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AkinPelu

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mobolaji AkinPelu

Faculty Mentor: Dr. Karl Iagnemma
Direct Supervisor: Dr. Carmine Senatore

Biography
My name is Mobolaji Akinpelu. I am from Lagos, Nigeria and I attend Coppin State University, Baltimore, Maryland. I am a rising senior in the Computer Science department at Coppin. I am interested in robotics for graduate school research, especially in the development of control systems and algorithms for robots. My hobbies include cooking and playing soccer video games. In a couple of years, I hope to be really good at whatever research area I specialize in and to use my expertise in socially significant and tangible ways.

Abstract

Studying Interaction between MARS Rover Wheel and MARS Soil Simulant. Mars Exploratory Rover (MER), Spirit, has been rendered immovable after getting stuck in soil. My lab collaborates with NASA to study wheel-soil interaction to solve this problem. My task will be to write MATLAB code aimed to track particle motion under MER's wheel. I will be responsible for taking pictures of the wheel motion from the side and running my program to track particle motion in time. In essence, my project is to design, implement and test a particle tracking program to be integrated with the test rig and to analyze the collected data.


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Angarita

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Maria Paula Angarita

Faculty Mentor: Pablo Jarillo-Herrero
Direct Supervisor: Nathaniel Gabor

Biography
I study physics, economics, and mathematics at Florida International University and wish to integrate these academic interests into an action-packed career. This will include multidisciplinary research as well as hands-on involvement in order to have a greater impact on our rapidly-changing world. I am especially interested in advocating for policies and programs that will raise the standard of living of people and provide a meaningful education to kids. I was born and raised in Colombia, which explains why I am passionate about food, salsa, and poverty alleviation.

Abstract
Title: Optoelectronic measurements of the topological insulator Bi2Se3: probing the optical, thermal, and electronic properties of surface states Abstract: Until now, the physics governing the optoelectronic response of massless electrons and holes, such as those in graphene and the surface states of topological insulators, has not been fully understood. Recent research on optoelectronic devices with single and double layer graphene components has revealed that a photothermal, rather than photovoltaic, mechanism triggers photocurrent signals. In this project, we will draw on our knowledge of the optoelectronic response of massless carriers in graphene to comparatively explore the optoelectronic response of topological insulator materials. To do this, we will measure the electronic current resulting from shining a focused laser onto a nanoscale gate voltage-controlled device composed of Bi2Se3. By measuring the spatially resolved photocurrent signal as a function of gate voltages, temperature, laser power and wavelength, we aim to understand the structure and transport behavior of massless charge carriers. Optoelectronic measurements that probe these novel surface states may open the door to applications in efficient photo-detection, solar thermoelectric energy harvesting, and computation based on optical manipulation of massless charge carriers.

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Anthony

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Matthew Anthony

Faculty Mentor: Dr. Jocelyn Monroe
Direct Supervisor: Dr. Kimberly Palladino

Biography
I was born in Lancaster, PA 21 years ago and grew up there for the first 18 years of my life. I am a double major in physics and mathematics and I am doing a concentration in advanced physics at the University of Notre Dame. After finishing my undergraduate degree, I would like to attend graduate school and work towards my PhD in either particle or nuclear physics. My eventual goal is to become a professor so that I can teach the next generation of physicists. In my free time, I like to box and play tennis and some soccer (while I have plenty of room to improve in all three) and to spend time with family and friends!

Abstract
Weakly interacting massive particles (WIMP’s), are hypothetical particles of which dark matter may be comprised. MiniCLEAN is an experiment designed to detect WIMP’s using a liquid argon detector to capture light signals from interactions with dark matter. These interactions are extremely rare (only several per year) so a high efficiency veto detector must distinguish between dark matter interactions and false positives. These false positives could be caused by other particles such as cosmic ray muons, high energy neutrons, and low energy neutrons interacting with the liquid argon detector. The goal of the project is to construct the veto detector and to characterize the electronic readout to distinguish interactions not coming from WIMP’s.

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Asante

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Angel Asante

Faculty Mentor: Dr. Kristala Jones Prather
Direct Supervisor: Himanshu Dhamankar (and Geisa Lopez)

Biography
I am originally from the San Francisco Bay Area. As a rising junior majoring in Bioengineering at UC Berkeley, my research interests involve applications of synthetic biology, namely redesigning and engineering biological systems that have useful and interesting capabilities in our healthcare and, ultimately, our society. My goals are to enroll in a Bioengineering Ph.D. program to become a pioneer in this emerging field and inspire others to pursue careers in science and engineering. In my spare time I enjoy hiking, traveling, and reading.

