Lorde, Paul Monette, Edmund White, and James Manrique are just six of the writers represented in this collection of contemporary lesbian and gay fiction. Zahava has compiled a unique and necessary collection, selecting stories for their artistic power and treatment of topics that are significant in lesbian and gay life and politics today.
Prevention of Health Problems Among Gay and Lesbian Youth
Queer Reader
A Queer Reader is a rich collection of quotes and short excerpts about the gay experience through the centuries, from Plato to Andy Warhol. Arranged chronologically and drawing on sources from Michelangelo's sonnets to a speech in the House of Lords, from graphic graffiti found in Pompeii to a Playboy interview with David Bowie, A Queer Reader presents gay history as never before.
The Penguin Book of Lesbian Short Stories
Dyke Strippers: Lesbian Cartoonists from A to Z
Dyke Strippers: Lesbian Cartoonists from A to Z
Asian American Sexualities: Dimensions of the Gay and Lesbian Experience
Asian American Sexualities works to dispel the stereotype of oriental sexual decadence, as well as the "model minority" heterosexual Asian sterotype in the US.

Writing from an impressive array of interdisciplinary perspectives, the contributors discuss a variety of topics, including sexuality and identity politics; community activism and gay activism; transnational aspects of love between women in Thailand; queer South Asian culture in the US; gay and lesbian filmmakers; same-sex sexuality in Pacific literature; and Asian American male homosexuality and AIDS. The relationship of the gay and lesbian experience to Asian American studies and Ethnic Studies is also explored.
Boys Like Us: Gay Writers Tell Their Coming Out Stories
Twenty-eight of the nation's most-admired gay writers, including Edmund White, Alan Gurganus, and Andrew Holleran, along with rising talents, present never-before-published tales of their coming out, spanning the years 1949 to 1995. 25,000 first printing.
Wrestling with the Angel: Faith and Religion in the Lives of Gay Men
Switch Hitters: Lesbians Write Gay Male Erotica and Gay Men Write Lesbian Erotica
Generation Q
Since the advent of the gay liberation movement in 1969 — the direct result of the Stonewall Riots in Greenwich Village — there has been a plethora of writing about the lives of gay men and lesbians. Much of this has been done by people who were already "out" by the mid-1970s. Generation Q is a collection of essays, memoirs, recollections and thoughts by young people who were just being born in 1969. Ranging from humorous commentary to serious examinations of what it means to be a young gay man in the middle of the AIDS epidemic, this is an important, moving and challenging look at the problems and the pleasures facing young gay people today, for it tells us not only about our youthful presence but our future as well.
Jocks: True Stories of America's Gay Male Athletes
Find out what happens when the final closet door—that of men in sports—finally swings open. Is there life for gay athletes after coming out to their teammates? Journalist Dan Woog, himself an openly gay soccer coach, interviewed dozens of gay jocks and offers over 25 inspiring stories of men who are truly today's champions.
Out Facts: Just About Everything You Need to Know About Gay and Lesbian Culture
Noirotica 2
Another volume of criminally seductive stories set in the murky terrain of the erotic and noir genres. Thomas Roche has gathered the darkest jewels from todays edgiest writers to create this provocative collection. Charles Ardai Bruce Benderson m. i. blue Bill Brent M. Christian Emilio Cubeiro Michelle Fairchild and Jeannine Renee Fairchild Amelia G Jeff Gelb Brian Hodge Maxim Jakubowski Gary Jonas Caitln R. Kiernan Kevin Killian and Simon Sheppard Lydia Lunch Kevin Andrew Murphy Mason Powell Carol Queen Paul Reed Caitlin Sullivan and Kate Bornstein D. Travers Scott Lucy Taylor
The Lesbian Health Book: Caring for Ourselves
The Warhol Look
Today's merging of art and fashion is in large measure the legacy of Andy Warhol. This book, which accompanies a major exhibition opening at the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York, shows the decisive impact of his work on fashion and glamor and how the "Warhol style" influenced contemporary art. For anyone who loves fashion, glamour, and Andy Warhol, here is the book of the year. 380 photos, 150 in color.
Changing Ones: Third and Fourth Genders in Native North America
In many Native American tribal societies, it was not uncommon for some men to live as women and some women to live as men. In this land, the original America, men who wore women’s clothes and did women’s work became artists, ambassadors, and religious leaders, and women sometimes became warriors, hunters and even chiefs. Same-sex marriages flourished. Berdaches—individuals who combine male and female social roles with traits unique to their status as a third gender—have been documented in more than 150 North American tribes. By looking at this aspect of non-Western culture, Roscoe challenges the basis of the dualistic way most Americans think about sexuality, and shakes the foundation of the way we understand and define gender.
O Solo Homo: The New Queer Performance
O Solo Homo is a diverse, definitive, and hugely entertaining collection representing the cutting edge of queer solo performance. The pieces in O Solo Homo touch nerves that run deep — from sex, politics, community, and health to the struggles and joys of family, friends, and lovers. Peggy Shaw, of Split Britches, revisits how she learned to be butch. The late Ron Vawter, of the Wooster Group, juxtaposes the lives of two very different men who died of AIDS: diva filmmaker Jack Smith and Nixon crony Roy Cohn. Tim Miller, one of the NEA Four, surveys the landscape of gay desire before and after the advent of AIDS. And Carmelita Tropicana, the “National Songbird of Cuba,” makes an unforgettable, hilarious return to Havana.
Culture, Society and Sexuality: A Reader (Social Aspects of AIDS)
Bi Lives: Bisexual Women Tell Their Stories
Eighteen interviews with bisexual women reveal a vast range of backgrounds and adult experiences, from childhoods in urban settings to youth spent on a southern Virginia farm, from a woman currently married and monogamous as well as not very sexual to one who is now nonmonogamous with both a woman and a man. "Susan," age 43 and an incest survivor, regards her bisexual activities as reflecting her need to please and be praised for being "hot." Radical feminist political organizer "Lani" ponders the philosophy of lesbian separatism and the hurt she endured because of it. HIV-positive "Mary" had been in an open relationship with a man, and both enjoyed going to parties and "playing" before learning of his HIV status (when interviewed, her health was failing, but an epilogue reveals that later her viral load diminished). Along with the interviews come safer-sex guidelines and a bisexual resource list, which round the book out as a valuable resource for collections strong in sexuality issues and women's studies.
Bisexual Resource Guide
The Guide was edited by Robyn Ochs and more than 150 volunteers from locations worldwide. The Guide is intended to be a comprehensive directory of bisexual and bi-inclusive organizations, including political groups, youth groups, bisexual people of color coalitions, cross-cultural alliances, and university student clubs. The Guide also provides information on bisexual and inclusive social gatherings, religious centers, bookstores, and HIV/AIDS support organizations, as well as information on bisexuality in the media.
Wilma Loves Betty and Other Hilarious Gay & Lesbian Parodies
Your favorite TV shows, movies, and social phenomena are approached with a queer sensibility in this anthology. Wilma and Betty finally get it on, and although Batman and Robin don't, it's not for lack of trying on Robin's part. Ex-gays get their share of ridicule, but there's also some good-natured ribbing of earnest homosexuals, including "Heather Has a Mommy and a Daddy" and "Rejection Letter from Bedsheet Books, Publisher of Lesbian Novels," in which the editor chastises the applicant for giving her protagonists unandrogynous names and creating sympathetic male characters, then queries, "Why doesn't your heroine have a cat?" In Jeff Black's hilarious "6,240 and Counting," Larry Kramer lambastes gay men for not doing enough to prevent Andrew Lloyd Webber from killing American musical theater, and reminds his readers of what it means to be Larry Kramer: "I was called a genius by the very people who invented the guillotine!" The mysterious Saint delivers parodies of half a dozen prominent gay and lesbian authors, including "Felicity Guano" and "Edmund Wimp." While the script for the "Chandler Comes Out" episode of Friends drags on far too long, and the revelations about Nancy Drew's best friend, George, are old hat to anyone who's read Mabel Maney's Nancy Clue and Hardly Boys books, there are certainly enough funny and clever bits here to bring a smile to just about anybody's face. And, as the editors remind us, "Parody is constitutionally protected. So nyah, nyah, nyah."
Out & About Campus: Personal Accounts by Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual & Transgender College Students
Introduction

So, how do you know?

If there is one thread that binds the stories in this collection, it is the question of "How do you know?""How do you know you're gay?""How do you know who's safe to come out to?""How do you know how to respond to hate?""How do you know how to create change on campus?" These questions and a variety of others asked and answered in the following stories are the same questions many lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender (LGBT), and questioning college students across the country ask.

Though the issues raised in these stories clearly speak to the experiences of LGBT students, they also speak to the questions asked by many student allies and college faculty, staff, and administrators: "How do you know how to be an ally?""How do you know if your campus is safe?""How do you know what to do when hate happens?""How do you know what efforts will make a difference?"

While many excellent research studies and books discuss issues facing LGBT college students, when we began this project we found no major publications that allowed students simply to give voice to their experiences. Indeed, over the time that we solicited contributions to this collection, more than 500 students wrote us to say they wished they had a book like this. We hope Out & About Campus will fill part of this need.

There is no question that for many people, college is a time of intensive personal exploration. College students questioning their sexuality or gender identity and students coming out or transitioning gender identities face an added dimension in their identity exploration. Many students who question their sexuality or gender identity do so for the first time in college. But even for those who know going into college that they are LGB or T, those years may be the first time they have had the chance to meet others like them or search out meaningful resources.

In the last decade there has been an explosive growth of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, questioning, and ally resources on college campuses. More than 800 LGBT college campus student groups exist across the nation; approximately five dozen colleges and universities (and the numbers are increasing rapidly) have o
New England Pink Pages 2000
Local gay yellow pages type directory with a travel section for New England's Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender Community with thousands of listings and ads that include e-mail, web addresses, phone, addresses and extensive description of non profit glbt organizations, businesses and glbt welcoming businesses. The Pink Pages includes all the New England States individually: Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Maine, Rhode Island, Connecticut and Vermont with an emphasis on Boston & Northampton MA, Providence,RI, Hartford & New Haven CT, Portland ME and Portsmouth NH. Gay Travel areas include: Provincetown, the Berkshires and Martha's Vineyard MA, Ogunquit ME, New Hope PA, and a small section on Fire Island NY. Special features include Commitment Ceremonies and mail order products.
Best of the Best Lesbian Erotica
The Best of Best Lesbian Erotica offers the steamiest collection in the series to date, collecting the hottest, and most thought-
provoking lesbian sex writing available. Contributors include Dorothy Allison, Heather Lewis, Pat Califia, and Cecilia Tan.
Hot Ticket
In her smart, brief introduction to this collection of lesbian travel erotica, Linnea Due makes a case for the relationship between travel—which is about displacement, movement, and foreignness—and Eros. This volume brings together work from well-known lesbian authors such as Barbara Wilson, Linda Smukler, and Jess Wells as well as stories by newcomers. The range is astonishing, from a wry vignette of a seduction over a map by Shelly Rafferty to a frightening speculative fiction by Myrna Elana set in a post-holocaust world where people live in underground tunnels. Some of the settings are more expected, such as a night train through Europe, or cyberspace, but all of the stories explore how lesbians cross borders, both sexual and geographic.
Pillow Talk II: More Lesbian Stories Between the Covers
The stories in this second volume of the Pillow Talk series could be a lot worse and still be fairly effective as erotica. As it happens, most of them are well crafted and appropriately evocative, with an emphasis on crossing boundaries. In J.L. Belrose's "Tyger! Tyger!" a free-spirited lover liberates her girlfriend from a hopeless relationship with her disapproving mother. In tatiana de la tierra's "Eye of the Hurricane," the stone butch Sirena barricades herself into a Florida apartment with her femme lover Julieta, giving Julieta what may be one final present before the storm overtakes them. Often the most successful of these tales present classic fantasy material. The working-class butch heroine of Lisa Gonzales's "Uncommon Janitors in Lust" finds herself writhing on the desk of a brainy and gorgeous white-collar worker who can also talk about football and car repair. One quick glance at a beautiful black woman on a crowded New York City subway, and the protagonist of Rosalind Christine Lloyd's "subway ride 4 play" manages to invite an unconventional encounter that leaves them both trembling and disheveled. Fully living up to the promise of Pillow Talk , these stories merit a place on the bedside table beside the Herotica series and Cleis Press's Best Women's Erotica. Anyone who still assumes that lesbian erotica is tame or badly written is now seriously out of touch. —Regina Marler
The Second Coming: A Leatherdyke Reader
Kosher Meat
`Kosher Meat` is a provocative and enlightening collection of memoir and fiction by a minyan of authors chosen by noted anthologist Lawrence Schimel. Passion, spirituality, tradition, identity, and a refusal to disappear in the face of oppression are persistent themes in this examination of Jewish identity and gay sexuality.
Dykes With Baggage
Some day you will look back on all this and laugh. If you never thought you would hear that phrase applied to the usually agonizing process of psychoanalysis, think again! Among the very skewed sessions in this hilarious collection you will find "Affirmations in Action" by Ellen Orleans, "Serial Therapy (or What to Do When Your Therapist Is Seeing Someone Else)" by G.L. Morrison, 'Case History of a Warrior Princess" by Julia Willis, "What Do You Say to a Naked Therapist?" by Lesla Newman, and cartoons by Kris Kovick. No matter if you are as well-balanced as a scale or should be in analysis for 18 hours a day, these stories will leave you in stitches!

Riggin Waugh is the author of Homo Neurotica and the editor of the Lambda Literary Award finalist Ex-Love Weird Shit.
Gay & Lesbian Online 4th Edition
Explosive and constantly changing, the World Wide Web is almost unchartable, and all people who try had better know their stuff and be prepared to update regularly. Fortunately, Jeff Dawson is a man who knows the territory, and in a lively, easy-to-read style, he plays tour guide in this newly updated edition of his best-selling guide. Encyclopedic in scope, this book charts the entire spectrum of gay and lesbian interests as found in the ever-growing digital world of the Internet. Join the exploding queer presence in cyberspace in this user-friendly, incredibly detailed, and enormously entertaining manual for people at all levels of computer skills.

Jeff Dawson is the author with Cleve Jones of Stitching a Revolution and has written for Macworld, The Net, and MacHome Journal, and writes a monthly Web resources column for Poz magazine. He lives in Northern California.
Heatwave: Women in Love and Lust
Sexual Identities, Queer Politics
In this collection, political and public policy analysts explore the social concerns of lesbians, gays, bisexuals, and the transgendered—what has come to be known as "lgbt" or "queer" politics. Compared to the humanities and to other social sciences, political science has been slow to address this phenomenon. Issues ranging from housing to adoption to laws on sodomy, however, have increasingly raised important political questions about the rights and status of sexual minorities, particularly within liberal democracies such as the United States, and also on an international level. This anthology offers the first comprehensive overview of the study of lgbt politics in political science across the discipline's main subfields and methodologies, and it spotlights lgbt movements in several regions around the world. Focusing on the politics of sexuality with regard to the politics of knowledge, the book presents a discussion of power that will interest all political scientists and others concerned with minority rights and gender as well as with transformation in the relations between public and private.

The articles cover such topics as lgbt power in urban politics, the impact of public opinion on lgbt life, means of effecting legal and political change in the United States, and international differences in lgbt political activism. The authors represent a new cadre of political scientists who are creating an interdisciplinary domain of research that is informed by and in turn generates political activism. They are Dennis Altman, M. V. Lee Badgett, Robert W. Bailey, Mark Blasius, Cathy J. Cohen, Timothy E. Cook, Paisley Currah, Juanita Díaz-Cotto, Jan-Willem Duyvendak, Leonard Harris, Bevin Hartnett, Rosalind Pollack Petchesky, David Rayside, Rebecca Mae Salokar, and Alan S. Yang.
Secret Sisters: Stories of Being Lesbian and Bisexual in a College Sorority
"This volume is an important one, because it teaches, in the most intimate way possible, the complex lessons of embrace and rejection of sisters. Lesbians do not want to be 'accepted.' We want to be, and to have, sisters. As with all love, the greatest enemy of that goal is fear."-from the foreword by Sheila Kuehl

The first-person accounts of 25 women stand as a powerful and courageous collective effort to address the traditionally homophobic and heterosexist atmosphere within sororities and gain greater understanding of the true nature of sisterhood.

Shane L. Windmeyer is the assistant director of student activities at the University of North Carolina in Charlotte. Pamela W. Freeman is the assistant dean of students at Indiana University in Bloomington, Ind.
The Shared Heart: Portraits and Stories Celebrating Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Young People
Adam Mastoon's beautifully reproduced photographs of gay, lesbian, and bisexual young people are a revelation: each subject, posed yet casual, looks directly into the camera and invites us into his or her life. But the book is more than a photo gallery, and the personal statements written by each young person brings a sense of what it means to be a gay youth today. In a world in which gay teens are told that they either don't exist or should change their sexual orientation, The Shared Heart is a beacon of hope, clarity, and joy.
Wisconsin Women's Law Journal
That Takes Ovaries!: Bold Females and Their Brazen Acts
Having ovaries: unabashed, gutsy, feisty, playful, challenging, full of chutzpah, mettlesome, naughty, victorious, straight from the hip, full-flavored, outrageous, righteous, loving, inspiring, bold as brass, self-assured, self-confident, self-possessed, daring, heroic, wild, wanton, crazy, optimistic, unflappable, pushy, unstoppable, impressive, rebellious, kick-ass, carefree, having moxie, having heart, having no fear . . .

“That takes balls” are words of praise usually reserved for a man who has done something tough, fearless, and maybe a little crazy—someone who pushes the boundaries or breaks a few rules. But when it comes to hotheaded courage, impassioned activism, quirky wisdom, or bold confrontation, women have got what it takes—and then some! That Takes Ovaries! is a lively, fun, and often touching celebration of women and girls doing their thing their way:

* Kathleen, who reduced a would-be burglar to tears by lecturing him about black pride (all while standing in her underwear)

* Elaine, a sky surfer who plunges from airplanes on a 30-inch surfboard

* Rachel, a high school junior who organized 100 high school girls to take on the boys who harassed them

* Denise, a teenage cashier who faced down an irate, gun-wielding gangbanger in an inner-city fast-food joint

* Joani, a public health educator who opened the country’s first women-oriented sex-toys store

* Eva, who made the dangerous, illegal journey from Central America to the United States in order to give her children a better life

Now that takes ovaries!
Black Like Us: A Century of Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual African American Fiction
Black Like Us chronicles 100 years of the African American lesbian, gay, and bisexual literary tradition. Beginning with the turn-of-the-century writings of Angelina Welde Grimke and Alice Dunbar Nelson, it charts the evolution of black lesbian and gay fiction into the Harlem Renaissance of Langston Hughes and Countee Cullen and the later postwar era, in which works by Audre Lorde and James Baldwin signal the emerging sexual liberation movements. The 40 authors featured also include Alice Walker, E. Lynn Harris, Audre Lorde, April Sinclair, Jewelle Gomez, Thomas Glave, and Jacqueline Woodson.
Queer View Mirror: Lesbian and Gay Short Short Fiction
Queer View Mirror is the first international assembly of lesbian and gay short short fiction including the work of 99 writers from all over the world, each offering fresh, once furtive glimpses of queer experience imbued with the rich possibilities of life, love, and language.

Contributors include: Lucy Jane Bledsoe, Maureen Brady, Beth Brant, Michael Bronski, Dennis Denisoff, Nisa Donnelly, Michael Lowenthal, Lesléa Newman, Felice Picano, Michael Rowe, Kitty Tsui, David Watmough, and Paul Yee.
Queeries: An Anthology of Gay Male Prose
The first anthology of gay male prose ever published in Canada, acknowledging the dynamic growth of innovative and politically concerned writing from Canada's gay male community. The AIDS crisis and its devastating effects on the gay community have politicized and invigorated gay culture beyond the spectre of sexuality. The gay community has responded to these challenges with rage and defiance. Queeries provides eloquent evidence of this rage. Includes works by Jeff Kirby, Stan Persky, David Watmough, and others. Dennis Denisoff is the author of Dog Years and Tender Agencies.
Found Tribe: Jewish Coming Out Stories
Found Tribe is a collection of intimate essays by and about gay Jewish men on the experience of coming out as gay within a Jewish context or as Jewish within a gay context. No longer necessarily lost or excluded, today’s gay Jews tell their courageous, powerful stories of finding and embracing their religious and sexual identities that enrich both the Jewish and gay experience. Written with honesty, humor, and insight, Found Tribe explores the joys and oys of coming out to family, lovers, rabbis, and others—and an Orthodox gay rabbi writes about Gayness and God. Found Tribe gives voice to the inextinguishable longing for community and acceptance in a religious identity that is defined by family and lineage, and serves as a beacon to isolated gay Jews that dignity and welcome await at the end of this rainbow. Found Tribe is intended as a gift and a resource for Jewish families with a gay son or sibling, and for gay Jews and all who love them. Found Tribe is the companion volume to the award winning volume, Kosher Meat.
DAMRON MEN'S GUIDE 2003- P (Damron Men's Travel Guide)
this bridge we call home: radical visions for transformation
Over twenty years after the ground-breaking anthology This Bridge Called My Back challenged feminists to envision new forms of communities and practices, Gloria E. Anzaldúa and AnaLouise Keating have brought together an ambitious new collection of over eighty original contributions offering a bold new vision of women-of-color consciousness for the twenty-first century.

Through personal narratives, theoretical essays, textual collage, poetry, letters, artwork and fiction, this bridge we call home examines and extends the discussion of issues at the center of the first Bridge such as classism, homophobia, racism, identity politics, and community building, while exploring the additional issues of third wave feminism, Native sovereignty, lesbian pregnancy and mothering, transgendered issues, Arab-American stereotyping, Jewish identities, spiritual activism, and surviving academe. Written by women and men - both 'of color' and 'white,' located inside and outside the United States - and motivated by a desire for social justice, this bridge we call home invites feminists of all colors and genders to develop new forms of transcultural dialogues, practices, and alliances.

Building on and pushing forward the revolutionary call for transformation announced over two decades ago, this bridge we call home, will challenge readers to rethink existing categories and invent new individual and collective identities.
Pulp Friction: Uncovering the Golden Age of Gay Male Pulps
Long before the rise of the modern gay movement, an unnoticed literary revolution was occurring, mostly between the covers of the cheaply produced pulp paperbacks of the post-World War II era. Cultural critic Michael Bronski collects a sampling of these now little-known gay erotic writings—some by writers long forgotten, some never known and a few now famous. Through them, Bronski challenges many long-held views of American postwar fiction and the rise of gay literature, as well as of the culture at large.
Finding the Real Me: True Tales of Sex and Gender Diversity
Finding the Real Me is an extraordinary collection of real-life stories told by a wide-range of sex and gender diverse people. These healing tales of struggle and transformation reveal just how creative, resourceful, and adventurous the individuals in this community can be and also helps to bridge the gap between ignorance and understanding. As each incredible story unfolds we become part of the author's journey to self-acceptance and join the celebration of their new life. Page by page, we laugh, cry, and learn to appreciate these wonderful courageous people and the road they walked to be their true selves. Finding the Real Me is a landmark book that encourages us to embrace diversity, to never fear our differences, and to remain always in awe of our amazing possibilities.
Don't Ask, Don't Tell: Debating the Gay Ban in the Military
Conservatives and liberals agree that President Bill Clinton's effort to lift the military's gay ban was perhaps one of the greatest blunders of his tenure in office. Conservatives argue that Clinton should have left well enough alone; liberals believe that he should have ordered the military to accept homosexuals rather than agreeing to the compromise "don't ask, don't tell" policy. In this ground-breaking book, experts of both persuasions come together to debate the critical aspects of the gays-in-the-military issue. The participants consider whether homosexuals undermine military performance; whether they threaten heterosexual privacy; and whether the experiences of militaries in other countries have relevance for the United States. They also explore the human, organizational, and dollar costs of the present policy. Belkin and Bateman provide a thorough context for the transcripts of the deliberations, as well as a discussion of the implications of the participants' conclusions for current U.S. policy.
Mobile Cultures: New Media in Queer Asia (Console-ing Passions)
Mobile Cultures provides much-needed, empirically grounded studies of the connections between new media technologies, the globalization of sexual cultures, and the rise of queer Asia. The availability and use of new media—fax machines, mobile phones, the Internet, electronic message boards, pagers, and global television—have grown exponentially in Asia over the past decade. This explosion of information technology has sparked a revolution, transforming lives and lifestyles, enabling the creation of communities and the expression of sexual identities in a region notorious for the regulation of both information and sexual conduct. Whether looking at the hanging of toy cartoon characters like “Hello Kitty” from mobile phones to signify queer identity in Japan or at the development of queer identities in Indonesia or Singapore, the essays collected here emphasize the enormous variance in the appeal and uses of new media from one locale to another. 

Scholars, artists, and activists from a range of countries, the contributors chronicle the different ways new media galvanize Asian queer communities in Taiwan, South Korea, Japan, Indonesia, Thailand, Malaysia, India, and around the world. They consider phenomena such as the uses of the Internet among gay, lesbian, or queer individuals in Taiwan and South Korea; the international popularization of Japanese queer pop culture products such as Yaoi manga; and a Thai website’s reading of a scientific tract on gay genetics in light of Buddhist beliefs. Essays also explore the politically subversive possibilities opened up by the proliferation of media technologies, examining, for instance, the use of Cyberjaya—Malaysia’s government-backed online portal—to form online communities in the face of strict antigay laws.

Contributors. Chris Berry, Tom Boellstorff, Larissa Hjorth, Katrien Jacobs, Olivia Khoo, Fran Martin, Mark McLelland, David Mullaly, Baden Offord, Sandip Roy, Veruska Sabucco, Audrey Yue
Captain Underpants and the Big, Bad Battle of the Bionic Booger Boy, Part 1: The Night of the Nasty Nostril Nuggets
Dav Pilkey's newest epic novel finds George, Harold, and everyone's favorite superhero in the stickiest situation yet. This time, the boys' latest prank has snotty school brainiac Melvin Sneedley in a stink. And when Melvin tries to transform himself into a bionic-powered superboy, things go from bad to boogers, literally, and the Bionic Booger Boy is born! With fun Flip-O-Rama and loads of laffs, here's another excellent adventure that will leave Captain Underpants fans begging for more. SPECIAL BONUS CLIFFHANGER ENDING INCLUDED!
Restoried Selves: Autobiographies of Queer Asian-Pacific-American Activists (Haworth Gay & Lesbian Studies) (Haworth Gay & Lesbian Studies)
The Gender Frontier: Mariette Pathy Allen
Mariette Pathy Allen documents the lives of extraordinary individuals, their partners, families and friends. Through photographs and short texts, the reader is offered an intimate connection to the book’s subjects and -insight into how their own lives are affected by gender. As Allen says: "Trans-gendered people offer the rest of us a potentially exhilarating -vision of fluidity, freed from traditional roles or definitions. They make vivid the questions: What is the essence of humanness beyond masculinity or femininity?"

Framed by the emerging transgender political movement, The Gender Frontier is one of the first book to include both female-to-males and male-to-females, as well as queer youth. One of her subjects, Robert Eads, a female-to-male who died of ovarian cancer, was also prominently featured in the award-winning film Southern Comfort
Studies in Gender and Sexuality
Tokyopop Sneaks Volume 3
Prism Comics: Your LGBT Guide to Comics
Prism Comics is the premier annual resource guide to lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) creators working in comics, with bios, art samples, web resources, contact information and more. The 2004 edition includes information on eighty different creators, interviews with Alison Bechdel, Phil Jimenez, José Villarrubia and Detective Comics writer Andersen Gabrych, and dozens of exclusive and preview comics pages.
Prism Comics: Your LGBT Guide to Comics
Prism Comics is the premier annual resource guide to lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) creators working in comics, with bios, art samples, web resources, contact information and more. The 2004 edition includes information on eighty different creators, interviews with Alison Bechdel, Phil Jimenez, José Villarrubia and Detective Comics writer Andersen Gabrych, and dozens of exclusive and preview comics pages.
Tokyopop Sneaks 2004, Volume 2
The sixth installment of this series. A sampling of Tokypop's latest titles.
From the Inside Out: Radical Gender Transformation, FTM and Beyond
Born female yet little identified with that gender, these transgender, genderqueer, third gender, and gender variant writers offer personal insights into changing gender identity, dating, workplace issues, and more. This book shines light on those who identify as FTM (female to male) and also illuminates those whose gender is more fluid, proving that biology doesn't control destiny.
Gravitation, Vol. 10
Shuichi returns to Japan and to his surprise, Eiri has come to greet him at the airport. Shuichi reveals that he just wants Eiri to open up to him. Hearing this, Eiri offers to say "I love you"...if Shuichi agrees to pay him every time he says it. Although Eiri is joking, Shuichi is dead serious about raising the money to hear those precious words. However, Eiri says something else that will leave Shuichi so shocked he will be unable to sing!
Black Queer Studies: A Critical Anthology
While over the past decade a number of scholars have done significant work on questions of black lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgendered identities, this volume is the first to collect this groundbreaking work and make black queer studies visible as a developing field of study in the United States. Bringing together essays by established and emergent scholars, this collection assesses the strengths and weaknesses of prior work on race and sexuality and highlights the theoretical and political issues at stake in the nascent field of black queer studies. Including work by scholars based in English, film studies, black studies, sociology, history, political science, legal studies, cultural studies, and performance studies, the volume showcases the broadly interdisciplinary nature of the black queer studies project.

The contributors consider representations of the black queer body, black queer literature, the pedagogical implications of black queer studies, and the ways that gender and sexuality have been glossed over in black studies and race and class marginalized in queer studies. Whether exploring the closet as a racially loaded metaphor, arguing for the inclusion of diaspora studies in black queer studies, considering how the black lesbian voice that was so expressive in the 1970s and 1980s is all but inaudible today, or investigating how the social sciences have solidified racial and sexual exclusionary practices, these insightful essays signal an important and necessary expansion of queer studies.

Contributors. Bryant K. Alexander, Devon Carbado, Faedra Chatard Carpenter, Keith Clark, Cathy Cohen, Roderick A. Ferguson, Jewelle Gomez, Phillip Brian Harper, Mae G. Henderson, Sharon P. Holland, E. Patrick Johnson, Kara Keeling, Dwight A. McBride, Charles I. Nero, Marlon B. Ross, Rinaldo Walcott, Maurice O. Wallace
Black Queer Studies: A Critical Anthology
While over the past decade a number of scholars have done significant work on questions of black lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgendered identities, this volume is the first to collect this groundbreaking work and make black queer studies visible as a developing field of study in the United States. Bringing together essays by established and emergent scholars, this collection assesses the strengths and weaknesses of prior work on race and sexuality and highlights the theoretical and political issues at stake in the nascent field of black queer studies. Including work by scholars based in English, film studies, black studies, sociology, history, political science, legal studies, cultural studies, and performance studies, the volume showcases the broadly interdisciplinary nature of the black queer studies project.

The contributors consider representations of the black queer body, black queer literature, the pedagogical implications of black queer studies, and the ways that gender and sexuality have been glossed over in black studies and race and class marginalized in queer studies. Whether exploring the closet as a racially loaded metaphor, arguing for the inclusion of diaspora studies in black queer studies, considering how the black lesbian voice that was so expressive in the 1970s and 1980s is all but inaudible today, or investigating how the social sciences have solidified racial and sexual exclusionary practices, these insightful essays signal an important and necessary expansion of queer studies.

Contributors. Bryant K. Alexander, Devon Carbado, Faedra Chatard Carpenter, Keith Clark, Cathy Cohen, Roderick A. Ferguson, Jewelle Gomez, Phillip Brian Harper, Mae G. Henderson, Sharon P. Holland, E. Patrick Johnson, Kara Keeling, Dwight A. McBride, Charles I. Nero, Marlon B. Ross, Rinaldo Walcott, Maurice O. Wallace
The Practice of Change: Concepts and Models for Service Learning in Women's Studies
Women's Studies
Butt
Nobody Passes: Rejecting the Rules of Gender and Conformity
Nobody Passes is a collection of essays that confronts and challenges the very notion of belonging. By examining the perilous intersections of identity, categorization, and community, contributors challenge societal mores and countercultural norms. Nobody Passes explores and critiques the various systems of power seen (or not seen) in the act of “passing.” In a pass-fail situation, standards for acceptance may vary, but somebody always gets trampled on. This anthology seeks to eliminate the pressure to pass and thereby unearth the delicious and devastating opportunities for transformation that might create.

Mattilda, aka Matt Bernstein Sycamore, has a history of editing anthologies based on brazen nonconformity and gender defiance. Mattilda sets out to ask the question, “What lies are people forced to tell in order to gain acceptance as 'real'.” The answers are as varied as the life experiences of the writers who tackle this urgent and essential topic.
Dreamgirls: Music from the Motion Picture Soundtrack
16 songs from the soundtrack of the film to garner the most Oscar nominations in 2006. Includes: Cadillac Car * Dreamgirls * Family * Hard to Say Goodbye, My Love * I Am Changing * I Want You, Baby * Listen * Love You I Do * Move * One Night Only * Patience * Perfect World * Steppin' to the Bad Side * more!
Fenway Guide to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual & Transgender Health
The Fenway Guide provides guidance, practical guidelines, and discussions of clinical issues pertinent to the LGBT patient and community. It also focuses on helping healthcare professionals gain a better understanding of the LGBT population, the LGBT life continuum, health promotion and disease prevention, transgender health, and patient communication and the office environment, The Fenway Guide is truly a one-of-a kind comprehensive resource!The healthcare issues surrounding sexual minorities is an area in which little research and few studies have been conducted. Written in conjunction with the world renowned Fenway Community Clinic, The Fenway Guide to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Health is an invaluable resource for healthcare professionals seeking further knowledge and guidance on sexual minority health care.
Fenway Guide to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual & Transgender Health
The Fenway Guide provides guidance, practical guidelines, and discussions of clinical issues pertinent to the LGBT patient and community. It also focuses on helping healthcare professionals gain a better understanding of the LGBT population, the LGBT life continuum, health promotion and disease prevention, transgender health, and patient communication and the office environment, The Fenway Guide is truly a one-of-a kind comprehensive resource!The healthcare issues surrounding sexual minorities is an area in which little research and few studies have been conducted. Written in conjunction with the world renowned Fenway Community Clinic, The Fenway Guide to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Health is an invaluable resource for healthcare professionals seeking further knowledge and guidance on sexual minority health care.
Eclogues - Eight Stories By Guy Davenport
Guy Davenport -
Graceland (Today Show Pick January 2005)
Chris Abani "A richly detailed, poignant, and utterly fascinating look into another culture and how it is cross-pollinated by our own. It brings to mind the work of Ha Jin in its power and revelation of the new."—T. Coraghessan Boyle

The sprawling, swampy, cacophonous city of Lagos, Nigeria, provides the backdrop to the story of Elvis, a teenage Elvis impersonator hoping to make his way out of the ghetto. Nuanced, lyrical, and pitch perfect, this is a remarkable story of a son and his father, and an examination of postcolonial Nigeria, where the trappings of American culture reign supreme.
Becoming Abigail
Chris Abani "Compelling and gorgeously written, this is a coming-of-age novella like no other. Chris Abani explores the depths of loss and exploitation with what can only be described as a knowing tenderness. An extraordinary, necessary book."-Cristina Garcia, author of Dreaming in Cuban

"Abani's voice brings perspective to every moment, turning pain into a beautiful painterly meditation on loss and aloneness."-Aimee Bender, author of The Girl in the Flammable Skirt

"Abani's empathy for Abigail's torn life is matched only by his honesty in portraying it. Nothing at all is held back. A harrowing piece of work."-Peter Orner, author of The Esther Stories

Tough, spirited, and fiercely independent Abigail is brought as a teenager to London from Nigeria by relatives who attempt to force her into prostitution. She flees, struggling to find herself in the shadow of a strong but dead mother. In spare yet haunting and lyrical prose reminiscent of Marguerite Duras, Abani brings to life a young woman who lives with a strength and inner light that will enlighten and uplift the reader.

Chris Abani is a poet and novelist and the author, most recently, of GraceLand, which won the 2005 PEN/Hemingway Prize, a Silver Medal in the California Book Awards, and was a finalist for several other prizes including the Los Angeles Times Book Prize. His other prizes include a PEN Freedom-to-Write Award, a Prince Claus Award, and a Lannan Literary Fellowship. He lives and teaches in California.
Men and Intimacy: Personal Accounts Exploring the Dilemmas of Modern Male Sexuality
Franklin Abbott
MYRA & GORE
John Mitzel with Steven Abbott
The Lesbian Idol: Martina, Kd and the Comsumption of Lesbian Masculinity (Sexual Politics)
Louise Allen
Bastard out of Carolina (Contemporary Fiction, Plume)
Dorothy Allison
Gay America: Struggle for Equality
Linas Alsenas Milestones of gay and lesbian life in the United States are brought together in the first-ever nonfiction book published specifically for teens.

Profusely illustrated with archival images, the groundbreaking Gay America reveals how gay men and women have lived, worked, and loved for the past 125 years. Gays and lesbians play a very prominent role in American life today, whether grabbing headlines over political gains, starring in and being the subject of movies and television shows, or filling the streets of nearly every major city each year to celebrate Gay Pride. However, this was not always the case, and this book charts their journey along with the history of the country.

First touching on colonial times, the book moves on to the Victorian period and beyond, including such historical milestones as the Roaring ’20s, the Kinsey study, the McCarthy witch hunts of the 1950s, the Beat generation, Stonewall, disco, AIDS, and present-day battles over gay marriage. Providing a sense of hope mixed with pride, author Linas Alsenas demonstrates how, within one century, gay women and men have gone from being socially invisible to becoming a political force to be reckoned with and proud members of the American public living openly and honestly. The book includes a bibliography and an index.
Five Minutes in Heaven
Lisa Alther From Tennessee's sunlit Smoky Mountains to New York City during the Stonewall era, and ultimately to a world of sophistication in Paris, Five Minutes in Heaven follows Jude — a woman haunted by dreams, ghosts, and longings — on an epic search for love and intimacy. The early loss of her mother, a sexually charged childhood friendship, the blossoming of intimacy with a gay man, a tempestuous liaison with a married woman, and an apprenticeship in the arts of seduction with a worldly Parisienne make their indelible marks on Jude and become stages in her classic journey from innocence to experience. Full of wry wisdom, unconstrained humor, and passionate intensity, this powerfully sensual and profoundly moving novel is Lisa Alther's most sophisticated and spellbinding tale yet.
Lovers' Legends: The Gay Greek Myths
Calimach Andrew First comprehensive uncensored collection of homosexual Greek myths in 2000 years. Lucian'ss Different Loves, an unabashed debate on gay vs. straight love, frames richly illustrated stories of Hercules, Orpheus, Narcissus, others. Presents positive and negative aspects of Greek male love within historical/cultural context. Carefully documented, suitable for classes in gender studies / history / religion. Notes, bibliography, glossary, map. Study guide forthcoming.
Frommer's Gay & Lesbian Europe
David Andrusia Europe is a gay adventure just waiting to happen. Written in a fun, frank, and fabulous style by four travel writers who know all the ins and outs, Frommer's Gay & Lesbian Europe is the first queer guide to Europe to include coverage on all aspects of your trip — from how to get there to how to get around, from where to stay and dine to where to shop, from what to see and do to where to work out, from where to sip a cocktail to where to cruise.

No matter what your budget, you'll find candid reviews of the best hotels and restaurants—mainstream, gay-friendly, and all-out gay. Are you looking for a plush suite with silk-covered walls and baroque paintings at the Hôtel Costes in Paris, a pleasant room with hand-hewn beams at the Hotel Bernardi-Semenzato in Venice, or an "atmospheric" room with bondage hooks and a galvanized steel cage at the Black Tulip in Amsterdam? Feeling hungry? You can choose from French haute cuisine, British pub fare, German comfort food, Spanish tapas, Greek specialties, and more.

Frommer's Gay & Lesbian Europe also offers the dish on queer sights (do you know where Oscar Wilde died and where he's buried, where there's a Homomonument, where there's a Gay Museum?) , neighborhoods, and beaches, plus all the top attractions. The guide also shows you where to shop for everything from antiques to clubwear to "toys" and sends you to the best venues for the performing arts. And, of course, it gives the lowdown on what to do after dark—bars and cafes, discos, saunas, and more.

If all that weren't enough, there are also fun little features like "A Queen's English" (on British gay slang), "The Queer Quiz" (on British gays), and "A Toast for the Boys" (on where to find "toast"—not what you think it is—on your way home from the clubs in Athens).
Hollywood Babylon: The Legendary Underground Classic of Hollywood's Darkest and Best Kept Secrets
Kenneth Anger Originally published in Paris, this is a collection of Hollywood's darkest and best kept secrets from the pen of Kenneth Anger, a former child movie actor who grew up to become one of America's leading underground film-makers.
Hollywood Babylon 2: 2
Kenneth Anger Originally published in Paris, this is a collection of Hollywood's darkest and best kept secrets from the pen of Kenneth Anger, a former child movie actor who grew up to become one of America's leading underground film-makers.
Before Night Falls: 2A Memoir
Reinaldo Arenas The Cuban-born novelist describes his poverty-stricken childhood in rural Cuba, his adolescence as a rebel fighting for Castro, his suppression as a writer, his imprisonment for his homosexuality, and his flight from Cuba. 10,000 first printing.
Dazzler: The Life and Times of Moss Hart
Steven Bach The first full-scale biography of the “Prince of Broadway,” the brilliant playwright and director Moss Hart.

No one loomed larger in Broadway’s golden age. Hart’s memoir, Act One, which told of a youth lived in poverty and his early success on Broadway, became the most successful and most loved book ever published about the lure of the theater. But it ended at the beginning—when Hart was only twenty-five—and at times embroidered or skirted the facts. Now, at last, we have the full and far richer story. 

Hart exemplified wit, urbanity, and grace. He knew everybody, from the Algonquin Round Table crowd 

to the Gershwins, Irving Berlin, Noël Coward, Cole Porter, and the Hollywood moguls. His passion for the theater gave wings to his long playwriting collaboration with George S. Kaufman; together they gave us such classic comedies as You Can’t Take It With You and The Man Who Came to Dinner. On his own Hart wrote the stunning Lady in the Dark and Light Up the Sky. His screenplays include Gentleman’s Agreement, Hans Christian Andersen, and the Judy Garland version of A Star Is Born. His career as a director was crowned by the creation of My Fair Lady and Camelot, his last two shows. They were still on Broadway when he died in 1961 at the age of fifty-seven.

But Hart’s life was not always golden, in spite of a Pulitzer Prize, Tony Awards, and Oscar nominations. His successes were shadowed by the unpredictable and often debilitating mood swings of manic depression. And he struggled with issues of sexual identity—documented here for the first time—finally marrying and fathering children in his forties.

Dazzler is the story of the seen and unseen struggles that beset Hart in a life crowded with friends, glamour, and achievements, a life that seemed to be one triumph and delight after another. But it was actually a life tormented in ways we didn’t know, and thus, heroic. It isn’t just that Hart rose from humble beginnings to fame and fortune. It’s that he rose above his private demons to achieve a kind of happiness that survives him still. He used to say, even in the face of failure, “Well, we aspired.” Aspiration was a key to his life, and the key to this superb biography.
Twice Blessed on Being Lesbian, Gay & Jewish
Christie Balka
Homo Alley (All Star Books)
Gregory Barnes
Invisible Lives: The Truth About Millions of Women-Loving Women
Martha Barron Barrett
Invisible Lives: The Truth About Millions of Women-Loving Women
Martha Barron Barrett
Screened Out: Playing Gay in Hollywood from Edison to Stonewall
Richard Barrios Rapacious dykes, self-loathing closet cases, hustlers, ambiguous sophisticates, and sadomasochistic rich kids: most of what America thought it knew about gay people it learned at the movies. A fresh and revelatory look at sexuality in the Great Age of movie making, Screened Out shows how much gay and lesbian lives have shaped the Big Screen. Spanning popular American cinema from the 1900s until today, distinguished film historian Richard Barrios presents a rich, compulsively readable analysis of how Hollywood has used and depicted gays and the mixed signals it has given us: Marlene in a top hat, Cary Grant in a negligee, a pansy cowboy in The Dude Wrangler. Such iconoclastic images, Barrios argues, send powerful messages about tragedy and obsession, but also about freedom and compassion, even empowerment.

Mining studio records, scripts, drafts (including cut scenes), censor notes, reviews, and recollections of viewers, Barrios paints our fullest picture yet of how gays and lesbians were portrayed by the dream factory, warning that we shouldn't congratulate ourselves quite so much on the progress movies - and the real world — have made since Stonewall.

Captivating, myth-breaking, and funny, Screened Out is for all film aficionados and for anyone who has sat in a dark movie theater and drawn strength and a sense of identity from what they saw on screen, no matter how fleeting or coded.
Where the Apple Falls
Samiya Bashir Where the Apple Falls resides at the intersections between woman & female—both human and environmental—and the concepts to which she is often linked (without her consent): death, rebirth, victim, sexual/perverse. Seasons are crucial: from the birth of Spring through Autumn’s final harvest the work suggests a recasting of the farmer; a reclamation of both the fall and redemption/death/(re)birth on her own terms. Finally, Where the Apple Falls highlights the resilience of strength. Even strength denied does not die. Instead, it continues to grow in power, waiting for its calling. We cannot call that which we have forgotten to imagine. Where the Apple Falls reminds us to imagine, encourages us to answer the call, to revel in the beauty and possibility that we all embody, to consider our direction and route.
Free Your Mind
Ellen Bass Free Your Mind is the definitive practical guide for gay, lesbian, and bisexual youth — and their families, teachers, counselors and friends. For too long, gay youth have wanted to be themselves and to feel good about it, but most have been isolated, afraid, harassed, or worse. Their very existence has been ignored, whispered about, or swept under the rug.

But each day more and more lesbian, gay, and bisexual youth are standing up, speaking out, breaking down stereotypes, demanding rights and recognition — shining. In this book, young people share their joy and their pain, their hopes and fears, the formidable obstacles they have faced and overcome, and the exciting opportunities they have discovered.

