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Nuclear and Particle Physics Colloquia

Mondays ~ Refreshments 3:30pm Talk: 4:00pm ~ Kolker Room, 26-414

 

Committee:
William Detmold, Chair ~ Mike Williams ~ Lindley Winslow

 

Colloquia Archives

 

Sebtember 12, 2016

hosted by: Bolek Wyslouch

Grodzins Prizewinner

Dennis Perepelitsa, University of Colorado, Boulder

Novel probes of the proton wavefunction through collisions with nuclei

Abstract:

Ultrarelativistic proton– and deuteron–nucleus collisions at RHIC and the LHC have traditionally been motivated as a way to understand how the longitudinal momentum structure of partons in nucleons is modified in the nuclear environment. When compared to proton–proton collision data, measurements of hard-scattered jet production in these systems have demonstrated that these nuclear modifications are mild at large-Q2. On the other hand, jet production rates have been found to correlate with global properties of the collision in an unexpected way.

By analyzing the jet-kinematics- and collision-energy-dependence of simultanous measurements at RHIC and the LHC, the data indicate that particle production downstream of the nucleus decreases systematically with increasing Bjorken-x in the proton or deuteron. This has been quantitatively interpreted as evidence that proton configurations with large Bjorken-x ≥ 0.1 have a compact transverse spatial extent relative to the average configuration. In this picture, the nucleus acts as a large-area target which can be used to measure, through the suppression of soft particle production, the shrinking of the traversing proton's size.

In this Colloquium, I will discuss how collisions with nuclei have provided unexpected insight into the correlations between the longitudinal momentum and transverse spatial configurations in the proton wavefunction, drawing a connection between heavy ion and hadron structure physics.

 

time:    4:00 p.m.
place:   Kolker Room (26-414)

(refreshments at 3:30 p.m.)



September 19, 2016

hosted by: Jesse Thaler

Tulika Bose, Boston University

Recent results from exotic searches at the CMS experiment

Abstract: The LHC re-started last year at an unprecedented center of mass energy of 13 TeV and the CMS experiment has already successfully collected more than ~30 fb^-1 data this year. In this talk, I will review recent searches for exotic physics with special focus on final state topologies with heavy standard model particles. This includes searches for diboson resonances, vector-like quarks and resonances with top quarks among others.

 

time:    4:00 p.m.
place:   Kolker Room (26-414)

(refreshments at 3:30 p.m.



September 26, 2016

hosted by:  Jesse Thaler


Kev Abazajian, UC Irvine

The Saga of Sterile Neutrino Dark Matter

Abstract: Sterile neutrinos as dark matter has been of interest for over twenty-three years. It ranges from "cold" to "warm" dark matter in its effects on structure formation. I will discuss increased accuracy in calculations of its production in the early universe through structure formation in the local universe today, as well as recent candidate detections of an X-ray line that could be produced via its decay.

 

time:    4:00 p.m.
place:   Kolker Room (26-414)

(refreshments at 3:30 p.m.)



October 3, 2016

hosted by: Lindley Winslow


Yannis Semertzidis, CAPP/IBS and KAIST, South Korea

The axion dark matter search at CAPP: a comprehensive approach

Abstract: Axions are the result of a dynamic field, similar to Higgs field, a result of the so-called Strong CP-problem solution.  The Strong CP-problem, i.e., why the electric dipole moment (EDM) of the neutron (and proton) has not been observed so far even though the theory of QCD predicts values by about ten order of magnitude larger than current experimental limits.  Axions as dark matter can be thought of as an oscillatory field interacting extremely weakly with normal matter.  The oscillation frequency is unknown, it can be anywhere between f = 200MHz to 200GHz and it’s expected to be a very narrow line, with df/f=10^-6.  A strong magnetic field can be used to convert part of that field into a very weak electric field oscillating at the same frequency and phase as the axion field.  In the coming years we plan to develop our experimental sensitivity to either observe or refute the axions as a viable dark matter candidate in a wide axion mass range.  That approach includes the development of ultra strong magnets, high quality resonators in the presence of strong B-fields, new resonator geometries, low noise cryo-amplifiers and new techniques of detecting axions.

 

Another related subject, through the strong CP-problem, is the search for the EDM of the proton, improving the present sensitivity on hadronic EDMs by more than three orders of magnitude to better than 10^{-29} e-cm.  Usually the study of EDM involves the application of strong electric fields and originally neutral systems were thought to be easier to work with.  Recently it became clear that charged particles in all-electric storage rings can be used for sensitive EDM searches by using techniques similar to the muon g-2 experiment.  The high sensitivity study of the proton EDM is possible due to the high intensity polarized proton beams readily available today, making possible to reach beyond 103 TeV in New Physics scale.

time:    4:00 p.m.
place:   Kolker Room (26-414)

(refreshments at 3:30 p.m.)



October 10, 2016



COLUMBUS DAY HOLIDAY

NO TALK



OCTOBER 17, 2016

hosted by: Mike Williams

Tomas Skwarnicki, Syracuse

Tetra- and Penta-quark Results from LHCb

Abstract: The last decade has seen upheaval in exotic hadron spectroscopy related to the observations of tetraquark, and more recently pentaquark, candidates with heavy quark pairs inside. Thanks to its unique capabilities, the LHCb experiment has left a strong mark on this topic. I will discuss the most important LHCb results related to this subject and I will put them in a context of the status of the field.

time:    4:00 p.m.
place:   Kolker Room (26-414)

(refreshments at 3:30 p.m.)



October 24, 2016

hosted by: TBA

TBA

TBA

time:    4:00 p.m.
place:   Kolker Room (26-414)

(refreshments at 3:30 p.m.)

 



October 31, 2016

hosted by: Lindley Winslow


Minerba Betancourt, FNAL

TBA

Abstract: TBA

time:    4:00 p.m.
place:   Kolker Room (26-414)

(refreshments at 3:30 p.m.)



November 7, 2016

hosted by: Jesse Thaler



Yonit Hochberg, Berkeley

TBA

Abstract: TBA

time:    4:00 p.m.
place:   Kolker Room (26-414)

(refreshments at 3:30 p.m.)



November 14, 2016

hosted by: Jesse Thaler



Kyle Cranmer, NYU

TBA

Abstract: TBA

time:    4:00 p.m.
place:   Kolker Room (26-414)

(refreshments at 3:30 p.m.)



November 21, 2016

hosted by: Will Detmold


Ira Rothstein, CMU

TBA

Abstract: TBA

time:    4:00 p.m.
place:   Kolker Room (26-414)

(refreshments at 3:30 p.m.)

 



November 28, 2016

hosted by:Mike Williams

Christine Aidala, University of Michigan

TBA

Abstract: TBA

time:    4:00 p.m.
place:   Kolker Room (26-414)

(refreshments at 3:30 p.m.)



December 5, 2016

hosted by: Jesse Thaler

Frank Petriello, NU/ANL

TBA

Abstract: TBA

 

time:    4:00 p.m.
place:   Kolker Room (26-414)

(refreshments at 3:30 p.m.)



May 9, 2016

hosted by: William Detmold



Yen-Jie Lee, MIT

TBA

Abstract: TBA

 

time:    4:00 p.m.
place:   Kolker Room (26-414)

(refreshments at 3:30 p.m.)