Abstract
Title: Ehancing 3-HBL and DHBA Synthesis From Glucose as a Sole Carbon Source Abstract: 3-hydroxy-γ-butyrolactone (3-HBL) is an important and highly desirable chiral building block in the pharmaceutical industry. We in the Prather group have established the first biosynthetic pathway towards 3-HBL and its hydrolyzed form, 3,4-dihydroxybutyric acid (DHBA), in recombinant E.coli using glucose as a single feedstock. Now, we are interested in further enhancing the production of 3-HBL through host engineering by knocking out various genes using the P1 transduction protocol and measuring the changes in pathway productivity.

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Ayala

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Arturo Ayala-Navarro

Faculty Mentor: Roberto Rusconi
Direct Supervisor: Roman Stocker

Biography
I was born in Michoacan, Mexico, raised in Napa, California, and educated at California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo. My research interests are in acoustics and vibrations as well as the exploration of new forms of sustainable energy. I enjoy all sports, swimming, biking, dancing, laughing, smiling and learning. My goal is to finish my undergraduate studies, continue my pursuit of a PhD, and eventually become an educator.

Abstract
Modeling Flow Effects on Quorum Sensing in Biofilm Patches Biofilms are surface-associated communities of microorganisms which are often studied to develop antibiotics. A fundamental step in biofilm formation is quorum sensing, a cell-to-cell communication mechanism. Researchers at MIT’s Parsons Lab are currently investigating the effects of flow on quorum sensing. In particular, they have developed a technique which allows the creation of biofilms of different shapes and dimensions (biofilm patches) in microfluidic devices. It is expected that flow-induced shear for a given biofilm geometry will affect the process of quorum sensing, and experiments are currently being performed to examine these implications. A computational model which accurately describes the system’s dynamics is to be developed. Results from the model will be compared to experimental data.

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Bell

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

U'Kevia Bell

Faculty Mentor: Paula Hammond
Direct Supervisor: Dongsook Chang

Biography
My name is U'Kevia Bell; I was born and raised in the Heart of Texas, where friendliness and Military are everyday aspects. I am currently pursuing a Bachelor’s degree in Chemical Engineering at Prairie View A&M University in Prairie View, TX. I enjoy horseback riding, laser tagging, Play Station 3, and watching movies (I love musicals). I aspire to receive a PhD in Chemical Engineering concentrating on Nano- therapeutics and Cancer Drug Delivery. I believe that I can make a huge difference in the world through these studies. I eventually would like to start my own company.

Abstract
Title: Binding and Down Stream Signaling Effect of EGFR-Targeting Peptide Ligand, D4. Abstract: In Cancerous tumors it is noted that there is overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR). In several studies it has been discovered that a particular combination of antibodies down regulate EGFR, this leads to an increase in the ability to destroy tumors and decrease mortality rates in cancerous mice. EGF is a ligand used to target tumors; however, it has an agonistic effect when conjugated with a dendrimer. By using D4 ligand instead of EGF ligand to bind with the dendrimer , I am hoping to see minimal growth effects; Thus, proving D4 to be a better targeting ligand than EGF. My first task is to verify that D4 is able to specifically bind with EGFR, by using flow cytometry. Next I will compare the cell proliferation of D4 treated cells with non-treated cells using MTT Assay. I will then take a more detailed look using Face Assay, to see if the growth signal is turned on. In this process I will use antibodies to specifically recognize the activated Kinase.

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Berzan

 

 

 

 

 

 

Constantin Berzan

Faculty Mentor: Una-May O'Reilly
Direct Supervisor: James McDermott

Biography
I was born in Moldova and lived there for most of my life, before coming to the US for college. I am currently studying Computer Science at Tufts University. I am interested in computer intelligence: machine learning, evolutionary algorithms, robotics, emergent behavior. I like biking, dystopias, modular origami, long letters, and loose-leaf tea.