Free Your Mind speaks to the basic aspects of the lives of gay, lesbian and bisexual youth: Self-Discovery; Friends and Lovers; Family; School; Spirituality; Community. Alive with the voices of more than fifty young people, rich in accurate information and positive practical advice, Free Your Mind talks about how to come out, deal with problems, make healthy choices about relationships and sex, connect with other gay youth and supportive adults, and take pride and participate in the gay and lesbian community. Free Your Mind also presents detailed guidance for adults who want to make the world safer for lesbian, gay and bisexual youth.
Endangered Species
Louis Bayard "In his witty and beautifully written novels, Louis Bayard is establishing Washington D.C. as the District of Comedy."-Bob Smith, author of Openly Bob, and Way to Go Smith

The Broome family is facing an uncertain future; however no one but youngest son Nick seems to notice. Driven by an inexplicable but driving certainty that they are on the brink of extinction, Nick vows to bring a child into the world by whatever means necessary. The problem? Nick is gay. The brave new world of parenting is explored as never before in Louis Bayard's new novel, which is full of the dry wit, snaking plot turns, and vivid, well-rounded characters that earned raves and fans for his first novel, Fool's Errand. Nick's quest for a surrogate mother will draw him to schizophrenics, Hispanic immigrants, body-pierced teenagers, female escorts, a God-fearing phlebotomist, an itinerant matchmaker, and an unbalanced but irrepressible young woman named Nattie, who ultimately may provide what he is seeking in the way he least expected. Alternately moving and very, very funny, Nick Broome's quest to leave a mark on the world drives straight to the heart of the evolving nature of love and family.

Louis Bayard is a freelance journalist whose work has appeared in The New York Times, The Washington Post, Nerve.Com, Genre, Lambda Book Report, and the Washington Blade among others. He is the author of Fool's Errand, and lives in Washington, D.C.
AIDS Doctors: Voices from the Epidemic: An Oral History
Ronald Bayer, Gerald M. Oppenheimer Today, AIDS has been indelibly etched in our consciousness. Yet it was less than twenty years ago that doctors confronted a sudden avalanche of strange, inexplicable, seemingly untreatable conditions that signaled the arrival of a devastating new disease. Bewildered, unprepared, and pushed to the limit of their diagnostic abilities, a select group of courageous physicians nevertheless persevered. This unique collective memoir tells their story. 

Based on interviews with nearly eighty doctors whose lives and careers have centered on the AIDS epidemic from the early 1980s to the present, this candid, emotionally textured account details the palpable anxiety in the medical profession as it experienced a rapid succession of cases for which there was no clinical history. The physicians interviewed chronicle the roller coaster experiences of hope and despair, as they applied newly developed, often unsuccessful therapies. Yet these physicians who chose to embrace the challenge confronted more than just the sense of therapeutic helplessness in dealing with a disease they could not conquer. They also faced the tough choices inherent in treating a controversial, sexually and intravenously transmitted illness as many colleagues simply walked away. Many describe being gripped by a sense of mission: by the moral imperative to treat the disempowered and despised. Nearly all describe a common purpose, an esprit de corps that bound them together in a terrible yet exhilarating war against an invisible enemy. 

This extraordinary oral history forms a landmark effort in the understanding of the AIDS crisis. Carefully collected and eloquently told, the doctors' narratives reveal the tenacity and unquenchable optimism that has paved the way for taming a 20th-century plague.
Transparent: Love, Family, and Living the T with Transgender Teenagers
Cris Beam When Cris Beam first moved to Los Angeles, she thought she might put in just a few hours volunteering at a school for transgender kids while she got settled. Instead she found herself drawn deeply into the pained and powerful group of transgirls she discovered. In Transparent she intro­duces four of them—Christina, Domineque, Foxxjazell, and Ariel—and shows us their world, a dizzying mix of familiar teenage cliques and crushes with far less familiar challenges like how to morph your body on a few dollars a day. Funny, heartbreaking, defiant, and sometimes defeated, the girls form a singular community. But they struggle valiantly to resolve the gap between the way they feel inside and the way the world sees them—a struggle we can all identify with.

 

Beam’s careful reporting, sensitive writing, and intimate relationship with her characters place Transparent in the ranks of the best narrative nonfiction.
The Perfect Cover Letter
Richard H. Beatty Write the perfect cover letter every time!

With fewer job opportunities and more applicants, just being qualified isn’t enough to get the job you want. So how can you separate yourself from the pack? With the perfect cover letter, of course! With so much riding on it, a cover letter that attracts–and holds–the attention of your prospective employer is essential. This practical how-to manual shows you step by step how to create highly effective letters designed to get the interview you want.

The Perfect Cover Letter, Third Edition is an indispensable guide that covers all the vital elements of a great cover letter, so you know what to include and know how to phrase it. Inside you’ll find: The nuts and bolts of every type of cover letter–what they should include, how employers use them, and how to write themGreat sample cover letters, including general broadcast, executive search, networking, advertisement response, and personal introductionTips on what makes a letter effective–and what doesn’tHelpful guidelines on following up–writing the post-interview thank you letter

With greatly expanded information on thank you letters and an entirely new chapter on the all-important networking cover letter, this update of the popular classic continues to offer top-notch advice and high-quality samples that will help any job hunter get the attention they deserve.
Dykes to Watch Out for
Alison Bechdel
Dykes to Watch Out for
Alison Bechdel
Dykes to Watch Out for
Alison Bechdel
More Dykes to Watch Out for
Alison Bechdel
More Dykes to Watch Out for
Alison Bechdel
New Improved!: Dykes to Watch Out for
Alison Bechdel
New Improved!: Dykes to Watch Out for
Alison Bechdel
Dykes to Watch Out for: The Sequel : Added Attraction! "Serial Monogamy" : A Documentary
Alison Bechdel
Dykes to Watch Out for: The Sequel : Added Attraction! "Serial Monogamy" : A Documentary
Alison Bechdel
Spawn of Dykes to Watch Out for
Alison Bechdel
Spawn of Dykes to Watch Out for
Alison Bechdel
Unnatural Dykes to Watch Out for
Alison Bechdel
Unnatural Dykes to Watch Out for
Alison Bechdel
Hot, Throbbing Dykes to Watch Out for
Alison Bechdel Alison's Bechdel's cartoons are a libidinous commentary on the tsunami of lesbian erotica surging through the culture. The familiar cast of characters will keep readers laughing as their carnal mores are revealed.
The Indelible Alison Bechdel : Confessions, Comix, and Miscellaneous Dykes to Watch Out for
Alison Bechdel
Post-Dykes to Watch Out For
Alison Bechdel The further adventures of Mo, her tenure-bound girlfriend, Sydney, and their much-loved friends unfold against a shifting gender landscape: lesbians sleeping with men, lesbians becoming men, Ginger sleeping with lesbians who've become men. As with her eight previous collections, Alison Bechdel covers a host of pressing issues, from the Monica Lewinsky scandal to the decline of the independent bookstore, and pauses to consider whether an online affair qualifies as cheating. "Of course it's cheating!" says Mo, "It would be a diversion of emotional energy." Sydney demurs: "It's more like remote, interactive masturbation." True love survives the gender wars, but monogamy may be on the wane. Don't miss the thrilling details, in the last volume of Bechdel's work to be published by the now-defunct Firebrand Press. —Regina Marler
Fun Home: A Family Tragicomic
Alison Bechdel A fresh and brilliantly told memoir from a cult favorite comic artist, marked by gothic twists, a family funeral home, sexual angst, and great books.

This breakout book by Alison Bechdel is a darkly funny family tale, pitch-perfectly illustrated with Bechdel's sweetly gothic drawings. Like Marjane Satrapi's Persepolis, it's a story exhilaratingly suited to graphic memoir form.

Meet Alison's father, a historic preservation expert and obsessive restorer of the family's Victorian home, a third-generation funeral home director, a high school English teacher, an icily distant parent, and a closeted homosexual who, as it turns out, is involved with his male students and a family babysitter. Through narrative that is alternately heartbreaking and fiercely funny, we are drawn into a daughter's complex yearning for her father. And yet, apart from assigned stints dusting caskets at the family-owned "fun home," as Alison and her brothers call it, the relationship achieves its most intimate expression through the shared code of books. When Alison comes out as homosexual herself in late adolescense, the denouement is swift, graphic — and redemptive.
But So Did Her Brother
Brian Kevin Beck
Summer Cruising
Dave Benbow
Reinventing The Family: Lesbian and Gay Parents
Laura Benkov The first thorough investigation of the joys, challenges, and issues facing Lesbian and gay men who are choosing to be parents, fighting for custody, and changing how we all think of "family values". From what to name your child to legal and psychological issues, here is a thoughtful guide to raising a healthy child in a homophobic world.
Monsters in the Closet: Homosexuality and the Horror Film (Inside Popular Film)
Harry M. Benshoff Monster in the Closet is a history of the horrors film that explores the genre's relationship to the social and cultural history of homosexuality in America. Drawing on a wide variety of films and primary source materials including censorship files, critical reviews, promotional materials, fanzines, men's magazines, and popular news weeklies, the book examines the historical figure of the movie monster in relation to various medical, psychological, religious and social models of homosexuality. While recent work within gay and lesbian studies has explored how the genetic tropes of the horror film intersect with popular culture's understanding of queerness, this is the first book to examine how the concept of the monster queer has evolved from era to era. From the gay and lesbian sensibilities encoded into the form and content of the classical Hollywood horror film, to recent films which play upon AIDS-related fears. Monster in the Closet examines how the horror film started and continues, to demonize (or quite literally "monsterize") queer sexuality, and what the pleasures and "costs" of such representations might be both for individual spectators and culture at large.
Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil
John Berendt Shots rang out in Savannah's grandest mansion in the misty,early morning hours of May 2, 1981.  Was it murder or self-defense?  For nearly a decade, the shooting and its aftermath reverberated throughout this hauntingly beautiful city of moss-hung oaks and shaded squares.  John Berendt's sharply observed, suspenseful, and witty narrative reads like a thoroughly engrossing novel, and yet it is a work of nonfiction.  Berendt skillfully interweaves a hugely entertaining first-person account of life in this isolated remnant of the Old South with the unpredictable twists and turns of a landmark murder case.

It is a spellbinding story peopled by a gallery of remarkable characters: the well-bred society ladies of the Married Woman's Card Club; the turbulent young redneck gigolo; the hapless recluse who owns a bottle of poison so powerful it could kill every man, woman, and child in Savannah; the aging and profane Southern belle who is the "soul of pampered self-absorption"; the uproariously funny black drag queen; the acerbic and arrogant antiques dealer; the sweet-talking, piano-playing con artist; young blacks dancing the minuet at the black debutante ball; and Minerva, the voodoo priestess who works her magic in the graveyard at midnight.  These and other Savannahians act as a Greek chorus, with Berendt revealing the alliances, hostilities, and intrigues that thrive in a town where everyone knows everyone else. 

Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil: A Savannah Story is a sublime and seductive reading experience.  Brilliantly conceived and masterfully written, this enormously engaging portrait of a most beguiling Southern city is certain to become a modern classic.
Butch Is a Noun
S. Bear Bergman Written by award-winning playwright and inveterate storyteller S. Bear Bergman, Butch Is a Noun picks up where gender theory leaves off. It makes butchness accessible to those who are new to the concept, and makes gender outlaws of all stripes feel as though they have come home—if home is a place where everyone understands you and approves of your haircut. From girls' clothes to men's underwear and what lies beyond, Butch Is a Noun chronicles the pleasures and dangers of living life outside the gender binary.
May I Kiss You On The Lips, Miss Sandra?
Sandra Bernhard Fragile, raw, daring, brilliant...Sandra Bernhard rocks. The actress, philospher, comedian, and cult goddess is definitely back — and feeling fabulous — with a labor of love that'll knock her followers off their feet and draw new ones to her like a magnet.

Stage, film, music, television — in every performance, Bernhard has shocked and amused, titillated and broken every rule. With her first two books, Confessions of a Pretty Lady and Love, Love, and Love Bernhard's electrifying talent took to the page and burned it up with flashes of true brillance — the kind of writing that separates the powerful from the good. And now, in this new book, Sandra returns with a deeply personal collection of spicy tales, fiercely witty riffs, and sweet doses of wisdom.

Here is Sandy as we know and love her — and as we've never quite seen her before: heartrenderingly honest, with the mouth of a diva, the soul of a fighter, and the insight of a girl who has lived life big. Like a whisper in your ear, Sandy opens up her world: from her friendship with her loyal housepainter to her imagined history as as one of Jack Kennedy's lovers; from the sensual streets of Mogador to the comfort of her pristine L.A. bungalow; from her own poetry of romantic yearning and reflective prayer to dead-on truths brought to light in the heartbreaking and hilarious glow of fashion, celebrity, rock and spirituality.

There is nothing Sandra Bernhard offers that doesn't deliver a pungent snap of truth and the surprise of unexpected emotion in this, her most revealing and entertaining book yet.
Straight Parents, Gay Children: Keeping Families Together
Robert A. Bernstein Straight Parents, Gay Children is Robert Bernstein’s moving account of how he came to terms with his daughter’s homosexuality and how the experience has enriched his life. Bernstein — winner of the 1996 Award for Best Scholarship on the Subject of Intolerance, awarded by the Gustaves Myers Center for the Study of Human Rights in North America — discusses the myths surrounding homosexuality, accepting the news, parents who speak out, public figures who have gay children, and more. Straight Parents, Gay Children is a survival guide for all parents who wish to help their gay children cope with the inevitable cruelty from which they cannot hide. This revised and updated edition includes an introduction by Robert MacNeil of MacNeil/Lehrer Productions and a foreword by Candace Gingrich, author of The Accidental Activist.
Caravaggio's Secrets (October Books)
Leo Bersani, Ulysse Dutoit Many critics have explored the homoerotic message in the early portraits of the baroque painter Michelangelo Caravaggio (1573-1610). In Caravaggio's Secrets, Leo Bersani and Ulysse Dutoit emphasize instead the impenetrability of these portraits. The tension between erotic invitation and self-concealing retreat leads Bersani and Dutoit to conclude that the interest of these works is in their representation of an enigmatic address that solicits intimacy in order to block it with a secret.

Bersani and Dutoit offer a psychoanalytic reading of the enigmatic address as initiating relations grounded in paranoid fascination. They study Caravaggio's attempts to move beyond such relations, his experiments with a space no longer circumscribed by the mutual and paranoid, if erotically stimulating, fascination with imaginary secrets. In his most original work, Caravaggio proposes a radically new mode of connectedness, a nonerotic sensuality relevant to the most exciting attempts in our own time to rethink, perhaps even to reinvent, community.
Coming Out Under Fire
Allan Berube
Setting Them Straight: You CAN Do Something About Bigotry and Homophobia in Your Life
Betty Berzon
Betty and Pansy's Severe Queer Review of San Francisco
Betty, Pansy The Severe Queer Review guides lesbian and gay travelers and residents alike to hundreds of absolutely fabulous sites offered in no other single volume. This fully updated edition reviews all the newest bars, cafes, clubs, and restaurants, as well as providing helpful lists and maps. An expanded lesbian section includes San Francisco and East Bay resources.
Gay Essentials: Facts for Your Queer Brain
David Bianco TABLE OF CONTENTS:

Who was Sappho?
How gay was the Renaissance?
When were the first sodomy laws passed in America?
Were there any gay heroes in the American Revolution?
Were "passing" women lesbians?
Who was Walt Whitman?
Who was Karl Heinrich Ulrichs?
How did San Francisco become so gay?
Was Susan B. Anthony a lesbian?
Who were the "berdaches"?
Who was Katharine Lee Bates?
What was the Scientific-Humanitarian Committee?
What were Oscar Wilde's trials about?
What is the history of gay bathhouses?
When did American gays, lesbians, and others first start calling themselves "queer"?
Who was E.M. Forster?
Who were Havelock Ellis and Edith Lees Ellis?
How gay was the Harlem Renaissance?
Who were Gertrude Stein and Alice B. Toklas?
Who was Willa Cather?
What was the Leopold and Loeb case?
Who was Natalie Barney?
What was the first gay rights organization in America?
Who was Janet Flanner?
What was the "Padlock" Bill?
What was The Well of Loneliness?
Who was Babe Didrikson Zaharias?
Was Eleanor Roosevelt a lesbian?
What was The Children's Hour?
What happened to gays and lesbians during the Holocaust?
Who were some of the lesbians in Hollywood's golden age?
What is the origin of the phrase "a friend of Dorothy's"?
Who were Ruth Benedict and Margaret Mead?
What were the army drag shows during World War II?
What were "blue discharges"?
When did the American gay and lesbian press begin?
How gay were Tennessee Williams's plays?
What was the Kinsey Report?
What were the lesbian pulp novels of the 1950s?
What were physique magazines?
Who was Christine Jorgensen?
What was the Mattachine Society?
How did McCarthyism affect gays and lesbians?
Who were the Daughters of Bilitis?
Who was Rudi Gernreich?
Who was James Baldwin?
What was the Boise Sex Scandal?
What was Evelyn Hooker's research about?
What was the Wolfenden Report?
Who was Lorraine Hansberry?
What was the Supreme Court's first pro-gay ruling?
What have gays and lesbians experienced in revolutionary Cuba?
Who was Bayard Rustin?
What was NACHO?
What is the origin of the annual gay and les
The Complete Poems, 1927-1979
Elizabeth Bishop Elizabeth Bishop was vehement about her art—a perfectionist who didn't want to be seen as a "woman poet." In 1977, two years before her death she wrote, "art is art and to separate writings, paintings, musical compositions, etc., into two sexes is to emphasize values in them that are not art." She also deeply distrusted the dominant mode of modern poetry, one practiced with such detached passion by her friend Robert Lowell, the confessional.

Bishop was unforgiving of fashion and limited ways of seeing and feeling, but cast an even more trenchant eye on her own work. One wishes this volume were thicker, though the perfections within mark the rightness of her approach. The poems are sublimely controlled, fraught with word play, fierce moral vision (see her caustic ballad on Ezra Pound, "Visits to St. Elizabeths"), and reticence. From the surreal sorrow of the early "Man-Moth" (leaping off from a typo she had come across for "mammoth"), about a lonely monster who rarely emerges from "the pale subways of cement he calls his home," to the beauty of her villanelle "One Art" (with its repeated "the art of losing isn't hard to master"), the poet wittily explores distance and desolation, separation and sorrow.
We Are Everywhere: A Historical Sourcebook of Gay and Lesbian Politics
Mark Blasius An important and original new contribution to lesbian and gay studies, We Are Everywhere brings together the key primary sources relating to the politics of homosexuality. Presenting political, historical, legal, literary, and psychological documents which trace the evolution of the lesbian and gay movement, it includes documents as diverse as organization pamphlets, essays, polemics, speeches, newspaper and journal articles, and academic papers. 

We Are Everywhere includes writings from the beginnings of the gay and lesbian movement in the 19th century by Karl Ulrichs, Magnus Hirschfeld, and John Addington Symonds; legal and government studies concerning rights of gay and lesbian citizens; articles from the early US liberation movement publications such as Mattachine Review, The Ladder and ONE; documents from the first days of the AIDS epidemic to current activism; statements and writings from the movements within "the movement" (bisexuals, S/M, conservatives); and finally, a look at the future of lesbian and gay politics. 

Together the documents allow readers to examine a diverse set of issues: the concept of gay love before "homosexuality," the development of political movements based on homosexual identity, the history of government persecution of homosexuality, the impact of feminism on the modern lesbian and gay rights movement, and the emergence of queer theory.
Rrose Is a Rrose Is a Rrose: Gender Performance in Photography
Jennifer Blessing, Judith Halberstam, Lyle Ashton Harris, Nancy Spector, Carole-Anne Tyler, Sarah Wilson The title of this large, provocative book is a combination of two historical wordplays: Gertrude Stein's famous "Rose is a rose is a rose," and Marcel Duchamp's "Rrose Selavy," the name of his imaginary, female alter ego. Spoken, it sounds like "Eros, c'est la vie,"or "Eros, that's life."

The catalog of an exhibition at New York's Guggenheim Museum, Rrose is a Rrose is a Rrose is exquisitely, elegantly designed. It includes a wealth of pictures as well as six essays on issues such as surrealist ambiguity, the exhibitionist body art of the 1970s, "queer theory" and "queer reality," and the fluidity of gender identity. With the exception of some 20th-century images of rubber appendages or bound dolls, much of the material has an innocent charm. In one of Alice Austen's Victorian-era self-portraits, for example, she and two friends are dressed as men, with spats, hats, and fake moustaches. One has carefully balanced a walking stick to suggest a male member; the women are cracking up.

The volume also explores the prejudice surrounding the evolution of gender consciousness, and details the heroism of many artists devoted to tolerance, such as Claude Cahun, whom the Nazis sentenced to death. Rrose is a Rrose is a Rrose will not change minds, but it will broaden those already open to its subject.
Trans-Sister Radio
Chris Bohjalian With Trans-Sister Radio, Chris Bohjalian, author of the bestseller Midwives, again confronts his very human characters with issues larger than themselves, here tackling the explosive issue of gender.

When Allison Banks develops a crush on Dana Stevens, she knows that he will give her what she needs most: attention, gentleness, kindness, passion. Her daughter, Carly, enthusiastically witnesses the change in her mother. But then a few months into their relationship, Dana tells Allison his secret: he has always been certain that he is a woman born into the wrong skin, and soon he will have a sex-change operation. Allison, overwhelmed by the depth of her passion, and finds herself unable to leave Dana. By deciding to stay, she finds she must confront questions most people never even consider. Not only will her own life and Carly’s be irrevocably changed, she will have to contend with the outrage of a small Vermont community and come to terms with her lover’s new body–hoping against hope that her love will transcend the physical.
What Color Is Your Parachute 1993 (What Color Is Your Parachute? (Paperback))
Richard N. Bolles
Coming Out to Parents: A Two-Way Survival Guide for Lesbians and Gay Men and Their Parents
Mary V. Borhek Listed by American Bookseller as "among the most important gay and lesbian books that should be represented in any general bookstore," Borhek's original edition of this book (1983) has also been praised as "sound, sympathetic, and helpful" (St. Luke's Journal of Theology). In this thorough revision, Borhek brings an additional decade of personal knowledge and experience to bear on the subject of coming out.
Gender Outlaw: On Men, Women and the Rest of Us
Kate Bornstein Part coming-of-age story, part mind-altering manifesto on gender and sexuality, coming directly to you from the life experiences of a transsexual woman, Gender Outlaw breaks all the rules and leaves the reader forever changed.26 black-and-white illustrations.
Gender Outlaw: On Men, Women and the Rest of Us
Kate Bornstein Part coming-of-age story, part mind-altering manifesto on gender and sexuality, coming directly to you from the life experiences of a transsexual woman, Gender Outlaw breaks all the rules and leaves the reader forever changed.26 black-and-white illustrations.
My Gender Workbook: How to Become a Real Man, a Real Woman, the Real You, or Something Else Entirely
Kate Bornstein Gender isn't just about "male" or "female" anymore - if you have any doubts, just turn on your television. RuPaul is as familiar as tomato ketchup with national radio and television shows, and transgendered folk are as common to talk-shows as screaming and yelling. But if the popularization of gender bending is revealing that "male" and "female" aren't enough, where are we supposed to go from here? Cultural theorists have written loads of smart but difficult-to-fathom texts on gender, but none provide a hands-on, accessible guide to having your own unique gender. With My Gender Workbook, Kate Bornstein brings theory down to Earth and provides a practical approach to living with or without a gender.

Bornstein starts from the premise that there are not just two genders performed in today's world, but countless genders lumped under the two-gender framework. Using a unique, deceptively simple and always entertaining workbook format, Bornstein gently but firmly guides you to discover your own unique gender identity. Whether she's using the USFDA's food group triangle to explain gender, or quoting one-liners from real "gender transgressors", Bornstein's first and foremost concern is making information on gender bending truly accessible. With quizzes and exercises that determine how much of a man or woman you are, My Gender Workbook gives you the tools to reach whatever point you desire on the gender continuum.

Bornstein also takes aim at the recent flurry of books that attempt to naturalize gender difference, and puts books like Men are from Mars, Women are from Venus squarely where they belong: on Uranus. If you don't think you are transgendered when you sit down to read this book, you will be by the time you finish it!
My Gender Workbook: How to Become a Real Man, a Real Woman, the Real You, or Something Else Entirely
Kate Bornstein Gender isn't just about "male" or "female" anymore - if you have any doubts, just turn on your television. RuPaul is as familiar as tomato ketchup with national radio and television shows, and transgendered folk are as common to talk-shows as screaming and yelling. But if the popularization of gender bending is revealing that "male" and "female" aren't enough, where are we supposed to go from here? Cultural theorists have written loads of smart but difficult-to-fathom texts on gender, but none provide a hands-on, accessible guide to having your own unique gender. With My Gender Workbook, Kate Bornstein brings theory down to Earth and provides a practical approach to living with or without a gender.

Bornstein starts from the premise that there are not just two genders performed in today's world, but countless genders lumped under the two-gender framework. Using a unique, deceptively simple and always entertaining workbook format, Bornstein gently but firmly guides you to discover your own unique gender identity. Whether she's using the USFDA's food group triangle to explain gender, or quoting one-liners from real "gender transgressors", Bornstein's first and foremost concern is making information on gender bending truly accessible. With quizzes and exercises that determine how much of a man or woman you are, My Gender Workbook gives you the tools to reach whatever point you desire on the gender continuum.

Bornstein also takes aim at the recent flurry of books that attempt to naturalize gender difference, and puts books like Men are from Mars, Women are from Venus squarely where they belong: on Uranus. If you don't think you are transgendered when you sit down to read this book, you will be by the time you finish it!
The Rough Guide to Montreal 2 (Rough Guide Travel Guides)
Arabella Bowen, John Shandy Watson INTRODUCTION

Montréal is by far Canada’s most cosmopolitan city. Toronto may have the country’s economic power and Vancouver its most majestic scenery, but the centuries-old marriage of English and French cultures that defines Montréal has given the city an allure and dynamic unique to North America – a captivating atmosphere that is admittedly hard to describe. Its ethnic make-up is in truth fairly diverse, what with plenty of Italians, Greeks, Eastern Europeans, Jews, Chinese and Portuguese putting down roots in various neighbourhoods over the last century. But ever since the French first flew the flag here back in the 1600s, the struggle for the city’s soul has centred on – and largely set apart – its English and French factions.

As such Montréal has always been a pivotal player in the politics of Québec separatism, the tension between the two main linguistic groups having reached a searing low in the late 1960s, when the Front de Libération du Québec waged a terrorist campaign on the city as the province was undergoing a "francization" that would affect Montréal most of all. In the wake of legislation that enshrined French-language dominance in Québec, English-Quebecers fled in droves, tipping the nation’s economic supremacy from Montréal to Toronto. After decades of linguistic dispute, though, a truce appears to have at last settled in, and nowadays it’s hard to believe that only a few years ago a narrowly failed 1995 referendum on separation transformed the city into a pitched battlefield over linguistic and territorial rights. It seems virtually everyone can speak French, while the younger generation of Francophones also speak l’anglais – certainly a blessing for English-speaking visitors who should have no problem finding someone who speaks the language. The truce has also gone hand in hand with the city’s economic resurgence, which sees Montréal at the fore of Canada’s high-tech industry.

The duality of Montréal’s social mix is also reflected in its urban make-up. Sandwiched between the banks of the St Lawrence River and the forested, trail-laced rise of Mont Royal, the heart of the city is an engaging melange of Old and New World aesthetics. Busy downtown, with its wide boulevards lined by sleek office towers and rambling shopping malls, is emblematic of a typical North American metropolis, while just to its south, Vieux-Montréal preserves the city’s unmistakable French heritage in its layout of narrow, cobblestone streets and town squares anchored by the radiant Basilique Notre-Dame. Balancing these are traces of the city’s greatest international moment, Expo ’67, echoes of which remain on Parc Jean-Drapeau, the islands across from Vieux-Montréal that hosted the successful World Fair. A few kilometres east stands perhaps the city’s greatest folly, the Stade Olympique built for the 1976 Olympics, its leaning tower overshadowing the expansive Jardin Botanique, second only to London’s Kew Gardens.

Specific sights aside, it’s the street-level vibe that makes Montréal such a great place to visit. Like the homegrown Cirque du Soleil, Montréal has a ceaseless – and contagious – energy that infuses its café and lounge culture, its exciting into-the-wee-hour nightlife, and the boisterous summer festivals that put everyone in a party mood. Nowhere captures this free-spirited ethos better than Plateau Mont-Royal, the trendiest neighbourhood in town and effective meeting point of Montréal’s founding and immigrant cultures. Here, the best restaurants, bars and clubs hum and groove along boulevard St-Laurent, the symbolic divide between the city’s French and English communities, under the watchful gaze of the city’s most prominent landmark, the cross atop Mont Royal that recalls Montréal’s initial founding as a Catholic colony.

In some contrast, Québec City, around 250km east, seems immune to outside forces, its walled old town steadfastly embodying the province’s French fact. Perched atop a promontory with a commanding view of the St Lawrence and laced with winding, cobblestone streets flanked by seventeenth- and eighteenth-century stone houses, it ranks as Québec’s most romantic and beautifully situated city. Closer to Montréal, two other enchanting regions – the Eastern Townships (Les Cantons-de-l’Est) and the Laurentian mountains (Les Laurentides) – provide excellent getaways, along with top-notch skiing, away from the teeming city centre.
The Revolution of Little Girls
Blanche Mccrary Boyd No matter how hard she tries, Ellen Burns will never be Scarlett O'Hara. As a little girl in South Carolina, she prefers playing Tarzan to playing Jane. As a teenage beauty queen she spikes her Cokes with spirits of ammonia and baffles her elders with her Freedom Riding sympathies. As a young woman in the 1960s and '70s, she hypnotizes her way to Harvard, finds herself as a lesbian, then very nearly loses herself to booze and shamans. And though the wry, rebellious, and vision-haunted heroine of this exhilarating novel may sometimes seem to be living a magnolia-scented Portrait of the Artist as a Young Woman, Blanche McCrary Boyd's The Revolution Of Little Girls is a completely original arid captivating work.
The Redneck Way of Knowledge
Blanche Mccrary Boyd This intoxicating book by the author of The Revolution of Little Girls combines autobiography, reporting, and the dressed-up lies we call fiction. An underground classic since its initial publication, it is the wildly funny personal testament of Blanche McCrary Boyd, sixties radical and born-againÀ Southerner, a lesbian with an un-P.C. passion for skydiving and stock-car racing, a graduate of Esalen and kundalini yoga who now takes her altered states "raw, like oysters."

The Redneck Way of Knowledge is about family reunions and kamikaze love affairs. It is about crashing an arts festival with two precociously decayed Charleston aristocrats and watching the Pope deliver Communion at Yankee Stadium. It is about the selves we try on and slough off on the way to becoming who we are. Throughout, Blanche Boyd travels the expressway between the realm of the senses and the state of grace, and reports on the journey in prose that combines riotous humor, diamond-hard intelligence, and savage lyricism.
My Husband Betty: Love, Sex, and Life with a Crossdresser
Helen Boyd Author Helen Boyd is a happily married woman whose husband enjoys sharing her wardrobe—and she has written the first book on transgendered men to focus on their relationships and their female partners. Traditionally known as cross-dressers, transvestites, or drag queens, men like Helen’s husband are diverse and don’t always conform to stereotype. Many of the older transvestites are socially conservative, deeply closeted, and devout churchgoers. Helen addresses every imaginable question concerning the reasons for behavior that still baffles not only “mental health professionals” but the practitioners themselves; the taxonomy of the transgendered and the distinct but overlapping societies of each group; coming out; bisexuality; and homophobia. The book features interviews with some very interesting people, all of whom struggle and love: dominatrix and her cross-dressing husband; a crossdressing Reiki master and his son; a woman who after dating one cross-dresser wanted to date others and met—and fell in love with—a transsexual instead; a woman whose husband promised her he was only a cross-dresser and later realized that he was transsexual. This is a book about relationships that will engage the reader, and Helen’s narrative is a powerful lens with which to examine our own notions of gender and equality.
One More River to Cross: Black & Gay in America
Keith Boykin In the aftermath of the historic 1993 March on Washington for gay and lesbian rights, Keith Boykin, in One More River to Cross, clarifies the relationship between blacks and gays in America by portraying the "common ground" lives of those who are both black and gay. 

Against a backdrop of civil rights and the black experience in America, Boykin interviews Baptist ministers, gay political leaders, and other black gays and lesbians on issues of faith, family, discrimination, and visibility to determine what differences—real and imagined—separate the two communities. Boykin points to evidence of African and precolonial same-sex behavior, as well as figures like James Baldwin and Bayard Rustin, to dispel the myth that homosexuality is a "white thang," while his research suggests that blacks are less homophobic than whites, despite the rhetoric of rap and religion. With stories from his own experience as well as that of other black gays and lesbians, Boykin targets gay racism and black homophobia and suggests that conservative forces have substituted the common language of racism for homophobia in order to prevent a potentially powerful coalition of blacks and gays.

By portraying what it means to be black and gay, One More River to Cross offers an extraordinary window into a community that challenges this country's acceptance of its minorities, both racial and sexual.
She's Not There: A Life in Two Genders
Jennifer Finney Boylan The provocative bestseller She’s Not There is the winning, utterly surprising story of a person changing genders. By turns hilarious and deeply moving, Jennifer Finney Boylan explores the territory that lies between men and women, examines changing friendships, and rejoices in the redeeming power of family. Told in Boylan’s fresh voice, She’s Not There is about a person bearing and finally revealing a complex secret. Through her clear eyes, She’s Not There provides a new window on the confounding process of accepting our true selves.

“Probably no book I’ve read in recent years has made me so question my basic assumptions about both the centrality and the permeability of gender, and made me recognize myself in a situation I’ve never known and have never faced . . . The universality of the astonishingly uncommon: that’s the trick of She’s Not There. And with laughs, too. What a good book.” —Anna Quindlen, from the Introduction to the Book-of-the-Month-Club edition.
In Memory of Angel Clare
Christopher Bram
The Substance of God: A Spiritual Thriller
Perry Brass What would you do with the Substance of God, a constantly regenerating, "self-cloning" material originating from Creation? The Substance can bring the dead back to life, but has a willful "mind" of its own. Dr. Leonard Miller, a gay bio-researcher secretly addicted to "kinky" sex, learned this after he was found mysteriously murdered in his laboratory while working alone on the Substance. Once brought back to life, Miller must find out who infiltrated his lab to kill him, how long will he have to live again—and, exactly, where does life end and any Hereafter begin?

Miller’s story takes him from the underground sex scenes of New York to the steamy all-male baths of Istanbul. It will deal with the longing for God in a techno-driven world; with the deep, persistent attractions of religious fundamentalism; and with the fundamentals of "outsider" sexuality, as both spiritual ritual and cosmic release. And Miller, the unbelieving, hard-core scientist, will be driven himself to ask one more question: Is our often-censored urge towards sex and our great, undeniable urge towards a union with God . . . the same urge?
Susie Sexpert's Lesbian Sex World
Susie Bright The lesbian sex book that rocked girls from coast to coast. Here's what lesbians really do, not what the sex cops think we ought to do. Cruising, packing, fisting, G- spots, porn stars, dildos, vibrators, anal sex, group sex, sex with straight girls, dental dams, lube 'n latex, sex during pregnancy...and more! Features new stories by Susie!!!!
Full Exposure: Opening Up to Sexual Creativity and Erotic Expression
Susie Bright In previous books such as The Sexual State of the Union, Susie Bright has told us about the way things are, and while she continues that mission in Full Exposure, she also presents an inspiring vision of the way things could be. This is far more than a self-help book; it's a blueprint for cultural revolution, focused on the liberation of our erotic expression and, as she puts it, "the creativity it demands, the challenges of sexual candor, and the rewards of coming clean about desire." The personal is always political, goes the adage, but whether she's making readers smile with a reminiscence of her first orgasm (during a fantasy in which she imagined herself as Barbara "Agent 99" Feldon) or evoking our concern over a bomb threat at one of her college lectures, Bright reminds us that the personal is always personal as well. Along the way, she tears down the false barriers between porn and erotica, counsels parents on how to negotiate the line between sexual honesty with their children and mutual privacy, and shows us again and again that gender and desire are never as simplistic as moral and cultural watchdogs would have us believe. "Girls can be women with real sexual appetites," she writes. "Men can be love-bunnies and still have raging hard-ons." Bright also includes a 17-step "sexual manifesto" aimed at enabling readers to reclaim their erotic identities and express desire on their own terms. Very few people are writing about sexuality as honestly and as well as Susie Bright—if you care at all about the subject, you owe it to yourself to read Full Exposure. —Ron Hogan
Totally Herotica
Susie Bright, Joani Blank
The Five Lesbian Brother's Guide to Life: A Collection of Helpful Hints and Fabricated Facts for Today's Gay Girl
Five lesbian brothers Congratulations, fellow lesbo! You have just been invited to join the award-winning nationally acclaimed theater troupe as they move from the stage to the page. With all their wit intact, they declare, "you can use this book to make you laugh, to make your friends cry, to upset your parents, to educate the uninformed, or as a coming-out tool." Exploring every aspect of lesbian life, they cover: Early indications that the straight life is not your style — from unusual encounters with Barbie to the proclivity to participate in every high school sportHelpful do's and don'ts for coming out at family dinners, at weddings, and at board meetingsThe language of lesbianism — in an uninhibited "dyketionary"How to achieve "lesbian style," the ultimate standard in American lifestyles todaySeduction, sex, and other tips on finding and keeping the perfect partner

Definitely proving that "laughing well is the best revenge"(Los Angeles Times), here is the most refreshing, most revealing, and raunchiest reference book ever to come out of the closet.
True Selves: Understanding Transsexualism-For Families, Friends, Coworkers, and Helping Professionals
Mildred L. Brown, Chloe Ann Rounsley Combines authoritative information and humanitarian insight into the transsexual experience

Filled with wisdom and understanding, this groundbreaking book paints a vivid portrait of conflicts transsexuals face on a daily basis—and the courage they must summon as they struggle to reveal their true being to themselves and others. True Selves offers valuable guidance for those who are struggling to understand these people and their situations.

Using real life stories, actual letters, and other compelling examples, the authors give a clear understanding of what it means to be transsexual. They also give other useful advice, including how to deal compassionately with these commonly misunderstood individuals—by keeping an open heart, communicating fears, pain and support, respecting choices.
Rubyfruit Jungle
Rita Mae Brown
Sudden Death
Rita Mae Brown Outrageous, irrepressible and endlessly  entertaining, the bestselling author of Rubyfruit Jungle  and Bingo spins a behind-the-scenes tale of women's  professional tennis that dramtically intertwines  the heart-stopping excitement of competition and  the lingering heartache of intimate human bonds.  Carmen Semanan loves three things passionalty:  tennis, money and professor Harriet Rawls. Just  twenty-four, Carmen is at her peak as one of the  world's top-seeded tennis champions, determined to win  the coveted Grand Slam. She is protected from  everything but the grueling demands of her sport by an  avericious agent and her devoted gusty Harriet.  All the odds are in her favor. But there are weeds  growing in her paradise patch. Carmen's vey latin  brother, Miguel, parlays her succes into a  financial house of cards with deals that include  smuggling, forgery, and fraud. Susan Reilly, Carmen's  archrival and former lover, leaks word of Carms's  relationship with Harriet to the press—and tennis's  best-kept secret is blown into a front-page  scandal. From the French Open to Wimbledon, jealousies,  ambitions and passions are set to explode. Now,  with everything she cherishes on the line, Carmen  must test the true depths of her feelings-both on  and off the court.
High Hearts
Rita Mae Brown From the celebrated author of Rubyfruit  Jungle and Bingo  comes a stirring novel of the Civil War, a tale of  true love and mistaken identity. Brimming with  colorful characters and vivid settings, High  Hearts is Rita Mae Brown at her most  ambitious and entertaining.

April 12,  1861. Bright, gutsy and young,Geneva Chatfield  marries Nash Hart in Albemarle County, Virginia, the  same day Fort Sumter's guns fire the start of the  Civil War. Five days later she loses him as Nash  joins the Confederate Army. Geneva, who is known  as the best rider since Light Horse Harry Lee,  cuts her hair, dons a uniform, enlists as "Jimmy  Chatfield," then rides off to be with her  beloved Nash. But sensitive Nash recoils in horror  from the violence of war, while Geneva is  invigorated by the chase and the fight. Can she be all the  man her husband isn't? She'll sure as hell try.  But there is a complication, and his name is Major  "Mars" Vickers. This macho major, to his own  shock and amazement, finds himself inexplicably  attracted to the young soldier named "Jimmy."  And this is only the beginning of a novel that  moves with sureness and grace from the ferocity of  battle to the struggle on the homefront, and brings  passion and sly humor to a story of dawning love.  High Hearts is a penetrating,  delightful and sweeping tale that gives fresh life to a  fascinating  time
The Culture of Desire: Paradox and Perversity in Gay Lives Today
Frank Browning Is there such a thing as an American gay culture—a set of styles, values, and behaviors that arises not from ethnicity or religion but from sexual orientation? How is that culture transmitted? And how is it likely to survive the depradations of homophobia and AIDS? These questions are explored by Browning, a reporter for NPR.
Radical Hollywood: The Untold Story Behind America's Favorite Movies
Paul Buhle, David Wagner, Dave Wagner A controversial and fascinating rewriting of the history of cinema's golden age.

Radical Hollywood is the first comprehensive history of the Hollywood Left. From the dawn of sound movies to the early 1950s, Paul Buhle and Dave Wagner trace the political and personal lives of the screenwriters, actors, directors, and producers on the Left and the often decisive impact of their work upon American film's Golden Age.

Full of rich anecdotes, biographical detail, and explorations of movies well-known, unjustly forgotten, and delightfully bizarre, the book is "an intelligent, well argued and absorbing examination of how politics and art can make startling and often strange bedfellows" (Publishers Weekly). Featuring an insert of rare film stillsRadical Hollywood relates the story-behind-the-story of films in such genres as crime, women's films, family cinema, war, animation, and, particularly, film noir.
Bi America: Myths, Truths, And Struggles Of An Invisible Community
William Burleson Gain an in-depth understanding of the unique struggles of the bisexual community!

"To me the gay and straight worlds are exactly the same; equally limited, judgmental, and bourgeois . . . just mirror images of each other. I truly like and overlap with some of the gay world, but my roots refuse to take hold there and grow. Unfortunately, my well-established roots in the straight world are simultaneously shriveling and dying too, leaving me feeling extremely unstable." —"Cool," a bisexual woman involved in a support group

There are at least five million bisexual people in America, generally invisible to straight society, the gay community, and even to each other. While the vast majority of these five million live within the straight or gay world, there are a few who have formed a community of their own. Bi America: Myths, Truths, and Struggles of an Invisible Community offers an inside look at the American bisexual community and gives an understanding of the special circumstances unique to being bisexual. The book takes the reader to bi community events from picnics, to conferences, to support groups, to performances in order to expose the everyday trials of the bisexual community.

Bi America includes very personal stories that let the voice of everyday bisexuals be heard through interviews, the "Bisexual History Project," in which ten bisexual people tell their life stories, and the "Online Support Group," a group of about 75 people who meet in cyberspace to talk about their lives and challenges. The book also includes the findings of a 2002 survey of about 300 bisexual people conducted via the Internet, an appendix that offers a concise list of resources for further study and personal enrichment, and an unabridged transcript of the "Bisexual History Project."

Get the answers to these questions in Bi America:

What is bisexuality?

Is there a bisexual community?

What is the culture of the bisexual community?

What are commonalities and differences between the experiences of bi men and bi women?

What is the special relationship between the bisexual and the transgender community?

How have bisexuals and the bi community been affected by HIV/AIDS?

What is the future of bisexual activism, if any?

and many more!

Bi America is a fascinating resource that exposes the challenges, struggles, and triumphs of bisexuals in America. Bisexuals, especially those newly coming out, can use this book to help understand their identity, and family members and friends seeking some insight into the unique circumstances faced by their loved ones will also find it helpful. This book will interest those concerned with the sociology of deviance or with subcultures in general. It is also appropriate for undergraduate sociology and cultural anthropology, as well as feminist studies and LGBT studies classes. This book offers one of the few accessible, nonacademic looks at this unique and interesting community.
Lucifer with a Book (Bard Book)
John Horne Burns
Olivia, (Penguin modern classics)
Dorothy Bussy
Double Indemnity V581
James M. Cain Tautly narrated and excruciatingly suspenseful, Double Indemnity gives us an X-ray view of guilt, of duplicity, and of the kind of obsessive, loveless love that devastates everything it touches. First published in 1935, this novel reaffirmed James M. Cain as a virtuoso of the roman noir.
Mildred Pierce V582
James M. Cain Mildred Pierce had gorgeous legs, a way with a skillet, and a bone-deep core of toughness. She used those attributes to survive a divorce and poverty and to claw her way out of the lower middle class. But Mildred also had two weaknesses: a yen for shiftless men, and an unreasoning devotion to a monstrous daughter. 

Out of these elements, Cain creates a novel of acute social observation and devastating emotional violence, with a heroine whose ambitions and sufferings are never less than recognizable.
Sapphistry: The Book of Lesbian Sexuality
Pat Califia
Melting Point
Pat Califia
Macho Sluts: Erotic Fiction
Pat Califia
Public Sex: The Culture of Radical Sex
Pat Califia For nearly two decades, Pat Califia has been "fuming and fussing" about censorship and the rights of perverts in America. Whether she's writing about lesbian relationships, S/M and "leather sex," sex between lesbians and gay men, eroticizing latex and safe sex, role-playing and genderbending, sex with youth, prostitution, or sex in public, Califia's essays-clear, consistent, provocative and eminently reasonable- set the standard for writing about sex. Public Sex collects the very best of Califia's work, providing both a chronicle of the sex radical movement in this country as well as the definitive positions of America's most consistent and trenchant sexual critic.
Sex Changes: The Politics of Transgenderism
Pat Califia Sex Changes: The Politics of Transgenderism is Califia's meticulously researched book based on an astute reading of the available literature and in-depth interviews with gender transgressors who "opened their lives, minds, hearts, and bedrooms to the gaze of strangers." Writing about both male-to-female and female-to-male transsexuals, Califia examines the lives of early transgender pioneers like Christine Jorgenson, Jan Morris, Renee Richards and Mark Rees, contemporary transgender activists like Leslie Feinberg and Kate Bornstein, and partners of transgendered people like Minnie Bruce Pratt. Califia scrutinizes feminist resistance to transsexuals occupying women's space, the Christian Right's backlash against transsexuals, and the appropriation of the berdache and other differently-gendered by gay historians to prove the universal existance of homosexuality. Finally, Sex Changes explores the future of gender.
Surviving AIDS
Michael Callen
CHARITY: A Novel
Paulette Callen This beautifully written novel explores Gustie's secret friendship with a beautiful young Sioux woman, a murder involving her best friend's husband—and the reaction of this small town when faced with surprising truths about the private lives of its citizens.
Le Malentendu suivi de Caligula: Nouvelles Versions.
ALBERT CAMUS
RADICAL RECORDS PB
Cant
Homosexuality: The Secret a Child Dare Not Tell
Mary Ann Cantwell HOMOSEXUALITY: The Secret a Child Dare Not Tell was written and published to educate the public about the obvious, yet irrationally-resisted, fact that homosexuals do not spring up at university enclaves and on city streets as fully-grown, mature sexual beings. First they were children, and as children, subjected to a great deal of hatred and other negativity. The book gathers surveys from many gay and lesbian adults and parents of gay and lesbian adults, and shows that all gays and lesbians shared the experience of having to hide something essential about themselves from their families and friends.

