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LNS Special Seminars


 

Friday, February 13, 2015

hosted by:  

    2:00 PM

    Kolker Room, 26-414


Dr. Michalis Bachtis, CERN

Higgs Discovery and Future Prospects in the Energy Frontier

Abstract: The discovery of a Higgs boson at the LHC compatible with the Standard Model (SM) has set new standards in high energy physics research. While the Standard Model is converging towards becoming the Standard Theory of particle physics, the next step in the energy frontier is to exploit the larger possible energy to discover possible deviations form the SM. The second LHC run at 13 TeV could unravel new phenomena via direct searches and one of the research priorities is to use the new data to search for possible extensions of the Standard Model. The Higgs boson could be used as a tool to discover new physics via its production and decays. The next step in the energy frontier is to exploit the full potential of the LHC by running on high luminosity. The high luminosity LHC can also be used as a precision tool towards predicting the scale of new physics implying large experimental challenges that need to be addressed in years to come.




Friday, February 20, 2015

hosted by:  Gunther Roland

    2:00 PM

    Kolker Room, 26-414


Dr. Alexander Schmah, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Soft and Hard Physics with Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions

Abstract: Studying the emergent properties of hot and dense nuclear matter is one of the main goals of relativistic heavy-ion collision experiments. At the highest energies a Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP) phase arises with partonic degrees of freedom. Due to the extremely short life time of the QGP, only probes created curing the collision can be used to study its properties. I will discuss recent developments at STAR for two of the most important probes from soft and hardphysics, namely elliptic flow and jets. I will furthermore give an overview of the Beam Energy Scan (BES) at RHIC, which was carried out to find signatures of a QCD critical point and a first order phase transition. At the end I will give an outlook of BES phase II, which is anticipated for the years 2018-2019.

Friday, February 27, 2015

hosted by:  Gunther Roland

    2:00 PM

    Kolker Room, 26-414


Dr. Jan C. Bernauer, MIT

The Precision Frontier: Lepton-Proton Scattering

Abstract: The nucleon and its structure are the focus of intense study on all energy scales, in both current and upcoming experiments. It is one of the simplest systems in non-perturbative QCD and the accurate description of its properties is a touchstone for theoretical calculations.

 

Recent precision experiments have provided a wealth of information, but have also illuminated two glaring discrepancies: the proton radius puzzle and the form factor ratio divergence. The former, still unsolved, may have opened the door to discovery of physics beyond the Standard Model, while a solution to the latter seems in reach.

 

In this talk, I will discuss the Mainz high precision form factor measurement and global form factor analysis, which are corner stones of the radius puzzle; the OLYMPUS experiment, which is poised to give the final confirmation of the solution to the ratio problem; the MUSE experiment, which will provide a missing piece for the proton radius puzzle; and the proposed DarkLight experiment, which will search for physics beyond the Standard Model at the intensity frontier



Friday, March 6, 2015

hosted by:  Christoph Paus

    2:00 PM

    Kolker Room, 26-414


Dr. Philip Harris, CERN

Sniffing Out Dark Matter at the LHC

Abstract: With observed galactic excesses, tighter constraints from underground experiments, and a precise measurement of the relic density, our understanding of dark matter has greatly improved. As the only source that can potentially produce heavy dark matter, the LHC has the capability of complementing existing measurements. However, the LHC faces serious challenges in the next years of operation. The large intensities and high particle density demand new approaches to resolving particle collisions. In this talk, we present a new kind of “QCD-­‐imaging,” PUPPI, which enhances the resolution of reconstructed particles in the LHC and largely overcomes the difficulties of high intensity running. In conjunction with a deeper understanding of hadronic structures, I will show these developments can establish a new paradigm in dark matter measurements.