Nenad Miljkovic

Postdoctoral Associate - MIT


By applying a microscopic pattern that resembles a bed of tiny, pointed leaves and special coating, researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have managed to increase the efficiency of water condensing plates by nearly a third. Water droplets are so repelled by the combination that they appear to jump off the plates.

Daniel Kelly

Scalable nanopatterned surfaces designed by MIT researchers could make for more efficient power generation and desalination.




David L. Chandler

Many industrial plants depend on water vapor condensing on metal plates: In power plants, the resulting water is then returned to a boiler to be vaporized again; in desalination plants, it yields a supply of clean water. The efficiency of such plants depends crucially on how easily droplets of water can form on these metal plates, or condensers, and how easily they fall away, leaving room for more droplets to form.

David Chandler

Nenad Miljkovic and Evelyn Wang of Mechanical Engineering are designing a specially adapted solar energy collector that will simultaneously produce electricity and steam or hot water at wide-ranging temperatures suited for home or industrial use. This research was supported in part by the MIT Solid-State Solar-Thermal Energy Conversion Center, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the US Department of Energy.

Nancy W. Stauffer

MIT researchers have designed an efficient, potentially low-cost system that will use the sun’s energy to produce electricity and hot water or steam simultaneously. Their design is based on a conventional solar thermal system but incorporates special features that make it more efficient and flexible.


Nancy W. Stauffer

A study by a team at MIT offers new insights to how droplets form when water condenses on a surface, and how to pattern the collecting surfaces at a nanoscale in order to encourage droplets to form more rapidly. These insights could enable a significantly more efficient power plants and desalination plants, the researchers said.

Ina Damm Muri

Dropwise condensation occurs when a vapor condenses on a surface, forming distinctive droplets that can be efficiently removed from the surface. According to MIT researcher Nenad Miljkovic, “The faster we can get the droplets to grow, the more heat they can carry away, and the more efficient the process becomes."

Massachusetts, US- Research by a team at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) has provided insights into how condensation forms on a surface. According to the group, the results could significantly increase the efficiency of the next generation of power and desalination plants.


The condensation of water is crucial to the operation of most of the powerplants that provide our electricity -- whether they are fueled by coal, natural gas or nuclear fuel. New research by a team at MIT offers important new insights into how these droplets form, and ways to pattern the collecting surfaces at the nanoscale to encourage droplets to form more rapidly."

The condensation of water is crucial to the operation of most of the powerplants that provide our electricity. New research by a team at MIT offers important new insights into how these droplets form, and ways to pattern the collecting surfaces at the nanoscale to encourage droplets to form more rapidly.


A study by a research team from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) has explained the mechanism behind the formation of water droplets during condensation and ways to design harvesting surfaces at the nanoscale to accelerate the formation of these droplets."



Cameron Chai

MIT researchers say a hybrid solar-thermoelectric system they’re working on would provide a big advantage over conventional solar cells or solar thermal systems, particularly for household use: the ability to produce heat and electricity simultaneously. They propose accomplishing this mean feat through a clever reconfiguration of the standard parabolic trough.

Pete Danko

Professor Evelyn Wang and student Nenad Miljkovic, have released an analysis showing it's possible to generate electricity and scalding temperatures in unison with a hybrid solar thermoelectric system. If their work pans out into a viable device, large homes and residential buildings could be heated and powered by a single unit, or factories could get their electricity and melt metals in one location, according to Miljkovic.


Joseph Orovic

Systems to harness the sun's energy typically generate either electricity or heat in the form of steam or hot water. But a new analysis by researchers at MIT shows that there could be significant advantages to systems that produce both electricity and heat simultaneously. The new study incorporates thermoelectrics — devices that can produce an electric current from a temperature gradient — into a concentrating solar thermal system, also called a parabolic trough.

MIT researchers have determined that there could be some serious advantages to solar systems that can generate both heat and electricity at the same time. More notably, the researchers have figured out how to build these systems.


Erik Davaney

Systems to harness the sun's energy typically generate either electricity or heat in the form of steam or hot water. But a new analysis by researchers at MIT shows that there could be significant advantages to systems that produce both electricity and heat simultaneously.

Systems to harness the sun’s energy typically generate either electricity or heat in the form of steam or hot water. But a new analysis by researchers at MIT shows that there could be significant advantages to systems that produce both electricity and heat simultaneously.The new study incorporates thermoelectrics — devices that can produce an electric current from a temperature gradient — into a concentrating solar thermal system, also called a parabolic trough.

David Chandler

In MechE, our professors are solving the need for efficient and cheap clean energy by looking at it in a myriad of ways, from solar and wind to thermal and chemical, from a myriad of increasingly multi­disciplinary perspectives, including design, mechanics, chemistry, physics, materials, architecture, and mathematics. Some are applying old methods to these new problems in creative and innovative ways, and some are discovering entirely new methods altogether.