Physics Spotlight  
“[MIT] is a fantastic place,” says associate professor Markus Klute, a member of the Laboratory of Nuclear Science. “Where else in the world do you get this amount of freedom?”

Photo: M. Scott Brauer “[MIT] is a fantastic place,” says associate professor Markus Klute, a member of the Laboratory of Nuclear Science. “Where else in the world do you get this amount of freedom?”
Photo: M. Scott Brauer

Particle hunter

Now that the Higgs boson has come to light, Markus Klute is looking at physics beyond the Standard Model.

Jennifer Chu | MIT News Office
July 21, 2017

On March 30, 2010, physicists and reporters packed into the two main control rooms at CERN’s Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in Geneva, Switzerland, waiting for a first signal from the world’s largest particle accelerator.

The underground collider, comprising a 17-mile-long circular tunnel lined with superconducting magnets, was designed to accelerate and smash together subatomic particles at close to the speed of light, in hopes of producing the elusive Higgs boson — the fundamental particle thought to give mass to elementary particles.

It was a memorable day for many, and particularly for Markus Klute, who at the time was an assistant professor at MIT. He was based in Geneva to oversee the operation of the computing system for the CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid), one of the LHC’s two main particle detectors. Klute was monitoring the detector for the first signs of particle collisions.
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