Abstract
Title: Optimizing the Cabling Layout of a Wind Farm Laying out cables between turbines incurs a significant cost when building a wind farm. For small farms, an expert can propose a good layout based on his or her domain knowledge. But as we plan for larger and larger farms, it becomes increasingly difficult to ensure that a hand-crafted layout is efficient. We aim to develop a software tool that will automatically find a cabling layout that minimizes costs. We started by discussing the problem with an industry expert, in order to apprehend the options, costs, and constraints involved in cabling. This has helped to encapsulate the domain knowledge into a model that we can evaluate using software. After some initial work on gauging the difficulty of the problem, we plan to solve it using an evolutionary algorithm.

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Cantu

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sergio Cantu

Faculty Mentor: Paulo C. Lozano

Biography
Hi my name is Sergio Cantu. I come from Brownsville, Texas. I am a rising senior studying physics and mathematics at the University of Texas at Brownsville. My hobbies have helped me find my way through academia, for example my love for video games has helped me use them as a tool for teaching physics for non-science majors in college. My research interests include: optics, nanophotonics, space propulsion, among others. My goal in life is to get a PhD in science and be able to make a significant contribution in my field.

Abstract
Title: Development of an electrochemistry-free Ionic Liquid Ion Source Ionic Liquid Ion Sources (ILIS) are being investigated for potential use in a wide range of applications, such as space propulsion. Despite advances in this field, there is still much to learn about ILIS and electrospray propulsion. One of the biggest issues is the role of electrochemistry in the performance of electrospray propulsion devices. The project goal is to develop a device that completely removes the electrochemical effects in the electrospraying process. Our approach is to introduce novel materials into the device that will aid in the transport of ions throughout the ionic liquid. If successful, this experiment will settle whether or not electrochemistry is essential in ILIS devices.

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Cruz

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Melissa Cruz-Acuna

Faculty Mentor: Dr. Moungi Bawendi
Direct Supervisor: Jose Cordero

Biography
I am originally from the Caribbean island, Puerto Rico, where I study Industrial Biotechnology at the University of Puerto Rico at Mayaguez. My research interests are varied, but now I am focused in the power of nanotechnology for biological applications. I love to learn about interdisciplinary approaches to solve biological questions. Also I love the beach, to travel, to read, and sing.

Abstract
SYNTHESIS OF A MALEIMIDE OLIGOPEPTIDE-BASED LIGAND FOR QUANTUM DOTS Semiconductor nanocrystals, also know as quantum dots (QDs), are inorganic fluorophores that exhibit tunable emission, high quantum yields, large extinction coefficients and exceptional chemical and photo stability. These properties make QDs attractive for biological applications, especially since their brightness and stability make them suitable for the study of intracellular dynamics by single molecule imaging. Poly-imidazole-based coating has been presented as a useful ligand that achieves QD water dispersion and maintains the particle’s compact size (Liu et. al., 2009). However, specific targeting to cellular receptor by multivalent QDs often leads to protein cross-linking, which makes data analysis difficult. Thus, there is a need to control the number of functional group on the QD’s surface to minimize interference with biological processes. Here, we present the synthesis of an oligopeptide-based ligand that contains exactly one maleimide functional group per polymer. Solid phase peptide synthesis is performed to control the composition of the oligopeptide and achieve monovalency. RAFT living polymerization technique was employed to add a monodisperse polysulfonate tag, which is used to separate QDs containing a single copy of the oligopeptide ligand, using agarose gel electrophoresis.

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Dahan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Eden Dahan

Faculty Mentor: Dr. Alvar Saenz-Otero
Direct Supervisor: Dr. Alvar Saenz-Otero

Biography
My name is Eden Dahan. I am currently a senior at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University majoring in Aerospace Engineering. I am also a scholar in the Ronald E. McNair Post Baccalaureate Program. My research interests include Space Propulsion, Controls, and Autonomous Robotic Systems. The fields stated are of interest is due to the fact that they can greatly mature different technologies important to the future of space exploration. Upon graduation from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, my intent is to pursue higher education towards my PhD. My ultimate goal is to continuously expand my knowledge in my field through education and experience until I have found myself successful in my chosen career. My hobbies include: taekwondo, surfing and motorcycle racing.