Mary Ann Cantwell wrote the book with the idea of educating the parents of all young children about the possibility that their child might be suffering needlessly and alone

This book, considered to be very "user-friendly," has been selected as an excellent source for use in diversity training, whether for schools, churches or for business. The author imagined a day when health care professionals would provide sexual orientation information along with the shots which protect the physical well-being of young children. She believes this information should strengthen the cohesion and nurturing power of all families.
Alternate Channels: The Uncensored Story of Gay and Lesbian Images on Radio and Television, 1930s to the Present
Steven Capsuto Definitive, vibrant, and utterly fascinating, Alternate Channels traces the monumental growth of gay, lesbian, and bisexual images on radio and television from the 1930s to the present. Splashed against the tumultuous backdrop of the McCarthy witch hunts, Stonewall and the gay liberation movement, the birth of the 700 Club and the religious right, the outbreak of AIDS and the arrival of in-your-face queer activism, this chatty, authoritative broadcast history tells the stories of such notorious and noteworthy moments as

- 1947: Radio gays—A bitchy fashion photographer throws fits at the drop of a designer hat on the adaptation of Moss Hart's Lady in the Dark

- 1967s: Monkey business—The Monkees flick limp wrists while caroling "Don we now our gay apparel" for a Christmas special

- 1974: Pepper in the wound—A notorious Police Woman episode depicts a gang of deadly lesbians who rob, torture, and murder senior citizens

- 1977: Wash your mouth out—Billy Crystal portrays Jodie Dallas on Soap, the first hit series with a gay character in a central role

- 1991: L.A. Law breaks 'em—Amanda Donohoe and Michelle Greene share a two-second kiss . . . and start a storm of controversy

- 2000: The last laugh—Featuring not one but two gay male characters, Will & Grace skyrockets to the top of the ratings charts

From mocking banter between Bing Crosby and Bob Hope on '50s radio to a historic peck between women on '90s television, from the stereotyping of gays, lesbians, and bisexuals as sissies and psychopaths to their widespread acceptance as real people, Alternate Channels is a compulsively readable chronicle of lesbian, gay, and bisexual images in the media—packed with unthinkable shows, bizarre personalities, unlikely heroes, and some of the strangest protests ever staged in the name of civil rights.
Sucking Sherbet Lemons
Michael Carson
Gay New York: Gender, Urban Culture, and the Making of the Gay Male World, 1890-1940
George Chauncey Gay New York brilliantly shatters the myth that before the 1960s gay life existed only in the closet, where gay men were isolated, invisible, and self-hating. Based on years of research and access to a rich trove of diaries, legal records, and other unpublished documents, this book is a fascinating portrait of a gay world that is not supposed to have existed.
Gay New York: Gender, Urban Culture, and the Making of the Gay Male World, 1890-1940
George Chauncey Gay New York brilliantly shatters the myth that before the 1960s gay life existed only in the closet, where gay men were isolated, invisible, and self-hating. Based on years of research and access to a rich trove of diaries, legal records, and other unpublished documents, this book is a fascinating portrait of a gay world that is not supposed to have existed.
The Exquisite Corpse
Alfred Chester
Fire Power
Chrystos
Loving Someone Gay
Donald H. Clark, Don Clark With gay marriage making headlines across the nation, LOVING SOMONE GAY is perhaps more relevant and needed than ever. In the original 1977 edition, Dr. Don Clark brought the first truly positive profile of gay identity to a general audience and contributed to the groundswell of the gay rights movement. In the 1980s, AIDS forever changed not only gay communities, but also the global landscape as prejudice yielded to knowledge that the HIV virus crosses the imagined barriers of gender, sexual orientation, and lifestyle. A new edition responded to the crisis. Thoroughly revised for the fourth time, LOVING SOMEONE GAY remains the most comprehensive profile of positive gay identity in print, offering courageous support and compassionate guidance for gay men and lesbians and the friends and families who love them.
Don't Get Me Started
Kate Clinton Let's get one thing straight. I'm not. And yes, my brother is Bill Clinton. But not the Bill Clinton. These two guys are very different. For one, whenever I hear President Bill speak—on gays in the military, healthcare reform—I hear that sound trucks make when they're backing up. 

I was born on the cusp of Title IX, at a time when the sports pages claimed only men played sports. When people ask where I got my comedy training, I tell them teaching high school English. I began performing stand-up in 1981, the same year Ronald Reagan began his comedy. I never got used to saying President Ronald Reagan. It was like saying President Merv Griffin. Reagan wasn't so much a president as the host. He was having such a good time playing president and going on vacation that he decided to run again.

I'm out and proud. When I'm out and it's raining I carry an umbrella. I used to be in but I hate the smell of moth balls. My closet was huge, complete with a foyer, turnstile, a few locks, dead bolts, and a burglar alarm that had to be deactivated before I could even touch the door handle. And then there was the storm door. It wasn't until I had lived and slept with a woman for a year that it occurred to me to ask, "Do you think were lesbians?" By the way, never come out to your father in a moving vehicle. 

Now I've written a book. It's not as easy as it looks. One night, I was working late on my computer when a little message came up on the screen, "You are almost out of memory." Here are my thoughts and observations on everything from gay marriage (Mad Vow Disease) to my morbid fear of mascots (with the exception of the San Diego Chicken). Thats all I'm going to say because I don't want to spoil it for you. That's a job for Jesse Helms.

I'll leave you with one last anecdote: Once when my Dad was visiting, he sat through an evening of gay politics, gay theory, gay gossip, and toward the end of the discussion, my partner turned to him and asked, "Well, Mr. Clinton, what do you think we as gay people can do to make more bridges to straight people?" My Dad did one of his patented, exquisitely timed pauses and replied, "Keep talking."
When AIDS Began: San Francisco and the Making of an Epidemic
Michel Cochrane As the AIDS crisis reaches new heights globally with no cure in the immediate future, the time is ripe to step back and examine the roots of this epidemic. In When AIDS Began, Michelle Cochrane constructs the making of the disease and expels many of the misconceptions that surround it. By examining the early outbreaks in San Francisco, she unfolds the "creation" of this disease in one geographic location and then traces how and why major claims about the transmission of HIV were made, extrapolated and then disseminated to the rest of the world - all important factors in understanding. 

Through her fascinating analysis and research, Cochrane dispels the myths of AIDS by interviewing patients, public health officials, workers and gaining access to medical charts and documents from the San Francisco Public Health Department. She comes to question some of the orthodoxies of AIDS: mainly saying it's a "gay" disease spread by sexual contact. She boldly suggests that in the tracking ofthe disease sexual transmission is more often assumed rather than empirically documented. Instead, she suggests that IV drug use and socio-economic status may have played a much greater than acknowledged role among the risk factors for those who were infected.

When AIDS Began is an original and controversial addition to the ongoing dialogue on the disease. Clearly pushing boundaries, this is an important history of an epidemic that continues to plague the globe.
The Naked Roommate: And 107 Other Issues You Might Run Into in College
Harlan Cohen In college, there's a surprise around every corner...

But that doesn't mean you can't be prepared! From sharing a bathroom with 40 strangers to sharing lecture notes, The Naked Roommate is your behind-the-scenes look at EVERYTHING you need to know about college (but never knew you needed to know).

This essential guide is packed with expert advice on everything from managing money to managing stress—plus hilarious, outrageous and telling stories from students on over 100 college campuses:

College Living

-Dorm do's, don'ts and dramas

-Lying, noisy, nasty roommates

Finding Friends

-Where they're hiding

-Friend today, gone tomorrow

Classes

-To go or not to go?

-How to get an A, C or F

-Classes in wine and bowling

Dating

-13 kinds of college hook ups

-Long distance = BIG concerns

The Party Scene

-The punch in the "fruit punch"

-Sex, drugs and the truth

Money

-Grants, loans and loose change

-Jobs: want one? How to get one

-Credit cards: handle with care

"If The Naked Roommate existed when I went to college, I would have devoured every page before I stepped foot on campus."

-Linda J. Sax, Associate Director of the Higher Education 

Research Institute and Director of the CIRP Freshman Survey
Do What I Say: Ms. Behavior's Guide to Gay and Lesbian Etiquette
Meryl Cohn Paul Rudnick and Judith Martin, move over! Do What I Say: Ms. Behavior's Guide to Gay and Lesbian Etiquette is now available in bookstores, and author Meryl Cohn, the doyenne of queer manners, is certain to become an instant celebrity, a national spokesperson for the lighter side of gay life in America. Cohn began writing the "Ms. Behavior" advice column for Boston's Bay Windows when she noticed a serious lack in the otherwise highly evolved gay and lesbian culture — there was nowhere for lesbians and gay men to turn for etiquette tips and advice. But with this exquisitely funny book, Ms. Behavior — far hipper than Ann, Abby, or even Miss Manners — has crafted an indispensable blueprint for the subtleties of gay life.
Black Sexual Politics: African Americans, Gender, and the New Racism
Patricia Hill Collins Caricatures of Black sexuality saturate American popular culture in bootylicious rap videos and paternity tests on the Jerry Springer show. Blacks have been cast as hypersexual animals in Western culture since a scantily clad "Hottentot Venus" was displayed in a cage in Paris in the 1800s. 

In Black Sexual Politics, one of America's most influential writers on race and gender explores how images of Black sexuality have been used to maintain the color line and how they threaten to spread a new brand of racism around the world today. 

The ideal of pure white womanhood, Collins argues, required the invention of hot-blooded Latinas, exotic Suzy Wongs, and wanton jezebels—images that persist in the media today in everything from animal-skin bikinis to the creation of the "welfare mom." Men confront a similar bias in a society that defines African American males as drug dealers, brutish athletes, irresponsible fathers, and rapists. Collins dissects the widespread impact of these distorted messages as she explores African American love relationships, sex in youth culture, interracial romance, sexual violence, and HIV/AIDS. 

A revolutionary work that touches the intimate and public lives of all African Americans, Black Sexual Politics brilliantly illuminates the subtle interplay of race, sex, and politics in American culture today.
Made in God's image: A resource for dialogue about the church and gender differences
Ann Thompson Cook
Made in God's image: A resource for dialogue about the church and gender differences
Ann Thompson Cook
And God Loves Each One: A Resource for Dialogue About Sexual Orientation
Ann Thompson Cook And God Loves Each One is a catalyst for a new dialogue about sexual orientation in churches and communities. It offers a path for people who wonder about sexual orientation, who wonder about the religious view that it s wrong to be gay. It s about lighting a spark of learning in your church and community. It s about growing and bringing gay and straight people together united by their profound faith that God indeed loves each one. Read it and start a dialogue. Share it, give it away, and tell your own story. Make And God Loves Each One the basis for making a difference in your church and community!
And God Loves Each One: A Resource for Dialogue About Sexual Orientation
Ann Thompson Cook And God Loves Each One is a catalyst for a new dialogue about sexual orientation in churches and communities. It offers a path for people who wonder about sexual orientation, who wonder about the religious view that it s wrong to be gay. It s about lighting a spark of learning in your church and community. It s about growing and bringing gay and straight people together united by their profound faith that God indeed loves each one. Read it and start a dialogue. Share it, give it away, and tell your own story. Make And God Loves Each One the basis for making a difference in your church and community!
The Sexual Perspective: Homosexuality and Art in the Last 100 Years in the West
Emmanuel Cooper First published in 1986 to wide critical accalaim, The Sexual Perspective broke new ground by bringing together and discussing the painting, sculpture and photography of artist who were lesbian/gay/queer/bisexual. The lavishingly and seductively illustrated new edition examines the increased lesbian visibility within the visual arts as well as artists' responses to the AIDS epidemic. Emmanuel Cooper places the art in its artistic, social and legal contexts, making it an impressively vital contribution to current debates about art, gender, identity and sexuality.
Some of the Parts
T Cooper In sparse, evocative prose, T Cooper tells the story of four splintered lives: Isak is a "gender freak" to the world at large. Taylor is so simultaneously perfect, yet useless, that she is paralyzed. Her mother Arlene is lonely and pill-popping, while Arlene's brother Charlie faces the unexpected-even unwanted-prospect of being healthy with HIV. Fractured lives in various forms of exile eventually join to re-forge a definition of family from the ashes.

T Cooper received an MFA in fiction writing from Columbia University. For some time, T doubled as T-Rok, a member of the heart-throbby Backdoor Boys performance troupe. T's work-both fiction and non-fiction-has appeared in a variety of magazines, journals and anthologies. This is a first novel.
Homosexuality in Cold War America: Resistance and the Crisis of Masculinity (New Americanists)
Robert J. Corber Challenging widely held assumptions about postwar gay male culture and politics, Homosexuality in Cold War America examines how gay men in the 1950s resisted pressures to remain in the closet. Robert J. Corber argues that a form of gay male identity emerged in the 1950s that simultaneously drew on and transcended left-wing opposition to the Cold War cultural and political consensus. Combining readings of novels, plays, and films of the period with historical research into the national security state, the growth of the suburbs, and postwar consumer culture, Corber examines how gay men resisted the "organization man" model of masculinity that rose to dominance in the wake of World War II. 

By exploring the representation of gay men in film noir, Corber suggests that even as this Hollywood genre reinforced homophobic stereotypes, it legitimized the gay male "gaze." He emphasizes how film noir’s introduction of homosexual characters countered the national "project" to render gay men invisible, and marked a deep subversion of the Cold War mentality. Corber then considers the work of gay male writers Tennessee Williams, Gore Vidal, and James Baldwin, demonstrating how these authors declined to represent homosexuality as a discrete subculture and instead promoted a model of political solidarity rooted in the shared experience of oppression. Homosexuality in Cold War America reveals that the ideological critique of the dominant culture made by gay male authors of the 1950s laid the foundation for the gay liberation movement of the following decade.
Now & Then
William Corlett The novel of remembrance—most often of love lost—is one of the most common of pre-Stonewall gay male literary themes. While it was enthusiastically replaced by the ever-popular theme of "come out and have sex," it has not completely passed into oblivion. William Corlett's enchanting and elucidating Now and Then has a decidedly pre-Stonewall feel to it, a tone of melancholia and nostalgia both surprising and comforting. Christopher Metcalf is a book editor at midlife who, upon returning home for his father's funeral, is faced with the painful memory of a love he lost at the age of 15 when he was betrayed by an older schoolmate whom he adored. Christopher's memories and his slow recognition of how he has squandered his emotional life over the years are moving, even startling. Corlett's language has a touch of classical elegance to it, yet resonates with contemporary idiom and briskness. The most astonishing aspect of Now and Then, however, is its refusal to become sentimental or present tough emotions in an easy or baleful manner. In this, it transforms a pre-Stonewall theme into a decidedly post-Stonewall novel. —Michael Bronski
I Speak For This Child: True Stories of a Child Advocate
Gay Courter This is the true story of Gay Courter's work as a Guardian of the legal powers, responsibilities, and duties her position entailed, of her fierce efforts to ensure that her clients were treated with care and respect, and of the rewards of participating in thie nationwide volunteer program. This book is for anyone who has ever wondered, "What can I do to help?"
Latter Days: A Novel
C. Jay Cox, T. Fabris "It's an all-stops-out heart-tugger for sure . . . its emotional wallop is earned honestly and uncompromisingly."-Kevin Thomas, L.A. Times

Winner of the Outstanding First Narrative Feature Award at OUTFest (the Los Angeles Gay & Lesbian Film Festival), and the Best Gay Male Feature Film Award at the Philadelphia International Gay & Lesbian Film Festival.

Combine a hunky, repressed Mormon missionary and an L.A. party boy, sensual sex and knowing humor, and the result is a sure-fire crowd-pleaser. Christian is a handsome, young man who flits from guy to guy without much of a thought in his pretty little head. So when his roommate Julie discovers that the gorgeous group of young men who moved in next door are Mormon missionaries, they bet on whether Christian can bed one of them. Christian quickly moves in for the kill, identifying Elder Aaron Davis as a repressed homo-and quite a sexy one at that. Their initial encounters have a charged sexual tension, but fear of the devil keeps Aaron's libido at bay. When the two are alone together, Aaron's Mormon missionary roommates interrupt, spot their brother as gay and send him back in shame to his Idaho hometown and embarrassed parents. But in a heartfelt conclusion that brought festival audiences to their feet, love wins out over fear.

The feature film version of Latter Days will be released in January 2004, starring Jacqueline Bisset, Mary Kay Place, Wes Ramsey, Steve Sandvoss and Amber Benson.

C. Jay Cox wrote the screenplay for the smash hit film Sweet Home Alabama, starring Reese Witherspoon, and makes his directing debut with Latter Days, for which he also wrote the screenplay.
Name Games: A Mark Manning Mystery (Mark Manning Mysteries)
Michael Craft Mark Manning, once a prominent journalist at a major daily newspaper in Chicago, is now the owner and publisher of the Dumont Daily Register, the daily paper in a small Wisconsin city. Here the biggest news is the impending city council report on a proposed new adult bookstore zoning law, the upcoming election for Sheriff and the upcoming annual exhibition of the Midwest Miniatures Society. In a unique coup for the first-ever miniatures exhibition in Dumont, the "king of miniatures", Mr. Carroll Cantrell has agreed to come and judge the show's main event. 

But the exhibition itself is quickly shoved off the front page of the paper when Cantrell is found murdered in his room. To make matters worse, Doug Pierce, the local sheriff, is widely believed to be responsible. Pierce - a closeted gay man and friend of Mark Manning - had been carrying on an affair with Cantrell and was the last person seen leaving his room before the body was discovered. As conservative elements in Dumont attempt to exploit the murder - and the sheriff's association with the deceased - to their own ends, Manning, with the help of his lover, architect Neil Waite, his staff and friends, starts his own investigation of the murder. With Cantrell having led something of a double life with no end of potential enemies and the miniatures world itself being a hot bed of rivalries and closely held resentments, the truth begins to feel very elusive indeed. As public sentiment begins to swing and time running out for Sheriff Pierce, Mark must uncover some of this close-knit town's most deeply held secrets if he's to learn the truth in time.
Homosexuality and Civilization
Louis Crompton How have major civilizations of the last two millennia treated people who were attracted to their own sex? In a narrative tour de force, Louis Crompton chronicles the lives and achievements of homosexual men and women alongside a darker history of persecution, as he compares the Christian West with the cultures of ancient Greece and Rome, Arab Spain, imperial China, and pre-Meiji Japan.

Ancient Greek culture celebrated same-sex love in history, literature, and art, making high claims for its moral influence. By contrast, Jewish religious leaders in the sixth century B.C.E. branded male homosexuality as a capital offense and, later, blamed it for the destruction of the biblical city of Sodom. When these two traditions collided in Christian Rome during the late empire, the tragic repercussions were felt throughout Europe and the New World.

Louis Crompton traces Church-inspired mutilation, torture, and burning of "sodomites" in sixth-century Byzantium, medieval France, Renaissance Italy, and in Spain under the Inquisition. But Protestant authorities were equally committed to the execution of homosexuals in the Netherlands, Calvin's Geneva, and Georgian England. The root cause was religious superstition, abetted by political ambition and sheer greed. Yet from this cauldron of fears and desires, homoerotic themes surfaced in the art of the Renaissance masters—Donatello, Leonardo, Michelangelo, Sodoma, Cellini, and Caravaggio—often intertwined with Christian motifs. Homosexuality also flourished in the court intrigues of Henry III of France, Queen Christina of Sweden, James I and William III of England, Queen Anne, and Frederick the Great.

Anti-homosexual atrocities committed in the West contrast starkly with the more tolerant traditions of pre-modern China and Japan, as revealed in poetry, fiction, and art and in the lives of emperors, shoguns, Buddhist priests, scholars, and actors. In the samurai tradition of Japan, Crompton makes clear, the celebration of same-sex love rivaled that of ancient Greece.

Sweeping in scope, elegantly crafted, and lavishly illustrated, Homosexuality and Civilization is a stunning exploration of a rich and terrible past.

(20031130)
Transmen and FTMs: Identities, Bodies, Genders, and Sexualities
Jason Cromwell
Where the Rainbow Ends
Jameson Currier With Where the Rainbow Ends, acclaimed short story writer and journalist Jameson Currier has written more than another AIDS novel. "Packed with the stuff of life, this rewarding work might be termed a 'gay immigrant' novel, a saga about men and women who leave their hometown and families, move to the big cities, and fashion new lives in an alien land" (Library Journal).

At the center of this epic tale is Robbie Taylor, who settles in New York City in 1978 as an optimistic, romantic young man with a circle of new friends. This powerful and passionate story of the trials and loves of a gay Everyman takes Robbie through a personal odyssey into enlightenment, spanning a period of almost fifteen years. As he navigates through the hedonism of his heady youth in Manhattan searching for faith, family, and understanding, Robbie is constantly being tested, like a modern-day Job. Currier masterfully weaves an ardent story about the families that we create for ourselves, a story that is at once lyrical, poignant, and sexy.
Inspiration for LGBT Students & Their Allies
Anthony J. D'Angelo, Stephen D. Collingsworth Jr., Mike Esposito, Gabriel Hermelin, Ronni Sanlo, Lydia A Sausa, Dr. Ronni Sanlo, Shane L. Windmeyer Inspiration for LGBT Students & Their Allies offers a collection of captivating, inspiring and thoughtful stories and reflections from lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender students and their allies. Each story, essay, poem, photograph and contribution takes the reader on a journey of encouragement, humor and motivation for a new generation of lgbtq students on college campuses.

The perfect resource for lgbtq educational awareness, ally training, college leadership library, a coming out gift to a friend or just to let someone know it is okay to be who you are.

$1.00 of every book sold is donated to The National Consortium of Directors of LGBT Resources In Higher Education.

This book is book number four of The Inspiration Book Series: Stories of Encouragement, Empowerment and Motivation By College Students For College Students. Other titles in The Inspiration Series include: Inspiration for Resident Assistants, Inspiration for Greeks and Inspiration for Student Leaders.
Intimate Matters: A History of Sexuality in America
John D'Emilio, Estelle B. Freedman The first full length study of the history of sexuality in America, Intimate Matters offers trenchant insights into the sexual behavior of Americans, from colonial times to today. D'Emilio and Freedman give us a deeper understanding of how sexuality has dramatically influenced politics and culture throughout our history.

"The book John D'Emilio co-wrote with Estelle B. Freedman, Intimate Matters, was cited by Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy when, writing for a majority of court on July 26, he and his colleagues struck down a Texas law criminalizing sodomy. The decision was widely hailed as a victory for gay rights—and it derived in part, according to Kennedy's written comments, from the information he gleaned from D'Emilio's book, which traces the history of American perspectives on sexual relationships from the nation's founding through the present day. The justice mentioned Intimate Matters specifically in the court's decision."—Julia Keller, Chicago Tribune

"Fascinating. . . . [D'Emilio and Freedman] marshall their material to chart a gradual but decisive shift in the way Americans have understood sex and its meaning in their lives." —Barbara Ehrenreich, New York Times Book Review

"[With] comprehensiveness and care . . . D'Emilio and Freedman have surveyed the sexual patters for an entire nation across four centuries." —Martin Bauml Duberman, Nation

"Intimate Matters is comprehensive, meticulous and intelligent." —Jonathan Yardley, Washington Post Book World

"This book is remarkable. . . . [Intimate Matters] is bound to become the definitive survey of American sexual history for years to come." —Roy Porter, Journal of the History of the Behavioral Sciences
James Dean: American Icon
David Dalton, Ron Cayen
Making History Matter
Robert Dawidoff This collection of Robert Dawidoff's essays and journalism is peopled by the likes of the Founding Fathers, Fred Astaire, Henry and William James, Sophie Tucker, Trent Lott, and Cole Porter. Drawing together this unlikely cast of characters, Dawidoff probes into the role of outsider groups as well as intellectual and political elites in the formation of American culture.

As a scholar of intellectual and cultural history, Dawidoff takes the stance that historians ought to take an active role in our democratic culture, informing and participating in public discourse. He argues for a broad reach when it comes to cultural expression, resisting the polarization of formal intellectual history and folk or commercial popular culture. In his view, Ralph Waldo Emerson and Katharine Hepburn are equally worthy topics for a historian's consideration, provided that they are treated with equal seriousness of purpose and analytic rigor. In "The Gay Nineties" section that closes the book, he traces key events in the continual struggle for gay and lesbian civil rights and takes on such unresolved issues as safer sex, needle exchange programs to control HIV transmission, and the public controversy around the portrayal of gay and lesbian television characters.

Divided into sections that deal with the patriarchs of American political and intellectual culture, expressive culture, and a historian's public voice, this book is a model of engaged and engaging writing. Accessible and witty, Making History Matter will appeal to general and academic readers interested in American history as well as gay and lesbian political and cultural issues.
Between Girlfriends
Elizabeth Dean
Coming Out: More Lesbian Fun 'N' Games
Elizabeth Dean, Linda Wells, Andrea Curran, Ginger Brown
Queer Astrology for Men
Jill Dearman A hilariously and startlingly insightful astrology guide for gay men.

Jill Dearman is a breakthrough astrologer for our time. No one has approached the stars with her sass and class ever before! Her guide to astrology for gay men is lively, revealing— and naughty!

Sections include: in life, in bed, how to seduce him, doing him and dating him, how to last over the long haul, how to get rid of him, and the three faces of each sign.

And a complete compatibility profile of each astrological combination.
Queer Astrology for Women
Jill Dearman A hilariously irreverent and startlingly insightful astrology guide for lesbians.

Jill Dearman is a breakthrough astrologer for our time. No one has approached the stars with her sass and class ever before! Her guide to astrology for lesbians is lively, revealing—and naughty!

Sections include: in life, in bed, how to seduce her, doing her and dating her, how to last over the long haul, how to get rid of her, and the three faces of each sign.

How to get rid of an Aquarius woman: Ms. Aquarius will pack her bags soon after you start invading her personal space and drowning her in too much nonstop and irrational cemotion. Ms. Aquarius hates to feel trapped, so if you slowly take away all her freedoms, you will be watching her walk out the door faster than you can sing "This is the dawning of the..."

The Cancer woman is intensely emotiona...and her moods change with the tides. Not that you can every completely figure her out. Would you dare to assume you could understand the sea or fully absorb or comprehend a beautiful piece of music? Or course not, you silly lesbian. So don't patronize this lovely woman.

But getting rid of a Cancer woman: Please don't be a cad and pull off the old "I'm going out for a pack of cigarettes (or a bag of Kitty Litter)" and never come back routine. She'll have your mother sitting with her and holding her hand, worrying, before you've made it past the border.

And a complete compatibility profile of each astrological combination:

Take Aries and Cancer: The best par? They can be fiercely loyal and protective of each other. The worst part? They instinctively know how to hurt each other's feelings and often do, in a most brutal way. Ms. Aries, ruled by fire strikes quickly and forcefully and without thinking. "Don't each that doughnut! It'll make you fat!" Ms Cancer, ruled by water, knows how to create a mood of subtle emotional torture. "I don't feel like being touched...No, I don't want to be alone. Can't we just sit together in the same room and not talk and not touch and not make such a big deal about it?"
Dear Friends: American Photographs of Men Together, 1840-1918
David Deitcher “A persuasive and startling look at friendship between men in the 19th century.” —Edmund White “Certainly one of the most interesting and provocative studies of American photography to have appeared in years.” —Linda Nochlin “Invaluable and deeply affecting. . . . A sophisticated analysis of a previously little-understood aspect of the history of male-male relationships.”—Martin Duberman

This groundbreaking book presents rarely seen photographs that provide an entirely fresh perspective on male friendship in the 19th century. The poignant images in more than 100 early photographs, drawn from public and private collections, suggest a surprisingly broad-minded attitude toward physical intimacy between men, challenging the conventional view of the Victorian era as more inhibited than our own. Deitcher’s provocative text—combining history, social observation, pictorial analysis, and personal reflection—explores the nature of that same-sex affection and the meaning such pictures can hold for us today.
Lesbian National Parks and Services Field Guide to North America: Flora, Fauna & Survival Skills
Shawna Dempsey
Gay Haiku
Joel Derfner Impossible to resist, this hilariously sassy and sweet collection of haiku turns the perilous sport of gay dating into pure poetry.

For hundreds of years, the Japanese haiku has been equated with peaceful contemplation and spiritual enlightenment. A delicate balance of rhythm and line, the haiku has provided countless readers with an appreciation of the changing of the seasons and the miracles of nature. Now, in Gay Haiku, readers can finally appreciate more important things—like the changing of boyfriends and the miracles of shopping.

Irresistible and irreverent, this collection of one hundred and ten witty and wicked short poems captures the many dating disasters of first-time author Joel Derfner. In a wonderfully fresh and original voice, Derfner shamelessly mines his personal life to send up such broad-ranging topics as gay pop culture, politics, family, sex, and, of course, home decorating.

Gay, straight, or undecided, readers will delight in Derfner’s dry sense of humor and unmistakable charm as he tackles the big questions of life.
The Family Heart: A Memoir Of When Our Son Came Out
Robb Forman Dew "ASTONISHINGLY MOVING...The Family Heart is a tough and challenging work, for it reminds us that empathy is a humble but radical virtue, if lived."

—USA Today

" I'm gay.' Every day, parents around the world hear those words from their children. Most are utterly unprepared for them. By writing The Family Heart, Robb Forman Dew has done such parents an extraordinary service."

—The Washington Post Book World

"TOUCHINGLY WRITTEN."

—The Boston Globe

"At the heart of this memoir lies a true epiphany: the author's sudden, galvanizing awareness of the suicidal consequences of homophobia. It is a chilling moment, and it is described with a writer's eloquence and a mother's rage....Dew's intense imagination, combined with her ignorance of homosexuality, was as much a hindrance as a help, and it is to her credit that she has recorded the occasionally wacky assumptions and painful readjustments of her own odyssey with such care and humor."

—The New Yorker

"POETIC, HONEST."

—Fort Worth Star-Telegram

"Eloquent and absorbing...The true testament of Mrs. Dew and her husband as parents, and the most powerful moments of this inspiring memoir, occur when they come out' to their community as parents of a gay child....Though Mrs. Dew imparts a lot of self-gained wisdom in this perceptive and beautifully articulated story, in the end she realizes she has something she has always had—a strong loving family and two good sons."

—The Dallas Morning News

"AMEN FROM ANY MOTHER, EVERY MOTHER."

—Anna Quindlen

The New York Times
The Films of Marlene Dietrich
Homer Dickens
Emily Dickinson: Selected Poems
Emily Dickinson Because I could not stop for Death-

He kindly stopped for me-

The carriage held but just ourselves-

And Immortality.

Bloomsbury Poetry Classics are selections from the work of some of our greatest poets. The series is aimed at the general reader rather than the specialist and carries no critical or explanatory apparatus. This can be found elsewhere. In the series the poems introduce themselves, on an uncluttered page and in a format that is both attractive and convenient. The selections have been made by the distinguished poet, critic, and biographer Ian Hamilton.
Marlene
Marlene Dietrich
The Unofficial Gay Manual
Kevin DiLallo, Robert Hickey
Hothead Paisan: Homicidal Lesbian Terrorist
Diane Dimassa
The Revenge of Hothead Paisan: Homicidal Lesbian Terrorist
Diane Dimassa This book is bound to leave you speechless—either due to slack-jawed shock or belly-aching laughter. It is, as the title does suggest, about a homicidal lesbian terrorist, and all that you might imagine this entails: men-hating, men-bashing, men-dismemberment. Those who are uncomfortable with over-the-top stereotypes should steer way clear of this book. But for the open-minded reader (not limited to militant lesbians), this is one heck of a ride.
Donelan's Back
Gerard Donelan
The bar stories: A novel after all
Nisa Donnelly
I'll Get There, It Better Be Worth the Trip
John Donovan
I'll Get There, It Better Be Worth the Trip
John Donovan
Negotiating Lesbian and Gay Subjects
M. Dorenkamp Locating Lesbian and Gay Subjects collects some of the best papers from the Fifth Annual Lesbian and Gay Studies Conference, held at Rutgers University in 1991. These essays are distinguished by their concern with `a politics of location,' shifting emphasis from gay and/or lesbian identity to the location of these subjects in material experiences or events.

Within this framework, the writers examine literature, art, psychoanalysis and personal experience. A number of the essays explore the role specific racial and ethnic constructions in the construction of gay men and/or lesbians, and conversely, the role of sexual identities in forming racial and ethnic constructs. Other are focused on the body and how it it created in reponse to American cultural forces.

The diversity of the contributors—academics, filmmakers, activists and authors—results in a book of broad scope, and will be an important work for those with an interest in issues of sexuality, race and gender.

Contributors: Joseph A. Boone, Julia Creet, Samuel Delany, Monica Dorenkamp, Richard Fung, Yukiko Hanawa, Richard Henke, Marcia Ian, Richard Meyer, Sylvia Molloy, Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick, Jennifer Terry, Simon Watney.
Kitsch; the world of bad taste
Gillo Dorfles
Greek Homosexuality
K. J. Dover
Cures: A Gay Man's Odyssey
Martin Bauml Duberman This is the tenth anniversary edition of Cures: A Gay Man’s Odyssey, Martin Duberman’s classic memoir of growing up gay in pre-Stonewall America. The tale of his desperate struggle to “cure” himself of his homosexuality through psychotherapy is utterly frank and deeply moving. But Cures is more than one man’s story; it’s the vivid, witty account of a generation, of changing times, shifting social attitudes, and the rising tide of protest against received wisdom. For this tenth anniversary edition, Duberman has written a substantial new afterword that updates both his personal history and the ongoing struggle for a more just society.
About Time: 2Exploring the Gay Past (Meridian)
Martin Bauml Duberman
Stonewall
Martin Bauml Duberman
Joining the Tribe: Growing Up Gay and Lesbian in the '90s
Linnea Due As our country struggles to accept its gay and lesbian citizens, the debate for gay civil rights often focuses on the issue of choice, with the majority of Americans believing that to be gay is a choice, one that's embraced for its lifestyle. This belief ignores the presence and experience of one segment of the gay and lesbian population: its youth. In Joining The Tribe, journalist Linnea Due travels America to create a portrait of gay and lesbian teenagers as an endangered and vulnerable community whose diversity, courage, and resiliency will inspire gay and straight readers alike. By vividly documenting the lives of gay and lesbian teenagers, Due shows that homosexuality is not about choice. It's about fights in the schoolyard, whispers in the locker room, cruel classmates, and oblivious or abusive parents. Most gay and lesbian youth endure severe humiliation and isolation for being gay, resulting in depression and low self-esteem for most, and suicide for some. Combining in-depth interviews with social analysis, Due reveals the realities gay and lesbian teenagers face, often without the support of family, peer groups, or adult gay and lesbian networks. With stories from across America, Due meets kids from a range of backgrounds and families, with some in the closet, some out, most somewhere-in-between, all struggling to grow into adulthood. By turns heartbreaking and infuriating, Joining The Tribe shows how against overwhelming odds, gay and lesbian teenagers continue to survive and bounce back, ready to join their brothers and sisters in gay America's fight for freedom and respect.
Rethinking Rights and Responsibilities: The Moral Bonds of Community
Arthur J. Dyck
Now You See It: Studies on Lesbian and Gay Film
Richard Dyer There have been hundreds of films featuring homosexual characters, and many lesbians and gay men have worked before and behind the camara. Yet relatively few films have been produced by gays and lesbians that actually explore the problems, pressures, and perceptions of homosexual life with sensitivity and understanding. Now You See It analyzes this political and artistic struggle, uncovering its dynamics within a variety of lesbian and gay films—some very well known, some long lost in film history. An exceptional work of film criticism and gay and lesbian history, Now You See It is a powerful investigation of the processes of cultural production and the construction of sexual identities.
Now You See It: Studies on Lesbian and Gay Film
Richard Dyer There have been hundreds of films featuring homosexual characters, and many lesbians and gay men have worked before and behind the camara. Yet relatively few films have been produced by gays and lesbians that actually explore the problems, pressures, and perceptions of homosexual life with sensitivity and understanding. Now You See It analyzes this political and artistic struggle, uncovering its dynamics within a variety of lesbian and gay films—some very well known, some long lost in film history. An exceptional work of film criticism and gay and lesbian history, Now You See It is a powerful investigation of the processes of cultural production and the construction of sexual identities.
Independence Day (Avon Flare Book)
B. A. Ecker
Independence Day
B. A. Ecker
Boy in the Sand: Casey Donovan, All-American Sex Star
Roger Edmonson Roger Edmonson details the life of one of the most famous and beloved American gay porn stars. In 1971, gay model and actor Cal Culver went from being relatively unknown to superstardom when he appeared in the acclaimed high-brow porn movie Boys in the Sand. Rechristened Casey Donovan, he became a stage star, a world-renowned celebrity, and an idol for gay men. In 1987 Culver died of AIDS-related complications. Boy in the Sand is remarkably free from moralizing, simply presenting the reader with the everyday realities of Donovan's life, from his careers as advice columnist for Stallion magazine and hustler to his romantic pursuits. Like Charles Isherwood's critically acclaimed Wonder Bread and Ecstasy: The Life and Death of Joey Stefano, Edmonson's book is more than simply a portrait of the artist as a young stud—it's an examination of how gay-male sexuality and identity are constructed and marketed for both homosexual and mainstream audiences. —Michael Bronski
Open Secret: Gay Hollywood—1928-1998
David Ehrenstein Hollywood isn't just a place or an industry — it's a fantasy that unfolds in the minds of moviegoers the world over. And talking about "who's gay in Hollywood" has always been the most socially acceptable way of talking about homosexuality period.But times have changed for gays and lesbians inside Hollywood and in the culture at large. Ellen DeGeneres "came out" to a world quite different from the one that allowed Marlene Dietrich to "stay in." And while Rupert Everett may be called "the gay Cary Grant," the real Cary Grant would never have described himself as gay — even though he was.So what has it meant to be gay in Hollywood, not just as a star but behind the scenes as well? How homosexual actors and actresses came to define straight America's sexual self-image is only one of the paradoxical and provocative questions explored in Open Secret, a revealing cultural chronicle of gay Hollywood. From the silent era to the age of the multiplex and beyond, homosexuality has been a fact of life in the film industry, and scores of important personalities — stars, writers, directors, producers — have enjoyed long and spectacular careers on both sides of the camera, despite mainstream America's professed bias against gays.

Part social history and part Tinseltown expose, this entertaining book spans seventy years, painting knowing and vivid portraits of many of Hollywood's foremost gays and lesbians, often in the words of eyewitnesses or the principals themselves. Veteran entertainment journalist David Ehrenstein traces the gradual transformation from an era when gays and lesbians had no public profile in "polite" society to the modern era when many top entertainment figures are not merely comfortable with their sexuality but actually celebrate it — and are in turn celebrated for it. In the process, he presents a unique reflection of American society as a whole and its ever-changing attitudes and values.
Travels With Lizbeth
Lars Eighner "Remarkable . . . irresistibly funny." The New Yorker

The true story of a modern Robinson Crusoe and Huckleberry Finn, a homeless man and his erstwhile companion, a dog named Lizbeth, and their unbelievable, funny and poignant adventures on the road and on the streets.
Early Embraces 3: More True-life Stories of Women Describing Their First Lesbian Experience
Lindsey Elder A good story is always worth telling, which is why it has taken three volumes (so far) to contain the sweet, sexy, funny, passionate, and heartwarming words of women describing their first lesbian experience. From first kiss to last gasp, these stories will thrill you with their honesty, candor, and passion.
Early Embraces 3: More True-life Stories of Women Describing Their First Lesbian Experience (Early Embraces)
Lindsey Elder A good story is always worth telling, which is why it has taken three volumes (so far) to contain the sweet, sexy, funny, passionate, and heartwarming words of women describing their first lesbian experience. From first kiss to last gasp, these stories will thrill you with their honesty, candor, and passion.
Oscar Wilde
Richard Ellmann The biography sensitive to the tragic pattern of the story of a great subject: Oscar Wilde - psychologically and sexually complicated, enormously quotable, central to a alluring cultural world and someone whose life assumed an unbearably dramatic shape.
The Truth Is . . .: My Life in Love and Music
Melissa Etheridge, Laura Morton Since she first burst onto the international music scene, Melissa Etheridge has released seven albums that have sold more than 25 million copies worldwide, garnering not only public adoration for her uncompromising honesty but numerous critical awards, including two Grammys and the prestigious ASCAP Songwriter of the Year award. The Truth Is . . . is a highly charged autobiography—a bold and unflinching account of an extraordinary life that Melissa describes as only she can: from her Kansas roots, through her early love of music, to her brilliant rise to superstardom in a male-dominated rock world. Melissa openly discusses the massive impact of her publicly coming out, a revelation that only increased her popularity, making her a highly visible spokesperson for the gay and lesbian community. The Truth Is . . . shares Melissa Etheridge’s fascinating story with unprecedented candor and insight.
Middlesex: A Novel (Oprah's Book Club)
Jeffrey Eugenides "I was born twice: first, as a baby girl, on a remarkably smogless Detroit day in January of 1960; and then again, as a teenage boy, in an emergency room near Petoskey, Michigan, in August of 1974." And so begins Middlesex, the mesmerizing saga of a near-mythic Greek American family and the "roller-coaster ride of a single gene through time." The odd but utterly believable story of Cal Stephanides, and how this 41-year-old hermaphrodite was raised as Calliope, is at the tender heart of this long-awaited second novel from Jeffrey Eugenides, whose elegant and haunting 1993 debut, The Virgin Suicides, remains one of the finest first novels of recent memory.

Eugenides weaves together a kaleidoscopic narrative spanning 80 years of a stained family history, from a fateful incestuous union in a small town in early 1920s Asia Minor to Prohibition-era Detroit; from the early days of Ford Motors to the heated 1967 race riots; from the tony suburbs of Grosse Pointe and a confusing, aching adolescent love story to modern-day Berlin. Eugenides's command of the narrative is astonishing. He balances Cal/Callie's shifting voices convincingly, spinning this strange and often unsettling story with intelligence, insight, and generous amounts of humor:

Emotions, in my experience aren't covered by single words. I don't believe in "sadness,""joy," or "regret."
 I'd like to have at my disposal complicated hybrid emotions, Germanic traincar constructions like, say, "the happiness that attends disaster." Or: "the disappointment of sleeping with one's fantasy." ... I'd like to have a word for "the sadness inspired by failing restaurants" as well as for "the excitement of getting a room with a minibar." I've never had the right words to describe my life, and now that I've entered my story, I need them more than ever.

When you get to the end of this splendorous book, when you suddenly realize that after hundreds of pages you have only a few more left to turn over, you'll experience a quick pang of regret knowing that your time with Cal is coming to a close, and you may even resist finishing it—putting it aside for an hour or two, or maybe overnight—just so that this wondrous, magical novel might never end. —Brad Thomas Parsons
Surpassing the Love of Men: Romantic Friendship and Love between Women from the Renaissance to the Present
Lillian Faderman A classic of its kind, this fascinating cultural history draws on everything from private correspondence to pornography to explore five hundred years of friendship and love between women.Surpassing the Love of Men throws a new light on shifting theories of female sexuality and the changing status of women over the centuries.
Odd Girls and Twilight Lovers: A History of Lesbian Life in Twentieth-Century America (Between Men—Between Women)
Lillian Faderman
Now That You Know: A Parents' Guide to Understanding Their Gay and Lesbian Children, Updated Edition
Betty Fairchild, Nancy Hayward Now updated with new material on AIDS and support groups, this “completely non-judgmental, very informative, and extremely effective book” (Library Journal)is a standard reference for parents of gays and lesbians.
Not Like Other Boys
Hilary Fanin Not Like Other Boys is a touching story from a mother and son about growing up gay in suburbia. Told in alternating voices, this frank, genuinely moving memoir chronicles the long journey they took from concealment and shame to acceptance and love. 8 photos.
Sexing the Body: Gender Politics and the Construction of Sexuality
Anne Fausto-Sterling Why do some people prefer heterosexual love while others fancy the same sex? Is sexual identity biologically determined or a product of convention? In this brilliant and provocative book, the acclaimed author of Myths of Gender argues that even the most fundamental knowledge about sex is shaped by the culture in which scientific knowledge is produced.Drawing on astonishing real-life cases and a probing analysis of centuries of scientific research, Fausto-Sterling demonstrates how scientists have historically politicized the body. In lively and impassioned prose, she breaks down three key dualisms - sex/gender, nature/nurture, and real/constructed - and asserts that individuals born as mixtures of male and female exist as one of five natural human variants and, as such, should not be forced to compromise their differences to fit a flawed societal definition of normality.
Spontaneous Combustion
David B. Feinberg
Stone Butch Blues
Leslie Feinberg Published in 1993, this brave, original novel is considered to be the finest account ever written of the complexities of a transgendered existence.

Woman or man? That's the question that rages like a storm around Jess Goldberg, clouding her life and her identity. Growing up differently gendered in a blue—collar town in the 1950's, coming out as a butch in the bars and factories of the prefeminist '60s, deciding to pass as a man in order to survive when she is left without work or a community in the early '70s. This powerful, provocative and deeply moving novel sees Jess coming full circle, she learns to accept the complexities of being a transgendered person in a world demanding simple explanations: a he-she emerging whole, weathering the turbulence.

Leslie Feinberg is also the author of Trans Liberation, Trans Gender Warriors and Transgender Liberation, and is a noted activist and speaker on transgender issues.
Stone Butch Blues
Leslie Feinberg Published in 1993, this brave, original novel is considered to be the finest account ever written of the complexities of a transgendered existence.

Woman or man? That's the question that rages like a storm around Jess Goldberg, clouding her life and her identity. Growing up differently gendered in a blue—collar town in the 1950's, coming out as a butch in the bars and factories of the prefeminist '60s, deciding to pass as a man in order to survive when she is left without work or a community in the early '70s. This powerful, provocative and deeply moving novel sees Jess coming full circle, she learns to accept the complexities of being a transgendered person in a world demanding simple explanations: a he-she emerging whole, weathering the turbulence.

