Physics Spotlight  
MIT scientists developed a super-resolution imaging technique, using a combination of multi-colored lasers and mirrors, to visualize very tiny, transient phenomena, such as enzyme clustering on genes. Photo: Jose-Luis Olivares/MITMIT scientists developed a super-resolution imaging technique, using a combination of multi-colored lasers and mirrors, to visualize very tiny, transient phenomena, such as enzyme clustering on genes.
Photo: Jose-Luis Olivares/MIT

Scientists illuminate a hidden regulator in gene transcription

New super-resolution technique visualizes important role of short-lived enzyme clusters.

Jennifer Chu | MIT News Office
May 25, 2016

Gene transcription is the process by which DNA is copied and synthesized as messenger RNA (mRNA) — which delivers its genetic blueprints to the cell’s protein-making machinery.   

Now researchers at MIT and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) have identified a hidden, ephemeral phenomenon in cells that may play a major role in jump-starting mRNA production and regulating gene transcription.
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