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Nuclear and Particle Physics Colloquia

Mondays ~ Refreshments 3:30pm Talk: 4:00pm ~ Kolker Room, 26-414

 

Committee:
Markus Klute, Chair ~ William Detmold ~ Hong Liu ~ Mike Williams


 

February 10, 2014

hosted by:  Prof. WILLIAM DETMOLD



  Dr. Guilherme Milhano (Lisbon, CERN)

  Sense and Sensitivity:  What Jets Can Tell Us
  about the Quark Gluon Plasma

Abstract:  After an extended, and hopefully pedagogical, survey of the current understanding of parton dynamics in the presence of a hot, dense and colored medium, I will argue in favor of the essential, and in some aspects unique, role played by jets in the unraveling of the properties of the Quark Gluon Plasma produced in ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions at the LHC.

time:    4:00 p.m.
place:   Kolker Room (26-414)

(refreshments at 3:30 p.m.)



February 17, 2014

PRESIDENTS' DAY – No NPPC



February 24, 2014

hosted by:  Prof. WILLIAM DETMOLD



  Prof. Witek Nazarewicz
  (University of Tennessee/ORNL)

  The Limits of the Nuclear Landscape

Abstract:  Understanding nuclei is a quantum many-body problem of incredible richness and diversity and studies of nuclei address some of the great challenges that are common throughout modern science. Nuclear structure research strives to build a unified and comprehensive microscopic framework in which bulk nuclear properties, nuclear excitations, and nuclear reactions can all be described. A new and exciting focus in this endeavor lies in the description of exotic and short-lived nuclei at the limits of proton-to-neutron asymmetry, mass, and charge.

In this talk, experimental and theoretical advances in rare isotope re-search will be reviewed in the context of the main scientific questions. Particular attention will be given to the worldwide radioactive beams initiatives and to the progress in theoretical studies of nuclei due to the advent of extreme-scale computing platforms.

time:    4:00 p.m.
place:   Kolker Room (26-414)

(refreshments at 3:30 p.m.)



March 3, 2014

hosted by:  Prof. MARKUS KLUTE



  Prof. Joao Guimaraes da Costa (Harvard University)

  Physics at the Large Hadron Collider:
  The First Four Years

Abstract:  Scientists have been exploring the high energy frontier with the CERN Large Hadron Collider for the last four years. The substantial dataset accumulated thus far, albeit at lower energy than initially foreseen, already yielded a Nobel prize award for the discovery of the Higgs Boson.

The new boson, discovered in 2012 by the ATLAS and CMS collaborations, has been shown to behave very much like the long-sought-after Higgs Boson, and hence it completes the discovery of the Standard Model of Particle Physics. Remarkably, no other deviations from the Standard Model have been found, neither in precision measurements nor in direct searches for new particles. In this talk, I will review several of these measurements from the ATLAS collaboration, with a focus on what we have learned about the Standard Model.

time:    4:00 p.m.
place:   Kolker Room (26-414)

(refreshments at 3:30 p.m.)



March 10, 2014

hosted by:  Prof. LIU HONG




  Dr. Veronika Hubeny (Durham University)

  Entanglement and Geometry

Abstract: Entanglement entropy is an important quantity characterizing quantum systems, employed in diverse areas of research ranging from condensed matter physics to quantum computing. Using holography, an invaluable tool for elucidating certain strongly coupled quantum field theories by using their higher-dimensional classical gravitational dual, entanglement entropy is conjectured to be related to a simple geometrical construct: an area of an extremal surface in asymptotically AdS spacetime. I will review this proposal, discuss some of the recent applications in time-dependent settings, and consider the role of causality.

time:    4:00 p.m.
place:   Kolker Room (26-414)

(refreshments at 3:30 p.m.)



March 17, 2014

hosted by:  Prof. MIKE WILLIAMS



  Prof. Daniel McKinsey (Yale University)

  First Science Results from the
  LUX Dark Matter Experiment

Abstract: The LUX (Large Underground Xenon) experiment is designed for the direct detection of dark matter particles via their collisions with xenon nuclei. This two-phase xenon time-projection chamber, operating at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (Lead, South Dakota), was cooled and filled in February 2013. Results will be presented from the first dark matter search data set, taken during the period April to August 2013 and corresponding to 85.3 live-days of data with a fiducial mass of 118 kg. The experiment exhibited a sensitivity to spin-independent WIMP-nucleon elastic scattering with a minimum upper limit on the cross section of 7.6 x 10^-46 cm^2 at a WIMP mass of 33 GeV/c^2. The LUX results are inconsistent with the low-mass WIMP signal interpretations of data from several recent direct detection experiments. This talk will provide an overview of the LUX experiment, focusing in the recent science results.

time:    4:00 p.m.
place:   Kolker Room (26-414)

(refreshments at 3:30 p.m.)