Leslie Feinberg is also the author of Trans Liberation, Trans Gender Warriors and Transgender Liberation, and is a noted activist and speaker on transgender issues.
Trans Liberation: Beyond Pink or Blue
Leslie Feinberg This stirring call for tolerance and solidarity from the acclaimed activist and author of Transgender Warriors collects Leslie Feinberg's speeches on trans liberation and its essential connection to the liberation of all people. 

Leslie Feinberg is author of the underground classic Stone Butch Blues.
Trans Liberation: Beyond Pink or Blue
Leslie Feinberg This stirring call for tolerance and solidarity from the acclaimed activist and author of Transgender Warriors collects Leslie Feinberg's speeches on trans liberation and its essential connection to the liberation of all people. 

Leslie Feinberg is author of the underground classic Stone Butch Blues.
The Family of Max Desir: 2
Robert Ferro
Oscar Wilde the Dramatic Life and Fascinat
Martin Fido
Torch Song Trilogy
Harvey Fierstein
In Memory of Her
Elisabeth Fiorenza This work is a first within the discipline of New Testament Studies. New York Times Book Review
Aimee and Jaguar: A Love Story, Berlin 1943
Erica Fischer Acclaimed in Germany and England, this tragic and remarkable real-life love story won a Lambda Literary Award when it was first published in America in 1995. Lilly Wust ("Aimée") was a conventional middle-class mother of four, estranged from her philandering husband, when she met Felice Schragenheim ("Jaguar") in 1941. Their passionate affair unfolded against the backdrop of the deportation of Jews from Berlin, but several months passed before Felice could even bring herself to tell Lilly that she was Jewish and living illegally on the streets. "I knew, of course, what it meant," Lilly recalled in old age. "Not for a moment did I think that I too could be in danger. On the contrary, all I wanted to do now was to save her." Lilly's heroic efforts to conceal and protect Felice through the next two years make for painful and inspiring reading. Felice was arrested in August 1944 and sent her last letter to Lilly four months later. In 1981 Lilly was awarded the German Federal Service Cross, though no one could read this as a happy ending. —Regina Marler
Cavalcade of Boys Vol. 2
Tim Fish
Cavalcade of Boys Volume 3
Tim Fish
Cavalcade of Boys
Tim Fish
Special Teachers/Special Boys
Peter Fisher
Making Love
Leonore Fleischer
First Gay Pope
Lynne Yamaguchi Fletcher
Out, Loud, & Laughing: A Collection of Gay & Lesbian Humor
Charles Flowers Gays in the military.  Lesbian parents taking their kids to school.  Gay and lesbian couples getting married.  Everywhere you turn gay and lesbian Americans are in the news and more often than not, at the center of some controversy, some debate about tolerance and civil rights, where anger and hatred rule the day.  What's amazing is how gays and lesbians continue to survive without losing their self-respect, their courage, or most surprisingly, their sense of humor. Out, Loud, & Laughing features fifteen of today's funniest gay and lesbian humorists, from stand up comics like Kate Clinton and Frank Maya, to the performance work of the Pomo Afro Homos (Postmodern African-American Homosexuals) and Marga Gomez, to the queer Addison and Steele of the 1990s, Frank DeCaro and David Sedaris. In many ways, gay and lesbian humor is no different from heterosexual comedy, but the material does raise a few eyebrows: the insufferable Jesse Helms, the military ban ("be all you can be ...but in private"), living up to the Lesbian Chic, the trauma of gay male dating rituals, body piercing ("sometimes a fashion statement is a cry for help"), coming out to parents ("Mom, would you please pass the potatoes to a homosexual"), and so much more. By rejecting stereotypes and playing with differences, gay and lesbian humor not only entertains, but educates by disarming ignorancc and fear and the homophobia they engender.  To that end, a portion of all proceeds from this book will be donated to Broadway Cares/Equity Fights AIDS, the organization that, among other projects, initiated and promoted the "red ribbon" campaign for AIDS awareness. Hilarious and socially minded, Out, Loud, & Laughing will leave you laughing out loud and wanting more.
Alec Baldwin Doesn't Love Me and Other Trials from My Queer Life
Michael Thomas Ford The short humorous essay is a form that few writers can master. Sure, pithy and funny are easy enough (if you are, in fact, pithy and funny), but the failings of most humorous essays come from a lack of seriousness. Humor is most effective when the writing articulates a clear, thoughtful point of view. The essays in Michael Thomas Ford's Alec Baldwin Doesn't Love Me & Other Trials from My Queer Life are perfect models of the form. Ford, who writes a syndicated column titled "My Queer Life," can muse on anything from Martha Stewart's manias to his devotion to Alec Baldwin's chest, from the elusive gay gene to right-wing Fundamentalist Christianity (in which he was raised), and he manages to make us laugh and sometimes even cry. His ironic view of a world that keeps threatening to be wonderful but never quite succeeds dovetails perfectly with his desire for world peace, freedom for gay people, and better sex. Witty, funny, and surprisingly moving, Michael Thomas Ford explains life to us and it actually begins to make sense.
Alec Baldwin Doesn't Love Me and Other Trials from My Queer Life
Michael Thomas Ford The short humorous essay is a form that few writers can master. Sure, pithy and funny are easy enough (if you are, in fact, pithy and funny), but the failings of most humorous essays come from a lack of seriousness. Humor is most effective when the writing articulates a clear, thoughtful point of view. The essays in Michael Thomas Ford's Alec Baldwin Doesn't Love Me & Other Trials from My Queer Life are perfect models of the form. Ford, who writes a syndicated column titled "My Queer Life," can muse on anything from Martha Stewart's manias to his devotion to Alec Baldwin's chest, from the elusive gay gene to right-wing Fundamentalist Christianity (in which he was raised), and he manages to make us laugh and sometimes even cry. His ironic view of a world that keeps threatening to be wonderful but never quite succeeds dovetails perfectly with his desire for world peace, freedom for gay people, and better sex. Witty, funny, and surprisingly moving, Michael Thomas Ford explains life to us and it actually begins to make sense.
That's Mr. Faggot to You : Further Trials from My Queer Life
Michael Thomas Ford An Excerpt

The Perils of P.E.

Summer is here, and I should be in shape. I even promised myself that this year I'd go to the gym and just do it. But once again I'm not ready. My stomach is still too big, my shoulders too small. Blame it on Wally Shufelt.

Wally Shufelt—Mr. Shufelt—was my fifth grade gym teacher. One of those aging ex-jocks who failed to make it to the majors, he told us at least once a month how the Dodgers almost signed him right out of high school but a knee accident sidelined him before the start of spring training. Instead, he spent his years taking out his frustrations on the boys he used to be, dedicating his life to making men of us. And he took to it with a fervor generally found only in missionaries and defenders of the spotted owl.

I think for most gay men gym class was a black or white thing. For those of us who could actually do things like tackle, hit balls, and sink free throws, it was a junior version of nirvana, complete with sweaty bodies and blossoming hormones. For those of us completely bereft of any coordination whatsoever, it was a different story altogether.

Today I can enjoy physical activity—I have even been known to watch sporting events from time to time—but back in my school days I was decidedly in the second camp. Although my father had been the star athlete at the same school 25 years earlier, I inherited none of his talent. And in a backwoods school where excelling in academics was nothing compared to being able to score 42 points in the first half of whatever game one was playing, this was a decided disadvantage.

How I dreaded those alternating days when fourth period came and I had to enter that cavernous, wooden-floored palace of misery with its stench of varnish and unwashed adolescence. Many were the mornings when I would wait for the bus and pray as hard as I could for God to bring about the Second Coming before 11:00 rolled around and I was forced to see what new ordeal Mr. Shufelt had prepared especially for me.

You see, although we engaged in the usual seasonal gym class cycle of soccer-basketball-baseball, Mr. Shufelt was happiest when putting us through the paces of some activity of his own design. He was of the firm opinio
It's Not Mean If It's True
Michael Thomas Ford "Cranky, bemused, and extremely funny, Ford is brilliant," wrote Publishers Weekly. With two best-sellers and a Lambda Literary Award under his belt, Michael Thomas Ford is still cranky. Lucky for us. The author of Alec Baldwin Doesn't Love Me and That's Mr. Faggot to You returns with more skewed observations on the strange state of the queer union. As fans of his previous collections have happily discovered, little escapes his attention, and no topic is too controversial or sacred to be tackled. "The Condensed History of Gay Pride" is enough to send any politically correct gay leader shrieking into the streets. But Ford's favorite target remains himself. The fact that Cher's butt is more famous than he is really irks him, and he is willing to pretend to be straight in order to get help while shopping for clothes. He murdered his rival's "egg baby" in high school to secure a good grade, and he sacrificed his own to a chocolate cake. Whether he is equating becoming a man with buying a barbecue in the very moving "Rite of Passage" or considering the state of parenthood in the unforgettable "Cheaper by the Dozen," Ford continues to observe life in ways that help us more closely observe ourselves—while never never forgetting to make us laugh.
Hog Heaven: Erotic Lesbian Stories
Caressa French From a biker bar to corporate towers and posh resorts to a fantasy-filled bath, each of these stories contains settings, characters, and situations that are strikingly different. Most importantly, these stories are HOT, ranging from a relatively mild PG13 to pedal-to-metal XXX.
A Mind of Its Own
David M. Friedman
A Mind of Its Own: A Cultural History of the Penis
David M. Friedman Setting out to "make intellectual and emotional sense of a man's relationship with his defining organ," David Friedman moves from highbrow to lowbrow in this lighthearted but substantive cultural history. Successively viewed as a life source, a symbol of a sacred covenant with God, an emblem of shame, an instrument of domination, a mere prop for the pharmaceutical companies, and finally, as simply a means of penetration-the penis has always been at the core of Western man's (and woman's) cultural evolution. With such luminaries as Leonardo da Vinci, Sigmund Freud, Walt Whitman, and Norman Mailer marking their territory on the subject, A Mind of Its Own is an intelligent and often hilarious account of man's complicated bond with his closest friend.
Natural Acts
James Fritzhand
Moab Is My Washpot
Stephen Fry
The Liar
Stephen Fry Fry's hilarious novel has won praise from critics everywhere, and it hit the very top of bestseller lists in England. Its bisexual hero is a diabolically brilliant pathological liar with the wit of a Truman Capote and the moral compunctions of an amoeba.
Winchell: Gossip, Power, and the Culture of Celebrity
Neal Gabler Hailed as the most important and entertaining biography in recent memory, Gabler's account of the life of fast-talking gossip columnist and radio broadcaster Walter Winchell "fuses meticulous research with a deft grasp of the cultural nuances of an era when virtually everyone who mattered paid homage to Winchell" (Time). of photos.
The Once and Future Goddess: A Sweeping Visual Chronicle of the Sacred Female and Her Reemergence in the Cult
Elinor W. Gadon A richly illustrated testament to the reemergence of the Goddess in the art and in the lives of contemporary women and men.

In this beautifully illustrated and far-reaching history. Elinor Gadon vividly weaves words and images to demonstrate the powerful connections between ancient and contemporary art, between the Goddess of the Ice Age and the Goddess of today.

This panoramic view of Goddess imagery extends from the prehistoric Goddess representations of Catal Huyuk, Malta, Avebury, and Crete, tot he more patriarchal images of the Sumerians, Greeks, and Christians, to the wide range of contemporary artists inspired by the Goddess, including Frida Kahlo, Mayumi Oda, and Judy Chicago.
Tilting the Tower: Lesbians / Teaching / Queer Subjects
Linda Garber Addresses lesbian/gay studies in education from a variety of political and pedagogical perspectives. Offers insights from college and high school educators within schools and covers educational politics outside the classroom.
Vested Interests: Cross-Dressing and Cultural Anxiety
Marjorie Garber Beginning with the bold claim, "There can be no culture without the transvestite," Marjorie Garber explores the nature and significance of cross-dressing and of the West's recurring fascination with it.

Vested Interests is a tour de force of cultural criticism: its investigations range across history, literature, film, photography, and popular and mass culture, from Shakespeare to Mark Twain, from Oscar Wilde to Peter Pan, from transsexual surgery and transvestite "sororities" to Madonna, Flip Wilson, Rudolph Valentino and Elvis Presley. What, Garber asks, does clothing have to do with sexuality? How do dress codes contribute to the organization of society? How is passing as a man or a woman related to racial passing? Is transvestitism a sign of homosexuality? What are the politics of drag? Why are cross-dressing rituals so commonly a part of the male power elite? How do transvestites appear—and disappear—in detective fiction? Is religious costume a kind of cross-dressing? Why is Peter Pan played by a woman?

The books fifteen chapters include "Cross-Dressing forSuccess,""Fetish Envy," The Chic of Araby,""Phantoms of the Opera,""Black and White TV" (on transvestitism in African-American literature and culture), Spare Parts" (on transsexual surgery, the surgical construction of gender) and "Red Riding Hood and the Wolf in Bed."

Rich in anecdote and insight, Vested Interests offers a provocative and entertaining view of our ongoing obsession with dressing up—and with the power of clothes.
Vice Versa: Bisexuality and the Eroticism of Everyday Life
Marjorie Garber Despite the flood of sexuality theory and queer cultural studies in 20th-century academia, bisexuality—and the many questions and problems surrounding it—has been little considered. In Vice Versa, Marjorie Garber, director of the Center for Literary and Cultural Studies at Harvard University, takes on this enormous project with refreshing academic rigor and compelling enthusiasm. Covering cultural influences from antiquity through early psychoanalysis to such recent provocateurs as Geraldo Rivera and Susie Bright, Garber calls into question the basic underpinnings of even the most radical views of human sexuality. She suggests that bisexuality is "not just another sexual orientation but rather a sexuality that undoes sexual orientation as a category," and leads us through the ensuing ruckus with wit and grace.

Vice Versa offers personal accounts, clinical studies, and analysis from every possible camp to demonstrate Garber's thesis that bisexuality as an idea and an experience "disappears" or is erased from our discussions of sexuality at every turn through the normalizing (not to mention limiting) influence of the terms of the discussion itself. Her call to recognize bisexuality as not only valid but deeply transgressive—and therefore useful—in our culture is urgent and marked by a great affection for her subjects, from Freud to Madonna. "One of the key purposes of studying bisexuality is not to get people to 'admit' they 'are' bisexual," she says, "but rather to restore to them and the people they have loved the full, complex, and often contradictory stories of their lives."—Jessica Peterson
Feminism and Philosophy: Perspectives on Difference and Equality
Moira Gatens
The Wild Good
Bea Gates
Alfred Ckinsey: Sex - The Measure Of All Things - A Biography
Jonathan Gathorne-hardy
Damron Women's Traveller 2002
Gina Gatta, Gina M. Gatta Damron Women's Traveller 2002. The most up-to-date and complete travel guide by-and-for lesbians. Over 7,500 listings cover North America, noting women-run businesses, vegetarian menus, wheelchair access, multiracial clientele, and much more. Special sections detail lesbian tours, festivals, conferences, and even camping & RV spots! Get the inside scoop on local lesbian hotspots from our unique city overviews, some contributed by readers! Now including Paris, London, Berlin, Amsterdam, Vienna, Rome and Spain.
DAMRON WOMEN'S GUIDE 2003 -P (Damron Women's Traveller)
Gina M. Gatta
Funeral Rites
Jean Genet Genet's sensual and brutal portrait of World War II unfolds between the poles of his grief for his lover Jean, killed in the Resistance during the liberation of Paris, and his perverse attraction to the collaborator Riton. Elegaic, macabre, chimerical, Funeral Rites is a dark meditation on the mirror images of love and hate, sex and death.
The Thief's Journal
Jean Genet The Thief's Journal is perhaps Jean Genet's most authentically autobiographical novel, personifying his quest for spiritual glory through the pursuit of evil. Writing in the intensely lyrical prose style that is his trademark, the man Jean Cocteau dubbed France's "Black Prince of Letters" here reconstructs his early adult years — time he spent as a petty criminal and vagabond, traveling through Spain and Antwerp, occasionally border hopping across the rest of Europe, always one step ahead of the authorities. "Only a handful of twentieth-century writers, such as Kafka and Proust, have as important, as authoritative, as irrevocable a voice and style." — Susan Sontag;"One of the strongest and most vital accounts of a life ever set down on paper. . . . Genet has dramatized the story of his own life with a power and vision which take the breath away. The Thief's Journal will undoubtedly establish Genet as one of the most daring literary figures of all time." — The New York Post
Women and Bisexuality
Sue George
Queer Looks
Martha Gever Queer Looks is a collection of writing by video artists, filmmakers, and critics which explores the recent explosion of lesbian and gay independent media culture. A compelling compilation of artists' statements and critical theory, producer interviews and image-text works, this anthology demonstrates the vitality of queer artists under attack and fighting back. Each maker and writer deploys a surprising array of techniques and tactics, negotiating the difficult terrain between street pragmatism and theoretical inquiry, finding voices rich in chutzpah and subtlety. From guerilla Super-8 in Manila to AIDS video activism in New York, Queer Looks zooms in on this very queer place in media culture, revealing a wealth of strategies, a plurality of aesthetics, and an artillary of resistances.
The Immoralist (Penguin Classics)
Andre Gide In The Immoralist, André Gide presents the confessional account of a man seeking the truth of his own nature. The story's protagonist, Michel, knows nothing about love when he marries the gentle Marceline out of duty to his father. On the couple's honeymoon to Tunisia, Michel becomes very ill, and during his recovery he meets a young Arab boy whose radiant health and beauty captivate him. An awakening for him both sexually and morally, Michel discovers a new freedom in seeking to live according to his own desires. But, as he also discovers, freedom can be a burden. A frank defense of homosexuality and a challenge to prevailing ethical concepts, The Immoralist is a literary landmark, marked by Gide's masterful, pure, simple style.

Translated by David Watson, with an introduction by Alan Sheridan.
In a Different Voice: Psychological Theory and Women's Development
Carol Gilligan This is the little book that started a revolution. First published almost twenty years ago, it made women's voices heard, in their own right and with their own integrity, for virtually the first time in social scientific theorizing about women. Its impact was immediate and continues to this day, in the academic world and beyond. Translated into sixteen languages, with more than three-quarters of a million copies sold around the world. In a Different Voice has inspired new research, new educational initiatives, and political debate-and helped many women and men to see themselves and each other in a different light.

Carol Gilligan believes that psychology has persistently and systematically misunderstood women—their motives, their moral commitments, the course of their psychological growth, and their special view of what is important in life. Here she sets out to correct psychology's misperceptions and refocus its view of female personality. The result is truly a tour de force, which may well reshape much of what psychology now has to say about female experience.
Come Home!: Reclaiming Spirituality and Community As Gay Men and Lesbians
Chris Glaser
Years from Now
Gary Glickman
Just Sex: Students Rewrite the Rules on Sex, Violence, Equality and Activism
Jodi Gold Just Sex chronicles the movement to end all forms of sexual violence on campus and gives a voice not only to rape victims but also to reformed rape perpetrators.
Crisis: 40 Stories Revealing the Personal, Social, and Religious Pain and Trauma of Growing Up Gay in America
Mitchell Gold, Mindy Drucker A mental health crisis faces American teens right now—and it is one we can solve. Hundreds of thousands of gay teens face traumatic depression, fear, rejection, persecution, and isolation—usually alone. Studies show they are 190 percent more likely to used drugs or alcohol and four times more likely to attempt suicide. Homophobia and discrimination are at the heart of their pain. Love, support, and acceptance—all within our power to give—can save them.

This book is for: clergy, parents, educators, and politicians who cause harm with their words and actions; parents of gay teens; teens navigating this difficult time; and fair-minded people who want to help end the harm. Here are revealing stories by forty diverse Americans, some well known and some not, plus insights from straight clergy and parents explaining their support of gay people as whole human beings guaranteed equal rights by our Constitution.
Crisis: 40 Stories Revealing the Personal, Social, and Religious Pain and Trauma of Growing Up Gay in America
Mitchell Gold, Mindy Drucker A mental health crisis faces American teens right now—and it is one we can solve. Hundreds of thousands of gay teens face traumatic depression, fear, rejection, persecution, and isolation—usually alone. Studies show they are 190 percent more likely to used drugs or alcohol and four times more likely to attempt suicide. Homophobia and discrimination are at the heart of their pain. Love, support, and acceptance—all within our power to give—can save them.

This book is for: clergy, parents, educators, and politicians who cause harm with their words and actions; parents of gay teens; teens navigating this difficult time; and fair-minded people who want to help end the harm. Here are revealing stories by forty diverse Americans, some well known and some not, plus insights from straight clergy and parents explaining their support of gay people as whole human beings guaranteed equal rights by our Constitution.
The Ins and Outs of Gay Sex
Stephen E. Goldstone Finally—the book for every gay man's bedside table.

At last! Answers to the questions you're too embarrassed to ask—but always wanted to know!

Why does it hurt down there? Is it really safe to do that?

What does it mean when something looks like this—and how do I make it go away?

Chances are you never learned anything about gay intimacy from your parents, your school, or your family physician. Here, at last, is reliable, comprehensive information on a wide spectrum of gay medical concerns, written by an eminent surgeon and recognized authority on gay health issues.

With up-to-date facts, interviews, and case studies from the author's practice, The Ins and Outs of Gay Sex goes far beyond HIV concerns, combining a complete education about the safe and pleasurable practices of male-male sexuality with a comprehensive medical volume.

Here are the facts about what you need to know to keep your sex life hot and healthy, including:

The rules of safe anorectal stimulation.

Symptoms to send you running to the doctor.

Foreplay, sex toys, and other accessories.

Viral and nonviral STDs-don't wake up with an unpleasant surprise!

Treatments for impotence and other sexual dysfunctions.

Diseases that can be spread without penetration.

Drugs...relationships...doctors (how to find the right one for you), and much more.
City Poet: The Life and Times of Frank O'Hara
Brad Gooch
What Is Marriage For?
E. J. Graff John Stuart Mill called marriage the first political institution most of us enter as adults. In a book that is always witty, often startling, E.J. Graff documents the many forms this institution has taken—while arguing forcefully for the legalization of same-sex marriage and shedding new light on such ongoing battles as equality between wives and husbands and the always contentious definition of family.
Queen of Wands (Crossing Press Feminist Series)
Judy Grahn
Another mother tongue: Gay words, gay worlds
Judy Grahn
Biography Of Maurice Richard
Michel Gratton
Hidden Holocaust?: Gay and Lesbian Persecution in Germany 1933-45 (Lesbian and Gay Studies)
Gunter Grau The persecution of lesbians and gay men by the Nazis is a subject that has been constantly debated during the last decade, providing a theme for books, articles, and plays. Until recently the discussion has remained speculative: most of the relevant documents were stored in closed East German archives, and access was denied to scholars and researchers.

As a result of the unification of East and West Germany, these archives are now open. Hidden Holocaust, by the German scholars Gunter Grau and Claudia Shoppmann of Humboldt Uinversity, Berlin, demonstrates that the eradication of homosexuals was a declared gol of the Nazis even before they took power in 1933, and provide proof of the systematic anti-gay campaigns, the methods used tjo justify discrimination, and the incarceration mutilation and murder of gay men and women in Nazi concentration camps. 

A chilling but groud-breaking work in gay and lesbian studies.
Many Roads Traveled
John C. Graves Many Roads Traveled is the life story of John C. Graves. It describes his many careers as theoretical physicist, philosophy professor, historian, psychotherapist, opera singer, and library director. It also shows how his being a gay man has influenced his other interests and aspects of his personality, and vice versa. It provides histories and critiques of the many places and organizations with which he has been associated.
In Your Face: Stories from the Lives of Queer Youth (Haworth Gay & Lesbian Studies) (Haworth Gay & Lesbian Studies)
Mary Gray In Your Face: Stories from the Lives of Queer Youth is a groundbreaking and informative collection of essays derived from discussions about gender and sexuality with gay, lesbian, and bisexual youths. Fifteen teens, age 14-18, discuss their lives, personal backgrounds, and visions for the future to give researchers, parents, and educators rare insight into the difficulties of being a sexual minority. In addition, this book is intended to reach out to other gay, lesbian, and bisexual youths in both rural and suburban areas of the country. In Your Face presents unique identity and social issues experienced by these youths in order to help you understand their needs and how to effectively address their fears, concerns, and questions. Offering responses from a variety of ethnic backgrounds and situations, this book is not confined to stories that involve one family type or religion. The contributors' ages, backgrounds, hometowns, childhood experiences, and plans for the future are discussed to give you a deeper understanding of their emotions and the problems they grapple with. With In Your Face, you will explore the hardships and perspectives of gay, lesbian, and bisexual youths in relation to several issues, including:-coming out to yourself-coming out to family and friends-dealing with the school environment-getting involved in the queer community-realizing how religion impacts one's sense of self In Your Face also investigates the Internet's impact on the global queer movement. Providing you with stories from chat sessions and e-mail messages, this book reveals how youths deal with their sexuality in increasingly public ways, such as becoming editors of online queer magazines and participating in online support groups, and how the Internet can help them find out what is means to be gay, lesbian, and bisexual. In examining many stereotypes and prejudices about sexuality, this valuable text documents essential information to help you relate to and comprehend the normal dilemmas faced by these teens. In Your Face confirms the needs of these youths and will assist you in giving support and reassurance to gay, lesbian, and bisexual youths.
Beating the College Blues
Paul A. Grayson, Philip W. Meilman Because not all of the challenges of college life are academic, Beating the College Blues helps readers identify, explore, and cope with pitfalls of college life. Completely updated and expanded throughout, topics covered include study habits; changing family relationships; sex, date rape, and sexual harassment; dealing with anxiety, depression, and stress; pressures to use alcohol and drugs; and eating disorders, such as bulimia and anorexia.

Topics new to this edition include: Internet addiction Gambling, money, and credit cards Problems of gay and lesbian students Self-cutting and mutilation Studying abroad Disabilities Obesity.
Beyond Carnival: Male Homosexuality in Twentieth-Century Brazil (Worlds of Desire: The Chicago Series on Sexuality, Gender, and Culture)
James N. Green For many foreign observers, Brazil still conjures up a collage of exotic images, ranging from the camp antics of Carmen Miranda to the bronzed girl (or boy) from Ipanema moving sensually over the white sands of Rio's beaches. Among these tropical fantasies is that of the uninhibited and licentious Brazilian homosexual, who expresses uncontrolled sexuality during wild Carnival festivities and is welcomed by a society that accepts fluid sexual identity. However, in Beyond Carnival, the first sweeping cultural history of male homosexuality in Brazil, James Green shatters these exotic myths and replaces them with a complex picture of the social obstacles that confront Brazilian homosexuals.

Ranging from the late nineteenth century to the rise of a politicized gay and lesbian rights movement in the 1970s, Green's study focuses on male homosexual subcultures in Rio de Janeiro and Sao Paulo. He uncovers the stories of men coping with arrests and street violence, dealing with family restrictions, and resisting both a hostile medical profession and moralizing influences of the Church. Green also describes how these men have created vibrant subcultures with alternative support networks for maintaining romantic and sexual relationships and for surviving in an intolerant social environment. He then goes on to trace how urban parks, plazas, cinemas, and beaches are appropriated for same-sex erotic encounters, bringing us into the world of street cruising, male hustlers, and cross-dressing prostitutes.

Through his creative use of police and medical records, newspapers, literature, newsletters, and extensive interviews, Green has woven a fascinating history, the first of its kind for Latin America, that will set the standard for future works. 

"Green brushes aside outworn cultural assumptions about Brazil's queer life to display its full glory, as well as the troubles which homophobia has sent its way. . . . This latest gem in Chicago's 'World of Desire' series offers a shimmering view of queer Brazilian life throughout the 20th century."—Kirkus Reviews

Winner of the 2000 Lambda Literary Awards' Emerging Scholar Award of the Monette/Horwitz Trust

Winner of the 1999 Hubert Herring Award, Pacific Coast Council on Latin American Studies
Becoming a Visible Man
Jamison Green Written by a leading activist in the transgender movement, Becoming a Visible Man is an artful and compelling inquiry into the politics of gender. Jamison Green combines candid autobiography with informed analysis to offer unique insight into the multiple challenges of the female-to-male transsexual experience, ranging from encounters with prejudice and strained relationships with family to the development of an FTM community and the realities of surgical sex reassignment.

For more than a decade, Green has provided educational programs on gender-variance issues for corporations, law-enforcement agencies, social-science conferences and classes, continuing legal education, religious education, and medical venues. His comprehensive knowledge of the processes and problems encountered by transgendered and transsexual people—as well as his legal advocacy work to help ensure that gender-variant people have access to the same rights and opportunities as others—enable him to explain the issues as no transsexual author has previously done.

Brimming with frank and often poignant recollections of Green’s own experiences—including his childhood struggles with identity and his years as a lesbian parent prior to his sex-reassignment surgery—the book examines transsexualism as a human condition, and sex reassignment as one of the choices that some people feel compelled to make in order to manage their gender variance. Relating the FTM psyche and experience to the social and political forces at work in American society, Becoming a Visible Man also speaks consciously of universal principles that concern us all, particularly the need to live one’s life honestly, openly, and passionately.
Children of the sun: A narrative of "decadence" in England after 1918
Martin Burgess Green
Why We Never Danced the Charleston: 2 (Contemporary American fiction)
Harlan Greene “Old stories never end; they just come down the generations to resolve themselves among the living.” The scene is Charleston, South Carolina; the time, the 1920s, when old ladies dream of the past and a strange new dance, “the Charleston,” is seducing the youth of the city. Years later, whispers emerge of something baffling and tragic that happened back then. As an old man confronts those demanding the truth, we catch brilliant flashes of the confrontation between the dark, doomed Hirsch Hess, son of immigrants, and the fantastically ethereal Ned Grimke, a scion of the city. Told in intoxicatingly beautiful prose, this story of passion, beauty and the deadly effects of sexual repression takes us to a specific time and place, yet simultaneously blossoms as a universal tale of the human heart in conflict with its era. This cult classic, set in the most intriguing period of one of America’s most beautiful cities, is now restored to print with an afterword by its author that traces the facts upon which it is based.
A Little Fruitcake: A Childhood in Holidays
David Valdes Greenwood A hilarious, delectable stocking stuffer of Christmas stories for the holiday lover in the family.

The annual fruitcake symbolizes all that is wonderful about the holidays (goodwill, tradition, colorful treats) and all that makes them maddening (strange foods, crazy relatives, and those darned candied fruits). Here in twelve stories—one each for the twelve days of Christmas—David Valdes Greenwood elfishly captures the spirit of the holiday and the outrageous unpredictability of family celebrations. Gather around the tree for tales of a God-fearing Grammy assembling candy tins as fast as she can; daredevil brothers roof-jumping into snow drifts—and Nixon's role in it all; a Christmas pageant with warring wise men and one wiser woman; and the winter night that Valdes Greenwood discovers the true gift of the season.

A perfect holiday confection, A Little Fruitcake is sure to find its place for years to come alongside other Christmas classics.
Beyond Acceptance: Parents of Lesbians & Gays Talk About Their Experiences
Carolyn W. Griffin, Marian J. Wirth "Mom, Dad, I'm gay." When a parent hears these words, the initial shock is often followed by feelings ranging from anger and denial to fear and guilt. It's also the beginning of a difficult journey that, with understanding and emotional support, can lead to acceptance and beyond.

Now fully revised and updated, Beyond Acceptance is a ground-breaking book that provides parents the comfort and knowledge they need to accept the gay children and build stronger family relationships. Based on the experiences of other parents, this book lets them know they are not alone and helps them through the emotional stages leading to reconciliation with their children.
Slow River
Nicola Griffith Nicola Griffith, winner of the Tiptree Award and the Lambda Award for her widely acclaimed first novel Ammonite, now turns her attention closer to the present in Slow River, the dark and intensely involving story of a young woman's struggle for survival and independence on the gritty underside of a near-future Europe.

She awoke in an alley to the splash of rain. She was naked, a foot-long gash in her back was still bleeding, and her identity implant was gone. Lore Van de Oest was the daughter of one of the world's most powerful families...and now she was nobody. 

Then out of the rain walked Spanner, an expert data pirate who took her in, cared for her wounds, and gave her the freedom to reinvent herself again and again. No one could find Lore if she didn't want to be found: not the police, not her family, and not the kidnappers who had left her in that alley to die. She had escaped...but she paid for her newfound freedom in crime, deception, and degradation—over and over again. 

Lore had a choice: She could stay in the shadows, stay with Spanner...and risk losing herself forever. Or she could leave Spanner and find herself again by becoming someone else: stealing the identity implant of a dead woman, taking over her life, and inventing her future.

But to start again, Lore required Spanner's talents—Spanner, who needed her and hated her, and who always had a price. And even as Lore agreed to play Spanner's games one final time, she found that there was still the price of being a Van de Oest to be paid. Only by confronting her past, her family, and her own demons could Lore meld together who she had once been, who she had become, and the person she intended to be....

In Slow River, Nicola Griffith skillfully takes us deep into the mind and heart of her complex protagonist, where the past must be reconciled with the present if the future is ever to offer solid ground. Slow River poses a question we all hope never to need to answer: Who are you when you have nothing left?
Akbar and Jeff's Guide to Life
Matt Groening A peek at Akbar & Jeff's private lives—are they or aren't they? (And what's up with Ernie and Bert?)
Keith Haring: The Authorized Biography
John Gruen
Les Féministes et le garçon arabe
Nacira Guénif-Souilamas
To the Friend Who Did Not Save My Life (High Risk Books)
Hrve Guibert novel, tr L Coverdale, based on Foucault's death
The Lavender Screen: The Gay and Lesbian Films : Their Stars, Makers, Characters and Critics (Film Books)
Boze Hadleigh
Hollywood Lesbians
Boze Hadleigh
Buddhism Plain and Simple
Steve Hagen “A beacon light of clarity and wisdom, a sobering teacher for us all. Simple and outstanding. Highly recommended.” - Charlotte Joko Beck, author of Everyday Zen

“This is. . . . about awareness. Not awareness of something in particular, but awareness itself'being awake, alert, in touch with what is actually happening. It's about examining and exploring the most basic questions of life. It's about relying on the immediate experience of this present moment. It's about freedom of mind.” - Steve Hagen

The observations and insights of the Buddha are practical and eminently down-to-earth, dealing exclusively with awareness in the here and now. Buddhism Plain and Simple offers listeners these fundamental teachings, stripped of the cultural trappings that have accumulated around Buddhism over the past twenty-five centuries. The newcomer will be inspired by the clear, simple principles found in Buddhism Plain and Simple, and those familiar with Buddhism will welcome this long-needed overview.

“Buddhism Plain and Simple is a delightfully direct pathway toward our true heart.” - Steven Levine, author of Who Dies?

Read by the author.
Art After Midnight: The East Village Scene
Steven Hager
The Next Century
David Halberstam
Sticks and Stones
Lynn Hall
The Well of Loneliness: A 1920s Classic of Lesbian Fiction
Radclyffe Hall First published in 1928, this timeless portrayal of lesbian love is now a classic. The thinly disguised story of Hall's own life, it was banned outright upon publication and almost ruined her literary career.
Don't: A Reader's Guide to the Military's Anti-Gay Policy (Public Planet)
Janet E. Halley In Don’t Janet E. Halley explains how the military's new anti-gay policy is fundamentally misdescribed by its common nickname, “Don't Ask/Don't Tell.” This ubiquitous phrase, she points out, implies that it discharges servicemembers not for who they are, but for what they do. It insinuates that, as long as military personnel keep quiet about their homosexual orientation and desist from “homosexual conduct,” no one will try to pry them out of their closets and all will be well. 

Not so, reveals Halley. In order to work through the steps by which the new law was ultimately drafted, she opens with a close reading of the 1986 Supreme Court sodomy case which served as the legal and rhetorical model for the policy revisions made in 1993. Halley also describes how the Clinton administration’s attempts to offer Congress an opportunity to regulate conduct—and not status—were flatly rejected and not included in the final statute. Using cultural and critical theory seldom applied to explain the law, Halley argues that, far from providing privacy and an assurance that servicemembers' careers will be ruined only if they engage in illegal conduct, the rule activates a culture of minute surveillance in which every member must strictly avoid using any gesture in an ever-evolving lexicon of “conduct that manifests a propensity.” In other words, not only homosexuals but all military personnel are placed in danger by the new policy. After challenging previous pro-gay arguments against the policy that have failed to expose its most devious and dangerous elements, Halley ends with a persuasive discussion about how it is both unconstitutional and, politically, an act of sustained bad faith.

This knowledgeable and eye-opening analysis of one of the most important public policy debates of the 1990s will interest legal scholars, policymakers, activists, military historians and personnel, as well as citizens concerned about issues of discrimination.
Don't: A Reader's Guide to the Military's Anti-Gay Policy (Public Planet)
Janet E. Halley In Don’t Janet E. Halley explains how the military's new anti-gay policy is fundamentally misdescribed by its common nickname, “Don't Ask/Don't Tell.” This ubiquitous phrase, she points out, implies that it discharges servicemembers not for who they are, but for what they do. It insinuates that, as long as military personnel keep quiet about their homosexual orientation and desist from “homosexual conduct,” no one will try to pry them out of their closets and all will be well. 

Not so, reveals Halley. In order to work through the steps by which the new law was ultimately drafted, she opens with a close reading of the 1986 Supreme Court sodomy case which served as the legal and rhetorical model for the policy revisions made in 1993. Halley also describes how the Clinton administration’s attempts to offer Congress an opportunity to regulate conduct—and not status—were flatly rejected and not included in the final statute. Using cultural and critical theory seldom applied to explain the law, Halley argues that, far from providing privacy and an assurance that servicemembers' careers will be ruined only if they engage in illegal conduct, the rule activates a culture of minute surveillance in which every member must strictly avoid using any gesture in an ever-evolving lexicon of “conduct that manifests a propensity.” In other words, not only homosexuals but all military personnel are placed in danger by the new policy. After challenging previous pro-gay arguments against the policy that have failed to expose its most devious and dangerous elements, Halley ends with a persuasive discussion about how it is both unconstitutional and, politically, an act of sustained bad faith.

This knowledgeable and eye-opening analysis of one of the most important public policy debates of the 1990s will interest legal scholars, policymakers, activists, military historians and personnel, as well as citizens concerned about issues of discrimination.
Coming Out: 2
Wallace Hamilton Taking responsibility for your life is the first step in moving forward and changing the world inside and around you. Rob Eichberg's Coming Out: An Act of Love, written for both men and women, is a step-by-step guide to understanding and accepting your homosexuality and dealing with others' reaction to it. Using clear, empathetic, and direct language, Eichberg, a trained psychotherapist, explains in detail how coming out radically alters self-perception and your relationships with others. Using examples from his own practice and letters from gay people to their mothers, fathers, siblings, and friends, Eichberg puts a positive, forceful, but gentle face on the process of coming out and the complications that it sometimes raises.

Eichberg discusses coming out as a psychological and political process that affects not only individuals but their families as well. Because this book continually reaffirms gayness as a gift for everyone—straight and gay—it can be read by gay people coming to terms with their sexuality and by their parents, friends, and coworkers. There are also chapters on how AIDS has affected the coming out process and how to deal with AIDS-phobia on a personal and political level. Coming Out: An Act of Love centers on the individual, but understands that one person's actions of self-respect and love can begin to change the world. —Michael Bronski
Coming Out: 2
Wallace Hamilton Taking responsibility for your life is the first step in moving forward and changing the world inside and around you. Rob Eichberg's Coming Out: An Act of Love, written for both men and women, is a step-by-step guide to understanding and accepting your homosexuality and dealing with others' reaction to it. Using clear, empathetic, and direct language, Eichberg, a trained psychotherapist, explains in detail how coming out radically alters self-perception and your relationships with others. Using examples from his own practice and letters from gay people to their mothers, fathers, siblings, and friends, Eichberg puts a positive, forceful, but gentle face on the process of coming out and the complications that it sometimes raises.

Eichberg discusses coming out as a psychological and political process that affects not only individuals but their families as well. Because this book continually reaffirms gayness as a gift for everyone—straight and gay—it can be read by gay people coming to terms with their sexuality and by their parents, friends, and coworkers. There are also chapters on how AIDS has affected the coming out process and how to deal with AIDS-phobia on a personal and political level. Coming Out: An Act of Love centers on the individual, but understands that one person's actions of self-respect and love can begin to change the world. —Michael Bronski
Kevin
Wallace Hamilton
Gay Guy's Guide to Life: 463 Maxims, Manners, and Mottoes for the Gay Nineties
Ken Hanes
Fadeout
Joseph Hansen On Dave Brandstetter Created by Joseph Hansen

"But with so many dying, we better love each other for real, and all we can—we're so lucky to have the chance." —Cecil, to Dave, in A Country of Old Men

"In many ways a conventional P.I.—although he is in fact an insurance claims investigator—Dave Brandstetter makes for an interesting read partly because he is one of the few convincing (male) gay characters in crime writing. What makes the Brandstetter books very good, however, is the way they combine a compelling, well-written 'whodunit' with their evocation of '70s and '80s Southern California, particularly Los Angeles. Listen to this, from Fadeout (1970): 'Fog shrouded the canyon, a box canyon above a California town called Pima. It rained. Not hard rain but steady and grey and dismal. Shaggy pines loomed through the mist like threats. Sycamores made white twisted gestures above the arroyo. Down the arroyo water poured, ugly, angry and deep. The road shouldered the arroyo. It was a bad road. The rains had chewed its edges. There were holes. Mud and rock half buried it in places. It was steep and winding and there were no guard rails.'

The fact that Joseph Hansen rewrote this passage thirty-four times is typical of his writing style. Wonderfully descriptive of its Southern California settings—and in particular L.A.—in a way few before have been. Chandler and Ross Macdonald spring to mind. The books also have the kind of effortless dialogue (now 'dialogue' has become noticed with the resurgence of Elmore Leonard) that marks a great writer. Added to this there is the kind of characterisation that makes you want to know more and, well, 'care'. Written without being patronising about everyday 'gay life', the books also recall Armistead Maupin's Tales of the City. No doubt about it, this sort of writing makes for one of the best series in the genre.

Throughout the twelve books Brandstetter grows—quite literally into an old man—as he comes to terms with the turmoil of his personal relationships. The emotional sub-text (as it were) of the books intertwines with the plot, the two often being resolved together. And what plots! Death Claims (1973), for example, sees Dave in
Skinflick
Joseph Hansen
Death claims
Joseph Hansen Death Claims is the second of Joseph Hansen's acclaimed mysteries featuring ruggedly masculine Dave Brandstetter, a gay insurance investigator. When John Oats's body is found washed up on a beach, his young lover April Stannard is sure it was no accident. Brandstetter agrees: Oats's college-age son, the beneficiary of the life insurance policy, has gone missing.
Fadeout
Joseph Hansen On Dave Brandstetter Created by Joseph Hansen

"But with so many dying, we better love each other for real, and all we can—we're so lucky to have the chance." —Cecil, to Dave, in A Country of Old Men

"In many ways a conventional P.I.—although he is in fact an insurance claims investigator—Dave Brandstetter makes for an interesting read partly because he is one of the few convincing (male) gay characters in crime writing. What makes the Brandstetter books very good, however, is the way they combine a compelling, well-written 'whodunit' with their evocation of '70s and '80s Southern California, particularly Los Angeles. Listen to this, from Fadeout (1970): 'Fog shrouded the canyon, a box canyon above a California town called Pima. It rained. Not hard rain but steady and grey and dismal. Shaggy pines loomed through the mist like threats. Sycamores made white twisted gestures above the arroyo. Down the arroyo water poured, ugly, angry and deep. The road shouldered the arroyo. It was a bad road. The rains had chewed its edges. There were holes. Mud and rock half buried it in places. It was steep and winding and there were no guard rails.'

The fact that Joseph Hansen rewrote this passage thirty-four times is typical of his writing style. Wonderfully descriptive of its Southern California settings—and in particular L.A.—in a way few before have been. Chandler and Ross Macdonald spring to mind. The books also have the kind of effortless dialogue (now 'dialogue' has become noticed with the resurgence of Elmore Leonard) that marks a great writer. Added to this there is the kind of characterisation that makes you want to know more and, well, 'care'. Written without being patronising about everyday 'gay life', the books also recall Armistead Maupin's Tales of the City. No doubt about it, this sort of writing makes for one of the best series in the genre.

Throughout the twelve books Brandstetter grows—quite literally into an old man—as he comes to terms with the turmoil of his personal relationships. The emotional sub-text (as it were) of the books intertwines with the plot, the two often being resolved together. And what plots! Death Claims (1973), for example, sees Dave in
The man everybody was afraid of
Joseph Hansen
Queer Blues: The Lesbian and Gay Guide to Overcoming Depression
Kimeron N. Hardin, Marny Hall
Accidental Creatures
Anne Harris Anne Harris returns with an outstanding look at the near future. Never before has her technological insight been so acute, or her portrayal of sex and gender issues more startling or insightful.

A bio-technology corporation has created a new species, intelligent, four-armed, humanoid "tetras" who can live in the vats in which "the company" grows biopolymers. Both the tetras and the human vat-divers they were created to replace are at the mercy of vicious corporate politics. But soon the victims become the aggressors, and something amazing, a transcendent change, occurs not only in their lives, but throughout the world. Anne Harris has created an extraordinary, breathtaking vision of the future.
Invisible Life: A Novel
E. Lynn Harris The re-issue of a remarkable first novel by a young, gay, black author who has fashioned a deeply moving and compelling coming of age story out of the highly controversial issues of bisexuality and AIDS.
And This Too Shall Pass: A Novel
E. Lynn Harris A stellar quarterback, an ambitious sportscaster. What happens when rising stars collide?

In And This Too Shall Pass, Harris takes us into the locker rooms and newsrooms of Chicago, where four lives are about to intersect in romance and scandal. At the heart of the novel is the celibate Zurich, a rookie

quarterback for the Chicago Cougars whose trajectory for superstardom is interrupted by a sexual assault charge by Mia, a sportscaster with her own sights on fame. With his career in jeopardy, Zurich hires Tamela, a high-powered attorney, to defend him, while Sean, a gay sportswriter, covers the story and uncovers his heart.

All of these characters face the challenge of keeping the faith—in themselves and in God—while Harris's heartfelt storytelling reveals how the love of family can help one to face the terrible legacy of long-held secrets. Throughout these characters' search for self-knowledge, Harris weaves the stories of MamaCee, Zurich's grandmother, whose lessons of faith teach one and all that "this too shall pass."

