Physics Spotlight  
MIT physics graduate student Qiong Ma, who is part of Associate Professor Pablo Jarillo-Herrero’s group, is doing original research on the electrical properties of graphene-based devices in combination with hexagonal boron nitride, using laser light stimulation. Photo: Denis Paiste/Materials Processing CenterMIT physics graduate student Qiong Ma, who is part of Associate Professor Pablo Jarillo-Herrero’s group, is doing original research on the electrical properties of graphene-based devices in combination with hexagonal boron nitride, using laser light stimulation. Photo: Denis Paiste/Materials Processing Center

Measuring hot electrons

MIT graduate student Qiong Ma is uncovering electrical properties of graphene-based devices using laser-light stimulation.

Denis Paiste | Materials Processing Center
May 26, 2015

New structures engineered by combining layers just one to several atoms thick of materials such as graphene and boron nitride feature properties distinctly different from those of the same materials' bulk crystal structures, sometimes displaying properties not found in nature, giving them the name metamaterials.

Fifth-year MIT graduate student Qiong Ma, who is part of Associate Professor Pablo Jarillo-Herrero's group, is doing original research on the electrical properties of graphene-based devices in combination with hexagonal boron nitride, using laser light stimulation.