Abstract
“Preliminary Design for SPHERES Payload Enabling Fluid Slosh and Fluid Transfer Experiments” Florida Institute of Technology is investigating fluid slosh coupling with vehicle dynamics through the use of visual aids in the form of three orthogonal cameras along with motion sensors. Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University is investigating the stability of liquid storage and transfer within fuel tanks undergoing different fluid transfer scenarios. Both experiments could utilize synchronized-position hold, engage, reorient experimental satellites (SPHERES), currently onboard the International Space Station as a test platform in order to validate different technologies. The research’s goal is to produce a preliminary design of a SPHERES payload that will allow for fluid slosh and fluid transfer experiments using SPHERES in microgravity. This research is “game-changing” as it can impact long duration, interplanetary missions. Propellant transfer can be achieved if it can be demonstrated that fluid flow can be controlled in microgravity through inertial propellant settling within the propellant tanks. Also, fluid slosh still remains a unique problem; using visual aids along with Computational Fluid Dynamics will provide important reliable information based on experimentation and software simulation of fluid slosh dynamics. The objective of the research is to mature different technologies along with initiating the collaboration with different research institutions.

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Deo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Darrel Deo

Faculty Mentor: Seth Teller
Direct Supervisor: Seth Teller

Biography
I was born and raised near Oakland, CA and am currently a rising senior at the University of California, Santa Cruz. My Major focus is Computer Engineering in Robotics and Autonomous Systems. I’m interested in research that’s geared towards helping people with mental or physical ailments through the use of robotics. I aspire to be a Professor of Robotics Engineering, where I can do research that positively impacts the world while teaching the bright minds of tomorrow.

Abstract
Real-Time Text Conveyance via a Videation Assistant for Blind Users Darrel R. Deo Supervisor: Professor Seth Teller Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, RVSN Group of CSAIL, Massachusetts Institute of Technology The RVSN Group at CSAIL has designed a vest to aid the blind or cognitively impaired in a natural manner. This vest, also known as the Vidation Assistant, is fitted with sensors and output components ranging from a Microsoft Kinect, Lidar, HTC G1 mobile phone and a text-to-braille SyncBraille device. At the forefront of aiding the blind is the notion that text is the most common means of relaying information. Signage enables people to navigate complex, busy, or unknown areas. I will begin by learning the system architecture and software development infrastructure of the project. Exploring the use of pods, the project’s codebase, and build dependencies will be pivotal in understanding the structure of the project. My initial motive is to develop a subset of the prototype in order to conduct user trials. I will then develop software and algorithms for the Videation Assistant to convey text present in the user’s environment. I will employ OCR engines to distinguish text that appears in the image files that the Kinect samples. After implementing this rigid framework, I will invoke the use of probability methods to distinguish between which types of text should hold precedence over others such as, hazard signs and near vs. far text.

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Gamboa

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jacqueline Gamboa Varela

Faculty Mentor: Timothy Swager
Direct Supervisor: Jason Cox

Biography
I attend the University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) and I’m majoring in chemistry with a minor in biology. Volunteering is a big part of my life and I currently do volunteer work with the Ronald McDonald House Charities-Family Room at a local hospital. I also love spreading the word about chemistry and volunteer doing Chemistry CirCus at local schools. I work in an organic research laboratory, making molecules for materials and must say I love it!.

Abstract
Synthesis of Extended Acenes by Diels-Alder Cycloadditions in Conductive Packing for Singlet-Fission. Singlet-fission is a process where an organic chromophore in an excited state distributes its excitation to an adjacent molecule, converting both into a triplet excited state. This system design can be used for solar cell production. This project will focus on the synthesis of a variety of extended acenes bearing triptycene moieties. The syntheses will involve a number of synthetic manipulations including Diels-Alder cycloadditions, 1,2-carbonyl additions, reductive aromatization reactions and other important methodologies. Our objective is to use the internal free volume of the triptycene functionality to generate solid-state packing motifs that are conducive to singlet-fission.

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Ginory

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alejandro Ginory

Faculty Mentor: Dr. Paul Seidel
Direct Supervisor: Timothy Nguyen

Biography
I'm from Miami, Florida where I study Mathematics at Florida International University. I am currently interested in abstract algebra due to its beauty and widespread application to so many different problems. My project this summer is related to the action of the braid group on m-tuples of transpositions in the symmetric group on n letters. My current goal is to attend graduate school and attain a PhD in Mathematics.