Breaking new ground in contemporary fiction, And This Too Shall Pass entertains and affirms with its stirring message about the healing power of family and faith.
Abide With Me: A Novel
E. Lynn Harris In this hotly anticipated conclusion to his popular Invisible Life trilogy, E. Lynn Harris delivers a masterful tale that traces the evolving lives of his beloved characters Nicole Springer and Raymond Tyler, Jr., and reintroduces readers to their respective lovers, best friends, and potential enemies.  Abide with Me moves between the worlds of New York City, where Nicole has recently settled in order to pursue her dream of returning to the Broadway stage, and Seattle, where a late-night phone call from a U.S. Senator is about to change Raymond's life dramatically.  Relationships and ambitions are tested as Harris deftly guides us toward this entertaining novel's conclusion.

Sexy and heartwarming in equal measure, Abide with Me will thrill new readers as well as fans already familiar with Harris's unique take on the universal themes of love, friendship, and family.  E. Lynn Harris has truly done it again.
Radically Gay: Gay Liberation in the Words of Its Founder
Harry Hay Gay Liberation in the words of its founder.
The Men with the Pink Triangle: the True Life-and-Death Story of Homosexuals in the Nazi Death Camps
Heinz Heger It has only been since the mid-1970s that any attention has been paid to the persecution and interment of gay men by the Nazis during the Third Reich. Since that time, books such as Richard Plant's The Pink Triangle (and Martin Sherman's play Bent) have illuminated this nearly lost history. Heinz Heger's first-person account, The Men with the Pink Triangle, was one of the first books on the topic and remains one of the most important.

In 1939, Heger, a Viennese university student, was arrested and sentenced to prison for being a "degenerate." Within weeks he was transported to Sachsenhausen, a concentration camp in East Germany, and forced to wear a pink triangle to show that his crime was homosexuality. He remained there, under horrific conditions, until the end of the war in 1945. The power of The Men with the Pink Triangle comes from Heger's sparse prose and his ability to recall—and communicate—the smallest resonant details. The pain and squalor of everyday camp life—the constant filth, the continuous presence of death, and the unimaginable cruelty of those in command—are all here. But Heger's story would be unbearable were it not for the simple courage he and others used to survive and, having survived, that he bore witness. This book is harrowing but necessary reading for everyone concerned about gay history, human rights, or social justice. —Michael Bronski
Toward a Recognition of Androgyny
Carolyn G. Heilbrun
Young Man from the Provinces: A Gay Life Before Stonewall
Alan Helms Young, intelligent, and handsome, Alan Helms left a brutal midwestern childhood for New York City in 1955. Denied a Rhodes scholarship because of his sexual orientation, he soon became an object of desire in a gay underground scene frequented by, among many others, Noel Coward, Leonard Bernstein, and Marlene Dietrich. In this unusually vivid and sensitive account, Helms describes the business of being a sex object and its psychological and physical toll.

"Riveting."- New York Times Book Review

"Extraordinary and elegantly written. A record of a gay world that has virtually disappeared over the past twenty-five years of liberation and fifteen years of AIDS." -Boston Globe

"A beautifully written memoir. Helms sped through the celebrity-packed fast lanes, but he has learned how to stand back and get some perspective." -Los Angeles Times

"Sublimely funny, engaging, pathetic, highly literary, and painful to read. Helms seems like a gay Everyman whose quest for self-knowledge, respect, and contentment in this contemptuous world mirrors that of many other marginalized people." -Bloomsbury Review

Alan Helms is professor of literature at the University of Massachusetts, Boston.
Cary Grant: The Lonely Heart
Charles Higham, Roy Moseley
Man Alive!: Dressing the Free Way
Charles Hix
Oscar Wilde's Last Stand
Philip Hoare Even though Oscar Wilde—playwright, wit, critic, and convicted sodomite—died exiled and disgraced in 1900, his memory and influence remain central to British culture. In 1918 the specter of Wilde manifested itself in what social historian Philip Hoare calls "the trial of the century." This shocking libel case was brought by American actress Maud Allan, who had just appeared in a production of Wilde's Salome, against Noel Pemberton Billing, an arch-conservative M.P., who accused her of being a member of "the cult of the clitoris": his catch phase for a sexual and social degeneracy that he saw as destroying England. Billing also claimed that the German government (with whom, you will recall, England was at war) had "a black book" containing the names of 47,000 prominent members of the British society who were "in the cult of Wilde"—a euphemism for quot;degenerate" homosexuals—and who were potential blackmailees, subversives, and traitors. As in the Wilde trials 23 years earlier, the real issue here was an attack by conservatives and moralists against social and sexual freedom. As in his earlier work, Serious Pleasures: The Life of Stephen Tennant and Noel Coward: A Biography, Hoare proves himself to be an incisive social critic and a vigorous historian who illuminates the paradoxes of the recent past with insight and passion. But the real power of Oscar Wilde's Last Stand (that Hoare makes clear again and again) is its understanding that Wilde—social rebel and martyr to artistic and sexual freedom—remains, in so many ways, under attack by conservative social forces even today. —Michael Bronski END
Consenting Adult
Laura Z. Hobson
With downcast gays: Aspects of homosexual self-oppression
Andrew Hodges
Gay Questions
Jerry Holderman
Wilde Album: Public and Private Images of Oscar Wilde
Merlin Holland The most comprehensive collection of photographs and images of Wilde—compiled by his only grandson.

Oscar Wilde was one of the first and unquestionably one of the greatest self-publicists who ever lived. With that exceptional streak of modernity that characterized much of his life and work, he understood the power of the image in his campaign to promote the self. As early as his Oxford days, he had himself photographed with his contemporaries in loud checked suits of the latest fashion. The Wilde Album now publishes more of these images of Oscar than have ever been seen together before, as well as later photographs, some previously unpublished, from the family archive, including rare snapshots of Oscar in his last years in Italy; the famous sitting in New York for Napoleon Sarony in fur coat and velvet suit; and the good, the bad, and the vicious caricatures, cartoons, and lithographs.

In the accompanying text, Merlin Holland examines Wilde's life as reflected in the photographs and images, paying particular attention to his relationships with friends, family, and lovers, as well as the profound influence of his Irish upbringing. He also investigates the reasons for the adverse opinions his work engered and the background to the famous legal battles that finally led to imprisonment and exile.
The Dancer from the Dance: 3A Novel (Plume Contemporary Fiction)
Andrew Holleran One of the most important works of gay literature, this haunting, brilliant novel is a seriocomic remembrance of things past — and still poignantly present. It depicts the adventures of Malone, a beautiful young man searching for love amid New York's emerging gay scene. From Manhattan's Everard Baths and after-hours discos to Fire Island's deserted parks and lavish orgies, Malone looks high and low for meaningful companionship. The person he finds is Sutherland, a campy quintessential queen — and one of the most memorable literary creations of contemporary fiction. Hilarious, witty, and ultimately heartbreaking, Dancer from the Dance is truthful, provocative, outrageous fiction told in a voice as close to laughter as to tears.
The Beauty of Men: A Novel (Beauty of Men)
Andrew Holleran Lake doesn't work and doesn't have friends, a job, or even a first name. All he really has is an abundance of memories of the unsatisfied life of a middle-aged gay man. "I've been a flop as a homosexual," says Lake. The book revolves around Lake's recollection of a time spent lost and hopeless and takes place in Gainesville, Florida, a place as unspectacular as his existence. In this examination of a life given to thinking about worry and lust, Andrew Holleran raises disturbing questions for people of every sexual preference.
Dancer from the Dance: A Novel
Andrew Holleran One of the most important works of gay literature, this haunting, brilliant novel is a seriocomic remembrance of things past — and still poignantly present. It depicts the adventures of Malone, a beautiful young man searching for love amid New York's emerging gay scene. From Manhattan's Everard Baths and after-hours discos to Fire Island's deserted parks and lavish orgies, Malone looks high and low for meaningful companionship. The person he finds is Sutherland, a campy quintessential queen — and one of the most memorable literary creations of contemporary fiction. Hilarious, witty, and ultimately heartbreaking, Dancer from the Dance is truthful, provocative, outrageous fiction told in a voice as close to laughter as to tears.
Nights in Aruba: A Novel
Andrew Holleran This groundbreaking novel of gay life centers around Paul, an uneasy commuter between two parallel worlds. He is the dutiful son of aging, upper-middle-class parents living in Florida, and a homosexual man plunged deliriously into the world of New York City's bars, baths, and one-night stands. With wry humor and subtle lyricism, Holleran reveals the tragedy and comedy of one man's struggle to come to terms with middle age, homosexuality, truth, love, and life itself.
Creating Civil Union: Opening Hearts and Minds
Linda Hollingdale This photo/essay collection chronicles the work of supportive Vermonters during the fight for gay/lesbian marriage which resulted in the civil union law. The essays and photographs help put a human face on this controversial issue. Gay men, lesbians, and straight allies offer personal perspectives on their courageous work. This book highlights an important part of this civil rights struggle.
The Spell: 0
Alan Hollinghurst Alan Hollinghurst's tour-de-force debut, The Swimming-Pool Library, was a literary sensation. Edmund White called it "the best book on gay life yet written by an English author." The Village Voice described it as "buoyant, smart, irrepressibly sexy...[with the] heft and resonance of a classic modernist novel." The New York Times Book Review raved about its "shimmering elegance" and "camp-fired wit." The New York Review of Books dubbed his second book, The Folding Star, a "miniature Remembrance of Things Past...an expanded Death in Venice...a homosexual Lolita." The Spell is Hollinghurst's most polished and entertaining novel to date. Here he marries Jane Austen's delicious social asperity with a sly eroticism in a story as romantic and surprising as anything he has written. Set in London and the idyllic countryside, the narrative tracks the interlocking passions of four men. As each character falls successively under the spell of love or drugs, country living or urban glamour, The Spell unfurls into a richly witty picture of modern gay life...and of all human affairs of the heart.
The Line of Beauty: A Novel
Alan Hollinghurst THE NATIONAL BESTSELLER, WINNER OF THE 2004 MAN BOOKER PRIZE FOR FICTION, AND NATIONAL BOOK CRITICS CIRCLE AWARD FINALIST

 

Winner of 2004’s Man Booker Prize for fiction and one of the most talked about books of the year, The Line of Beauty is a sweeping novel about class, sex, and money that brings Thatcher’s London alive.

 

A New York Times Bestseller (Extended) · A LA Times Bestseller List · A Book Sense National Bestseller · A Northern California Bestseller · A Sunday Times Bestseller List · A New York Times Notable Book of the Year

 

And chosen as one of the best books of 2004 by:

Entertainment Weekly  · The Washington Post · The San Francisco Chronicle · The Seattle Times

Newsday  · Salon.com · The Boston Globe · The New York Sun · The Miami Herald  · The Dallas Morning News · San Jose Mercury News · Publishers Weekly
Women Together: Portraits of Love, Commitment, and Life
Mona Holmlund
Women on Women 2: An Anthology of American Lesbian Short Fiction (Women on Women)
Naomi Holoch, Joan Nestle Twenty-eight short works discuss a range of issues relevant to the lesbian community, covering such topics as love and sex, relationships, sexual abuse, and AIDS.
Women on Women 2: An Anthology of American Lesbian Short Fiction (Women on Women)
Naomi Holoch, Joan Nestle Twenty-eight short works discuss a range of issues relevant to the lesbian community, covering such topics as love and sex, relationships, sexual abuse, and AIDS.
The Vintage Book of International Lesbian Fiction
Naomi Holoch, Joan Nestle There are those among us—you know who you are—who tend to avoid lesbian fiction because the genre isn't known for literary excellence. The occasional lesbian mystery or vampire story may slip through as vacation reading, but for something serious you turn to the poets (Audre Lorde, Adrienne Rich, Jewelle Gomez), or to straight women novelists, or to writers such as Dorothy Allison, whose work transcends the boundaries of lesbian fiction. This anthology is for readers like you. The consistently fine quality of the stories is matched by their unusual ingenuity and playfulness with language (the specter of James Joyce hovers over many stories, and not only those by Irish writers). In fact, American writers—who might be thought to have pioneered the genre—may seem sluggish and puritan by comparison. As the editors point out, "the word lesbian is not global in its use and significance," and while most of the authors included would define themselves as lesbian, for others the term is almost without meaning. Selections by Marguerite Yourcenar, Anchee Min (from Red Azalea), and the Egyptian writer Alifa Rifaat are among the most striking. —Regina Marler
Out of the Ordinary: Essays on Growing Up with Gay, Lesbian, and Transgender Parents
Noelle Howey, Ellen Samuels, Margarethe Cammermeyer Out of the Ordinary is a truly unique anthology, a groundbreaking collection of essays by the grown children of lesbian, gay, and transgender parents. Ranging from humorous to poignant, the essays touch on some of the most important and complicated issues facing them: dealing with a parent's sexuality while developing an identity of one's own; overcoming homophobia at school and at family or social gatherings; and defining the modern family. In a time when traditional family structure has undergone radical change, Out of the Ordinary is an important look at the meaning of love, family, and relationships, and will speak to anyone who has lived or is interested in non-traditional families.With a foreword by Margarethe Cammermeyer, Ph.D., author of Serving in Silence, and a preface by columnist and author Dan Savage, Out of the Ordinary also includes a resource guide of organizations that offer support for the hundreds of thousands of gay, lesbian, and transgender parents and their children. As the demographic increases, this book becomes an invaluable tool for learning, understanding, and acceptance.
ROCK HUDSON: HIS STORY.
Rock Hudson, Sara Davidson
Coming Out Spiritually: The Next Step
Christian de la Huerta Coming Out Spiritually is structured by author Christian de la Huerta's idea that gay people have traditionally assumed 10 spiritual roles or archetypes, and continue to assume them today. These include, among others, "creator of beauty,""mediator,""shaman," and "healer." This understanding of gay people's spirituality draws on a number of religious traditions, including Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, Judaism, Sufism, and Taoism. After establishing his theoretical understanding of gay spirituality, de la Huerta suggests spiritual practices (ranging from meditation to healing to Sufi dancing) that can help readers achieve greater spiritual integrity. Perhaps the most interesting passages in the book consider how sex itself can express spiritual devotion. "When we learn to reunite sex and Spirit in our lives, we will experience change and healing beyond our wildest dreams," de la Huerta writes. Coming Out Spiritually describes a mode of spirituality that has previously been explored in the work of Andrew Harvey and Matthew Fox, among others. Christian de la Huerta is equally passionate, and his message—that the coming-out process, when understood in spiritual terms, never ends—is an important one. This book may be a bit confusing to gay people just beginning to come out. (Like Harvey and Fox, de la Huerta sometimes uses jargon that obscures his arguments.) For gay people who have a pretty good sense of who they are, however, Coming Out Spiritually can be an important resource for continuing the process of learning to live honestly with their desires. —Michael Joseph Gross
Clit Notes: A Sapphic Sampler
Holly Hughes Obie Award–winning performance artist and playwright Holly Hughes takes the reader on a personal tour across America with visits to Michigan’s Mystery Spot, the floor of the U.S. Senate, and New York’s WOW Cafe, where notions of theater and femaleness are taken apart and put back together.
As I See It
John Hurt Internationally acclaimed photographer Greg Gorman has just completed his most personal work to date: the male figure study. Twenty years in the making, this epic artist's project features carefully selected young men—not big or overly built—who exemplify for Gorman a perfected state, allowing him to frame grace, beauty, and elegance in the form of the male nude. Included amongst the 240-plus portraits are many of Gorman's friends and acquaintances, as well as professional models, many of whom had never posed nude before. The cumulative effect of As I See It creates a pleasurable zone of contemplation, allowing one to reexamine the precepts of beauty within a refreshing framework of exalted maleness. According to Gorman, "As I see it, they're not really boys, yet they're not really men. They are caught somewhere in between—almost at that point of maturity that defines masculinity."
Love Between Men: Enhancing Intimacy and Keeping Your Relationship Alive
Rik Isensee
Wonder Bread & Ecstasy: The Life and Death of Joey Stefano
Charles Isherwood Video pornography has been a staple of gay male culture for decades, but there is little written about the people who perform or produce this entertainment. Charles Isherwood has written a modern tragedy about the life and death of porn star Joey Stefano. After a rapid climb to the top, Stefano died of an overdose at age 26. Isherwood is a good reporter who holds no illusions about the porn industry. Ecstasy and Wonder Bread is both a hard-hitting exposé of an industry that uses people up and then spits them out and a sympathetic portrait of a young man whose desire for attention and fame was equaled only by his inability to say no.
Queer Theory: An Introduction
Annamarie Jagose "Annamarie Jagose knows that queer theory did not spring full-blown from the head of any contemporary theorist. It is the outcome of many different influences and sources, including the homophile movement, gay liberation, and lesbian feminism. In pointing to the history of queer theory—a history that all too often is ignored or elided—Jagose performs a valuable service."
—Henry Abelove, co-editor of The Lesbian and Gay Studies Reader

The political and academic appropriation of the term queer over the last several years has marked a shift in the study of sexuality from a focus on supposedly essential categories as gay and lesbian to more fluid or queer notions of sexual identity. Yet queer is a category still in the process of formation. In Queer Theory, Annamarie Jagose provides a clear and concise explanation of queer theory, tracing it as part of an intriguing history of same-sex love over the last century.

Blending insights from prominent theorists such as Judith Butler and David Halperin, Jagose argues that queer theory's challenge is to create new ways of thinking, not only about fixed sexual identities such as heterosexual and homosexual, but also about other supposedly essential notions such as sexuality and gender and even man and woman.
The Male Cross-Dresser Support Group
Tama Janowitz Pamela Trowel is single in New York City, and her ad sales job is as mundane as her love life is macabre; Alby, a liar and exhibitionist, shows up in the most unexpected places, and unfortunate moments; her creepy, masochistic boss Daniel falls for her in an obsessive way; Bronc, a rich playboy takes her to see sex shows involving pigs. Her options aren't exactly appetizing — and then Abdul follows her home from a pizza parlor.

Abdul is a clever urchin who adopts Pamela as his makeshift mother, and the two of them leave Manhattan, slipping away from their problems to embark on a hilarious adventure. But when Abdul disappears Pamela's fierce maternal instincts kick in, and she returns to Manhattan to search for him — in the guise of a man. As Pamela sinks deeper into her new role of a man who knows how to listen to women, she becomes wildly popular — until her deception begins to unravel....
Tales Of The Lavender Menace: A Memoir Of Liberation
Karla Jay A fast-paced memoir, serious and hilarious in turn, of the struggles and scandals, politics and personalities that made up the women's and gay liberation movements of the 1960s and '70s

Karla Jay, a direct participant in the dramatic history of the women's and gay liberation movements, brings on stage a dazzling cast of unforgettable characters and gives voice to the sweeping tale of the activists who struggled for their vision of social justice and sexual liberation.

"Karla Jay's intimate account of life in the early years of feminism and gay liberation is as irresistible as a novel, but as credible, humorous, and unexpected as real life." -Gloria Steinem

"A glorious guide to the perplexed seeking the complex, a history that illuminates a way out of passivity and despair." -Tony Kushner
Final Atonement: 2A Doug Orlando Mystery (Doug Orlando)
Steve Johnson
False Confessions: 2A Doug Orlando Mystery
Steve Johnson
A Time to Embrace: Same-Gender Relationships in Religion, Law, and Politics
William Stacy Johnson As rhetoric continues to heat up on both sides of the debate over same-gender unions, clearly reasoned statements are in short supply. Watching this debate unfold, William Stacy Johnson found that he could be silent no longer.

In A Time to Embrace Johnson presents a brilliant analysis of the religious, legal and political stakes in the debates over gay marriage, civil unions, and the place of committed gay couples in a democratic society.

The book begins by laying out the church’s seven different responses, from outright prohibition to full ecclesial consecration, testing the arguments of each along the way. Johnson then focuses on gay rights in recent court battles, detailing the arguments made from both liberty and equality. Finally, he assesses the different types of gay marriage and civil union arrangements and suggests how deliberative democracy can create a society in which all citizens can rely on principles of equality and liberty.

Weighing the pros and cons from across the moral and religious spectrum, A Time to Embrace is a thought-provoking and well-argued treatment of one of the most controversial issues in the West today. This book is sure to stir readers to reflect more deeply on religious truth and the meaning of marriage.
Love Makes a Family: Portraits of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Parents and Their Families
Gigi Kaeser, Peggy Gillespie
Just Add Hormones: An Insider's Guide to the Transsexual Experience
Matt Kailey Matt Kailey lived as a straight woman for the first forty-two years of his life, and then he changed. With the help of a good therapist, chest surgery, and some strong doses of testosterone, Kailey began living life as the man he'd always wanted to be. In Just Add Hormones, he answers all the questions you've ever had about what it's like to live as a transsexual.

"Parts of Just Add Hormones dwell, wittily, on the author's own experiences . . . other chapters offer a cheeky insider's discussion of pesky pronouns, pants-packing, bathroom blues, and on-the-job jitters. But the real worth of Just Add Hormones stems from its thoughtful analysis—at times philosophical, at times political, and at times polemical—of a life-changing decision."

—Richard Labonte, Q Syndicate

"A heartfelt plea for mainstream American society to understand, accept and support gender diversity . . . Kailey describes all with frankness, engaging his reader with honesty and a touch of humor."

—Kirkus Reviews

"This book is a natural for the gender issues shelves."

—Booklist

"Anyone who has ever contemplated, is just curious about, or finds him or herself in the midst of gender transformation will appreciate and applaud this extraordinary, comprehensive journal. Both informative and quite fascinating, Kailey delivers his life story with a compassionate eye and a true heart."

—Jim Piechota, Bay Area Reporter

Matt Kailey is an author, journalist, public speaker, and female-to-male transsexual. A former social worker, he now writes and speaks on issues of gender and sexuality. Kailey lives in Denver, Colorado.
The Gay Metropolis
Charles Kaiser This “fascinating and fabulous oral history”(Vanity Fair), “both serious and gossipy”(New York Times), chronicles gay life in New York City-and americanca-since 1945. “Irresistible” (Out). Black-and-white photographs.
The Gay Metropolis
Charles Kaiser This “fascinating and fabulous oral history”(Vanity Fair), “both serious and gossipy”(New York Times), chronicles gay life in New York City-and americanca-since 1945. “Irresistible” (Out). Black-and-white photographs.
Gore Vidal: A Biography
Fred Kaplan This first major, authorized biography of a towering literary and cultural figure, published to coincide with The Golden Age (Doubleday, Fall 200), the seventh title in Vidal's Narratives of Empire series. 

No writer since Hemingway has lived his life on as ambitious or international a scale as Gore Vidal, whose work, like Hemingway's, has become a prominent landmark in twentieth century American literature. Thanks to Vidal's complete cooperation and Kaplan's complete autonomy, this meticulously researched biography has all the glamour, sex, gossip, and family scandal one would expect. But more than that, Kaplan ties together the diversity and variety of his subject's work and life in a highly satisfying, utterly thorough study that will be the starting point for any critical and cultural analysis of Gore Vidal for years to come.
A Funny Time to Be Gay
Ed Karvoski Jr. Meet the out crowd that's really "in" — the gay and lesbian stand-up comics who've come out of the closet and stormed the mainstream with the hippest and wittiest comedy acts of the last three decades.

In A Funny Time to Be Gay, Ed Karvoski Jr. traces the evolution of gay and lesbian comedy from Robin Tyler in the seventies and mavericks who played San Francisco's famed Valencia Rose in the eighties to the latest comics in development for their own sitcoms.

With short introductions that reveal the performers' approaches to both their sexual and professional identities, over thirty hilarious monologues capture the diversity of the gay and lesbian comic community, including Lynda Montgomery on being white trailer trash ("I was raised in a paneled hallway"); Barry Steiger on Prozac ("I think antidepressants should come in a Pez dispenser"); Bob Smith on being a gay kid ("(My parents) once gave me a chemistry set — I used it to make my own line of skin care products"); and Suzanne Westenhoefer on the distinctions in lesbian culture (.".. the butch is the one that holds the remote control, and the femme is the one that sits beside her going, 'change it ... change it ... change it ... '"). From cabaret performers, late-night regulars, and rising stars, these pieces carry a message of joyful celebration: "We're here, we're queer — get used to laughing along with us!"
The Bad and the Beautiful: Hollywood in the Fifties
Sam Kashner, Jennifer Macnair A vivid portrait of power, fame, and sex in 1950s Hollywood, from the rise of tabloid journalism to the making of legendary film icons.

With "fresh emphasis on little-known stories [and] an impressive number of eyewitnesses" (Chicago Tribune), Sam Kashner and Jennifer MacNair present "a revealing,...ever fascinating glimpse into the shadowy reality and hidden mores of Hollywood in what was popularly considered a decade of innocence" (Suzanne Finstad). "[S]urprisingly vivid accounts" (People) of such public icons as Lana Turner, Rock Hudson, Kim Novak, and Mae West explore the private scandals exploited by tabloids such as Confidential. Highlighting Hollywood's curious religious revival with The Robe, the film industry's exploitation of the potboiler Peyton Place, and the life of anarchic director Nick Ray of the enduring classic Rebel without a Cause, the authors "[give] a compelling sense" (Kirkus Reviews) of the unique obsessions of the era and the city's attempts to reinvent the magic and mystery of its past glories.

Guided by the authors' historical savvy and intimate storytelling, we discover a city at a crossroads, attempting to reinvent the magic and mystery of its past glories. Tragic, irreverent, and always entertaining, The Bad and the Beautiful reveals the underground history of this turbulent decade in American film. 35 b/w photographs.
Gross Indecency: The Three Trials of Oscar Wilde
Moises Kaufman
A Philosophical Investigation
Philip Kerr When the English government mandates genetic testing for predisposition to violence in the early 21st century, it also creates an elaborate computer network to store the results. But when a computer expert with just such a violent predisposition breaks into the carefully-guarded data, he decides to protect the rest of society by killing off others on the list.

Enter Inspector "Jake" Jakowicz, a tough, smart cop who must use all her powers of intuition to track the sociopath who wants to draw her into a chilling dialogue about the nature of life itself.
The Reign of the Phallus: Sexual Politics in Ancient Athens
Eva C. Keuls At once daring and authoritative, this book offers a profusely illustrated history of sexual politics in ancient Athens. The phallus was pictured everywhere in ancient Athens: painted on vases, sculpted in marble, held aloft in gigantic form in public processions, and shown in stage comedies. This obsession with the phallus dominated almost every aspect of public life, influencing law, myth, and customs, affecting family life, the status of women, even foreign policy. This is the first book to draw together all the elements that made up the "reign of the phallus"men's blatant claim to general dominance, the myths of rape and conquest of women, and the reduction of sex to a game of dominance and submission, both of women by men and of men by men. In her elegant and lucid text Eva Keuls not only examines the ideology and practices that underlay the reign of the phallus, but also uncovers an intense counter-movementthe earliest expressions of feminism and antimilitarism. Complementing the text are 345 reproductions of Athenian vase paintings. Some have been reproduced in a larger format and gathered in an appendix for easy reference and closer study. These revealing illustrations are a vivid demonstration that classical Athens was more sexually polarized and repressive of women than any other culture in Western history.
The Reign of the Phallus: Sexual Politics in Ancient Athens
Eva C. Keuls At once daring and authoritative, this book offers a profusely illustrated history of sexual politics in ancient Athens. The phallus was pictured everywhere in ancient Athens: painted on vases, sculpted in marble, held aloft in gigantic form in public processions, and shown in stage comedies. This obsession with the phallus dominated almost every aspect of public life, influencing law, myth, and customs, affecting family life, the status of women, even foreign policy. This is the first book to draw together all the elements that made up the "reign of the phallus"men's blatant claim to general dominance, the myths of rape and conquest of women, and the reduction of sex to a game of dominance and submission, both of women by men and of men by men. In her elegant and lucid text Eva Keuls not only examines the ideology and practices that underlay the reign of the phallus, but also uncovers an intense counter-movementthe earliest expressions of feminism and antimilitarism. Complementing the text are 345 reproductions of Athenian vase paintings. Some have been reproduced in a larger format and gathered in an appendix for easy reference and closer study. These revealing illustrations are a vivid demonstration that classical Athens was more sexually polarized and repressive of women than any other culture in Western history.
Good Times Bad Times
James Kirkwood
Two Lives To Lead: Bisexuality in Men and Women (Journal of Homosexuality Series)
Fritz Klein, Timothy J. Wolf An unbiased and revealing look at bisexuality, an important variation and aspect of homosexuality. Leading sex researchers of bisexuality look at this often-misunderstood sexual minority and explain the major issues affecting bisexual men and women today. The authors bring to this book a solid understanding of the issues involving bisexuality and clarify many misconceptions surrounding this controversial area of human sexual identity.
Peace Breaks Out
John Knowles
A Separate Peace
John Knowles Set at a boys' boarding school in New England during the early years of World War II, A Separate Peace is a harrowing and luminous parable of the dark side of adolescence. Gene is a lonely, introverted intellectual. Phineas is a handsome, taunting, daredevil athlete. What happens between the two friends one summer, like the war itself, banishes the innocence of these boys and their world.

A bestseller for more than thirty years, A Separate Peace is John Knowles's crowning achievement and an undisputed American classic.
A Separate Peace
John Knowles Set at a boys' boarding school in New England during the early years of World War II, A Separate Peace is a harrowing and luminous parable of the dark side of adolescence. Gene is a lonely, introverted intellectual. Phineas is a handsome, taunting, daredevil athlete. What happens between the two friends one summer, like the war itself, banishes the innocence of these boys and their world.

A bestseller for more than thirty years, A Separate Peace is John Knowles's crowning achievement and an undisputed American classic.
David Kopay Story
David Kopay, Perry Deane Young Twenty-three years after publishing his story, David Kopay remains the only NFL player who has publicly acknowledged his homosexuality. From psychotherapy to hypnosis to heartbreaking family confrontations to finally surprising acceptance from former teammates and coaches, this is a story of denial leading to acceptance, and finally to pride. As inspiring today as it was upon publication, Advocate Books is proud to make The David Kopay Story

available to a new generation of readers.

David Kopay has been involved in a variety of business ventures since his decision to leave professional football. He currently lives and works in Los Angeles.
What I Love About Lesbian Poli
Kris Kovick
Faggots
Larry Kramer Larry Kramer's Faggots has been in print since its original publication in 1978 and has become one of the best-selling novels about gay life ever written. The book is a fierce satire of the gay ghetto and a touching story of one man's desperate search for love there, and reading it today is a fascinating look at how much, and how little, has changed.
The Tragedy of Today's Gays
Larry Kramer With equal parts eloquence and urgency, common sense and patriotism, Kramer writes a concise history of AIDS and despairs that gays have become a tragic people: A lack of civic and political involvement even when faced with an increasingly powerful and hateful opposition. A sexual abandon so reckless that "we are murdering each other." A growing addiction to crystal-meth that defies logic. But Kramer offers gays a survival plan: "So many of Larry Kramer's messages to the younger generation are humanist messages, so old-fashioned in a callow age that we need Kramer to make them again," writes Naomi Wolf in her foreword. "Honor your dead. Take responsibility for yourselves. Grow up. Your lives have meaning-don't fuck and drug them away."
Restoried Selves: Autobiographies of Queer Asian-Pacific-American Activists (Haworth Gay & Lesbian Studies) (Haworth Gay & Lesbian Studies)
Kevin Kumashiro
The Reluctant Pornographer
Bruce Labruce
Bruce LaBruce: Ride, Queer, Ride!
Bruce Labruce, Bruce La Bruce An engaging portrait of the underground filmmaker Bruce LaBruce, founder of the Homocore movement and maker of No Skin Off My Ass, Super 81/2, and Hustler White. Included are LaBruce's diary from the making of Hustler White, a letter from the late Kurt Cobain, LaBruce's interview with performance artist Vaginal Creme Davis, and essays by filmmaker Gus Van Sant and David McIntosh of the Toronto International Film Festival. Fully illustrated with film stills and candid behind-the-scenes snapshots.
She's Come Undone (Oprah's Book Club)
Wally Lamb In this extraordinary coming-of-age odyssey, Wally Lamb invites us to hitch a wild ride on a journey of love, pain, and renewal with the most heartbreakingly comical heroine to come along in years.

Meet Dolores Price. She's 13, wise-mouthed but wounded, having bid her childhood goodbye. Stranded in front of her bedroom TV, she spends the next few years nourishing herself with the Mallomars, potato chips, and Pepsi her anxious mother supplies. When she finally orbits into young womanhood at 257 pounds, Dolores is no stronger and life is no kinder. But this time she's determined to rise to the occasion and give herself one more chance before she really goes under.
A Woman Like That: Lesbian and Bisexual Writers Tell Their Coming Out Stories
Joan Larkin "I suppose my parents tried to raise me just like other little girls, but it was soon apparent that I was different."

The act of "coming out" has the power to transform every aspect of a woman's life, family, friendships, career, sexuality, spirituality. An essential element of self-realization, it is the unabashed acceptance of one's "outlaw" standing in a predominantly heterosexual world. The collected reminiscences of thirty-one supremely talented writers, A Woman Like That is a literate, important, funny and profoundly moving compilation of lesbian and bisexual coming out stories, each richly colored by conflict and risk, and thrumming with the electric excitement of early sexual adventure.

These accounts-sometimes heart-wrenching, often exhilarating-encompass a wide breadth of backgrounds and experiences. From a teenager institutionalized for her passion for women to the mother who must come out to her young sons at the risk of losing them- from the cautious academic to the raucous, liberated femme-each woman represented here tells of forging a unique path toward the difficult but emancipating recognition of herself. Extending from the 1940s to the present day, these intensely personal stories in turn reflect a unique history of the changing social mores that affected each woman's ability to determine the shape of her own life. Together they form an ornate tapestry of lesbian and bisexual experience in the United States over the past half-century.

A Woman Like That is an unforgettable anthology of intimate tales that celebrate the courage of women who demanded to be visible, tales that illuminate this most complex-and empowering-process of personal revelation.
Lost Language of Cranes, The
David Leavitt When Philip falls in love with Eliot, he realizes it's time to come out of the closet to his parents, Owen and Rose. But they are experiencing life changes of their own. Owen spends Sunday afternoons in gay porn theaters, and when he and Rose are forced out of their long-time apartment, they must confront his latent homosexuality and their son's stunning admission.
Equal Affections: A Novel
David Leavitt
Family Dancing
David Leavitt
The Lost Language of Cranes
David Leavitt When Philip falls in love with Eliot, he realizes it's time to come out of the closet to his parents, Owen and Rose. But they are experiencing life changes of their own. Owen spends Sunday afternoons in gay porn theaters, and when he and Rose are forced out of their long-time apartment, they must confront his latent homosexuality and their son's stunning admission.
The Page Turner
David Leavitt At the age of eighteen Paul Porterfield dreams of playing piano at the world's great concert halls, yet the closest he's come has been to turn pages for his idol, Richard Kennington, a former prodigy who is entering middle age. The two begin a love affair that affects their lives in ways neither could have predicted. "Absorbing from start to finish" (The New Yorker), The Page Turner testifies to the tenacity of the human spirit and the resiliency of the human heart.
Family Dancing.
David. (Kay Boyle) Leavitt
My Worst Date
David Leddick In Miami, where the sun always shines and the people are always fabulous, sixteen-year-old Hugo is ready for something more than school and hanging out. When he meets Glenn Elliot Paul, he thinks that, maybe, he had found something to look forward to. Hugo gets more than he bargained for, however, when he realizes that the man of his dreams is also dating his mother.

My Worst Date is a humorous and insightful novel—an innovative take on the traditional coming-of-age novel.
La Bâtarde
Violette Leduc An obsessive and revealing self-portrait of a remarkable woman humiliated by the circumstances of her birth and by her physical appearance, LA Bâtarde relates Violette Leduc’s long search for her own identity through a series of agonizing and passionate love affairs with both men and women. When first published, La Bâtarde was compared to the work of Jean Genet for the frank depiction of sexual escapades and immoral behavior. A confession that contains portraits of several famous French authors, this book is more than just a scintillating memoir—like that of Henry Miller or Charles Bukowski, Leduc’s brilliant writing style and attention to language transform this autobiography into a work of art.
Pearls of Passion: A Treasury of Lesbian Erotica
C. Allyson Lee
Officially Gay: The Political Construction of Sexuality by the U.S. Military (Queer Politics, Queer Theories)
Gary L. Lehring In 1993, simply the idea that lesbians and gays should be able to serve openly in the military created a firestorm of protest from right-wing groups and powerful social conservatives that threatened to derail the entire agenda of a newly elected President. Nine short years later, in the wake of September 11, 2001, the Pentagon's suspension of discharge of gay and lesbians went largely overlooked and unremarked by political pundits, news organizations, military experts, religious leaders and gay activists. How can this collective cultural silence be explained?

Officially Gay follows the military's century-long attempt to identify and exclude gays and lesbians. It traces how the military historically constructed definitions of homosexual identity relying upon religious, medical, and psychological discourses that defined homosexuals as evil, degenerate, and unstable, making their risk to national security obvious, and mandating their exclusion from the Armed Services.

Officially Gay argues that this process made possible greater regulation and scrutiny of gays and lesbians both in and out of the military while simultaneously helping to create a gay and lesbian political movement and helped shape the direction that movement would take.
Amerasia Journal - Vol. 20, No. 1, 1994 (Double Issue)
Russell C. (ed.) Leong
Transgender Emergence: Therapeutic Guidelines for Working With Gender-Variant People and Their Families (Haworth Marriage and the Family) (Haworth Marriage and the Family)
Arlene Lev Explore an ecological strength-based framework for the treatment of gender-variant clients!

This comprehensive book provides you with a clinical and theoretical overview of the issues facing transgendered/transsexual people and their families. Transgender Emergence: Therapeutic Guidelines for Working with Gender-Variant People and Their Families views assessment and treatment through a nonpathologizing lens that honors human diversity and acknowledges the role of oppression in the developmental process of gender identity formation.

Specific sections of Transgender Emergence: Therapeutic Guidelines for Working with Gender-Variant People and Their Families address the needs of gender-variant people as well as transgendered children and youth. The issues facing gender-variant populations who have not been the focus of clinical care, such as intersexed people, female-to-male transgendered people, and those who identify as bigendered, are also addressed.

The book examines: the six stages of transgender emergence

coming out transgendered as a normative process of gender identity development

thinking "outside the box" in the deconstruction of sex and gender

the difference between sexual orientation and gender identity, as well as the convergence, overlap, and integration of these parts of the self

the power of personal narrative in gender identity development

etiology and typographies of transgenderism

treatment models that emerge from various clinical perspectives

alternative treatment modalities based on gender variance as a normative lifecycle developmental process

Complete with fascinating case studies, a critique of diagnostic processes, treatment recommendations, and a helpful glossary of relevant terms, this book is an essential reference for anyone who works with gender-variant people. Handy tables and figures make the information easier to access and understand.
Queer Science: The Use and Abuse of Research into Homosexuality
Simon Levay In a follow-up to his controversial first book, Sexual Brain, Simon LeVay, an English-born neuro-anatomist associated with the Salk Institute in San Diego, continues to argue that scientific support for the genetic predisposition theory is the best strategy for the homosexual community to embrace. Queer Science: The Use and Abuse of Research Into Homosexuality contrasts his own research—which showed that the INAH-3 nucleus in the hypothalamus is smaller in homosexual men than in heterosexual men—with the "environmental" explanation of neglect and poor parenting. LeVay believes his findings will one day eradicate the myth that homosexuality is something to "recover" from.
Queer Science: The Use and Abuse of Research into Homosexuality
Simon LeVay What makes people gay, lesbian, bisexual, or heterosexual? And who cares? Written by one of the leading scientists in the research of sexual orientation, Queer Science looks at how scientific discoveries about homosexuality influence society's attitude toward gays and lesbians, beginning with the theories of the German sexologist and gay-rights pioneer Magnus Hirschfeld and culminating with the latest discoveries in brain science, genetics, endocrinology, and cognitive psychology.
Rolling The R's
R. Zamora Linmark By R. Zamora Linmark.
Leaving Alva: A Novel
Victoria Lipman For Chloe, it was enough. More than enough. So she packs her bags and heads for the bus station, headed for who-knows-where and who-knows-what. Where turns out to be Arizona, and what turns out to be a liberating journey of self discovery and the realization that freedom has as many risks as it does rewards. As Chloe's story unfolds in Victoria Lipman's beautifully written and wonderfully entertaining debut novel, it becomes clear that leaving Alva is not only the best thing Chloe could do, it's the only thing she could do.

After a warped childhood of emotional deprivation, of being lonely, friendless, and motherless, Chloe wants only to feel loved. So when Alva comes along — steady, kind, approving — he seems to her a sanctuary, a rock-steady place where she can anchor and feel safe. But marriage proves to be a dead end rather than an escape, a safety net that turns into a trap. Quite simply, Alva loves Chloe too much, with love constant and unqualified — and suffocating.

So she takes off for the Greyhound bus station, leaving behind a note telling Alva that he deserves better. Her only priorities in picking a destination: no place cold or states with a North or South in their names. She settles on Phoenix, buys a one-way ticket, says good-bye to one life, and anxiously anticipates the new one. Her seatmate is Zeno, an outrageous, impulsive, and hugely selfish woman who charms Chloe with exotic tales of her past, present, and future. After Alva, the freedom Zeno represents is pure intoxication, so she accepts the invitation to stay in Phoenix with Zeno and her aunt Ethel.

Despite the sense of freedom that comes with leaving Alva, Chloe still doesn't feel entirely at home with these two strange women. Ethel, who owns and runs a small flower shop, is the fattest woman Chloe has ever seen. And Zeno — well, she's just plain odd.

Finally it's enough to send Chloe back on the road, only this time she's more confused than ever about who she is, where she's going, and what she wants to find once she gets there. But at least she is free to take this journey, and what a trip it is — funny, moving, filled with wonderful characters and stark, stunning insights.

And what does Chloe find? Well, for one thing she comes to realize that in real life you can go home again, but you just may not want to...
Flaming Iguanas: An Illustrated All-Girl Road Novel Thing
Erika Lopez Tomato Rodriguez hops on her motorcycle and embarks on the ultimate sea-to-shining-sea all-girl adventure — a story in that combines all the best parts of Alice in Wonderland and Easy Rider as Tomato crosses the country in search of the meaning of life, love, and the perfect post office.

Flaming Iguanas is a hilarious novel that combines text, line drawings, rubber stamp art, and a serious dose of attitude. The result is a wild and wonderful ride unlike any you you've ever taken before.
Sister Outsider: Essays and Speeches (Crossing Press Feminist Series)
Audre Lorde essays & speeches
Breaking the Surface:
Greg Louganis Greg Louganis won back-to-back double gold medals at the 1984 and 1988 Olympics, and his amazing physique and handsome face should have made him a media superstar. Yet Louganis's struggles with self-doubt lack of confidence held him back personally and professionally. He only achieved real happiness after coming out as an HIV-positive gay man. This is a thoughtful, sensitive portrait of a man whose insecurities nearly destroyed him, but who found the love and inner strength to save himself.
Breaking the Surface:
Greg Louganis Greg Louganis won back-to-back double gold medals at the 1984 and 1988 Olympics, and his amazing physique and handsome face should have made him a media superstar. Yet Louganis's struggles with self-doubt lack of confidence held him back personally and professionally. He only achieved real happiness after coming out as an HIV-positive gay man. This is a thoughtful, sensitive portrait of a man whose insecurities nearly destroyed him, but who found the love and inner strength to save himself.
The Same Embrace: 4A Novel
Michael Lowenthal The Same Embrace tells the powerful story of two young men struggling against a heritage of intolerance and silence. Twins Jacob and Jonathan were inseparable while growing up in their second-generation-American Jewish family. As adults, though, they are almost hopelessly estranged—Jacob is a gay activist in Boston, while Jonathan lives the strict, disciplined life of an Orthodox student at a yeshiva in Jerusalem. 

In the shadow of a tragedy, Jacob travels to Israel in the hopes of finding common ground with his brother. But his twin's new assurance and faith force Jacob to reexamine his own sexual and religious identities, as well as his place in his complex and haunted family history. An ultimate confrontation between the brothers lays bare the shattering secrets of a legacy that began during the Holocaust. 

Alternating between the present and Jacob's childhood memories, The Same Embrace moves gracefully from anger and alienation toward forgiveness and acceptance. A striking debut, this novel depicts a quintessentially American search for belonging. 

