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Nuclear and Particle Physics Colloquia

Mondays ~ Refreshments 3:30pm Talk: 4:00pm ~ Kolker Room, 26-414

 

Committee:
Markus Klute, Chair ~ William Detmold ~ Mike Williams


 

September 8, 2014

hosted by: Prof. MIKE WILLIAMS



  Prof. Mark Vagins (University of California, Irvine)

  Zen and the Art of Gadolinium-Loaded Water   Cherenkov Detectors

Abstract: Water Cherenkov detectors have been used for many years to study neutrino interactions and search for nucleon decays. Super-Kamiokande, at 50 kilotons the largest such underground detector in the world, has itself enjoyed close to two decades of interesting and important physics results. Looking to the future, for the last eleven years extensive R&D on a potential upgrade to the detector known as GADZOOKS! has been underway and is now nearly complete. The benefits and challenges of enriching Super-K with 100,000 kilograms of a water-soluble gadolinium compound - thereby enabling it to detect thermal neutrons and dramatically improving its performance as a detector for supernova neutrinos, reactor neutrinos, atmospheric neutrinos, and also as a target for the T2K long-baseline neutrino experiment - will be discussed. Enriching other water-based detectors, both existing and planned, for use as remote non-proliferation monitors and short-baseline neutrino experiments, will also be discussed.

time:    4:00 p.m.
place:   Kolker Room (26-414)

(refreshments at 3:30 p.m.)



September 15, 2014

hosted by:  Prof. WILLIAM DETMOLD



  Prof. Sanjay Reddy (University of Washington)

  Neutron Stars in the Multi-Messenger Era: Extreme   Matter and Extreme Phenomena

Abstract: Neutron stars are at the core of most extreme astrophysical phenomena. In this talk I will discuss how the properties of matter at extreme density shape observable aspects of these phenomena. I highlight the role of nuclear and neutrino physics in core collapse supernova, neutron star mergers, nucleosynthesis and transient phenomena observed in accreting neutron stars and magnetars. Quantitative predictions for future multi-messenger signals (photon, neutrino and gravitational wave) is within reach and relies on combining advances in theory, simulation, and terrestrial experiments.

time:    4:00 p.m.
place:   Kolker Room (26-414)

(refreshments at 3:30 p.m.)



September 22, 2014

hosted by:  Prof. MARKUS KLUTE



  Dr. Nigel Lockyer (Director of Fermilab)

              Neutrinos, Front and Center!
  Towards a New Understanding of the Quantum Universe

Abstract: Neutrinos are the most numerous massive particles in the universe. The masses are tiny and unknown, which neutrino is heaviest is unknown, and whether the neutrino is a Majorana particle is unknown. We do not know whether the Higgs field provides mass to the neutrino. Indeed, the complete chapter on mass and fermion family patterns has yet to be written and at the heart of this discussion is the ubiquitous neutrino. Neutrino masses influence the cosmic microwave background polarization. Neutrinos are a possible source of CP violation in the universe that may play a role in generating the matter excess in the universe. Each of these questions is developing as one of the main quests in particle physics throughout the world. As Fermilab develops its plan for the next two decades with partners around the world, the neutrino will be front and center

time:    4:00 p.m.
place:   Kolker Room (26-414)

(refreshments at 3:30 p.m.)



September 29, 2014

hosted by:  Prof. WILLIAM DETMOLD



  Dr. Ruth Van de Water (Fermilab)

  To be announced

time:    4:00 p.m.
place:   Kolker Room (26-414)

(refreshments at 3:30 p.m.)



October 6, 2014

hosted by:  TBD



  Lee Grodzin's Award (to be announced)

  To be announced

time:    4:00 p.m.
place:   Kolker Room (26-414)

(refreshments at 3:30 p.m.)



October 13, 2014

COLUMBUS DAY – No NPPC



October 20, 2014

hosted by:  TBD



  Prof. Patrick Huber  (Virginia Tech)

  To be announced

time:    4:00 p.m.
place:   Kolker Room (26-414)

(refreshments at 3:30 p.m.)


October 27, 2014

hosted by: Prof. WILLIAM DETMOLD



   Prof. Fabio Maltoni

   To be announced

time:    4:00 p.m.
place:   Kolker Room (26-414)

(refreshments at 3:30 p.m.)



November 3, 2014

hosted by:  TBD



   Matthew Wetstein (University of Chicago)

 

time:    4:00 p.m.
place:   Kolker Room (26-414)

(refreshments at 3:30 p.m.)



November 10, 2014

VETERANS' DAY – No NPPC



November 17, 2014

hosted by:  Prof. WILLIAM DETMOLD



  Prof. Simona Murgia (University of California, Irvine)

  Indirect Detection of Dark Matter with
  Gamma Rays

Abstract:  Evidence for dark matter is overwhelming. From experimental data we can infer that dark matter constitutes most of the matter in the Universe and that it interacts very weakly, and at least gravitationally, with ordinary matter. However we do not know what it is. Several theoretical models have been proposed that predict the existence of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) that are excellent dark matter candidates. The existence of WIMPs can be tested indirectly, primarily through their annihilation or decay into photons. In this talk I'll present the latest results on these searches by Fermi LAT.

time:    4:00 p.m.
place:   Kolker Room (26-414)

(refreshments at 3:30 p.m.)



November 24, 2014

hosted by:  TBD



   To be announced

 

time:    4:00 p.m.
place:   Kolker Room (26-414)

(refreshments at 3:30 p.m.)



December 1, 2014

hosted by:  TBD



   To be announced

 

time:    4:00 p.m.
place:   Kolker Room (26-414)

(refreshments at 3:30 p.m.)



December 8, 2013

hosted by:  TBD



   To be announced

 

time:    4:00 p.m.
place:   Kolker Room (26-414)

(refreshments at 3:30 p.m.)