Abstract
Graph Theoretic Properties arising from Hurwitz Equivalence in Symmetric Groups We investigate the braid group B_d action on d-tuples of transpositions in the symmetric group on n letters S_n which we shall refer to as Hurwitz moves. Specifically, we will be considering the d-tuples (t1, t2, ..., t_d) whose entries generate a subgroup of S_n that acts transitively on {1,..., n} and where t1*t2 *** t_d= 1. We then define a graph G whose vertices are the d-tuples described above and whose edges are determined by the B_d action transforming one d-tuple into another. The aims of this research are as follows: determine the diameter of G (especially the asymptotic behavior for large n and d), find an efficient algorithm for transforming one (t1, t2, ..., t_d) into another through Hurwitz moves, and associate a character to the action of Bd on the d-tuples in question. We plan to determine a formula for the number of d-tuples with the prescribed properties, establish lower and upper bounds for this number, and determine finite quotients of B_d to achieve these goals.

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Grell

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TeSehai Grell

Faculty Mentor: Collin Stultz
Direct Supervisor: Sarah E.J. Bowman

Biography
I am from a small country in the Caribbean called the Commonwealth of Dominica. I am currently studying Chemistry at Morgan State University. My undergraduate research project deal with a innovative technique for accelerated crystallization of small molecules such as amino acids with the aid of metal nanaoparticles and microwave heating. This summer, I my research project is heavily computational and requires me to produce a homology model of a protein. My immediate goal is to receive a graduate degree in chemistry.

Abstract
Computational Simulation of a Homology Model of Helicobacter pylori NikR-Regulatory Protein Tsehai A. J. Grell, Sarah E.J. Bowman, Catherine L. Drennan and Collin M. Stultz Helicobacter pylori are gastric pathogens, which cause peptic ulcers and increase the risk of developing gastric carcinoma. H. pylori is able to survive the acidic conditions of the human stomach and to colonize the more neutral gastric mucosa of the stomach. A nickel-dependent transcription regulatory protein, HpNikR, is an important player in H. Pylori’s ability to adapt to different environmental conditions. Presently, there have been three structures solved for nickel-coordinated HpNikR. However, these structures are problematic because the crystallization conditions were at acidic pH values, rather than a more neutral pH. We hypothesize that the structure of HpNikR at neutral pH is similar to that of Escherichia coli (EcNikR). The goal of this project is to produce, computationally, a structure of HpNikR at physiological conditions using homology modelling and test its stability through molecular dynamic simulations. The EcNikR structure at neutral pH serves as the basis for the homology model.

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Gunther

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thoth Gunther

Faculty Mentor: Peter Fisher
Direct Supervisor: Jan Balewski

Biography
I was born in Chicago, Il. I attend Hampton University where I am a Physics major. My research interest range widely from studying particle collision kinematics to the engineering of Aerospace vehicles. Currently, I spend much of my free time programming various project for fun. Academically I plan to go on to graduate school and pursue an advanced degree in Physics.

Abstract
Title: DarkLight Detector Design and Optimization Dark matter is thought to make up more than half of the total mass of most galaxies, the effects of which can be seen through astrophysical observations and can explain anomalies which would otherwise clash with the general understanding of physics. The Detecting A Resonance Kinematically with eLectrons Incident on Gaseous Hydrogen Target (DarkLight) experiment investigates one such anomaly. The DarkLight experiment will search for the existence of a dark matter force carrying particle, the A-prime (A’) boson, through the study of electron-proton collisions. Specifically, by looking for a resonance peak at the A′ mass in the electron-positron invariant mass spectrum. This project’s goal is to design and optimize the detector which will be used to detect the A′ for the DarkLight experiment using GEANT4 simulations and ROOT, a graphical analysis software package. Currently the DarkLight experiment is in the beginning phases of design thus this project will help determine and solidify the geometries of the detector.

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Haji

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Maha Haji

Faculty Mentor: Prof. Michael S. Triantafyllou
Direct Supervisor: James Schulmeister and Jason Dahl

Biography
My name is Maha Haji and I am a rising super senior pursuing a dual degree in Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mathematics at the University of California, Berkeley. Having grown up in South Florida and moved out to the Bay Area for college, I have always been surrounded by sunshine and beaches, which has undoubtedly shaped my hobbies and research interest. My research interests include ocean engineering, specifically the development of wave energy converters and ways in which they can be utilized in developing nations. Aside from academics, I love doing anything and everything outdoors, including (but most certainly not limited to) swimming, surfing, sailing, scuba diving, hiking, and camping.

