NSE - Nuclear Science & Engineering at MIT

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Shawn Fitzgerald G

“If you want to be part of a department that values intellectual growth, teamwork, and a sense of community, then the Nuclear Science and Engineering Department here at MIT is a solid choice..”

Shawn Fitzgerald G

I’m extremely fortunate to be part not only of the NSE Department, but also the Political Science Department here at MIT.  I’m pursuing masters degrees in both Nuclear Engineering and Security Studies.  While not a formal dual-degree program, my goal is to study some aspect of nonproliferation, which has definite technology and policy components and implications. 

I am a Captain in the US Army, and following MIT, I will move on to become an instructor at the United States Military Academy to teach cadets physics and nuclear engineering.  Following that assignment, I will serve in a variety of non/counter-proliferation billets in the Army, both in the US and overseas.  I have no doubt that my graduate education here at MIT will not only prepare me academically for these challenges, but will teach me how to solve the complex problems that are sure to arise with regard to nuclear technology in the next 20 years.  That is exactly why I chose to join the two different departments.  While it’s great to be able to talk about technical aspects of nuclear engineering, I believe it’s definitely necessary to be able to articulate how those technologies affect the world. 

If you want to be part of a department that values intellectual growth, teamwork, and a sense of community, then the Nuclear Science and Engineering Department here at MIT is a solid choice.  We have incredible faculty, staff, and students here, and I consider it an honor to learn amongst them.  NSE is an increasingly relevant department in an age that will see the growth of fusion technology, the proliferation of nuclear power plants, and security risks associated with nuclear materials and weapons technologies.  Overall, the NSE department is simply a “can’t miss.”

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

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