March 24, 2014

SPRING BREAK – No NPPC



March 31, 2014

OPEN HOUSE – No NPPC


April 7, 2014

hosted by:  Prof. WILLIAM DETMOLD



  Prof. Xiangdong Ji (University of Maryland)

  Parton Physics from Large-Momentum
  Effective Field Theory

Abstract: Feynman's parton model provides a simple description of high-energy scattering involving composite hadrons, but relegates the non-perturbative QCD physics onto the light-cone, which is intrinsically Minkowskian. On the other hand, Wilson's lattice QCD is intrinsically Euclidean, and cannot be used to calculate the parton physics directly. Despite two decades of efforts, solving the non-perturbative QCD in Minknowski formulation – light-cone quantization – has not yielded a systematic approximation. In this talk, I will introduce a new effective theory of QCD, which un-boosts the parton physics off the light-cone, allowing calculations finally be done in Euclidean lattice QCD.

time:    4:00 p.m.
place:   Kolker Room (26-414)

(refreshments at 3:30 p.m.)



April 14, 2014

hosted by:  Prof. WILLIAM DETMOLD




  Prof. Jesse Thaler (MIT)

  The Case for Jet Substructure

Abstract:  Collisions at the LHC are dominated by jets, collimated sprays of hadrons that are proxies for short-distance quarks and gluons. With the remarkable performance of the ATLAS and CMS detectors, jets can now be characterized not just by their overall direction and energy but also by their substructure. In this talk, I highlight the ways that jet substructure can enhance the search for new physics at the LHC, especially at higher energies and luminosities. I also explain how theoretical studies of jet substructure have taught us surprising lessons about QCD.

time:    4:00 p.m.
place:   Kolker Room (26-414)

(refreshments at 3:30 p.m.)


April 21, 2014

PATRIOT'S DAY – No NPPC



April 28, 2014

hosted by:  Prof. MARKUS KLUTE




  Prof. Paolo Zuccon (MIT)

  AMS-02:  Status and Perspectives

Abstract:  The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer is a particle physics detector installed on the International Space Station, measuring the Cosmic Ray flux in the rigidity range 0.1-2 TV. The current status of the data analysis will be presented as well as the possible interpretations in terms of Dark Matter or other astrophysical phenomena.

time:    4:00 p.m.
place:   Kolker Room (26-414)

(refreshments at 3:30 p.m.)



May 5, 2014

hosted by:  Prof. LIU HONG




  Prof. Mariangela Lisanti (Princeton University)

  Bringing Dark Matter into Focus

Abstract:   Although dark matter comprises the vast majority of the matter in the universe, its properties remain elusive. Direct detection experiments are a promising avenue for discovering and characterizing the dark sector. These experiments seek to identify dark matter particles as they scatter off nuclei in underground detectors. The standard picture since the 1980s is that the scattering rate modulates annually due to the Earth's orbit around the Sun. We have recently discovered a new modulation effect: Unbound dark-matter particles are focused by the Sun's gravitational potential, affecting their phase-space density in the lab frame. This 'gravitational focusing' results in a significant overall shift in the phase of the annual modulation and provides a powerful new tool for characterizing the properties of the dark matter particle.

time:    4:00 p.m.
place:   Kolker Room (26-414)

(refreshments at 3:30 p.m.)



May 12, 2014 CANCELLED

hosted by:  Prof. MARKUS KLUTE




  Prof. Simona Murgia (University of California Irvine)

  Indirect Detection of Dark Matter with Gamma Rays

CANCELLED

Abstract:  Evidence for dark matter is overwhelming. From experimental data we can infer that dark matter constitutes most of the matter in the Universe and that it interacts very weakly, and at least gravitationally, with ordinary matter. However we do not know what it is. Several theoretical models have been proposed that predict the existence of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) that are excellent dark matter candidates. The existence of WIMPs can be tested indirectly, primarily through their annihilation or decay into photons. In this talk I'll present the latest results on these searches by Fermi LAT.

time:    4:00 p.m.
place:   Kolker Room (26-414)

(refreshments at 3:30 p.m.)