"This is a young man's book in all the best ways, its passions urgent and defining, its hopefulness based on a trust that there are some bonds that simply cannot be broken." —Rosellen Brown 

"Michael Lowenthal has written a big-hearted and wise book about familial love in all its richness and complexity." —Dani Shapiro 

"All the determinants of behavior—religion, family, culture, history, genetics, nurture—are invoked in this moving first novel." —Edmund White
Gay and Lesbian Couples: Voices from Lasting Relationships
Richard A. Mackey, Bernard A. O'Brien, Eileen F. Mackey The voices in this book come from the stories of gay and lesbian partners who talk about their struggles over the years in building a life together. The stories reach beyond the obvious realities of sexual orientation to speak to the joys, sorrows, hopes, and fears of human beings who are committed to making their relationships work. Based on a life-span perspective, in-depth interviews of people whose relationships have lasted more than 15 years explore how partners adapted over the years. Each interview consisted of questions that focused upon dimensions of these relationships over time from the unique perspective of each partner. They were asked about conflict over the years, decision-making styles, ways of working out roles, the importance of social supports, and sexual and psychological intimacy. The research upon which the book is based has continuity with the authors' earlier work on lasting relationships among heterosexual couples, including Lasting Marriages: Men and Women Growing Together (Praeger, 1995). Compared to marriages, relatively little research has been done on the development of same sex relationships. This book will be of great interest to all researchers and students of gender differences, marriage and family therapy, human sexuality, and interpersonal relationships.
The Sewing Circle: Hollywood's Greatest Secret : Female Stars Who Loved Other Women
Axel Madsen
Growing Up Gay: From Left Out to Coming Out
Funny Gay Males
Love in the Time of HIV: The Gay Man's Guide to Sex, Dating, and Relationships
Michael Mancilla, Lisa Troshinsky The facts of life have never been more complicated for gay men. While the threat of AIDS has been diminished by new treatments and longer life expectancy, HIV remains a serious and intractable foe. In this affirming guide, therapist Michael Mancilla, himself HIV-positive, helps fellow gay men, both single and partnered, pursue the happy and fulfilling love life they deserve. Readers will find advice on everything from meeting Mr. Right and talking about HIV status to building the long-term relationships that many never expected to have. Candid first-hand accounts reveal how others in the community are negotiating safer sex, overcoming legal and financial hurdles to plan for the future, learning to accept care as well as give it, and crafting the kinds of intimate relationships they want, whether that means casual sex, dating, or permanent commitment. Smart, honest, and insightful, this book is written from the heart.
Wisecracker: 1The Life and Times of William Haines, Hollywood's First Openly Gay Star
William Mann In 1930 William Haines was Hollywoods #1 box-office draw - a talented, handsome, wisecracking romantic lead. Offscreen, protected by a careful collaboration between studio and press, he was openly gay with reporters and studio chiefs alike. Here is Haines's virtually unknown story - rich with detail, revelations, and scandal - about silent movies and talkies; his lover Jimmie Shields, and the fifty-year relationship (Joan Crawford, their best friend, called them "The happiest married couple in Hollywood") and the enforcement of the Production Code and the establishment of the Hollywood closet, which led to the blacklisting that ultimately doomed Haimes's film career. Wisecracker sweeps from gay pool parties to the excitement of early talkies to Haines's infamous encounter with gay-bashing white supremicists in 1936. He survived the scandal to emerge as a top interior decorator to the stars and to such clients as Nancy Reagan and Walter Annenberg, who employed him for the American Embassy in London. With a cast of characters running from Tallulah Bankhead to Betsy Bloomingdale, from Clark Gable to William Randolph Hearst, Wisecracker is an astounding peice of newly discovered gay history, a chronicle of high Hollywood, and - at it's heart - a great and enduring love story.
Behind the Screen: How Gays and Lesbians Shaped Hollywood, 1910-1969
William Mann William Mann's Behind the Screen is a thoughtful and eye- opening look at the totality of the gay experience in studio-era Hollywood. Much has been written about how gays have been portrayed in the movies but no book— until now— has looked at their influence behind the screen. Whether out of or in the closet, gays and lesbians have from the very beginning played a significant role in shaping Hollywood. Gay actors were among the earliest matinee idols and gay directors have long been among the most popular and commercially successful filmmakers. In fact, gay set and costume designers created the very look of Hollywood.

With this landmark book, Mann fills a void in the Hollywood history archives. Written in the tradition of Neal Gabler's An Empire of Their Own: How the Jews Invented Hollywood and based on hundreds of hours of interviews with survivors of this golden age, Behind the Screen is destined to become a classic of film literature.
Ptown: Art, Sex, and Money on the Outer Cape
Peter Manso When you look back at its history, you can see a progression in Provincetown, things getting wilder and wilder, the outlaw element becoming the norm....

Provincetown, Cape Cod: This small Massachusetts enclave has long been home to pirates, commune-dwellers, artists, and other noble countrymen who value liberty over law — from Norman Mailer and Tennessee Williams to John Waters, Robert Motherwell, and former congressman Gerry Studds. With one of the largest homosexual populations per capita of any town or city in the United States, and some of the highest beachfront real estate prices in the Northeast, Provincetown is a thriving tourist spot that attracts more than one million visitors each year. Here, acclaimed writer and longtime Ptown resident Peter Manso brings together all the celebrities and townsfolk, history and happenstance, and politics and gossip to offer an unparalleled account of this unconventional seaside society — a place, in the words of Henry David Thoreau, where "one may stand...and put all of America behind him."
The Male Couple's Guide: Finding a Man, Making a Home, Building a Life
Eric Marcus A practical and straightforward guide that explores the personal,

familial, and professional intricacies of life for male couples.
Making History: The Struggle for Gay and Lesbian Equal Rights : 1945-1990 : An Oral History
Eric Marcus
Sex and the Single Savior: Gender and Sexuality in Biblical Interpretation
Dale B. Martin “I firmly believe that Christians should read Scripture and make it relevant to our lives. But I also believe that we need new ways of thinking about how we read Scripture. We need to move beyond the false claims of modernism that looked to the text of the Bible as a reliable and objective ‘source’ for knowledge or as a ‘foundation’ for ethics. We need to think about Scripture more theologically and with fresh imaginations. Far from urging the irrelevance of the Bible, I am advocating a more robust use of the Bible and a more sophisticated and adequate theology of Scripture.” —from the conclusion Probing into numerous questions about gender and sexuality, Dale Martin delves into the biblical texts anew and unearths surprising findings. Avoiding preconceptions about ancient sexuality, he explores the ethics of desire and marriage and pays careful attention to the original meanings of words, especially those used as evidence of Paul’s opposition to homosexuality. For example, after a remarkably faithful reading of the scriptural texts, Martin concludes that our contemporary obsession with marriage—and the whole search for the “right” sexual relationships—is antithetical to the message of the gospel. In all of these essays, however, Martin argues for engaging Scripture in a way that goes beyond the standard historical-critical questions and the assumptions of textual agency in order to find a faith that has no foundations other than Jesus Christ.
The Queerest Places: A National Guide to Gay and Lesbian Historic Sites
Paula Martinac It has long been a slogan of gay liberation that "We are everywhere." But exactly where is everywhere? Paula Martinac gives names, places, street addresses, and even apartment numbers in The Queerest Places: A Guide to Gay and Lesbian Historic Sites. Covering every U.S. state and most major cities, Martinac lists the homes of the queer and famous, notable historic sites, cemeteries in which notable deviants are interred, and even contemporary resources such as gay community centers and gay and lesbian research libraries. Martinac has a chatty style, an eye for amusing details, and a wealth of historical knowledge. If you have a hankering to see where Rock Hudson was born, where African American arts patron A'Lelia Walker gave her famous parties, or the rooming house where W. H. Auden, Gypsy Rose Lee, and Carson McCullers all lived together, this is the address book you need.
Confessions of a Jewish Wagnerite: Being Gay and Jewish in America (Cassell Lesbian & Gay Studies)
Lawrence D. Mass
Significant Others
Armistead Maupin "An extended love letter to a magical San Francisco." 

—New York Times Book Review

Tranquillity reigns in the ancient redwood forest until a women-only music festival sets up camp downriver from an all-male retreat for the ruling class. Among those entangled in the ensuing mayhem are a lovesick nurseryman, a panic-stricken philanderer and the world's most beautiful fat woman. Significant Others is Armistead Maupin's cunningly observed meditation on marriage, friendship, and sexual nostalgia.

"Comedy in its most classical form...some of the sharpest and most speakable dialogue you are ever likely to read."
—The Guardian

"The color is wonderful, the line bold and flowing. It is also wise, witty, loving and caring about the foibles and frailties we all seem to have."
—David Hockney
Cole Porter: A Biography
William Mcbrien The most richly told biography we have had of one of the most important and beguiling composer/lyricists of the century—the incomparable Cole Porter, whose songs were the essence of wit and sophistication and whose life was marked by tragedy, courage, sorrow, and secrecy.

        McBrien reveals the private Porter: his privileged Indiana youth (he composed his first song at ten). He went East to boarding school and to Yale, where he wrote the football anthems "Hail to Yale" and "Bull Dog," and show after show in which many of his classmates appeared—among them, Archibald MacLeish, Gerald Murphy, Dean Acheson, and Averell Harriman. Then a brief, unhappy stint at Harvard Law School. Off to Paris at twenty-six, and in crisis joining the French Foreign Legion during the First World War. Two years later, Cole Porter had his first Broadway hit.

        William McBrien's biography, the result of ten years of work and bursting with stories and scenes of Porter's life, takes us beyond the patina of Porter's very public career, beyond the high and low aristocratic worlds of Venice (Porter with Elsa Maxwell in 1923 together put Venice back on the map as the place to be), beyond the opulent parties and costume balls on two continents he not only attended but threw himself—and made into an art form. McBrien takes us into Porter's seemingly conventional marriage to reveal his complicated emotional life—the lost, privileged man who had a wild, irrepressible talent to amuse but at first find couldn't find his voice; the man who married "the most beautiful woman in the world," the very social, very southern Linda Lee Thomas, but who preferred his own sex. He had long relationships as well as frequent dalliances with many men but for thirty-five years maintained a loving marriage to the woman he truly adored.

        We see the supremely gifted Porter who created twenty musicals on Broadway (Anything Goes, DuBarry Was a Lady, Gay Divorce, Born to Dance), writing for such stars as Ethel Merman, Fred Astaire, Mary Martin, Bert Lahr, and Bea Lilly; and who gave Hollywood Fifty Million Frenchmen, The Gay Divorcee, Rosalie, Broadway Melody of 1940, Night and Day, High Society, Silk Stockings, Can-Can, and Kiss Me, Kate.

        Porter was "the top" and lived at the top, but his life was catastrophically transformed after a near-fatal horseback-riding accident. The thirty-one operations during the next eighteen years brought on increasing pain, and the growing paralysis that darkened his life was never hinted at publicly nor in his work.

        Interweaving the life and the music, McBrien shows us a man whose genius as a composer flowered in deceptively simple melodies that were thought to be completely modern but today are considered ingenious, complicated, and steeped in the nineteenth-century tradition of lieder; a composer whose craft concealed complicated solutions to musical problems while it enchanted his audiences. And we come to understand how Porter's doubts and desires, longings and infatuations, insinuated their way into the heart of his incomparable words and music.
Alternatives to Sex: A Novel
Stephen McCauley Boston real estate agent William Collins knows that his habits are slipping out of control. Due to obsessive-compulsive daily cleaning binges and a penchant for nightly online cruising for hookups, he finds his sales figures slipping despite a booming market. There's also his ongoing struggle to collect the rent from his passive-aggressive tenant and his worries about his best friend, Edward, whom he's certainly not in love with. Just as he decides to do something about his life, he meets Charlotte and Samuel, wealthy suburbanites looking for the perfect city apartment. "Happy couple," he writes in his notes. "Maybe I can learn something from them." What he ultimately discovers challenges his own assumptions about real estate, love, and desire; and what they learn from him might unravel a budding friendship, not to mention a very promising sale.

Full of crackling dialogue delivered by a stellar ensemble of players, Alternatives to Sex is a smart, hilarious chronicle of life in post-traumatic, morally ambiguous America — where the desire to do good is constantly being tripped up by the need to feel good. Right now.
The Lesbian Couples Guide
Judith Mcdaniel A complete guide to lesbian relationships that explores both the practical and emotional dimensions of being a lesbian couple in today's society.
Naming the Waves
Christian Mcewen
George Cukor: A Double Life: A Biography of the Gentleman Director
Patrick McGilligan George Cukor is best known for directing witty comedies, but he also made wonderful dramas and musicals. He adapted many of his films from theatrical productions, but with such technical proficiency that they rarely felt stagy. In his long and productive career, he made classics such as Camille, Holiday, The Philadelphia Story, Adam's Rib, A Star is Born, and My Fair Lady. Patrick McGilligan's excellent biography gives the story behind the making of these and many other movies as well as terrific insights into Cukor's Jewish upbringing, his homosexuality, his reputation as a "woman's director," and his long-time association with Katharine Hepburn, with whom he made 10 films.
The Nanny Diaries: A Novel
Emma Mclaughlin, Nicola Kraus Wanted:

One young woman to take care of four-year-old boy.

Must be cheerful, enthusiastic and selfless-bordering on masochistic

Must relish sixteen-hour shifts with a deliberately nap-deprived pre-schooler

Must love getting thrown up on, literally and figuratively, by everyone in his family

Must enjoy the delicious anticipation of ridiculously erratic pay

Mostly, must love being treated like fungus found growing out of employers Hermes bag. 

Those who take it personally need not apply.

Who wouldn't want this job?

Struggling to graduate from NYU and afford her microscopic studio apartment, Nanny takes a position caring for the only son of the wealthy X family. She rapidly learns the insane amount of juggling involved to ensure that a Park Avenue wife who doesn't work, cook, clean, or raise her own child has a smooth day. 

When the Xs marriage begins to disintegrate, Nanny ends up involved way beyond the bounds of human decency or good taste. Her tenure with the X family becomes a nearly impossible mission to maintain the mental health of their four-year-old, her own integrity and, most importantly, her sense of humor. Over nine tense months Mrs. X and Nanny perform the age-old dance of decorum and power as they test the limits of modern-day servitude.

The Nanny Diaries deftly skewers the manner in which America's over-privileged raise les petites over-privileged-as if grooming them for a Best in Show competition. Written by two former nannies, this alternately comic and poignant satire punctures the glamour of Manhattan's upper class.
Love! Valor! Compassion! and A Perfect Ganesh: Two Plays (Drama, Plume)
Terrence McNally
Poisoned Ivy Pb
Toni Mcnaron Lesbian and gay books and conference papers might be hot items these days, but lesbian and gay academics all over the country are still subjected to homophobic personal slights, harassment, and discrimination. How do they cope, and what kinds of actions can promote positive change?

In Poisoned Ivy, Toni A. H. McNaron tells her own story and reports on the experiences of some 300 lesbian and gay academics with at least fifteen years in their profession. McNaron, a lesbian who has spent thirty years teaching English at one institution, tells of her own painful steps toward coming out to colleagues and students. Recalling her terror of being identified as a lesbian, she describes how she awkwardly attempted to befriend other (probably closeted) faculty members and stifled class discussions that veered too close to the taboo topic of sexuality.

Like McNaron, faculty from a wide range of disciplines, geographical regions, and institutions speak out about their long-term experiences in negotiating the difficult terrain of casual conversations with colleagues, departmental politics, and administration policies. Each had to carefully weigh the risks of coming out, and their stories dramatically underscore that no decision fits all situations. In stark contrast to accounts of being denied tenure or promotion are testimonies about the elation that comes from doing lesbian/gay scholarship or political work on campus, or mentoring students and junior faculty.

As numerous personal testimonies make clear, the bad old days are far from over. Lesbian and gay individuals flourish in relatively few progressive departments and institutions; at others, they find ambivalent or inhospitable responses. Seeing the hard-won gains in civil liberties under siege all over the country, some lesbian and gay faculty wonder whether they were wise to come out; others are steadfast in their choice but not sanguine about the threat to their careers. Poisoned Ivy is an unsparing account of contemporary academic life.
Fete
Daniel McVay
Dorothy Parker: What Fresh Hell Is This?
Marion Meade Dorothy Parker was known for her outrageous one-liners, her ruthless theater criticism, her clever verses and bittersweet stories, but there was another side to Dorothy Parker—a private life, set on a course of destruction. She suffered through two divorces, a string of painful affairs, a lifelong problem with alcohol, and several suicide attempts.

In this lively, absorbing biography, Marion Meade illuminates both the dark side of Parker and her days of wicked wittiness at the Algonquin Round Table with the likes of Robert Benchley, George Kaufman, and Harold Ross, and in Hollywood with S.J. Perelman, William Faulkner, and Lilian Hellman. At the dazzling center of it all, Meade gives us the flamboyant, self-destructive, and brilliant Dorothy Parker.
Dorothy Parker: What Fresh Hell Is This?
Marion Meade Dorothy Parker was known for her outrageous one-liners, her ruthless theater criticism, her clever verses and bittersweet stories, but there was another side to Dorothy Parker—a private life, set on a course of destruction. She suffered through two divorces, a string of painful affairs, a lifelong problem with alcohol, and several suicide attempts.

In this lively, absorbing biography, Marion Meade illuminates both the dark side of Parker and her days of wicked wittiness at the Algonquin Round Table with the likes of Robert Benchley, George Kaufman, and Harold Ross, and in Hollywood with S.J. Perelman, William Faulkner, and Lilian Hellman. At the dazzling center of it all, Meade gives us the flamboyant, self-destructive, and brilliant Dorothy Parker.
An Arrow's Flight
Mark Merlis The award-winning An Arrow's Flight tells the story of the Trojan War and Pyrrhus, the son of the fallen Achilles, now working as a go-go boy and hustler in the big city. Magically blending ancient headlines and modern myth, Merlis creates a fabulous new world where legendary heroes declare their endowments in personal ads and any panhandler may be a divinity in disguise. Comical, moving, startling in its audacity and range, An Arrow's Flight is a profound meditation on gay identity, straight power, and human liberation.
Forth into Light
Gordon Merrick
The Lord Won't Mind (Peter & Charlie Trilogy)
Gordon Merrick
The Lord Won't Mind (Peter & Charlie Trilogy)
Gordon Merrick
Perfect Freedom
Gordon Merrick
One for the Gods (Peter & Charlie Trilogy)
Gordon Merrick
One for the Gods (Peter & Charlie Trilogy)
Gordon Merrick
Now Let's Talk About Music
Gordon Merrick
Secrets Of A Gay Marine Porn Star
Rich Merritt
Outlaw Representation: Censorship and Homosexuality in Twentieth-Century American Art (Ideologies of Desire)
Richard Meyer From the U.S. Navy's 1934 confiscation of a painting of sailors on shore leave to contemporary culture wars over funding for the arts, conflicts surrounding homosexuality and creative freedom have shaped the history of modern art in America. Richard Meyer's Outlaw Representation tells the charged story of this strife through pioneering analysis of the works of gay artists and the circumstances under which these works have been attacked, suppressed, or censored outright. Focusing on the careers of Paul Cadmus, Andy Warhol, Robert Mapplethorpe, David Wojnarowicz, Gran Fury, and Holly Hughes, Outlaw Representation explores how gay artists responded to the threat of censorship by producing their own "outlaw representations" of homosexuality. Instead of acquiescing to attacks on their work as indecent or obscene, these artists used the outlaw status of homosexuality to propose new forms of social, sexual, and creative life.

Richly illustrated, Outlaw Representation includes close to 200 striking images, ranging from the art of celebrated figures such as Andy Warhol and Robert Mapplethorpe to physique-magazine photographs and gay liberation posters. Throughout, images that once provoked censorship now elicit close visual analysis and careful historical investigation. Engagingly written and sweepingly researched, Outlaw Representation promises to be a landmark in the study of twentieth-century American art, politics, and sexuality.
How Sex Changed: A History of Transsexuality in the United States
Joanne Meyerowitz How Sex Changed is a fascinating social, cultural, and medical history of transsexuality in the United States. Joanne Meyerowitz tells a powerful human story about people who had a deep and unshakable desire to transform their bodily sex. In the last century when many challenged the social categories and hierarchies of race, class, and gender, transsexuals questioned biological sex itself, the category that seemed most fundamental and fixed of all.

From early twentieth-century sex experiments in Europe, to the saga of Christine Jorgensen, whose sex-change surgery made headlines in 1952, to today's growing transgender movement, Meyerowitz gives us the first serious history of transsexuality. She focuses on the stories of transsexual men and women themselves, as well as a large supporting cast of doctors, scientists, journalists, lawyers, judges, feminists, and gay liberationists, as they debated the big questions of medical ethics, nature versus nurture, self and society, and the scope of human rights.

In this story of transsexuality, Meyerowitz shows how new definitions of sex circulated in popular culture, science, medicine, and the law, and she elucidates the tidal shifts in our social, moral, and medical beliefs over the twentieth century, away from sex as an evident biological certainty and toward an understanding of sex as something malleable and complex. How Sex Changed is an intimate history that illuminates the very changes that shape our understanding of sex, gender, and sexuality today.

(20021201)
Unbecoming (Series Q)
Eric Michaels In 1982, the American-born anthropologist Eric Michaels went to Australia to research the impact of television on remote aboriginal communities. Over the next five years, until his death, he became a major intellectual presence in Australia. Unbecoming is Michaels’s gritty, provocative, and intellectually powerful account of living with AIDS—a chronicle of the last year of his life as he became increasingly ill. Michaels’s diary offers a forceful and ironic rumination on the cultural phenomenon of AIDS, how it relates to his concerns as both an anthropologist and a gay man, and the failure of medical and governmental institutions to come to terms with the disease. Like the AIDS testimony of artist David Wojnarowicz and filmmaker Derek Jarman, Unbecoming provides a view of the AIDS epidemic from a distinctly new vantage point.
In Search of Gay America: Women and Men in a Time of Change
Neil Miller
In Search of Gay America: Women and Men in a Time of Change/30830
Neil Miller
In Search of Gay America: Women and Men in a Time of Change/30830
Neil Miller
Out In the World
Neil Miller
Out of the Past: Gay and Lesbian History from 1869 to the Present
Neil Miller A unique and hugely absorbing narrative history of gay life—from Oscar Wilde to the 25th anniversary of Stonewall—by the award-winning journalist and distinguished author of Out in the World. Miller accompanies his narrative with essays and excerpts from contemporary and historical writings. Photos and line drawings.
Out of the Past: Gay and Lesbian History from 1869 to the Present
Neil Miller A unique and hugely absorbing narrative history of gay life—from Oscar Wilde to the 25th anniversary of Stonewall—by the award-winning journalist and distinguished author of Out in the World. Miller accompanies his narrative with essays and excerpts from contemporary and historical writings. Photos and line drawings.
The state of the workplace for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgendered Americans
Kim I Mills
Confessions of a Mask (New Directions Paperbook)
Yukio Mishima
The Gold Diggers:A Novel
Paul Monette
Lesbiot: Israeli Lesbians Talk About Sexuality, Feminism, Judaism and Their Lives (Cassell Women on Women)
Tracy Moore
Everybody Loves You (Stonewall Inn)
Ethan Mordden A gay ghost, a talking dog, and a street kid who thinks he's an elf-child join our narrator Bud, best friend Dennis Savage, eternally young Little Kiwi, devastating hunk Carlo, and the other characters from I've a Feeling We're Not in Kansas Anymore and Buddies in this final volume in Mordden's trilogy on gay life in the big city.

And there's trouble in paradise: Dennis Savage is suffering midlife crisisl; his lover little Kiwi who uses sex as a weapon, threatens to tear apart the delicate fabric of this gay family of buddies, lovers, and brothers and the AIDS crisis may bring an end to this whole world.
Zanele Muholi: Only Half the Picture
Zanele Muholi A photographer and an activist, Zanele Muholi offers us the chance to journey across our own boundaries - to think differently about blackness, female forms, skins, bodies and sexualities in a way that is unprecedented in South Africa. Her images offer frank and intimate portrayals of black lesbian lives, the scars of hate crimes, the bonds between lovers, the life lines of women living on the margins. Muholi's subjects are never silent or inactive in front of her lens, and never less than complex human beings.
Anne Frank : The Biography
Melissa Muller With an Epilogue by Miep Giess 

The first biography of the girl whose fate has touched the lives of millions. For people all over the world, Anne Frank, the vivacious, intelligent Jewish girl with a crooked smile and huge dark eyes, has become the "human face of the Holocaust." Her diary of twenty-five months in hiding, a precious record of her struggle to keep hope alive through the darkest days of this century, has touched the hearts of millions. Here, after five decades, is the first biography of this remarkable figure. Drawing on exclusive interviews with family and friends, on previously unavailable correspondence, and on documents long kept secret, Melissa Muller creates a nuanced portrait of her famous subject. This is the flesh-and-blood Anne Frank, unsentimentalized and so all the more affecting—Anne Frank restored to history. Muller traces Frank's life from an idyllic childhood in an assimilated family well established in Frankfurt banking circles to her passionate adolescence in German-occupied Amsterdam and her desperate in Bergen Belsen at the age of sixteen. Full of revelations, this richly textured biography casts new light on Anne's relations with her mother, whom she treats harshly in the diary, and solves an enduring mystery: who betrayed the families hiding in the annex just when liberation was at hand? This is an indispensable volume for all those who seek a deeper, richer understanding of Anne Frank and the brutal times in which she lived and died.
Palm Springs Babylon: Sizzling Stories From The Desert Playground Of The Stars
Ray Mungo Something about the slow-burning sun and the easy lifestyle of Hollywood's notorious desert haven has nurtured a scrumptious history of cardinal sins, both public and private. From philanthropists to actors-in-waiting, Ray Mungo's Palm Springs Babylon is the compilation of these burning secrets, complete with damning photographic evidence and merciless documentation.

From Clara Bow's sexual appetite and voracious Jim Bakker's denials of promiscuity, to the rich veins of gossip to be mined from the Betty Ford Center, any gossipmonger or film buff will thrill to this lurid social history of Hollywood arcana. Witness zaftig Fatty Arbuckle stand trial for the grisly murder of a starlet; the egos of the powerful, the famous, and the purely eccentric locking horns; and the flamboyance and controversy, past and present, surrounding this florid and flourishing community.

Palm Springs Babylon is a secret history of this Hollywood playground at its best-its sleaziest, most corrupt, and most deliciously indecorous-in short, at its height of glamour.
Disidentifications: Queers of Color and the Performance of Politics (Cultural Studies of the Americas, V. 2)
Jose Esteban Munoz, Munoz Jose
Gravitation, Vol. 1
Maki Murakami Shuichi Shindou is determined to be a rock star. He has no experience, no talent, and no band. After finding a charismatic guitarist and getting a gig, he's ready to show the world what a genius he is with his powerful lyrics. However, Eiri Yuki overhears his amateurish verse and puts the young musician in his place. Unable to get the harsh criticism out of his mind Shuichi forces himself into Yuki's life and the two find their futures inexorably intertwined. The force that brings them together is like gravity and there is nothing they can do to stop it.
Gravitation, Vol. 2
Maki Murakami *A New Cult Classic *A romantic comedy/drama about making it in the music industry *Spawned a ton of collectibles in Japan; Soundtracks, pencil boards, calendars, phone cards, postcards, artbooks *Gravitation anime available on DVD *A forerunner in the hugely popular Shonen-Ai (boy love) category

Just when Shuichi Shindou's rock star dreams seem to be coming together, everything falls apart. His gifted guitarist Hiro quits the band, the new manager wants to take Shuichi off the keyboards, and Shuichi finds himself constantly berated by their producer. The one person he can fall back on is his biggest critic, the cynical and abrasive Yuki. But in love, as with music, the more serious things become the greater the pressure ... gravitation takes its toll.
Gravitation, Book 3
Maki Murakami *A New Cult Classic *A romantic comedy/drama about making it in the music industry *Spawned a ton of collectibles in Japan; Soundtracks, pencil boards, calendars, phone cards, postcards, artbooks *Gravitation anime available on DVD *A forerunner in the hugely popular Shonen-Ai (boy love) category

Shuichi is crushed to hear that Eiri is already engaged but the show must go on. His band, Bad Luck, gears up for their debut show and Shuichi begins to announce to the gathered crowd that Eiri is his and his alone when he is fortuitously interrupted before he can make himself clear. The premier goes well and Bad Luck is on their way to being famous when a rival band member discovers damaging information about Shuichi and Eiri's relationship. How long can Bad Luck's good luck can hold out?
Gravitation, Book 5
Maki Murakami Shuichi and his band, Bad Luck, are a rising star in Japan’s pop scene, and their chief rival, ASK, seems doomed to the has been status of an 80s hairband. But just when it looks like the top spot on the Billboard charts is Bad Luck’s for the taking, a completely unexpected competitor emerges—Nittle Grasper is reuniting! Now Shuichi finds his idol (not to mention his band’s Keyboardist) his biggest rival.
Gravitation, Vol. 7
Maki Murakami *A New Cult Classic *A romantic comedy/drama about making it in the music industry *Spawned a ton of collectibles in Japan; Soundtracks, pencil boards, calendars, phone cards, postcards, artbooks *Gravitation anime available on DVD *A forerunner in the hugely popular Shonen-Ai (boy love) category

Eiri and Shuichi's intense relationship continues to escalate as Bad Luck's record races to the top of the charts—Eiri's coming out party on national TV boosts his popularity, as fans chant, "More-more-more!" But just as everyone is feeling sky high, Hiro announces that he's hanging up his guitar and quitting! Will Shuichi's queer eye for the rock guy convince Hiro to return to the stage? Or is the band finally out of luck?
Gravitation, Book 4
Maki Murakami, Jamie S. Rich *A New Cult Classic *A romantic comedy/drama about making it in the music industry *Spawned a ton of collectibles in Japan; Soundtracks, pencil boards, calendars, phone cards, postcards, artbooks *Gravitation anime available on DVD *A forerunner in the hugely popular Shonen-Ai (boy love) category

Shuichi's debut single is rising on the charts, but Taki Aizawa, the leader of rival band ASK finds out about his relationship with Eiri. On top of all that, Eiri has suddenly declared their relationship over! What's going on ...!?
Gravitation, Vol. 6
Maki Murakami, Jamie S. Rich Frustrated by Ryuichi's superior talent, Shuichi decides to get into his own groove in order to go head-to-head against his idol. And when Eiri makes an unexplained exodus to New York, Hiro convinces Tatsuho to dress up like Eiri and make some magic happen! But when Shuichi gets carried away and locks lips with the costumed Tatsuho, will the face-sucking scandal be too hot for everyone to handle? Or will Shuichi tell everyone to kiss off?!
Gravitation, Vol. 8
Maki Murakami, Jamie S. Rich *A New Cult Classic *A romantic comedy/drama about making it in the music industry *Spawned a ton of collectibles in Japan; Soundtracks, pencil boards, calendars, phone cards, postcards, artbooks *Gravitation anime available on DVD *A forerunner in the hugely popular Shonen-Ai (boy love) category

After going platinum and getting a date with Eiri, Shuichi thought nothing could bring him down. But when Seguchi delivers an ultimatum to the happy couple, Eiri takes it to heart and breaks up with Shuichi. K tries in vain to help a devastated Shuichi recover, but the surprises just keep coming when Shuichi ends up kidnapped and on a plane to the US for a debut!
Gravitation, Vol. 9
Maki Murakami, Jamie S. Rich *A New Cult Classic *A romantic comedy/drama about making it in the music industry *Spawned a ton of collectibles in Japan; Soundtracks, pencil boards, calendars, phone cards, postcards, artbooks *Gravitation anime available on DVD *A forerunner in the hugely popular Shonen-Ai (boy love) category

As Shuichi decides to debut in the US with XMR records, his relationships with Eiri and Reiji reach an impasse. Shuichi breaks the news to Eiri that he wants to forget about his life in Japan...including Eiri!
Gravitation Volume 11 (Gravitation)
Maki Murakami, Jamie S. Rich When the plans to release five singles in three weeks turn into releasing ten singles in ten weeks, it's up to Shuichi to get into the groove before the pressure leads him on a road to nowhere. Talk about working hard for the money! With all eyes on Shuichi and everyone tuning in to hear Bad Luck's latest recording, will this band become the old kids on the block?
Getting Off Clean
Timothy Murphy Gay male coming-out novels usually deal more with the personal than with the political, but Getting Off Clean encompasses both. Eric Fitzpatrick is a bright, high school senior in Mendham, a working-class town in Massachusetts. He is determined to fit in, be popular, and go to college. The only problem is that he is gay and just coming out—a problem complicated when he begins having an affair with Brooks Tremont, a black student who attends a prestigious prep school outside of town. When racial violence breaks out in Mendham, both Eric and Brooks have to make some serious choices. Getting Off Clean, deftly written and incredibly smart, challenges us to think in new ways about sexuality, class, race, and the accomplishments of gay fiction.
Bosie: The Man, The Poet, The Lover of Oscar Wilde
Douglas Murray Lord Alfred Douglas, or 'Bosie' as he was known , is destined to be remembered as the lover of Oscar Wilde. Dissolute, well-born and beautiful as a young man, his role in the events that led to Oscar Wilde's trial and imprisonment determined the strange celebrity which haunted him until his death. Biographies of Wilde generally give only a cursory account of what happened to Douglas after Wilde's death, but Bosie recounts the full and absorbing story of his complex life. A successful though now obscure poet, he renounced homosexuality after converting to Roman Catholicism and embarked on an ill-fated marriage to Olive Custance. Lord Alfred's time was largely consumed by his growing interest in religion and costly feuds - he was imprisoned for libeling Winston Churchill - and he died a neglected and lonely figure in 1945.

Douglas Murray has had unprecedented access to many letters and key literary manuscripts, and presents evidence which casts a new light on the relationship between Wilde and Bosie. Indeed, Murray has succeeded where Bosie himself failed in securing the release of a British government file which was to be sealed until 2043. The result is a genuinely groundbreaking biography, and the definitive account of a fascinating life.
Homosexualities (Worlds of Desire: The Chicago Series on Sexuality, Gender, and Culture)
Stephen O. Murray Breathtaking in its historical and geographical scope, this book provides a sweeping examination of the construction of male and female homosexualities, stressing both the variability of the forms same-sex desire can take and the key recurring patterns it has formed throughout history.

"[An] indispensable resource on same-sex sexual relationships and their social contexts. . . . Essential reading." —Choice

"[P]romises to deliver a lot, and even more extraordinarily succeeds in its lofty aims. . . . [O]riginal and refreshing. . . . [A] sensational book, part of what I see emerging as a new commonsense revolution within academe." —Kevin White, International Gay and Lesbian Review
Downtown-V285
Michael Musto
Hidden Law
Michael Nava "Intriguing, fast-paced....Henry Rios, the gay lawyer Michael Nava has created, is sensitive and appealing."

SANDRA SCOPPETTONE

Author of I'LL BE LEAVING YOU ALWAYS

Michael Nava's sequel to HOW TOWN.

When State Senator Gus Pena, a politician with a spotty past and an ambition to become mayor, is gunned down, the LAPD arrests Michael Ruiz, a hot-tempered teen who had spat violent words about Pena while they both attended a drug rehab center. Believing in the troubled youth's innocence, lawyer Henry Rios takes the case, despite the fact that he's in the middle of a wrenching breakup with his HIV-positive lover, Josh.

As his personal life unravels, and the cops and press rush to judgment on Ruiz, Rios penetrates the highly protected world of L.A. politics to ferret out a most unlikely killer...
Hidden Law
Michael Nava Henry explores his Mexican-American roots as he defends a young Latino accused of murdering a rising Latino politician. A strong emotional connection with both the victim and his accused killer results in a deepening internal conflict for Henry as he battles L.A.'s corrupt political machine and faces Josh's impending death from AIDS.
A Restricted Country
Joan Nestle A proud working-class woman, an “out” lesbian long before the Rainbow revolution, Joan Nestle has stood at the forefront of American freedom struggles from the McCarthy era to the present day. Featuring photographs and a new introduction by the author, this classic collection which intimately accounts the lesbian, feminist and civil rights movements through personal essays is available again for the first time in years.
She Loves Me, She Loves Me Not: Romantic Fiction by Lesla Newman
Lesla Newman Here is a new collection of Lesla Newman's fiction at its finest. In A Stone's Throw, two butch buddies become more than buddies, though neither of them will admit it. In Mothers of Invention, one woman in a relationship wants a child, but her partner won't learn the true meaning of compromise and commitment. And in Girls Will Be Boys, a straight woman-at least she thinks she's straight-discovers a shocking fact about her "boyfriend." Whether the stories are serious, as in Keeping a Breast when a woman discovers a lump in her breast while making love, or hilarious, as in Flights of Fancy when a femme surprises herself by being attracted to another femme, She Loves Me, She Loves Me Not showcases Newman's talent for portraying the lesbian community in all its glory with compassion, wit, and heart.

Marketing Plans:
National Advertising: The Advocate, Girlfriends, Sojourner, The Lesbian Review of Books
Advance Reader Copies
Author Appearances: Boston, Amherst, New York, Philadelphia, Washington, DC, San Francisco, Los Angeles

Lesla Newman has written and edited more than 20 books. Four of her books have been Lambda Literary Award finalists. A native New Yorker, she lives in Northampton, Mass.

Also Available by Lesla Newman

Girls Will be Girls
TP $12.95 1-55583-537-6
Out of the Closet and Nothing to Wear
TP $10.95 1-55583-415-9
Every Woman's Dream: Short Fiction
Leslea Newman Charming stories of contemporary lesbians and lesbian life by one of our most beloved writers.
Heather Has Two Mommies: 10th Anniversary Edition (Alyson Wonderland)
Leslea Newman Originally self-published in 1989, Heather Has Two Mommies became the first title in Alyson's newly formed Alyson Wonderland imprint in 1990. The simple and straightforward story of a little girl named Heather and her two lesbian mothers was created by Newman and illustrator Diana Souza because children's books that reflected a nontraditional family did not exist, but a firestorm of controversy soon ensued. Attacked by the religious right, lambasted by Jesse Helms from the floor of the U.S Senate, and stolen from library shelves, it was an uphill battle for Heather. Thanks to the overwhelming support of booksellers, librarians, parents, and children, however, Heather Has Two Mommies has sold over 35,000 copies, launched a minor industry in providing books for the children of gay and lesbian parents and, as attested to by a recent New Yorker cartoon, become part of the cultural lexicon.
Out of the Closet and Nothing to Wear
Leslea Newman
Sparks Might Fly: A Novel
Cris Newport
CHERRY GROVE FIRE ISLA
Esther Newton
Alice in Genderland: A Crossdresser Comes of Age
Richard J. Novic Alice in Genderland tells the story of Dr. Richard Novic, Harvard-educated psychiatrist and crossdresser. No memoir like it has ever been published. Most of the time, he is a man at the office or a husband and father at home. But one evening a week, she is a woman about town, shopping, dining, dancing, and dating a man for over six years. And it’s all out in the open.

Although he now leads a richly expressive life, Dr. Novic suffered since childhood with a secret, a desire he was in no way equipped to handle, but one that eventually burst through his denial, a few months before his wedding day. Just once, he felt, while he still could, he had to know how it felt like to be a woman.

Like Alice in Wonderland, his curiosity led him to fall headlong down a rabbit hole, through desperate straits, mind-opening surprises, heart-rending changes, and boundless love. By the time he was back on his feet, he was a different person, living a lifestyle he hadn't known existed. Anyone who has struggled to figure out who they are and how they want to live will see themselves in this powerful life story.

Praise for Alice in Genderland

“Few know the transgender scene like GIRL TALK magazine’s Alice Novic. This exciting new memoir by her male alter ego takes us along with him and the people he loves, as he encounters and explores each twist and turn around him and within him. As much Lewis and Clark as it is Lewis Carroll, Alice in Genderland blazes a new trail in the world of crossdressing.”

—Linda Jensen, contributing writer, Transgender Forum

“Alice bravely explores the limits of gender, sexuality, and relationships—a sexy, poignant, and often hilarious memoir of transgenderism.”

—Vernon A. Rosario, M.D., author of The Erotic Imagination, clinical faculty, UCLA Neuropsychiatric Institute

“Alice in Genderland is a fascinating story, well worth reading.”

—Vern L. Bullough, Ph.D., author of Crossdressing, Sex, and Gender, past president of the Society of the Scientific Study of Sex
Coming Out Within: Stages of Spiritual Awakening for Lesbians and Gay Men
Craig O'Neill, Kathleen Ritter
Long Day's Journey into Night
Eugene O'Neill Eugene O'Neill's autobiographical play Long Day's Journey into Night is regarded as his finest work. First published by Yale University Press in 1956, it won the Pulitzer Prize in 1957 and has since sold more than one million copies. This edition, which includes a new foreword by Harold Bloom, coincides with a new production of the play starring Brian Dennehy, which opens in Chicago in January 2002 and in New York in April.
Memory Mambo: A Novel
Achy Obejas Juani Casas is obsessed with memory. Having escaped from Cuba to the United States with her irresistibly imperfect family, she is fixated on extracting the truth of her life from the nostalgic mythology of exile. Surrounded by a chorus of cousins — blood cousins and "cousins in exile" — Juani, a 24-year-old lesbian, struggles with violence, desire, and the meaning of love.
Ethan Green Chronicles
Eric Orner
Vulgar Favors : Andrew Cunanan, Gianni Versace and the Largest Failed Manhunt in U.S. History
Maureen Orth In her eagerly awaited first book, Vanity Fair special correspondent Maureen Orth offers a landmark work of investigative journalism—a riveting account of a charming sociopath, his savage crimes, and the mysteries he left along the way.  Revealing the explosive story of Andrew Cunanan and his cross-country killing spree in its entirety, Vulgar Favors is a tale of lurid sex and family secrets, extravagant wealth and exploitative greed, international celebrity and overnight infamy that exposes underworlds all around us while dramatizing the human tragedies that brought them to sudden, shadowed light.

Maureen Orth had just filed a major Vanity Fair story on Andrew Cunanan and his four murder victims when Gianni Versace was murdered in July 1997.  When Miami detectives implicated the suspected serial killer in Versace's death, Orth made news with the startling revelation that the killer—already on the FBI's Ten Most Wanted list—wasn't a stranger to the superstar murder victim.  As the world struggled to understand how the focus of a national manhunt could have gunned down a beloved celebrity in broad daylight, Cunanan continued to elude authorities despite steadily mounting pressure from both law enforcement and media.  Cornered in Miami Beach, he escaped captivity only by taking his own life, never revealing what drove him to commit five murders in four states.

Although the media moved on to the next story, and law enforcement agencies have closed their books, Orth continued investigating the killer and his crimes, crossing the country to explore the sometimes extreme, almost parallel universes through which Cunanan moved.  Drawing on hundreds of interviews, unreleased records, and her own incomparable experience in the center of the media maelstrom, Orth now tells the complete story of a twisted killer, his unwitting victims, the moneyed, hedonistic worlds in which they lived and died, the failure of the nation's law enforcement agencies to apprehend the killer, and the mysteries that remain unsolved—if not suppressed—to this day.

From the shadowy, drug-fueled gay underworlds of California to the fiercely protected opulence of Chicago's Miracle Mile, from the midwestern family homes of beloved sons slaughtered in their prime to the glittering celebration of decadence that is Versace's legendary South Beach, Orth takes readers on an eye-opening journey across America at the end of the century—a place where justice can fall between the cracks of jurisdiction, where what passes for truth can be bought and sold, and where an intelligent, unbalanced young man can suddenly erupt, blazing a trail of bloodshed that couldn't hide the untold secrets left in its wake.
The Orton diaries: Including the correspondence of Edna Welthorpe and others
Joe Orton
The Orton diaries: Including the correspondence of Edna Welthorpe and others
Joe Orton
Coming Home to America: A Roadmap to Gay & Lesbian Empowerment
Torie Osborn In this "roadmap to gay and lesbian empowerment," the former head of the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force provides a blueprint for broad social revolution that starts by looking within one's own heart. Drawing upon the personal stories of queer Americans representing a diverse range of ages, races, religions and sexual orientations, Osborn celebrates the courage inherent in every decision to come out, and argues that simply by living our lives, each of us provides compelling arguments for our place in society. She then suggests ways in which gays, lesbians, and everyone else can come together and build inclusive communities of hope which serve as models not just for the gay rights movement, but for all Americans.
Gus Van Sant: An Unauthorized Biography
James Robert Parish, James Parish Enigmatic, retiring, and openly gay, Gus Van Sant is one of the best-known independent filmmakers. An active and honored director for two decades, noted for his rapport with actors, Van Sant nevertheless remains aloof from Hollywood, preferring to live and write in Portland, OR. Extensively researched and based on interviews with the director, Gus Van Sant examines his career from the inauspicious debut Mala Noche to the haunting Drugstore Cowboy; from the angst-ridden My Own Private Idaho and the mainstream black comedy To Die For to the Oscar-nominated Good Will Hunting and the high-profile Finding Forrester. Van Sant remains committed to exploring themes of the outsider and presenting an idiosyncratic vision in an unobtrusive but compelling style. Equally important, under Van Sant's guidance many actors (Matt Dillon, River Phoenix, Keanu Reeves, Nicole Kidman, Matt Damon, and acclaimed newcomer Robert Brown, whom Van Sant discovered) have done their best work. The first full-length biography of the Oscar nominated director, author Parish has interviewed Van Sant exclusively for this book.
Fighting Fire
Caroline Paul One of the first women in the San Francisco Fire Department writes about what it's like to be a firefighter—the daily routine in the firehouse; the danger and thrills of risking her life fighting this elemental force—and tells readers what life is like for a woman in what has traditionally been a man's world.
Honoring the Body: Meditations on a Christian Practice
Stephanie Paulsell In this exquisite and sensitive book, author Stephanie Paulsell draws on resources from the Christian tradition to show how we can learn to celebrate the body's pleasures, protect the body's vulnerabilities, and develop the practices that will ultimately transform our troubled relationship with our bodies to one of honor and joy. A practical resource, Honoring the Body weaves together scripture, history, and lively stories that can help us recover and sustain an appreciation for ourselves as physical beings.
The Essential Book of Gay Manners & Etiquette
Steven Petrow With intelligence, understanding, and humor, a prominent gay writer expertly details the intricacies of appropriate gay male behavior.
PFLAG Cookies
PFLAG
Cartographies of Desire: Male-Male Sexuality in Japanese Discourse, 1600-1950
Gregory M. Pflugfelder In this sweeping study of the mapping and remapping of male-male sexuality over four centuries of Japanese history, Gregory Pflugfelder explores the languages of medicine, law, and popular culture from the seventeenth century through the American Occupation.

Pflugfelder opens with fascinating speculations about how an Edo translator might grapple with a twentieth-century text on homosexuality, then turns to law, literature, newspaper articles, medical tracts, and other sources to discover Japanese attitudes toward sexuality over the centuries. During each of three major eras, he argues, one field dominated discourse on male-male sexual relations: popular culture in the Edo period (1600-1868), jurisprudence in the Meiji period (1868-1912), and medicine in the twentieth century.

This multidisciplinary and theoretically engaged analysis will interest not only students and scholars of Japan but also readers of gay studies, literary studies, gender studies, and cultural studies.
Homophobia: A Weapon of Sexism
Suzanne Pharr
An Asian Minor: The True Story of Ganymede
Felice Picano
All of a Sudden
Jack Pierson The hardcover classic back in paperback, with a brand-new surprise cover design by Patrick Li!
The Pink Triangle: The Nazi War Against Homosexuals
Richard Plant This is the first comprehensive book in English on the fate of the homosexuals in Nazi Germany. The author, a German refugee, examines the climate and conditions that gave rise to a vicious campaign against Germany’s gays, as directed by Himmler and his SS—persecution that resulted in tens of thousands of arrests and thousands of deaths.

In this Nazi crusade, homosexual prisoners were confined to death camps where, forced to wear pink triangles, they constituted the lowest rung in the camp hierarchy. The horror of camp life is described through diaries, previously untranslated documents, and interviews with and letters from survivors, revealing how the anti-homosexual campaign was conducted, the crackpot homophobic fantasies that fueled it, the men who made it possible, and those who were its victims, this chilling book sheds light on a corner of twentieth-century history that has been hidden in the shadows much too long.
The Catholic: 2
David Plante
A Family and Friend's Guide to Sexual Orientation: Bridging the Divide Between Gay and Straight
Bob Powers When it comes to sexual orientation, most families operate in a "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" environment. A Family and Friend's Guide to Sexual Orientation helps individuals and families to bridge the divide between gay and straight, to heal the wounds that often accompany individuals and families negative feelings about lesbians, gay men, bisexuals, and transgendered persons.

