LBGT and Questioning Student Discussion and Support Programs

lbgt@mit, in collaboration with MIT Medical, Counseling and Support Services, and Women's Studies, sponsors a variety of discussion and support programs for current MIT students. More information below!


1. Boston Area Trans Support (BATS)

A peer-run support group for young college-age and twentysomething transgender people in the Boston area. It is inclusive of those who are questioning their gender, from MTF to FTM to genderqueer or whatever descriptor you prefer. It is for those who are seeking others of similar age for support in realization of one's own gender identity, help with coming-out, transition concerns, and anything else that members wish to bring up. BATS is an LGBTIQ-friendly safe space, with confidentiality respected among members. For more information please email Abigail at afran@mit.edu or call (617) 253-0684.

2. Monthly LBGT Workshops

A monthly workshop on various topics of interest including, coming out, relationships, self-care, etc. Sponsored by LBGT@MIT, MIT Mental Health, and Student Support Services. For more information, please feel free to contact the following individuals: James Collins (Student Support Services) at jmcollin@mit.edu or x8-5482 and Maya Hanelin (Mental Health) at hanelin@med.mit.edu or x3-2916

One-on-One Counseling and Support Sessions

Through the Mental Health Service of MIT Medical and Counseling and Support Services in the Division of Student Life, current students can access individualized counseling and support services. Referrals to counselors outside MIT may also be possible. For more information, please feel free to contact the following individuals: James Collins (Student Support Services) at jmcollin@mit.edu or x8-5482 and Maya Hanelin (Mental Health) at hanelin@med.mit.edu or x3-2916

3. What should I expect from a support group?

Support groups are forums where students can bring questions or topics that they would like to discuss. They really are designed around what would be useful for you to talk about. Below are a sample of questions that often serve as points of departure.

"Disclosures"
How, when, and why do you tell your GLBT-themed stories to others? When do you omit details?
Do you want to be "out" as GLBT? Why/Why not/in what ways?
Are their certain communities/people with whom you have decided not to be Out? Why?
Does revealing one part of yourself ever feel like hiding another part? How?

"Connections and Community"
Is a sense of connection and "community" important to you? Why? How might/do you achieve it?
What does it mean (to you) to connect --sex, activism, work, family, friendship, etc.?
What means have you used to connect --sex, activism, work, family, friendship, etc.?
Do you have different communities that you keep separate? Why? What is it like for you?

"Multiple Identities: Sexuality PLUS Race, Culture, Nation, Gender"
How do your sex, race, nation, culture, gender, class, gender expression affect your Coming Out Process?
Is there a relationship between your gender and your sex life? Between your sexuality and your gender expression? Between your Race/Culture/Nation and your sexual orientation?

"Life Transitions, Sexual Orientation, and Your Future"
Starting university, coming out as queer/transgender, having a first significant relationship, negotiating moves from "straight" to "gay," finding places for our differences in queer spaces,...all of these can be major shifts in our lives.
What are the major shifts, transitions, and changes of your life and How has being LBGT affected your attitude towards making life transitions?
How does your sexual orientation/gender factor into your decision-making process in terms of life transitions?
How does your sexual orientation/gender affect decisions about your Future? (where you will live, your career, your thoughts about family and communitys).