Abstract
Title: Drag control on a maneuvering slender body Most ocean vehicles are designed to be streamlined bodies to minimize drag when moving forward. However, when maneuvering, these bodies encounter significant increases in drag forces due to flow separation. Since these large drag forces can result in a decrease in forward speed and increases in power required to maintain speed, it is desirable to control the vortex separation process in order to minimize increased drag forces on a vehicle. In this experiment, two rotating cylinders will be used to inject angular momentum into the fluid surrounding a main cylinder with the goal of inhibiting vortex separation and thereby decrease drag forces on the main cylinder. A future goal of this project is to implement a flow control device to decrease vortex separation that will be activated based on measurements of the force on the main cylinder and the velocity profile of the wake.

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Havener

 

 

 

 

 

Laura Havener

Faculty Mentor: Dr. Richard Milner
Direct Supervisor: Dr. Richard Milner

Biography
My name is Laura Havener and I am from High Point, North Carolina. I currently am a rising senior at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill where I am majoring in physics with a minor in mathematics. My goal is to attend graduate school in nuclear or particle physics to obtain a Ph.D so hopefully I can be a research professor at a university. In my free time I like to dance, run, and hang out with friends.

Abstract
Title: Experimental Perspective on Elastic Electron-Proton Scattering at the Electron-Ion Collider The Electron Ion Collider is a proposed accelerator to collide polarized electron and proton beams in order to study the quark and gluon substructures of nucleons and nuclei. Initial theoretical development of the collider kinematics for elastic electron proton collisions has been accomplished, but actual experimental setups need to be considered. The plausible ranges of experimental parameters such as beam energies, electron and proton beam angles, and detector features for experimental execution of the theoretical situations proposed need to be outlined. A major difficulty lies in separating elastic scattering from inelastic scattering. This distinction is clearly defined in theoretical calculations but the difference becomes blurred in reality. The ROOT Data Analysis Framework will be used to evaluate these different experimental situations in order to design specific experiments that can accomplish the EIC tasks.

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Johnson

 

 

 

 

 

 

Joel Johnson

Faculty Mentor: Tim Swager
Direct Supervisor: Rebecca Parkhurst

Biography
Joel is from Chicago, IL and currently attends the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, majoring in Chemistry. Since he was young, Joel loved to tinker with and question things that he didn't understand. His ultimate goal is to obtain a PhD in Chemistry and become a professor.

Abstract
Title: Synthesis of Anthracene Based Ladder Polymers. Abstract: Inorganic semiconductors, such as Silicon (Si) and Gallium Arsenide (GaAs), display novel electronic properties that make them useful in electronic devices. However, due to the relatively high cost and density of such materials, researchers have experimented with carbon-based material as replacements. Acenes, which are composed of linearly fused benzene rings, have been shown to have novel electronic properties, indicating a potential to act as semi-conducting material. One drawback of such polymeric structures is an associated decrease in stability at the number of fused benzene rings increase. Creating organic polymers composed of stable acenes separated by four membered rings may lead to an organic semiconductor with novel electronic properties that is stable enough to be used in current and future technology which will ultimately lead to lowered cost in production and fabrication of light-weight, flexible electronic devices.

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Lopez

 

 

 

 

 

Hellen Lopez

Faculty Mentor: Harry Asada
Direct Supervisor: Ian Rust

Biography
My journey begins in Pasadena, California where crowded and poor living conditions forced us to move to where I’ve called home for the past 18 years, South Pasadena, California. I am now a rising senior at Cornell University majoring in mechanical engineering and am currently interested in surgical robotics and the sustainability of communities with hopes of reaching out to poor and underdeveloped countries in the future. My family and my passion to help others have kept me on track, but singing at my university church choir is a passion of mine that fills me with more joy than all the world’s combined. I love singing and it has been a great teacher, friend, and companion over the years.

Abstract
Title: Two-Axis Gimbal Design For Spherical Underwater Vehicle The Eyeball ROV (Remotely Operated Vehicle) was designed for the purpose of monitoring areas underwater inaccessible to humans due to hazardous environments, i.e. nuclear reactor inspections. It is controlled and steered by a two-axis gimbal mechanism with an offset spherical mass. Using the computer aided CAD modeling tool, SolidWorks, the project goal is to develop a new and official design of the gimbal mechanism allowing for more electronics space and further develop the existing prototype. The new gimbal design, originally 3D printed from plastic will be an improvement from the existing prototype in that it will be made from metal and improve the use of space by redesigning for different motors and the new buoyant force introduced by the use of metal.

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See page 2 for interns M - Z