Consisting of thirty stories by individuals who have come to accept (and who have embraced) their own sexuality, twelve of the stories are by heterosexuals who, in addition to talking about their own sexuality, speak of the homosexuality of a loved one. The stories focus on each individual's life history, the development of their negative attitudes toward differing sexual orientations, and how they moved beyond these attitudes. In addition, the book includes five stories from two families: A gay father, his ex-wife and daughter; and a father who is a Rabbi and his lesbian daughter. These stories offer striking insights into the family dynamics relating to the homosexuality of a family member, and how families can work together to achieve a place of compassion and acceptance.
Arena of Masculinity: Sports, Homosexuality, and the Meaning of Sex
Brian Pronger Sports are perhaps the most visible expression of the ideals of masculinity in our society, and figure as a training ground on which young boys are taught what it means to be a man. Given the involvement of sports with masculinity, the homosexual athlete becomes a paradox, and the recent explosive growth of gay sporting leagues, a puzzle.

Pronger explores the paradoxical position of the gay athlete in a straight sporting world, examines the homoerotic undercurrent subliminally present in the masculine struggle of sports, and explicates the growth of gay sports in the framework of the developing gay culture.
Brokeback Mountain: Now a Major Motion Picture
Annie Proulx Annie Proulx has written some of the most original and brilliant short stories in contemporary literature, and for many readers and reviewers, "Brokeback Mountain" is her masterpiece.

Ennis del Mar and Jack Twist, two ranch hands, come together when they're working as sheepherder and camp tender one summer on a range above the tree line. At first, sharing an isolated tent, the attraction is casual, inevitable, but something deeper catches them that summer.

Both men work hard, marry, and have kids because that's what cowboys do. But over the course of many years and frequent separations this relationship becomes the most important thing in their lives, and they do anything they can to preserve it.

The New Yorker won the National Magazine Award for Fiction for its publication of "Brokeback Mountain," and the story was included in Prize Stories 1998: The O. Henry Awards. In gorgeous and haunting prose, Proulx limns the difficult, dangerous affair between two cowboys that survives everything but the world's violent intolerance.
Ferrari Guides Gay Travel A to Z: The World of Gay & Lesbian Travel Options at Your Fingertips (Ferrari's Places of Interest)
FERRARI PUBLICAIONS, Ferrari International Over 20,000 entries in 86 countries including 725 US cities and over 1700 cities worldwide with everything you need to know about gay and lesbian travel worldwide, including accommodations, nightlife, restaurants, retail stores, tours & cruises. The clear, easy-to-read format is designed for pleasurable browsing through travel options like tours, cruises, and special events. A 35-page index lists every destination and activity offered by the over 350 tour operators listed. A Trip and Event calendar contains over 1000 entries. Throughout the city-by-city listings, feature articles and FYI sidebars highlight points of gay interest around the globe.
Dykeversions: Lesbian Short Fiction
Price Stern Sloan Publishing A celebration of lesbian lives; original short fiction by talented writers.
Monsieur Venus (Decadence from Dedalus)
Rachilde, Liz Heron
Different Daughters: A Book by Mothers of Lesbians
Louise Rafkin Coming out to Mom is a lesbian rite of passage. In the third edition of this landmark anthology, 34 remarkable women face their fears and confusion, prejudice and misunderstandings, and speak honestly and bravely about the difficulties and joys of life with their “different daughters.” Among the topics of discussion are family, community, religion, grandchildren, bisexuality, transgenderism, and coming out.
Barbie's Queer Accessories (Series Q)
Erica Rand She’s skinny, white, and blond. She’s Barbie—an icon of femininity to generations of American girls. She’s also multiethnic and straight—or so says Mattel, Barbie’s manufacturer. But, as Barbie’s Queer Accessories demonstrates, many girls do things with Barbie never seen in any commercial. Erica Rand looks at the corporate marketing strategies used to create Barbie’s versatile (She’s a rapper! She’s an astronaut! She’s a bride!) but nonetheless premolded and still predominantly white image. Rand weighs the values Mattel seeks to embody in Barbie—evident, for example, in her improbably thin waist and her heterosexual partner—against the naked, dyked out, transgendered, and trashed versions favored by many juvenile owners and adult collectors of the doll.

Rand begins by focusing on the production and marketing of Barbie, starting in 1959, including Mattel’s numerous tie-ins and spin-offs. These variations, which include the much-promoted multiethnic Barbies and the controversial Earring Magic Ken, helped make the doll one of the most profitable toys on the market. In lively chapters based on extensive interviews, the author discusses adult testimony from both Barbie "survivors" and enthusiasts and explores how memories of the doll fit into women’s lives. Finally, Rand looks at cultural reappropriations of Barbie by artists, collectors, and especially lesbians and gay men, and considers resistance to Barbie as a form of social and political activism.

Illustrated with photographs of various interpretations and alterations of Barbie, this book encompasses both Barbie glorification and abjection as it testifies to the irrefutably compelling qualities of this bestselling toy. Anyone who has played with Barbie—or, more importantly, thought or worried about playing with Barbie—will find this book fascinating.
Dancing on Tisha b'Av
Lev Raphael
Dancing on Tisha B'av
Lev Raphael
The Life and Adventures of Lyle Clemens: A Novel
John Rechy From the author of the classic City of Night comes a captivating, wickedly entertaining novel in which an irrepressible young hero is set loose in the religious-fundamentalist world of Texas, the gambling palaces of Las Vegas, and the enticing mythos of Los Angeles

The internationally renowned novelist recently described by Gore Vidal as "one of the few original writers of the last century" re-creates himself yet again with a witty bildungsroman that pays homage to the classic eighteenth-century picaresque. Loosely inspired by Fielding’s Tom Jones, it sends the charming, handsome Lyle Clemens on an adventure from fundamentalist Texas to the contemporary wilderness of Los Angeles.

Raised in Texas, the son of a Miss America aspirant and an unknown father, Lyle Clemens approaches adulthood and notices that everyone wants him to be something he’s not. His beautiful mother wants to make him into the cowboy who abandoned her; a group of avaricious fundamentalists plot to convert him into "the Lord’s Cowboy"; and the lovely Maria wants him to fulfill her varying fantasies of "true love." When Lyle leaves home to make his own destiny, he encounters a gallery of charlatans and wistful souls, quirky gamblers, dreamy showgirls, wily pornographers, and fake magicians; and is seduced into an aging starlet’s mad comeback scheme during a rambunctious Academy Awards ceremony. Through it all, Lyle becomes himself. The Life and Adventures of Lyle Clemens is a hilarious, bittersweet, and wise book that establishes once again John Rechy’s great storytelling gifts.
In the Tent
David Rees
The Best Little Boy in the World
John Reid, Andrew Tobias The classic account of growing up gay in America.
"The best little boy in the world never had wet dreams or masturbated; he always topped his class, honored mom and dad, deferred to elders and excelled in sports . . . . The best little boy in the world was . . . the model IBM exec . . . The best little boy in the world was a closet case who 'never read anything about homosexuality.' . . . John Reid comes out slowly, hilariously, brilliantly. One reads this utterly honest account with the shock of recognition." The New York Times
"The quality of this book is fantastic because it comes of equal parts honesty and logic and humor. It is far from being the story of a Gay crusader, nor is it the story of a closet queen. It is the story of a normal boy growing into maturity without managing to get raped into, or taunted because of, his homosexuality. . . . He is bright enough to be aware of his hangups and the reasons for them. And he writes well enough that he doesn't resort to sensationalism . . . ." San Francisco Bay Area Reporter
Blind Items: A (Love) Story
Matthew Rettenmund In this hilarious romp through gay New York, author Matthew Rettenmund once again delivers with acerbic wit, dead-on dialogue, and perfect pop culture references. This time, a lonely magazine editor has fallen for a TV star hunk, who, unfortunately, must remain firmly in the closet or risk his career. Which will win out, true love or shallow fame? Rettenmund answers the question with verve and attitude, in this wonderful second novel of love and loss in modern Manhattan.
The Gay and Lesbian Guide to College Life (College Admissions Guides)
Princeton Review Featuring advice from students and administrators at more than seventy of the nation’s top colleges, the Gay and Lesbian Guide to College Life lets you know how to how to thrive on campus as a lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, and/or questioning student. Including tons of student testimonials and dozens of parent tips, the Gay and Lesbian Guide to College Life offers no-nonsense guidance to LGBT students, their families, and allies on how to make the most of their college experience. Learn how you can:

·Find an LGBT-friendly school 

·Evaluate administrative policies related to LGBT student life 

·Deal with homo/bi/transphobia on campus 

·Participate in LGBT student activism 

·Get support for your health and safety needs 

·Fully integrate yourself into the campus community
On Lies Secrets and Silence: Selected Prose 1966-1978
Adrienne Rich
Blood, Bread, and Poetry: Selected Prose 1979-1985
Adrienne Rich
The Dream of a Common Language: Poems, 1974-1977
Adrienne Cecile Rich
k.d. lang: Carrying the Torch (Candadian Biography Series)
William Robertson Since the release of her first album, a truly western experience in 1984, k.d. lang has galvanized listeners with her amazing voice, while battling for a place in the music industry and fighting off prejudice against her appearance and attitude. This compelling biography explores everything from her tomboy girlhood in Consort, Alberta, through her entry into show business and the making of her first five albums and her first film, to her move away from country music to easy listening jazz and adult-oriented pop.
The queens' vernacular;: A gay lexicon
Bruce Rodgers
Fag Hag: 6 (Plume Fiction)
Robert Rodi
Closet Case: A Novel
Robert Rodi
Ship Of Fools
Christine Peri Rossi Sex and power are dominant themes in this innovative novel by a major femisnist writer, an exile from Uruguay now living in Spain.
Evolution's Rainbow: Diversity, Gender, and Sexuality in Nature and People
Joan Roughgarden In this innovative celebration of diversity and affirmation of individuality in animals and humans, Joan Roughgarden challenges accepted wisdom about gender identity and sexual orientation. A distinguished evolutionary biologist, Roughgarden takes on the medical establishment, the Bible, social science—and even Darwin himself. She leads the reader through a fascinating discussion of diversity in gender and sexuality among fish, reptiles, amphibians, birds, and mammals, including primates. Evolution's Rainbow explains how this diversity develops from the action of genes and hormones and how people come to differ from each other in all aspects of body and behavior. Roughgarden reconstructs primary science in light of feminist, gay, and transgender criticism and redefines our understanding of sex, gender, and sexuality. Witty, playful, and daring, this book will revolutionize our understanding of sexuality. 

Roughgarden argues that principal elements of Darwinian sexual selection theory are false and suggests a new theory that emphasizes social inclusion and control of access to resources and mating opportunity. She disputes a range of scientific and medical concepts, including Wilson's genetic determinism of behavior, evolutionary psychology, the existence of a gay gene, the role of parenting in determining gender identity, and Dawkins's "selfish gene" as the driver of natural selection. She dares social science to respect the agency and rationality of diverse people; shows that many cultures across the world and throughout history accommodate people we label today as lesbian, gay, and transgendered; and calls on the Christian religion to acknowledge the Bible's many passages endorsing diversity in gender and sexuality. Evolution's Rainbow concludes with bold recommendations for improving education in biology, psychology, and medicine; for democratizing genetic engineering and medical practice; and for building a public monument to affirm diversity as one of our nation's defining principles.
Self Made Men: Identity, Embodiment and Recognition Among Transsexual Men
Henry Rubin In Self-Made Men, Henry Rubin explores the production of male identities in the lives of twenty-two FTM transsexuals—people who have changed their sex from female to male. The author relates the compelling personal narratives of his subjects to the historical emergence of FTM as an identity category.

In the interviews that form the heart of the book, the FTMs speak about their struggles to define themselves and their diverse experiences, from the pressures of gender conformity in adolescence to being mistaken for "butch lesbians," from hormone treatments and surgeries to relationships with families, partners, and acquaintances. Their stories of feeling betrayed by their bodies and of undergoing a "second puberty" are vivid and thought-provoking. Throughout the interviews, the subjects' claims to having "core male identities" are remarkably consistent and thus challenge anti-essentialist assumptions in current theories of gender, embodiment, and identity.

Rubin uses two key methods to analyze and interpret his findings. Adapting Foucault's notions of genealogy, he highlights the social construction of gender categories and identities. His account of the history of endocrinology and medical technologies for transforming bodies demonstrates that the "family resemblance" between transsexuals and intersexuals was a necessary postulate for medical intervention into the lives of the emerging FTMs. The book also explores the historical emergence of the category of FTM transsexual as distinguished from the category of lesbian woman and the resultant "border disputes" over identity between the two groups. Rubin complements this approach with phenomenological concepts that stress the importance of lived experience and the individual's capacity for knowledge and action.

An important contribution to several fields, including sociology of the body, gender and masculinity, human development, and the history of science, Self-Made Men will be of interest to anyone who has seriously pondered what it means to be a man and how men become men.
The Riddle of Gender
Deborah Rudacille When Deborah Rudacille learned that a close friend had decided to transition from female to male, she felt compelled to understand why. 

Coming at the controversial subject of transsexualism from several angles–historical, sociological, psychological, medical–Rudacille discovered that gender variance is anything but new, that changing one’s gender has been met with both acceptance and hostility through the years, and that gender identity, like sexual orientation, appears to be inborn, not learned, though in some people the sex of the body does not match the sex of the brain. 

Informed not only by meticulous research, but also by the author’s interviews with prominent members of the transgender community, The Riddle of Gender is a sympathetic and wise look at a sexual revolution that calls into question many of our most deeply held assumptions about what it means to be a man, a woman, and a human being.
Outlander
Jane Rule
This Is Not for You
Jane Rule
The Celluloid Closet: Homosexuality in the Movies
Vito Russo Praised by the Chicago Tribune as "an impressive study" and written with incisive wit and searing perception—the definitive, highly acclaimed landmark work on the portrayal of homosexuality in film.
The Celluloid Closet: Homosexuality in the Movies
Vito Russo Praised by the Chicago Tribune as "an impressive study" and written with incisive wit and searing perception—the definitive, highly acclaimed landmark work on the portrayal of homosexuality in film.
The New Gay Book of Lists
Leigh W. Rutledge
Sex Between Men: An Intimate History of the Sex Lives of Gay Men Postwar to Present
Douglas Sadownick From the liberating discovery of "buddies" in the World War II trenches to the brutal repression of the '50s, from the heady possibilities that emerged in the wake of the Stonewall uprising to the hedonistic lovefests and ecstatic extremes of the baths and sex clubs of the '70s, and finally from the psychical and emotional carnage of the AIDS-plagued '80s to the '90s sex clubs, Douglas Sadownick provides a full-scale psychosocial analysis of the sexual behavior of gay men. Combining personal testimony, thoughtful commentary and glimpses of social history from archival material, Sex Between Men puts the sex back in homosexual.
The Great Mirror of Male Love
Ihara Saikaku
Coming To Power: Writing and Graphics on Lesbian S/M 3rd Edition, Revised and Updated
Samois
Coming To Power: Writing and Graphics on Lesbian S/M 3rd Edition, Revised and Updated
Samois
Bowie: Loving The Alien
Christopher Sandford Based on interviews with family members, colleagues, lovers, and the previously silent William Burroughs, this unsparing yet evenhanded biography guides the reader through the many personas, crises, and musical metamorphoses of David Bowie—also known as Davy Jones, the Laughing Gnome, Major Tom, Ziggy Stardust, Aladdin Sane, the Thin White Duke, a drug-addled grandfather of punk, actor, art aficionado, political activist, one of rock's most resonant icons, and a totem of modern pop culture. Nowhere else is the man and musician so convincingly deconstructed and so compellingly humanized.
The Touch Typist (Diva Books)
Helen Sandler A novel about sanity, secrets and cybersex. Joss has a nice lover, a nasty neighbour and a job on a pointless magazine. She has the kind of pals who go camping for the weekend and wind up lying in a field getting stoned. They don't know she has another life on-line, where she meets women for cyber fun. But one friend does know-one friend who would like nothing better than "a private chat" with Joss. And it's her best friend's girlfriend. A funny and involving story about 21st Century urban dykes.

Helen Sandler is the editor of Diva books and wrote the best selling erotic novel Big Deal (Sapphire).
The Emerging Lesbian: Female Same-Sex Desire in Modern China (Worlds of Desire: The Chicago Series on Sexuality, Gender, and Culture)
Tze-Lan D. Sang In early twentieth-century China, age-old traditions of homosocial and homoerotic relationships between women suddenly became an issue of widespread public concern. Discussed formerly in terms of friendship and sisterhood, these relationships came to be associated with feminism, on the one hand, and psychobiological perversion, on the other—a radical shift whose origins have long been unclear.

In this first ever book-length study of Chinese lesbians, Tze-lan D. Sang convincingly ties the debate over female same-sex love in China to the emergence of Chinese modernity. As women's participation in social, economic, and political affairs grew, Sang argues, so too did the societal significance of their romantic and sexual relations. Focusing especially on literature by or about women-preferring women, Sang traces the history of female same-sex relations in China from the late imperial period (1600-1911) through the Republican era (1912-1949). She ends by examining the reemergence of public debate on lesbians in China after Mao and in Taiwan after martial law, including the important roles played by globalization and identity politics.
The World Unseen
Shamim Sarif In 1950's South Africa, free-spirited Amina has broken all the rules of her own conventional Indian community, and the new apartheid-led government, by running a café with Jacob her 'coloured' business partner. When she meets Miriam, a young wife and mother, their unexpected attraction pushes Miriam to question the rules that bind her and a chain of events is set in motion that changes both women forever. The World Unseen transports us to a vibrant, colourful world, a world that divides white from black and women from men, but one that might just allow an unexpected love to survive.
I Can't Think Straight
Shamim Sarif Tala, a London-based Palestinian, is preparing for her elaborate Middle Eastern wedding when she meets Leyla, a young British Indian woman who is dating her best friend. Spirited Christian Tala and shy Muslim Leyla could not be more different from each other, but the attraction is immediate and goes deeper than friendship. But Tala is not ready to accept the implications of the choice her heart has made for her and escapes back to Jordan, while Leyla tries to move on with her new-found life, to the shock of her tradition-loving parents. As Tala's wedding day approaches, simmering tensions come to boiling point and the pressure mounts for Tala to be true to herself. Moving between the vast enclaves of Middle Eastern high society and the stunning backdrop of London's West End, I Can't Think Straight explores the clashes between East and West, love and marriage, conventions and individuality, creating a humorous and tender story of unexpected love and unusual freedoms.
Pictures and Passions: A History of Homosexuality in the Visual Arts
James M. Saslow The first complete history of gay and lesbian visual expression in all media, from the dawn of time to the present day—massive, fascinating, beautiful

As spectacular in its appearance as in its depth and range— encompassing works of all genres in all ages on gay themes, by gay artists, or for gay patrons—Pictures and Passions supersedes more narrowly focused studies. Following an Introduction that discusses the sexual and artistic practices of prehistoric and early societies, Pictures and Passions examines the classical world's visual celebration of homoerotic love and how its status among the Greeks permeated later civilizations as an emblem of lost Arcadian ideals. The pictorial denigration and satire of the Middle Ages give way to the dawning tolerance of male beauty and affection in the Renaissance, then to eighteenth- and nineteenth-century economic and social transitions that stimulated the emergence of modern homosexual identity and cultural institutions, and finally to the flowering of modern homosexual art.

Throughout, gay and lesbian art and experience are seen in a broad context that includes non-Western cultures (with an entire chapter on Asia and Islam); traditional media such as painting, sculpture, architecture, and graphics; and modern commercial and mass media such as magazines, photography, and advertising. Pictures and Passions is a groundbreaking work of nuanced scholarship in a lucid and engaging idiom that will appeal to general readers, students, artists, and sophisticated gift givers.
Escape from Intimacy: Untangling the ``Love'' Addictions: Sex, Romance, Relationships
Anne Wilson Schaef Schaef applies the addictions of sex, love, romance, and relationships to her broader addiction theory and clearly defines and contrasts the relationship addictions.
The Last Time I Wore A Dress
Daphne Scholinski This terrifying memoir recounts author Daphne Scholinski's three years spent in mental institutions for, among other things, Gender Identity Disorder. Daphne came from a busted home: Mom left to go to college and become a feminist and an artist; Dad stayed home with two daughters, the elder of whom, Daphne, he often beat. When Daphne started acting up at school, her shrinks decided to put her away. Her family, not knowing how to handle her, agreed. Because she was a tomboy who wore jeans and T-shirts and didn't act enough like a girl, her treatment, in addition to talk therapy, isolation, and drugs, required her to wear makeup, walk with a swing in her hips, and pretend to be obsessed with boys. This sounds awful enough, but when you realize that the confinement and treatment took place from 1981 to 1984, it's absolutely chilling. This book is both a powerful indictment of Gender Identity Disorder treatment and an inspiring testament of one person's survival.
Trying Hard to Hear You
Sandra Scoppettone
I'll Be Leaving You Always
Sandra Scoppettone "The work of a fine writer coming into her own...Laurano is an appealing character whose most natural responses are warmth and humor."

THE WASHINGTON POST BOOK WORLD

In this sequel to EVERYTHING YOU HAVE IS MINE, Lauren's closest friend Megan is killed hours after a hold up of her Greenwich Village jewelry store, and Lauren soon discovers how little she knew about her friend's life. Hired by one of Megan's many ex-husbands to investigate, Lauren takes a microscope to a life she thought she knew intimately and finds a secret world of deception and danger. As Lauren moves closer to the solution to Megan's murder, she uncovers some unpleasant truths about herself—and realizes how much she needs a little help from her friends....

An Alternate Selection of the Book-of-the-Month Club
Trying Hard to Hear You
Sandra Scoppettone
Barrel Fever: Stories and Essays
David Sedaris A collection of stories and essays by humorist and NPR commentator David Sedaris based upon his own experiences and the hidden perversity that can be found in Anytown, U.S.A. Here are images and blasphemies that nice people don't dare look at—blatantly exposed and told with the clear, casual voice of intimate knowledge. Sedaris' humor is born of compassion and his tales range from the sharing of cheery Christmas letters featuring infanticide, to experiences of the Gay and Famous (Charlton Heston and Elizabeth Dole, for example), to the lives of siblings named Hope, Faith, Charity and Adolph and to alcoholics and chain smokers you can laugh with.
Naked
David Sedaris Hip radio comedy fans and theater folks who belong to the cult of Obie-winning playwright/performer David Sedaris must kill to get this book. These would be fans of the scaldingly snide Sedaris's hilariously described personal misadventures like The Santaland Diaries (a monologue about his work as an elf to a department store Santa) seen off-Broadway in 1997. In a series of similarly textured essays, Sedaris takes us along on his catastrophic detours through a nudist colony, a fruit-packing plant, his own childhood, and a dozen more of the world's little purgatories.
Funny Boy: A Novel
Shyam Selvadurai Coming of age as the son of a middle-class Sri Lankan family, Arjie finds his childhood games giving way to a realization that he is gay, in a gentle and humorous story set against a backdrop of growing racial tension and civil unrest.
Whipping Girl: A Transsexual Woman on Sexism and the Scapegoating of Femininity
Julia Serano A provocative manifesto, Whipping Girl tells the powerful story of Julia Serano, a transsexual woman whose supremely intelligent writing reflects her diverse background as a lesbian transgender activist and professional biologist. Serano shares her experiences and observations — both pre- and post-transition — to reveal the ways in which fear, suspicion, and dismissiveness toward femininity shape our societal attitudes toward trans women, as well as gender and sexuality as a whole. 

Serano's well-honed arguments stem from her ability to bridge the gap between the often-disparate biological and social perspectives on gender. She exposes how deep-rooted the cultural belief is that femininity is frivolous, weak, and passive, and how this “feminine” weakness exists only to attract and appease male desire. 

In addition to debunking popular misconceptions about transsexuality, Serano makes the case that today's feminists and transgender activist must work to embrace and empower femininity — in all of its wondrous forms.
Gay Bombay: Globalization, Love and (Be)longing in Contemporary India
Parmesh Shahani Using a combination of multi-sited ethnography, textual analysis, historical documentation analysis, and memoir writing, the author provides macro and micro perspectives on what it means to be a gay man located in Gay Bombay at a particular point in time. Specifically, he explores what being gay means to members of Gay Bombay and how they negotiate locality and globalization, their sense of identity as well as a feeling of community within its online/offline world. On a broader level, he critically examines the formulation and reconfiguration of contemporary Indian gayness in the light of its emergent cultural, media, and political alliances. 

Key Features Offers an exciting path breaking ethnography, which combines a large macro sweep with an intensely personal narrative. The author's memories flow in and out of the main narrative to create a distinct reading experience.Presents a unique and timely look at urban contemporary Indian sexualityProvides an integrated approach that illuminates how new media technologies, the media industry, audiences, and broader socio-historical contexts shape gay identity in contemporary urban IndiaGives a different perspective on globalization in post-liberalization urban India, as India re-positions itself as a global superpower. How are its minorities being treated? How are they asserting themselves in this new imagination of the nation-state?Weaves in personal experience that helps us understand male same-sex desire in relation to customary experiences in a city like Bombay
Four Tragedies: Hamlet, Othello, King Lear, Macbeth (Bantam Classic)
William Shakespeare Hamlet

One of the most famous plays of all time, the compelling tragedy of the young prince of Denmark who must reconcile his longing for oblivion with his duty to avenge his father’s murder is one of Shakespeare’s greatest works. The ghost, Ophelia’s death and burial, the play within a play, and the breathtaking swordplay are just some of the elements that make Hamlet a masterpiece of the theater.

Othello

This great tragedy of unsurpassed intensity and emotion is played out against Renaissance splendor. The doomed marriage of Desdemona to the Moor Othello is the focus of a storm of tension, incited by the consummately evil villain Iago, that culminates in one of the most deeply moving scenes in theatrical history.

King Lear

Here is the famous and moving tragedy of a king who foolishly divides his kingdom between his two wicked daughters and estranges himself from the young daughter who loves him–a theatrical spectacle of outstanding proportions.

Macbeth

No dramatist has ever seen with more frightening clarity into the heart and mind of a murderer than has Shakespeare in this brilliant and bloody tragedy of evil. Taunted into asserting his “masculinity” by his ambitious wife, Macbeth chooses to embrace the Weird Sisters’ prophecy and kill his king–and thus, seals his own doom.

Each Edition Includes:

• Comprehensive explanatory notes 

• Vivid introductions and the most up-to-date scholarship 

• Clear, modernized spelling and punctuation, enabling contemporary readers to understand the Elizabethan English

• Completely updated, detailed bibliographies and performance histories 

• An interpretive essay on film adaptations of the play, along with an extensive filmography
The Crimson Letter: Harvard, Homosexuality, and the Shaping of American Culture
Douglass Shand-Tucci In a book deeply impressive in its reach while also deeply embedded in its storied setting, bestselling historian Douglass Shand-Tucci explores the nature and expression of sexual identity at America’s oldest university during the years of its greatest influence. The Crimson Letter follows the gay experience at Harvard in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, focusing upon students, faculty, alumni, and hangers-on who struggled to find their place within the confines of Harvard Yard and in the society outside.

Walt Whitman and Oscar Wilde were the two dominant archetypes for gay undergraduates of the later nineteenth century. One was the robust praise-singer of American democracy, embraced at the start of his career by Ralph Waldo Emerson; the other was the Oxbridge aesthete whose visit to Harvard in 1882 became part of the university’s legend and lore, and whose eventual martyrdom was a cautionary tale. Shand-Tucci explores the dramatic and creative oppositions and tensions between the Whitmanic and the Wildean, the warrior poet and the salon dazzler, and demonstrates how they framed the gay experience at Harvard and in the country as a whole.

The core of this book, however, is a portrait of a great university and its community struggling with the full implications of free inquiry. Harvard took very seriously its mission to shape the minds and bodies of its charges, who came from and were expected to perpetuate the nation’s elite, yet struggled with the open expression of their sexual identities, which it alternately accepted and anathematized. Harvard believed it could live up to the Oxbridge model, offering a sanctuary worthy of the classical Greek ideals of male association, yet somehow remain true to its legacy of respectable austerity and Puritan self-denial.

The Crimson Letter therefore tells stories of great unhappiness and manacled minds, as well as stories of triumphant activism and fulfilled promise. Shand-Tucci brilliantly exposes the secrecy and codes that attended the gay experience, showing how their effects could simultaneously thwart and spark creativity. He explores in particular the question of gay sensibility and its effect upon everything from symphonic music to football, set design to statecraft, poetic theory to skyscrapers.

The Crimson Letter combines the learned and the lurid, tragedy and farce, scandal and vindication, and figures of world renown as well as those whose influence extended little farther than Harvard Square. Here is an engrossing account of a university transforming and transformed by those passing through its gates, and of their enduring impact upon American culture.
The Mayor of Castro Street: The Life and Times of Harvey Milk
Randy Shilts When Randy Shilts's The Mayor of Castro Street appeared in 1982, the very idea of a gay political biography was brand-new. While biographies of literary and artistic figures (both living and dead) were a popular genre, there had been no openly gay political figure who merited a full-length book. Harvey Milk—a gay political organizer who became the first openly gay city supervisor in San Francisco and was then assassinated (along with liberal mayor George Moscone)—was the obvious choice for such a book. And Randy Shilts—a young reporter who had risen up through the gay press to become the first openly gay reporter with a gay "beat" in the American mainstream press—was the perfect person to write it. While his later works such as And the Band Played On and Conduct Unbecoming were based on hard-hitting, fact-driven reportage, Shilts's tone in The Mayor of Castro Street is softer, more focused on the narrative of Harvey Milk's political rise from running a small business on Castro Street, to organizing local gay men and lesbians around grass-roots issues, to winning an elected office. But in many ways this is also a forceful and engaging story of the gay rights movement in the second half of the 20th century. Thus, Shilts follows the growth of the Castro as a gay neighborhood and the growth of San Francisco's gay community from a ragtag collection of people who socialized and sexualized together into a vibrant and political force. —Michael Bronski
Conduct Unbecoming: Gays and Lesbians in the U.S. Military
Randy Shilts
The Black and White of It
Ann Allen Shockley
Not Like Other Boys
Christopher Shyer, Marlene Fanta Shyer This frank memoir chronicles the long journey mother and son took from shame and concealment to acceptance and love. In alternating voices, this poignant book describes the parallel lives of a mother and son during the painful years that they kept silent, even though they both suspected that Chris was gay. Chris tells of his ongoing struggle to change his sexual orientation, and Marlene's attempt to control her son's sexual future.
Queer in America: Sex, the Media, and the Closets of Power
Michelangelo Signorile In this tenth-anniversary edition, journalist Michelangelo Signorile updates his classic Queer in America, the bestseller that exposed the hypocrisy and prejudice that pervade mainstream American institutions. This third edition includes a new preface and a new chapter with an eye-opening critique of present-day America and its attitude toward gays and lesbians.
On Sunset Boulevard: The Life and Times of Billy Wilder
Ed Sikov
Lesbian Quotations
Rosemary Silva
The New Civil War: The Lesbian and Gay Struggle for Civil Rights (The Lesbian and Gay Experience)
Diane Silver
Piece of My Heart: A Lesbian of Colour Anthology
Makeda Silvera
Openly Bob
Bob Smith As an openly gay comic, Bob Smith broke barriers with an appearance on "The Tonight Show." Now Smith offers up his own original, whine-free perspective on being grown up and gay.In OPENLY BOB, the acclaimed comedian candidly, and humorously, tackles issues facing grown-up gays as they make their place in an overwhelmingly straight society. From bringing your boyfriend home to your father's funeral, to being the only gay couple at a family wedding, to surviving couples counseling, Smith's decidedly wry spin on the events of our lives resonates with keen observation and hilarious truth."So Mom says to me on the phone, 'Just because you're coming home for your father's funeral doesn't mean we can't have fun!'"Sex education, meteor showers, lesbian ventriloquist dummies, fleamarket shopping, body piercing, pot -smoking drag queens, environmental correctness, Judgment Day, Samuel Beckett, Newt Gingrich, Coco Chanel, Sigmund Freud—nothing and no one escapes Smith's incisive eye in this very human collection of comic essays.
Counter Play: 2
Anne Snyder
Counter Play: 2
Anne Snyder
Nureyev: His Life
Diane Solway Everyone knows the name Rudolf Nureyev, but does anyone know the man behind the myth? Diane Solway does; she spent over four years and conducted more than 200 interviews with his family, his friends and lovers, his colleagues, and even his doctors to research Nureyev: His Life the first book to capture him as he was onstage and off — a great artist whose talent was matched only by his steely will to succeed.

Here is his professional career: his famed partnership with Margot Fonteyn, his personal transformation of the Royal Ballet and the Paris Opera Ballet, his impact on dance companies all over the world, his collaborations with Martha Graham and Paul Taylor, and, behind all his accomplishments, the athletic grace and profound understanding that was his gift of genius. Here, too, is the private Nureyev: his Soviet childhood, his inner demons, the men and women who were willing to devote their lives to him. Solway chronicles his flamboyant, extravagant lifestyle, his celebrity-studded circle of friends — Jacqueline Onassis, Andy Warhol, and Marlene Dietrich, to name only three — his stormy love affairs, his homosexual promiscuity, and his death from AIDS in 1993.

Nureyev was his own masterpiece, a man always in the process of reinventing himself. Diane Solway's superb biography is as brilliant and as fascinating as the dazzling dancer at center stage.
Des Beurettes aux descendantes d'immigrants nord-africains (Partage du savoir)
Nacira Guenif Souilamas
The Kindness of Strangers
Donald Spoto
All About All About Eve: The Complete Behind-the-Scenes Story of the Bitchiest Film Ever Made!
Sam Staggs To millions of fans, All About Eve represents all that's witty and wonderful in classic Hollywood movies. Its old-fashioned, larger-than-life stars—including Bette Davis, Marilyn Monroe, Anne Baxter, George Sanders, and Celeste Holm—foudn their best roles in Eve and its sophisticated dialogue has entered the lexicon.

But there's much more to know about All About Eve. Sam Staggs has written the definitive account of the making of this fascinating movie and its enormous incluence on both film and popular culture. Staggs reveals everything about the movie—from the famous European actress Margo Channing was based on to the hot-blooded romance on-set between Bette Davis and costar Gary Merrill, from the jump-start the movie gave Marilyn Monroe's career to the capstone it put on director Joseph L. Mankeiwicz's.

All About "All About Eve" is not only full of rich detail about the movie, the director, and the stars, but also about the audience who loved it when it came out and adore it to this day.
Forbidden Channels: The Truth They Hide from TV Guide
Penny Stallings
Gays and the Military
Joseph Steffan, Marc Wolinsky, Richard B. Cheney, United States District Court (DST) In April 1987 Joseph C. Steffan, one of the ten highest ranking midshipmen in his class at the U.S. Naval Academy, and only six weeks from graduation, was denied his diploma and forced to resign his commission because he answered "Yes, sir" to the question, "I'd like your word, are you a homosexual?" Six years later his cause, and that of other gay men and lesbians seeking to serve their country by enlistment in the military, has become the subject of intense national controversy. This unusual and innovative work, based on the litigation strategy and court papers filed in the case of Joseph C. Steffan v. Richard Cheney, Secretary of Defense, et al., brings the resources of clinical psychiatry, clinical and social psychology, cultural history and political science to bear upon the fundamental questions at issue: How is sexual orientation determined? How and why have socially prejudiced stereotypes about male and female homosexuals developed? Why have gays faced special obstacles in defending themselves against discrimination? How much political power do gays have?

Marc Wolinsky and Kenneth Sherrill argue that gays constitute a politically powerless class that has been unjustly deprived of its constitutional right to equal protection under the law. They have collected here the affidavits filed on behalf of Joseph Steffan in his suit against the United States government, together with the counter-arguments of the Department of Defense and the extraordinary opinion of the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia. Whatever the outcome of the case, presently on appeal to the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, this book will stand as a lasting and indispensable guide to the sources of sexual discrimination.
Moving Beyond Words: Age, Rage, Sex, Power, Money, Muscles: Breaking the Boundries of Gender
Gloria Steinem From one of the most influential women in the country and bestselling author of Revolution from Within comes a collection of provocative, entertaining, mind-changing essays. The six pieces, three of which have never been published before, explode common assumptions and propose radical new ways of looking at human possibilities.
Controversies in Feminism
James P. Sterba Feminism was born in controversy and it continues to flourish in controversy. The distinguished contributors to this volume provide an array of perspectives on issues including: universal values, justice and care, a feminist philosophy of science, and the relationship of biology to social theory.
Third Man Out: A Donald Strachey Mystery (Donald Strachey Mysteries)
Richard Stevenson Which powerful mystery man killed the gay activist for outing him?

After an attempt is made on his life, Queer Nation activist John Rutka asks tough-as-nails gay private detective Don Strachey to provide him with protection. Why does someone want to kill him? The activist's efforts at outing closeted gay homophobes have earned him a multitude of enraged enemies who would just as soon see him dead. After Strachey refuses to help, the man's body is found savagely murdered in apparent retribution for his deeds. Now, because of this, the reluctant Strachey feels obligated to investigate. Third Man Out brings back one of the most popular gay heroes in mystery fiction, Don Strachey, a private investigator as hard-boiled as they come, along with his lover, Tim Callahan, in a topical and very entertaining mystery dealing with the ethical issues of outing.

The Don Strachey mysteries starring Chad Allen are now being filmed for here!, the first gay television network. Third Man Out starring Chad Allen as Don Strachey aired in September 2005.

An excerpt from Third Man Out

I almost asked John Rutka if somebody had shot him in the foot—I knew plenty of people who'd have loved to but before I could, he gave me a look of astonishment and said, "I've been shot. One of them actually shot me."

"Somebody shot you in the foot?"

"One of them tried to kill him," Eddie Sandifer said, "but they only got him in the foot."

Sandifer looked stunned too, and uncharacteristically shaky; ordinarily it was these two who inspired anger and fright, and Sandifer seemed unsure of what to make of this turn of events.

"It must have been somebody I outed," Rutka said, and looked down, appalled, at the bandaged foot. "God, they're even sicker than I thought. I knew some of them were pathetic, but this is something only a psychopath would do."

We all peered down at the foot as if it might add something on its own behalf. I'd walked over to Albany Med from Crow Street to visit yet another dying friend when I ran into Rutka and Sandifer, and we were in the parking lot outside the E.R., standing in vapors rising from the tarmac after an early evening thunderstorm. Everybody looked purple under the arc lamps, spooky in the urban miasma. Ambulances coasted in and out through the mist, the Tuesday night torn and traumatized delivered as swiftly and silently as Fed-Exed envelopes. Somebody was probably working on a way to fax them in.

Rutka's wound was to his right foot, which he lifted from the pavement a few inches, his right arm over Sandifer's shoulder for support, while he described the incident. As I listened, I tried to concentrate on the narrative and not become distracted by Rutka's wandering left eye, which, in his excitement, was now all over the place.

So Don Strachey must sift through Rutka's much sought-after files to root out the one suspect with the most to lose. Third Man Out revisits one of the wittiest, most magnetic private detectives in mystery literature, on a difficult case involving his lover Tim Callahan, murder, scandal, and the ethical issues of one of the more controversial aspects of gay activism.
A Shock to the System: A Donald Strachey Mystery (Donald Strachey Mysteries)
Richard Stevenson Donald Strachey is asked to investigate the suspicious death of Paul Haig by three different people-Haig's homophobic mother, his ex-lover, and the psychiatrist hired to "cure" him of his homosexuality. Just as he gets started, however, all three remove him from the case, leaving Strachey with a brutal murderer that now everyone wants left alone.
Gay Dads: A Celebration of Fatherhood
David Strah, Susanna Margolis The first book to feature inspiring portraits of gay men and their families from all across America.

An evolution has quietly been occurring in the world of parenting. Recent surveys reveal that millions of children have found loving homes either by being born to, or being adopted by, gay men. This book is a celebration of all these remarkable new families.

Gay Dads includes twenty-five personal accounts from men describing their unique journeys to fatherhood and the struggles and successes they have experienced as they raise their children. This is the first book to provide such an expansive exploration of this extraordinary new family unit. With beautiful black-and-white photographs of each of the families, Gay Dads is a moving tribute to familial love.

Black and white photographs by Kristen Timken.
Queer Pulp: Perverted Passions from the Golden Age of the Paperback
Susan Stryker From homicidal homos to locked-up lesbians, and almost every sexually dangerous combination in between, Queer Pulp: Perverted Passions from the Golden Age of the Paperback is the first complete expose of queer sexuality in mid-twentieth century paperbacks. Compellingly written by historian Susan Stryker, Queer Pulp gives a complete overview of the cultural, political, and economic factors involved in the boom of queer paperbacks. With chapters covering gay, lesbian, transgender, and bisexually oriented books, a lively overview of the genres, and loads of scorching paperback covers, Queer Pulp reveals the complicated and fascinating history of alternative sexual literature and book publishing. Featuring the work of well-known authors such as W. Somerset Maugham and Truman Capote to the low-brow and no-brow scribes who worked under several names, Queer Pulp is the entertaining and informative introduction to these lost, salacious literary genres.
Transgender History [TRANSGENDER HIST]
Susan(Author) Stryker
Same-Sex Marriage: Pro and Con
Andrew Sullivan With same-sex marriage igniting a firestorm of controversy in the press and in the courts, in legislative chambers and in living rooms, Andrew Sullivan, a pioneering voice in the debate, has brought together two thousand years of argument in an anthology of historic inclusiveness and evenhandedness. Among the selections included here:

- The 2003 Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court ruling in support of same-sex marriage

- Justice Kennedy’s majority opinion and Justice Scalia’s dissent in the 2003 landmark Supreme Court decision striking down anti-sodomy laws

- President George W. Bush’s call for a Federal Marriage Amendment

- John Kerry’s Senate speech urging defeat of the Defense of Marriage Act

- Harvard historian Nancy F. Cott's testimony before the Vermont House Judiciary Committee

- Reverend Peter J. Gomes on the distinction between civil and religious marriage

- Stanley Kurtz on the politics of gay marriage

- Evan Wolfson on the popularity of the right to marry among lesbians and gay men

- New York Times op-ed columnistDavid Brooks’ conservative case for same-sex marriage

- Excerpts from Genesis, Leviticus, and other essential biblical texts

- Aristophanes’s classic theory of same-sex love, from Plato’s Symposium

- Hannah Arendt on marriage as a fundamental right

- Camille Paglia’s skepticism

Representing the full range of perspectives and the most cogent and arresting arguments, Same-Sex Marriageis essential to a balanced understanding of the most pressing cultural question we face today.
Parents of the Homosexual
David K. Switzer
Coming Out As Parents: You and Your Homosexual Child
David K. Switzer This complete revision of Parents of the Homosexual helps parents understand their feelings and reactions to the knowledge that their child is a homosexual. Suitable for counselors and clergy too.
Sex in History
Reay Tannahill Thoroughly fascinating.—New York Post
Best Lesbian Erotica 1998
Tristan Taormino Celebrating sexy, literate queer writing, Best Lesbian Erotica features the steamiest, most thought-provoking sexual writing of each year. Guest judges selected from the queer literary world select and introduce the collections, which represent a wide range of styles and voices. The series is edited by Tristan Taormino. Best Lesbian Erotica 1997 is selected and introduced by guest editor Jenifer Levin, author of Water Dancer and The Sea of Light. "There's a new generation of queer women writing unabashedly about the truth, pain, and fun of the queer sexual experience-in all its variety, its surprising twists and turns, its rich psychological depth," writes Levin. "These gals are not afraid to just go out and get it. And when opportunity rears its pretty head, they tend to ask 'Why not?!' instead of 'Why?' Ah. The calling card of youth"
PIERRES ET GILLES
Benedickt Taschen
An American Obsession: Science, Medicine, and Homosexuality in Modern Society
Jennifer Terry Drawing on original research from medical texts, psychiatric case histories, pioneering statistical surveys, first-person accounts, legal cases, sensationalist journalism, and legislative debates, Jennifer Terry has written a nuanced and textured history of how the century-old obsession with homosexuality is deeply tied to changing American anxieties about social and sexual order in the modern age. 

Terry's overarching argument is compelling: that homosexuality served as a marker of the "abnormal" against which malleable, tenuous, and often contradictory concepts of the "normal" were defined. One of the few histories to take into consideration homosexuality in both women and men, Terry's work also stands out in its refusal to erase the agency of people classified as abnormal. She documents the myriad ways that gays, lesbians, and other sexual minorities have coauthored, resisted, and transformed the most powerful and authoritative modern truths about sex. Proposing this history as a "useable past,"An American Obsession is an indispensable contribution to the study of American cultural history.
Gay spirit: Myth and meaning
Mark Thompson Gay Spirit, the psychic and creative energies generated by people we now call gay, has always existed on the outer shores of our culture's collective consciousness. In the past, gay people were labeled heretics, perversions of nature, or categorized pseudo-scientifically. Gay people lived on the edge of the global village or worked within its mainstream in denial and disguise. But today that spirit has re-emerged and lives among us.

This book of essays explores the possibilities of that spirit—suggesting ways in which gay people might find a place and purpose in human culture unique to themselves, departing with the questions asked nearly forty years ago by the Mattachine Society: Who are we? Where have we come from? Why are we here?
Gay Soul: Finding the Heart of Gay Spirit and Nature with Sixteen Writers, Healers, Teache
Mark Thompson Gay spirituality and sensibility come to light in these pages of striking portraits and trenchant interviews. Thompson brings out the unique contributions of the esteemed gay men – including Will Roscoe, Joseph Kramer, Harry Hay, James Broughton, Andrew Harvey, Paul Monette, Malcolm Boyd, and Ram Dass – who lead the spiritual life.Thompson elicits vivid musings on such provocative issues as the third gender, S&M, ritual as ‘holy fire’, and spirituality in the age of Aids. His interviews call out the deepest emotions of each of these vibrant leaders who reveal, as never before, the spirit and the soul of the gay life.
Academic Outlaws: Queer Theory and Cultural Studies in the Academy
William G. Tierney "One of the few portraits of higher education from a postmodern queer analysis that is devoid of painful rhetoric and brutal theorizing. I plan to use it for a course I teach on gay and lesbian issues. A passionately argued and personally revealing postmodern analysis of academia and the queer presence. Rousing, enlightening, and lucid." —James T. Sears, Professor of Curriculum and Higher Education, University of South Carolina "William G. Tierney amply and ably probes the political charge of the specifics of an out gay researcher versus the unmarked person who does research on gay and/or lesbian topics." —Patti Lather, Professor of Education and Women's Studies, The Ohio State University "William G. Tierney is a practicing 'outlaw,' crisscrossing the horizon where cultural studies meets the academy. One of our premier critics of higher education, Tierney reveals how cultural distinctions shape our relation to key dimensions of everyday life: sexuality, ethnicity, gender, and social class. Academic Outlaws works at the intersections of cultural studies and queer theory by forcing us to reflect on how authors/readers reflect and interact with one another in the construction of a text. The book has a theoretical sophistication and elegance of style that is rare in academic writing. A thought-provoking work that is as courageous as it is provocative." —Peter McLaren, Professor of Education and Cultural Studies, UCLA "Academic Outlaws lays the foundation for those in higher education who are honestly interested in creating inclusive environments on our campuses. William G. Tierney's ability to translate theory into strategies for change eliminates the common excuses that scholars do not provide blueprints for transformation. The book is communicated with passion, commitment, and love. A model for all those who have not been full participants in higher education." —Mildred Garcia, Assistant Vice President for Academic Affairs, Montclair State University "Simultaneously autobiographical, fictional, and theoretical, this powerful and accessible exposition is essential reading for all interested in cultural studies and politics." —William F. Pinar, St. Bernard Parish Alumni Endowed Professor, Louisiana State University "William G. Tierney's juxtaposition of critical theory and structural analysis is the most coherent and systematic framework for cultural studies to date. A far-reaching intellectual accomplishment. The bitter, sweet, and loving persona stories inform both sophisticated theory development and superb tactical and strategic planning for faculty and administrators. No other contemporary work connects these epistemological and methodological arenas so deftly and so accessibly. The book sets a new standard for transdisciplinarity in the social sciences." —Yvonna S. Lincoln, Professor, Texas A&M "Every heterosexual person should read this book. It could be one small step in making for a more peaceful, happier world." —Clyde Hendrick, Department of Psychology, Texas Tech University and formerly Dean, Texas Tech University Graduate School "William G. Tierney provides a provocative contemporary look into queer scholarship and queer scholars. There is certainly a need for this book as many academic units are currently struggling with issues on the role of gay and lesbian scholars and scholarship in their respective disciplines. The book should definitely make a significant contribution to the field of gay and lesbian studies." —Larry D. Icard, School of Social Work, University of Washington, Seattle Scholarly yet provocatively written, Academic Outlaws presents a comprehensive discussion of how life in academe is experienced by gay men and lesbian women. Using a narrative style that mixes autobiography, case study data, and fiction, author William G. Tierney provides timely insight into how homosexuals are treated in higher education and proposes an alternative process for redefining long-established cultural norms. He works at the intersection of "hot points" in intellectual, university life, exploring the theoretical and practical implications of cultural studies, queer theory, and critical theory among others. Drawing readers into a comfortable conversation about some of society's most difficult topics, this book demonstrates the need to reframe concepts such as oppression, difference, language, and culture as they affect the social culture of our learning institutions. Of broad and contemporary appeal, this book should be read by researchers, academics, students, and lay readers as well. Academic Outlaws will also appeal to those interested in knowledge production and how we might reconfigure the academy as we approach the 21st century. The policy-related implications will be stimulating to those who are concerned with issues of equity.
The Velvet Years: Warhol's Factory 1965-67
Lynne Tillman
The Best Little Boy in the World Grows Up
Andrew Tobias John Reid's The Best Little Boy in the World was hailed as a classic memoir of growing up gay in a straight world. But "John Reid" didn't write it. Years would pass before the writer could reveal his true identity as Andrew Tobias, America's bestselling financial guru, author of The Only Investment Guide You'll Ever Need. Now, twenty-five years later, Tobias, proud to use his real name, brings his remarkable life story up to date.

Writing with his customary charm and frank humor, Tobias tells of love affairs and heartbreak, hot New York parties and tough political battles, the excitement of genuine social change and the tragedy of seeing dear friends die young. Here too are the unforgettable scenes of Tobias revealing his sexual orientation not only to his parents but to the president of the United States.

The author is an irresistible companion as he shares with us his proud stories, embarrassing confessions, and hilarious musings on "the homosexual lifestyle." Witty, heartfelt, and wonderfully affirming in every sense, this is Andrew Tobias's finest book to date.
The Best Little Boy in the World Grows Up
Andrew Tobias John Reid's The Best Little Boy in the World was hailed as a classic memoir of growing up gay in a straight world. But "John Reid" didn't write it. Years would pass before the writer could reveal his true identity as Andrew Tobias, America's bestselling financial guru, author of The Only Investment Guide You'll Ever Need. Now, twenty-five years later, Tobias, proud to use his real name, brings his remarkable life story up to date.

Writing with his customary charm and frank humor, Tobias tells of love affairs and heartbreak, hot New York parties and tough political battles, the excitement of genuine social change and the tragedy of seeing dear friends die young. Here too are the unforgettable scenes of Tobias revealing his sexual orientation not only to his parents but to the president of the United States.

The author is an irresistible companion as he shares with us his proud stories, embarrassing confessions, and hilarious musings on "the homosexual lifestyle." Witty, heartfelt, and wonderfully affirming in every sense, this is Andrew Tobias's finest book to date.
When I Knew
Robert Trachtenberg When I Knew is a collection of smart, hilarious, and often poignant stories about that revelation for all gay men and women: when they first knew. In this gorgeously illustrated, cleverly designed, and colorful book, acclaimed fashion and celeb-rity photographer Robert Trachtenberg brings humor and style to the EUREKA! moments of more than eighty contributors, including B. D. Wong, Arthur Laurents, Simon Doonan, Stephen Fry, Marc Shaiman, Michael Musto, and more. Also mixed in are tales about when parents knew and when everyone else knew, as well as laugh-out-loud coming-out stories.

Readers will fall in love with these anecdotes, from the seven-year-old who looked under the television set to sneak a peek under Tarzan's loincloth, to the inquisitive grandmother who asked her grandson, "You don't like a girl to get married? You prefer a boy?", to the courageous field trip participant who passed up the universal favorite burger-and-fry combo in favor of the fruit plate with cottage cheese.

Filled with original art by New Yorker illustrator Tom Bachtell, historical images, and personal photographs from the contributors, When I Knew is a vibrant and witty celebration of that sometimes glorious, sometimes painful, but always captivating moment when everything suddenly makes sense.
Hollywood Diva: A Biography of Jeanette MacDonald
Edward Baron Turk Jeanette MacDonald, the movie musical's first superstar, was an American original whose onscreen radiance mirrored a beguiling real-life personality. Based in large part on the author's exclusive access to MacDonald's private papers, including her unpublished memoir, this vivid, often touching biography transports us to a time when lavish musical films were major cultural events and a worldwide public eagerly awaited each new chance to fall under the singer's spell. Edward Baron Turk shows how MacDonald brilliantly earned her Hollywood nickname of "Iron Butterfly," and why she deserves a privileged position in the history of music and motion pictures.

What made MacDonald a woman for our times, readers will discover, was her uncommon courage: Onscreen, the actress portrayed strong charcters in pursuit of deep emotional fulfillment, often in defiance of social orthodoxy, while offscreen she personified energy, discipline, and practical intellect. Drawing on interviews with individuals who knew her and on MacDonald's own words, Turk brings to life the intricate relations between the star and her legendary costars Maurice Chevalier, Clark Gable, and, above all, baritone Nelson Eddy. He reveals the deep crushes she inspired in movie giants Ernst Lubitsch and Louis B. Mayer and the extraordinary love story she shared with her husband of twenty-seven years, actor Gene Raymond.

More than simply another star biography, however, this is a chronicle of American music from 1920s Broadway to 1960s television, in which Turk details MacDonald's fearless efforts to break down distinctions between High Art and mass-consumed entertainment. Hollywood Diva will attract fans of opera and concert music as much as enthusiasts of the great Hollywood musicals. It is first-rate cultural and film history.
Genealogy Of Queer Theory (American Subjects)
William B. Turner Who are queers and what do they want? Could it be that we are all queers? Beginning with such questions, William B. Turner's lucid and engaging book traces the roots of queer theory to the growing awareness that few of us precisely fit standard categories for sexual and gender identity.

Turner shows how Michel Foucault's work contributed to feminists' investigations into the ways that power relates to identity. In the last decades of the twentieth century, feminists were the first to challenge the assumption that a claim to universal identity—the white male citizen—should serve as the foundation of political thought and action. Difference matters. Race, ethnicity, class, gender, and sexuality interact, producing a wide array of identities that resist rigid definition and are mutable. By understanding the notion of transhistorical categories—woman, man, homosexual, and so forth—feminist and gay male scholars launched queer theoretical work as a new way to think about the politics of gender and sexuality.

A Genealogy of Queer Theory probes the fierce debates among scholars and activists, weighing the charges that queer readings of texts and identity politics do not constitute and might inhibit radical social change. Written by a historian, it considers the implications of queer theory for historical inquiry and the distinction between philosophy and history. As such, the book will interest readers of gay/lesbian/bisexual/transgender studies, intellectual history, political theory, and the history of gender/sexuality.
The Same Sea as Every Summer (European Women Writers)
Esther Tusquets Poetic and erotic, El mismo mar de todos los veranos (The Same Sea As Every Summer) was originally published in Spain in 1978, three years after the death of Franco and in the same year that government censorship was abolished. But even in a new era that fostered more liberal attitudes toward divorce, homosexuality, and women's rights, this novel by Esther Tusquets was controversial. Its feminine view of sexuality—in particular, its depiction of a lesbian relationship—was unprecedented in Spanish fiction. Now its complex moods and rhythms have been caught in an English translation by Margaret E. W. Jones that has won the Kayden National Translation Award. 

The disillusioned narrator of The Same Sea As Every Summer is a middle-aged woman whose unhappy life prompts a journey into she past to rediscover a more authentic self. However, events force her to realize that love or trust will inevitably be repaid by betrayal. This pattern assumes various forms in a story that moves forward as well as backward, playing out in Barcelona among the haute bourgeoisie. Richly textured with allusion, The Same Sea As Every Summer is also a commentary on post-Civil War Spanish society by an author who grew up during the repressive Franco regime. Esther Tusquets’s other novels include El amor es un juego solitano (1979) and Para no volver (1985).
Been There Should've Done That: 505 Tips for Making the Most of College
Suzette Tyler
Imagining Transgender: An Ethnography of a Category
David Valentine Imagining Transgender is an ethnography of the emergence and institutionalization of transgender as a category of collective identity and political activism. Embraced by activists in the early 1990s to advocate for gender-variant people, the category quickly gained momentum in public health, social service, scholarly, and legislative contexts. Working as a safer-sex activist in Manhattan during the late 1990s, David Valentine conducted ethnographic research among mostly male-to-female transgender-identified people at drag balls, support groups, cross-dresser organizations, clinics, bars, and clubs. However, he found that many of those labeled “transgender” by activists did not know the term or resisted its use. Instead, they self-identified as “gay,” a category of sexual rather than gendered identity and one rejected in turn by the activists who claimed these subjects as transgender. Valentine analyzes the reasons for and potential consequences of this difference, and how social theory is implicated in it.

Valentine argues that “transgender” has been adopted so rapidly in the contemporary United States because it clarifies a model of gender and sexuality that has been gaining traction within feminism, psychiatry, and mainstream gay and lesbian politics since the 1970s: a paradigm in which gender and sexuality are distinct arenas of human experience. This distinction and the identity categories based on it erase the experiences of some gender-variant people—particularly poor persons of color—who conceive of gender and sexuality in other terms. While recognizing the important advances transgender has facilitated, Valentine argues that a broad vision of social justice must include, simultaneously, an attentiveness to the politics of language and a recognition of how social theoretical models and broader political economies are embedded in the day-to-day politics of identity.
Acts of Disclosure: The Coming-Out Process of Contemporary Gay Men (Haworth Gay & Lesbian Studies) (Haworth Gay & Lesbian Studies)
Marc E. Vargo
Men on Men: Best New Gay Fiction (Men on Men)
Various
Men on Men 2: Best New Gay Fiction (Men on Men)
Various
Women on Women: An Anthology of American Lesbian Short Fiction
Various The 29 stories in the volume range from the daring and erotic "Eat" by Sapphire to Dorothy Allison's energetic Southern tale "A Lesbian Appetite" to Valerie Miner's suspenseful "Trespassing." Whether its the joy or loss of love, the difficulty of family relations, or the pain of death, these stories bring to life the unique lesbian experience.
Flesh and the Word: An Anthology of Erotic Writing (Flesh and the Word)
Various
Flesh and the Word: An Anthology of Erotic Writing (Flesh and the Word)
Various
Women on Women 3: A New Anthology of American Lesbian Fiction (Women on Women)
Various
Women on Women 3: A New Anthology of American Lesbian Fiction (Women on Women)
Various
Myra Breckenridge/Myron
Gore Vidal
Palimpsest: A Memoir
Gore Vidal This explosively entertaining memoir abounds in gossip, satire, historical apercus, and trenchant observations. Vidal's compelling narrative weaves back and forth in time, providing a whole view of the author's celebrated life, from his birth in 1925 to today, and features a cast of memorable characters—including the Kennedy family, Marlon Brando, Anais Nin, and Eleanor Roosevelt. of photos.
Jailbird
Kurt Vonnegut Jailbird takes us into a fractured  and comic, pure Vonnegut world of high crimes and  misdemeanors in government. . .and in the heart.  This wry tale follows bumbling bureaucrat Walter F.  Starbuck from Harvard to the Nixon White House to  the penitentiary as Watergate's least known  co-conspirator. But the humor turns dark when Vonnegut  shines his spotlight on the cold hearts and  calculated greed of the mighty, giving a razor-sharp  edge to an unforgettable portait of power and  politics in our times.
America
Andy Warhol
Andy Warhol's Party Book
Andy Warhol
Popism: The Warhol Sixties
Andy Warhol, Pat Hackett
The Andy Warhol Diaries
Andy Warhol, Pat Hackett
Inversions: Writings by Dykes, Queers and Lesbians
Betsy Warland
The Fancy Dancer: A Novel
Patricia Nell Warren Tom Meeker is a handsome rookie priest stranded in a dying rural parish. Vidal Stump is a proud, gay half-breed with a criminal record and unlawful desires. Father Meeker must choose between his sacred vows and his secret attraction to this Fancy Dancer who lures him into forbidden love.

First published two decades ago, this provocative, hard-hitting novel was the first bestseller to portray a gay priest and to explore gay life in a small town.
Shock Value
John Waters To me, bad taste is what entertainment is all about. If someone vomits watching one of my films, it's like getting a standing ovation. Thus begins John Waters's autobiography. And what a story it is. Opening with his upbringing in Baltimore ("Charm City" as dubbed by the tourist board; the "hairdo capital of the world" as dubbed by Waters), it covers his friendship with his muse and leading lady, Divine, detailed accounts of how Waters made his first movies, stories of the circle of friends/actors he used in these films, and finally the "sort-of fame" he achieves in America. Complementing the text are dozens of fabulous old photographs of Waters and crew. Here is a true love letter from a legendary filmmaker to his friends, family, and fans.
Crackpot: The Obsessions of John Waters
John Waters This hilarious collection of essays by the offbeat writer and director is a treat for fans of the "Pope of Trash" and the perfect introduction for those who have not yet discovered his eccentric charms.
The Night Watch
Sarah Waters A novel of relationships set in 1940s London that brims with vivid historical detail, thrilling coincidences, and psychological complexity, by the author of the Booker Prize finalist Fingersmith. 

Sarah Waters, whose works set in Victorian England have awards and acclaim and have reinvigorated the genres of both historical and lesbian fiction, returns with novel that marks a departure from nineteenth century and a spectacular leap forward in the career of this masterful storyteller. 

Moving back through the 1940s, through air raids, blacked-out streets, illicit liasons, and sexual adventure, to end with its beginning in 1941, The Night Watch tells the story of Londoners: three women and a young man with a past-whose lives, and those of their friends and lovers, connect in ways that are surprising not always known to them. In wartime London, the women work-as ambulance drivers, ministry clerks, and building inspectors. There are feats of heroism, epic and quotidian, and tragedies both enormous and personal, but the emotional interiors of her characters that Waters captures with absolute and intimacy. 

Waters describes with perfect knowingness the taut composure of a rescue worker in the aftermath of a bombing, the idle longing of a young woman her soldier lover, the peculiar thrill convict watching the sky ignite through the bars on his window, the hunger a woman stalking the streets for encounter, and the panic of another who sees her love affair coming end. At the same time, Waters is absolute control of a narrative that offers up subtle surprises and exquisite twists, even as it depicts the impact grand historical event on individual lives. 

Tender, tragic, and beautifully poignant, The Night Watch is a towering achievement that confirms its author as "one of the best storytellers alive today" (Independent on Sunday).
Factory Made: Warhol and the Sixties
Steven Watson Factory Made: Warhol and the Sixties is a fascinating look at the avant-garde group that came together—from 1964 to 1968—as Andy Warhol’s Silver Factory, a cast that included Lou Reed, Nico, Edie Sedgwick, Gerard Malanga, Paul Morrissey, Joe Dallesandro, Billy Name, Candy Darling, Baby Jane Holzer, Brigid Berlin, Ultra Violet, and Viva. Steven Watson follows their diverse lives from childhood through their Factory years. He shows how this ever-changing mix of artists and poets, musicians and filmmakers, drag queens, society figures, and fashion models, all interacted at the Factory to create more than 500 films, the Velvet Underground, paintings and sculpture, and thousands of photographs. 

Between 1961 and 1964 Warhol produced his most iconic art: the Flower paintings, the Marilyns, the Campbell’s Soup Can paintings, and the Brillo Boxes. But it was his films—Sleep, Kiss, Empire, The Chelsea Girls, and Vinyl—that constituted his most prolific output in the mid-1960s, and with this book Watson points up the important and little-known interaction of the Factory with the New York avant-garde film world. Watson sets his story in the context of the revolutionary milieu of 1960s New York: the opening of Paul Young’s Paraphernalia, Truman Capote’s Black and White Ball, Max’s Kansas City, and the Beautiful People Party at the Factory, among many other events. 

Interspersed throughout are Watson’s trademark sociogram, more than 130 black-and-white 

photographs—some never before seen—and many sidebars of quotes and slang that help define the Warholian world. With Factory Made, Watson has focused on a moment that transformed the art and style of a generation.
Mae West: An Icon in Black and White
Jill Watts "Why don't you come up and see me sometime?" Mae West invited and promptly captured the imagination of generations. Even today, years after her death, the actress and author is still regarded as the pop archetype of sexual wantonness and ribald humor. But who was this saucy starlet, a woman who was controversial enough to be jailed, pursued by film censors and banned from the airwaves for the revolutionary content of her work, and yet would ascend to the status of film legend? 

Sifting through previously untapped sources, author Jill Watts unravels the enigmatic life of Mae West, tracing her early years spent in the Brooklyn subculture of boxers and underworld figures, and follows her journey through burlesque, vaudeville, Broadway and, finally, Hollywood, where she quickly became one of the big screen's most popular—and colorful—stars. Exploring West's penchant for contradiction and her carefully perpetuated paradoxes, Watts convincingly argues that Mae West borrowed heavily from African American culture, music, dance and humor, creating a subversive voice for herself by which she artfully challenged society and its assumptions regarding race, class and gender. Viewing West as a trickster, Watts demonstrates that by appropriating for her character the black tradition of double-speak and "signifying," West also may have hinted at her own African-American ancestry and the phenomenon of a black woman passing for white.

This absolutely fascinating study is the first comprehensive, interpretive account of Mae West's life and work. It reveals a beloved icon as a radically subversive artist consciously creating her own complex image.
Bear Pond
Bruce Weber
Dual Attraction: Understanding Bisexuality
Martin S. Weinberg, Colin J. Williams, Douglas W. Pryor For the past two generations, extensive research has been conducted on the determinants of homosexuality. But, until now, scant attention has been paid to what is perhaps the most mysterious—and potentially illuminating—variation of human sexual expression, bisexuality. Today, as ignorance and fear of AIDS makes greater awareness of all forms of sexual behavior an urgent matter of private and public consequence, leading sex researchers Martin Weinberg, Colin Williams, and Douglas Pryor provide us with the first major study of bisexuality.

Weinberg, Williams, and Pryor explore the riddle of dual attraction in their study of 800 residents of San Francisco. Fieldwork, intensive interviews, and surveys provided a wealth of data about the nature of bisexual attraction, the steps that lead people to become bisexual, and how sexual preference can change over time. They found that heterosexuals, more often than homosexuals, become bisexual; that bisexual men and women differ markedly in their sexual behavior and romantic feelings; that most bisexuals ultimately settle into long-term relationships while continuing sexual activity outside those relationships; and they also explain why transsexuals often become bisexual. Moreover, the authors discovered that as the AIDS crisis unfolded, many bisexual men entered into monogamous relationships with women, and bisexual women into more lesbian relationships.

Recent media accounts attest that a growing number of researchers and writers are narrowing the fundamental cause of sexual preference to a single factor, biology. But if, as this study shows, learning plays a significant part in helping people traverse the boundaries of gender, if past and present intimate relationships influence their changing preferences, and if bisexual activity is inseparable from a social environment which provides distinctive sexual opportunities, then a mosaic of factors far more complex than those previously considered must be entertained in explaining the fuller spectrum of sexual preferences. Dual Attraction is one of the most significant contributions to our understanding of sexuality since the original Kinsey reports and Bell and Weinberg's 1978 international bestseller, Homosexualities. It is must reading for all those interested in the study of sexual behavior—especially now, since the onset of AIDS.
Divine Secrets of the Ya-Ya Sisterhood: A Novel
Rebecca Wells When Siddalee Walker, oldest daughter of Vivi Abbott Walker, Ya-Ya extraordinaire, is interviewed in the New York Times about a hit play she's directed, her mother gets described as a "tap-dancing child abuser." Enraged, Vivi disowns Sidda. Devastated, Sidda begs forgiveness, and postpones her upcoming wedding. All looks bleak until the Ya-Yas step in and convince Vivi to send Sidda a scrapbook of their girlhood mementos, called "Divine Secrets of the Ya-Ya Sisterhood." As Sidda struggles to analyze her mother, she comes face to face with the tangled beauty of imperfect love, and the fact that forgiveness, more than understanding, is often what the heart longs for.

Divine Secrets of the Ya-Ya Sisterhood may call to mind Prince of Tides in its unearthing of family darkness; in its unforgettable heroines and irrepressible humor and female loyalty, it echoes Fannie Flagg's Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Stop Cafe.
The Scarlet Professor: Newton Arvin — A Literary Life Shattered by Scandal
Barry Werth In this provocative and unsettling look at the consequences of America's puritanical "need to punish," Barry Werth explores the tragic story of one of America's great literary minds whose life and career were shattered by the "Pink Scare."

Newton Arvin (1900-1963) was one of America's most esteemed literary critics, admired by Edmund Wilson and Lillian Hellman, and mentor to Truman Capote. He was a member of the American Academy of Arts and in 1951, won the National Book Award for his biography of Herman Melville. As a scholar and writer, Arvin focused on the secret, psychological drives of such American masters as Melville and Nathaniel Hawthorne, and identified the witch-hunt mentality that lies deep in the American psyche. 

Born and raised in the constrained society of Protestant Indiana, Arvin was a social radical and an unproclaimed homosexual. He came through the Red Scare relatively unscathed, but when the national antismut campaign followed, his apartment in Northampton, Massachusetts, where he was a distinguished professor at Smith College, was searched and relatively mild homoerotic materials were confiscated. He was arrested for possession of pornography, accused in the press of being a leader of a "smut ring," and forced to choose between friendship and survival. After naming several men, he despaired at his own guilt and confusion, and banished himself to the state mental institution overlooking the Smith campus. From there public shame and the fear of his associates began to unravel his connections with the esteemed institutions that had been the cornerstones of his life.

In The Scarlet Professor, Barry Werth probes into the virulence with which even the most marginal "sins" are pursued in the fever of America's recurring puritanical crusades. His insights into the tangle of political and moralistic fanaticism underlying America's social landscape provide a forthright and compelling perspective on the dangers of a society where the possibility of a "private life" no longer exists.

But The Scarlet Professor is not just a political parable. It also a story of redemption.
Age of Innocence (Movie Tie-in)
Edith Wharton Cambridge Literature is a series of literary texts edited for study by students aged 14-18 in English-speaking classrooms. It will include novels, poetry, short stories, essays, travel-writing and other non-fiction. The series will be extensive and open-ended and will provide school students with a range of edited texts taken from a wide geographical spread. It will feature writing in English from various genres and differing times. The Age of Innocence by Edith Wharton is edited by Janet Beer Goodwyn, Senior Lecturer in the Department of English at Roehampton Institute.
Soul of Indiscretion: Tom Driberg-Poet, Philanderer, Legislator, Outlaw
Francis Wheen Shortlisted for Britain’s coveted Whitbread Prize, The Soul of Indiscretion is a brilliant portrait of one of the most colorful figures of the Brideshead–generation London social set.
Unspeakable Love: Gay and Lesbian Life in the Middle East
Brian Whitaker Homosexuality is a taboo subject in Arab countries. Clerics denounce it as a heinous sin, while newspapers write cryptically of "shameful acts." Although many parts of the world now accept sexual diversity, the Middle East is moving in the opposite direction. In this absorbing account, journalist Brian Whitaker calls attention to the voices of men and women who are struggling with gay identities in societies where they are marginalized and persecuted by the authorities. He paints a disturbing picture of people who live secretive, fearful lives and who are often jailed, beaten, and ostracized by their families, or sent to be "cured" by psychiatrists. 

Whitaker's exploration of changing sexual behavior in the Arab world reveals that—while deeply repressive prejudices and stereotypes still govern much thinking about homosexuality—there are pockets of change and tolerance. The author combines personal accounts from individuals in the region with a look at recent Arab films and novels featuring gay characters and conducts a sensitive comparative reading of Christian, Jewish, and Islamic strictures around sexuality. Deeply informed and engagingly written, Unspeakable Love draws long overdue attention to a crucial subject. 

Copub: Saqi Books
Nocturnes for the King of Naples: 2
Edmund White A hauntingly beautiful evocation of lost love, Noctunes for the King of Naples has all the startling, almost embarrassing, intimacy of a stranger's love letters. The intense emotional situation envelops the readers from the first page; like all images in a dream, White's characters are the most real people we know, thought they remain phantoms. Each chapter, each nocturne, is set in a different emotional key, but all are interconnected through such subtle modulations that the final effect is devastating.
A Boy's Own Story: 2
Edmund White For more than two decades, Edmund White has been widely recognized as America’s preeminent gay writer. “He has a novelist’s eye for the telling detail or the remarkable phrase and, like Proust himself, concentrates upon the minutiae of the past so that it might live again,” wrote The New York Times Book Review. “White possesses the rare combination of a po-etic sense of language and an ironic sense of humor,” declared Newsweek. “[He] is unquestionably the foremost American gay novelist.” Commemorating the twentieth anni-versary of A Boy’s Own Story, this Modern Library edition presents White’s autobiographical novel together with an Introduction by prizewinning novelist Allan Gurganus and a new Afterword by the author himself.

A Boy’s Own Story, with equal parts stunning lyricism and unabashed humor, traces a nameless narrator’s coming-of-age in the 1950s. Struggling with his homosexuality, the narrator seeks the consolations of a fantastic imagination and fills his head with romantic expectations (“I believed without a doubt in a better world, which was adulthood or New York or Paris or love.”) His distant, divorced parents exacerbate his hunger for emotional connection, and he endures the unhelpful attentions of a priest and a psychoanalyst. In time, he recognizes the need to be loved by the men in his life and, in the surprising conclusion, escapes his childhood forever with one unforgettable act.

“With A Boy’s Own Story, American literature is larger by one classic novel,” wrote The Washington Post Book World. “No reader, straight or gay . . . can fail to experience shock after shock of recognition in these pages, and few, I would bet, will be able to withhold a one-to-one sympathy from the unnamed narrator, even when he is being, by the standards of only yesterday, ‘shocking.’”
The Beautiful Room Is Empty
Edmund White When the narrator of White's poised yet scalding autobiographical novel first embarks on his sexual odyssey, it is the 1950s, and America is "a big gray country of families on drowsy holiday." That country has no room for a scholarly teenager with guilty but insatiable stirrings toward other men. Moving from a Midwestern college to the Stonewall Tavern on the night of the first gay uprising—and populated by eloquent queens, butch poseurs, and a fearfully incompetent shrink—The Beautiful Room is Empty conflates the acts of coming out and coming of age.

"With intelligence, candor, humor—and anger—White explores the most insidious aspects of oppression.... An impressive novel."—Washington Post book World

From the Trade Paperback edition.
Forgetting Elena
Edmund White Combining glittering wit, an atmosphere dense in social paranoia, and a breathtaking elegance and precision of language, White's first novel suggests a hilarious apotheosis of the comedy of manners. For, on the privileged island community where Forgetting Elena takes place, manners are everything. Or so it seems to White's excruciatingly self-conscious young narrator who desperately wants to be accepted in this world where everything from one's bathroom habits to the composition of "spontaneous" poetry is subject to rigid conventions.
A Boy's Own Story: Revised Edition
Edmund White For more than two decades, Edmund White has been widely recognized as America’s preeminent gay writer. “He has a novelist’s eye for the telling detail or the remarkable phrase and, like Proust himself, concentrates upon the minutiae of the past so that it might live again,” wrote The New York Times Book Review. “White possesses the rare combination of a po-etic sense of language and an ironic sense of humor,” declared Newsweek. “[He] is unquestionably the foremost American gay novelist.” Commemorating the twentieth anni-versary of A Boy’s Own Story, this Modern Library edition presents White’s autobiographical novel together with an Introduction by prizewinning novelist Allan Gurganus and a new Afterword by the author himself.

A Boy’s Own Story, with equal parts stunning lyricism and unabashed humor, traces a nameless narrator’s coming-of-age in the 1950s. Struggling with his homosexuality, the narrator seeks the consolations of a fantastic imagination and fills his head with romantic expectations (“I believed without a doubt in a better world, which was adulthood or New York or Paris or love.”) His distant, divorced parents exacerbate his hunger for emotional connection, and he endures the unhelpful attentions of a priest and a psychoanalyst. In time, he recognizes the need to be loved by the men in his life and, in the surprising conclusion, escapes his childhood forever with one unforgettable act.

“With A Boy’s Own Story, American literature is larger by one classic novel,” wrote The Washington Post Book World. “No reader, straight or gay . . . can fail to experience shock after shock of recognition in these pages, and few, I would bet, will be able to withhold a one-to-one sympathy from the unnamed narrator, even when he is being, by the standards of only yesterday, ‘shocking.’”
Stranger at the Gate: To Be Gay and Christian in America
Mel White As seen on 60 Minutes. Until Christmas Eve 1991, Mel White was regarded by the leaders of the religious right as one of their most talented and productive supporters. He penned speeches for Ollie North, was a ghostwriter for Jerry Falwell, worked with Jim Bakker. What they didn't know is that Mel White—evangelical minister, committed Christian, family man—is gay. In this book, White details his twenty-five years of being counseled, exorcised, electric-shocked, prayed for, and nearly driven to suicide because his church said homosexuality was wrong. His salvation—to be openly gay and Christian—is much more than a unique coming-out story.

"Fascinating... harrowing... a remarkable and important story." —Dallas Morning News
Uncommon Lives
Catherine Whitney
The Picture of Dorian Gray
Oscar Wilde Celebrated novel traces the moral degeneration of a handsome young Londoner from an innocent fop into a cruel and reckless pursuer of pleasure and, ultimately, a murderer. As Dorian Gray sinks into depravity, his body retains perfect youth and vigor while his recently painted portrait reflects the ravages of crime and sensuality.
Immortal Invisible: Lesbians and the Moving Image
Tamsin Wilton Immortal, Invisible: Lesbians and the Moving Image is the first collection to bring together leading film-makers, academics and activists to discuss films by, for and about lesbians and queer women.

The contributors debate the practice of lesbian and queer film-making, from the queer cinema of Monika Treut to the work of lesbian film-makers Andrea Weiss and Greta Schiller. They explore the pleasures and problems of lesbian spectatorship, both in mainstream Hollywood films including Aliens and Red Sonja, and in independent cinema from SheMust Be Seeing Things to Salmonberries and Desert Hearts.

The authors tackle tricky questions: Can a film such as Strictly Ballroom be both pleasurably camp and heterosexist? Is it OK to drool over dyke iconsw like Sigourney Weaver and kd lang? What makes a film lesbian, or queer, or even post-queer? What about showingsex on screen? And why do lesbian screen romances hardly ever have happy endings?

Immortal, Invisible is splendidly illustrated with a selection of images from film and television texts, and will a significant contribution to the areas of queer theory and film studies.
Brotherhood: Gay Life in College Fraternities
Shane L. Windmeyer Since the 1998 publication of his groundbreaking book Out on Fraternity Row, editor and Lambda 10 Project founder Shane Windmeyer has witnessed many changes in the reception and treatment of gay fraternity members: "We have made tremendous progress on men coming out to their brothers and being more likely to find acceptance due to the credo once a brother, always a brother,' but the new challenge and logical next boundary to break down for the fraternity closet is rushing openly gay." His new book, Brotherhood, is a bold step in that direction. Windmeyer reveals a 10-year perspective of progress on gay issues within college fraternities and suggests a 10-year plan to continue educational efforts for further systemic implementation to combat homophobia in fraternities. Windmeyer and others involved in the Lambda 10 Project provide valuable articles on:

Hazing and homophobia
Trials and tribulations of rushing openly gay
How to be an ally to a gay brother
Passing sexual orientation in a fraternity nondiscrimination statement

And in addition to new, true accounts by gay fraternity members about their experiences coming out over the past decade, Brotherhood includes numerous stories by gay men concerning the reception they received when they did not hide their sexual orientation while rushing.

This is a must-read book for high school advisors, anyone involved in college life, and young men intent on rushing a fraternity.

Shane Windmeyer (Phi Delta Theta) is the co-editor of Out on Fraternity Row and the founder of the Lambda 10 Project, a clearinghouse for gay fraternity issues. His educational work as an activist on gay fraternity issues has been profiled in TIME, The New York Times, Rolling Stone, The Advocate, and Out, and on the websites UMagazine, mtvU, Salon, and elsewhere. He is also co-editor of Secret Sisters and the author of Inspiration for LGBT Students & Their Allies. He lives in Charlotte, North Carolina.
The Advocate College Guide for LGBT Students
Shane L. Windmeyer Shane L. Windmeyer, national LGBT campus authority and founder of Campus Pride, has created the first comprehensive guide that lists the best 100 colleges and universities for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) students. This book has grown out of Campus Pride's groundbreaking youth mobilizing efforts as the only national network for LGBT college student leaders and campus organizations.

This new guide profiles the 100 U.S. institutions with the top "Gay Point Average"™ on critical LGBT issues such as: o Gay-affirmative policies o Campus events o LGBT student groups o Queer student perspectives o Housing for LGBT students o Local gay hangouts o Gay-friendly support resources o Queer studies

THE ADVOCATE COLLEGE GUIDE is the product of nearly 5,000 online interviews with LGBT students and 500 online interviews with faculty and staff from campuses across the country. Not only does the guide rank the best LGBT campuses, but for the first time, you also hear the reasons why from the experts themselves-LGBT college students.
Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit
Jeanette Winterson
Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit
Jeanette Winterson Winner of the Whitbread Prize for best first fiction, Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit is a coming-out novel from Winterson, the acclaimed author of The Passion and Sexing the Cherry. The narrator, Jeanette, cuts her teeth on the knowledge that she is one of God’s elect, but as this budding evangelical comes of age, and comes to terms with her preference for her own sex, the peculiar balance of her God-fearing household crumbles.
The Lesbian Body
Monique Wittig Back in print, this daring novel constitutes a rhapsodic hymn to women's bodies and women's relationships.

"That rare work in fiction . . . the art and the courage are of the highest level." 

—The Boston Globe
Men Like Us : The GMHC Complete Guide to Gay Men's Sexual, Physical, and Emotional Well-Being
Daniel Wolfe, Gay Men'S Health Crisis THE DEFINITIVE RESOURCE FOR ALL ASPECTS OF GAY MEN'S SEXUAL, PHYSICAL, AND EMOTIONAL LIVES, this indispensable, landmark book will empower you to take charge of your health, your relationships, and your life.

For nearly two decades, Gay Men's Health Crisis (GMHC), the world's largest and most respected not-for-profit AIDS service organization, has provided vital support, education, and health information to gay men in the New York City area. Now, with Men Like Us, their guidance—and the insights of hundreds of gay men across America—can help you. Practical, down-to-earth, and accessible, this authoritative health resource covers such topics as

- Finding Doctor Right

- Your sex life vs. the rest of your life

- Sexually transmitted diseases: How to protect yourself, tell if you have them, and treat them 

- 5 tests and vaccines no gay man should go without

- Guidelines for gay couples: Rekindling romance in long-term relationships

- Aging well: Strategies for mind and body

- An AIDS primer: Choices for the newly infected; antiviral drugs and how they work; deciding when to start antiviral therapy; determining if your therapy is working; and what to do if it's not

- Spirituality: Waking up inside; working for the gay good

- Mental matters: Meditation; stress reduction; finding a therapist; dealing with depression, anxiety, and psychotropic medications

Filled with expert advice—from leading doctors, lawyers, therapists, and fitness instructors to "ordinary gay men" whose stories provide important voices of experience—Men Like Us opens a window onto the ways we gay men, in all our diversity, care for ourselves and each other.
The Boys and Their Baby
Larry Wolff
The Other Fifty Percent: Instructor's Manual
Mari Womack What do a Papua New Guinea businesswoman and a Los Angeles policewoman have in common? Why are virgin brides valued in some societies and not in others? And why are the goddesses and folk heroines of India often depicted as angry and even violent? In addressing these and other issues, The Other Fifty Percent challenges traditional anthropological assumptions about the ordering of male and female roles crossculturally. Drawing on current research in Asia, Africa, Europe, and North and South America, the contributors to this volume explore the ordering of gender in such aspects of social life as marriage, economic decision making, allocation of political power, and in the symbolic representation of gods and goddesses. Articles in The Other Fifty Percent present a range of exciting research on gender in a clearly reasoned and concisely written style.
The Other Fifty Percent: Multicultural Perspectives on Gender Relations
Mari Womack What do a Papua New Guinea businesswoman and a Los Angeles policewoman have in common? Why are virgin brides valued in some societies and not in others? And why are the goddesses and folk heroines of India often depicted as angry and even violent? In addressing these and other issues, The Other Fifty Percent challenges traditional anthropological assumptions about the ordering of male and female roles crossculturally. Drawing on current research in Asia, Africa, Europe, and North and South America, the contributors to this volume explore the ordering of gender in such aspects of social life as marriage, economic decision making, allocation of political power, and in the symbolic representation of gods and goddesses. Articles in The Other Fifty Percent present a range of exciting research on gender in a clearly reasoned and concisely written style.
To the Lighthouse
Virginia Woolf, Eudora Welty (Introduction) Subject of this extraordinary novel is the daily life of an English family in the Hebrides. “Radiant as [To the Lighthouse] is in its beauty, there could never be a mistake about it: here is a novel to the last degree severe and uncompromising. I think that beyond being about the very nature of reality, it is itself a vision of reality.”-Eudora Welty, from her Introduction.
Different: An Anthology of Homosexual Short Stories
Stephen Wright
Covering: The Hidden Assault on Our Civil Rights
Kenji Yoshino In this remarkable and elegant work, acclaimed Yale Law School professor Kenji Yoshino fuses legal manifesto and poetic memoir to call for a redefinition of civil rights in our law and culture.

Everyone covers. To cover is to downplay a disfavored trait so as to blend into the mainstream. Because all of us possess stigmatized attributes, we all encounter pressure to cover in our daily lives. Given its pervasiveness, we may experience this pressure to be a simple fact of social life.

Against conventional understanding, Kenji Yoshino argues that the demand to cover can pose a hidden threat to our civil rights. Though we have come to some consensus against penalizing people for differences based on race, sex, sexual orientation, religion, and disability, we still routinely deny equal treatment to people who refuse to downplay differences along these lines. Racial minorities are pressed to “act white” by changing their names, languages, or cultural practices. Women are told to “play like men” at work. Gays are asked not to engage in public displays of same-sex affection. The devout are instructed to minimize expressions of faith, and individuals with disabilities are urged to conceal the paraphernalia that permit them to function. In a wide-ranging analysis, Yoshino demonstrates that American civil rights law has generally ignored the threat posed by these covering demands. With passion and rigor, he shows that the work of civil rights will not be complete until it attends to the harms of coerced conformity. 

At the same time, Yoshino is responsive to the American exasperation with identity politics, which often seems like an endless parade of groups asking for state and social solicitude. He observes that the ubiquity of the covering demand provides an opportunity to lift civil rights into a higher, more universal register. Since we all experience the covering demand, we can all make common cause around a new civil rights paradigm based on our desire for authenticity–a desire that brings us together rather than driving us apart. 

Yoshino’s argument draws deeply on his personal experiences as a gay Asian American. He follows the Romantics in his belief that if a human life is described with enough particularity, the universal will speak through it. The result is a work that combines one of the most moving memoirs written in years with a landmark manifesto on the civil rights of the future.

“This brilliantly argued and engaging book does two things at once, and it does them both astonishingly well. First, it's a finely grained memoir of young man’s struggles to come to terms with his sexuality, and second, it's a powerful argument for a whole new way of thinking about civil rights and how our society deals with difference. This book challenges us all to confront our own unacknowledged biases, and it demands that we take seriously the idea that there are many different ways to be human. Kenji Yoshino is the face and the voice of the new civil rights.” -Barbara Ehrenreich, author of Nickel and Dimed

“Kenji Yoshino has not only given us an important, compelling new way to understand civil rights law, a major accomplishment in itself, but with great bravery and honesty, he has forged his argument from the cauldron of his own experience. In clear, lyrical prose, Covering quite literally brings the law to life. The result is a book about our 

public and private selves as convincing to the spirit as it is to the 

mind.” -Adam Haslett, author of You Are Not A Stranger Here

“Kenji Yoshino's work is often moving and always clarifying. Covering elaborates an original, arresting account of identity and authenticity in American culture.”

-Anthony Appiah, author of The Ethics of Identity and Laurance S. Rockefeller University Professor Of Philosophy at Princeton University

“This stunning book introduces three faces of the remarkable Kenji Yoshino: a writer of poetic beauty; a soul of rare reflectivity and decency; and a brilliant lawyer and scholar, passionately committed to uncovering human rights. Like W.E.B. DuBois's The Souls of Black Folk and Betty Friedan's The Feminine Mystique, this book fearlessly blends gripping narrative with insightful analysis to further the cause of human emancipation. And like those classics, it should explode into America's consciousness.”

-Harold Hongju Koh Dean, Yale Law School and former Assistant Secretary of State for Human Rights

“Covering is a magnificent work - so eloquently and powerfully written I literally could not put it down. Sweeping in breadth, brilliantly argued, and filled with insight, humor, and erudition, it offers a fundamentally new perspective on civil rights and discrimination law. This extraordinary book is many things at once: an intensely moving personal memoir; a breathtaking historical and cultural synthesis of assimilation and American equality law; an explosive new paradigm for transcending the morass of identity politics; and in parts, pure poetry. No one interested in civil rights, sexuality, discrimination - or simply human flourishing - can afford to miss it.” 

-Amy Chua, author of World on Fire

“In this stunning, original book, Kenji Yoshino demonstrates that the struggle for gay rights is not only a struggle to liberate gays—-it is a struggle to free all of us, straight and gay, male and female, white and black, from the pressures and temptations to cover vital aspects of ourselves and deprive ourselves and others of our full humanity. Yoshino is both poet and lawyer, and by joining an exquisitely observed personal memoir with a historical analysis of civil rights, he shows why gay rights is so controversial at present, 

why “covering” is the issue of contention, and why the “covering demand,” universal in application, is the civil rights issue of our time. This is a beautifully written, brilliant and hopeful book, offering a new understanding of what is at stake in our fight for 

human rights.” 

-Carol Gilligan, author of In a Different Voice
Masculine Marine: Homoeroticism in the U.S. Marine Corps (Haworth Gay & Lesbian Studies) (Haworth Gay & Lesbian Studies)
Steven Zeeland This exciting book was listed as #1 on The Advocate?s (ital) bestseller list for December 1996! In The Masculine Marine, author Steven Zeeland records, for the first time ever, what active-duty Marines have to say about what it means to be a man, to be a Marine, and to desire other men. 

As the foremost surviving icon of traditional masculinity, Marines are often considered the opposite of “gay.” Yet in contemporary gay culture, Marines are stereotyped as likely to play the passive role in sexual encounters with other men. By vividly illustrating some of the startling ways in which gay and Marine attributes can coincide, The Masculine Marine uncovers the wild sexual contradictions built into military hypermasculinity. 

From ordinary grunts to a major who flies a combat jet, Zeeland?s Marine interviewees provide thoughtful and articulate insight into aspects of this rarely documented culture, including: homoerotic bonding among Marineshow gay Marines reconcile their sexual identity with the ethos of “hard” Marine supermasculinityhow some Marines eroticize the pain and humiliation of Marine Corps boot campMarines in all-male pornographymale attitudes toward women in the Marine Corpshazing and institutional violence

These Marines talk candidly about what motivated them to join the United States’most elite fighting force, and they reveal how becoming Marines has shaped their sexual and gender identities. For the student of gay or military studies or anyone sexually intrigued by men in uniform, The Masculine Marine must reading.

Visit Steven Zeeland at his home page: http://www.stevenzeeland.com
Sorry Now? (Stonewall Inn Mysteries)
Mark Richard Zubro While in Chicago, right-wing televangelist Bruce Mucklewrath is attacked and his daughter killed. Sensing a potential time bomb, and with Mucklewrath creating great pressure, the police brass assign the case to Detective Paul Turner whom they trust with sensitive matters. During their investigation, Turner and his partner discover that other right-wing bigots have been suffering odd attacks, and they begin to suspect a conspiracy of vengeance, perhaps even from the gay community. This is an uncomfortable thought for Turner, who is himself gay, but when Turner is attacked and his two sons threatened, he has to enlist the help of people in his close-knit neighborhood, as well as his contacts in the gay world, to find the solution in time.