Chris Warshaw

FACULTY  |  CHRIS WARSHAW

Chris Warshaw is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science at MIT. He completed his PhD in Political Science at Stanford University. He also received a JD from Stanford Law School and a BA from Williams College. Warshaw's current research focuses on political representation in Congress, state legislatures, and municipal governments. He has also written on a wide range of other topics, such as survey research methodology, judicial politics, energy policy, and the institutional underpinnings of democratization. His work has appeared in the American Political Science Review, the Journal of Politics, Political Analysis, and three books from Cambridge University Press.

Research

Warshaw is a specialist in the fields of public opinion and political representation. Warshaw's current research focuses on representation in Congress, state legislatures, and municipal governments. This research provides new insights into the performance of representative democracy in the United States. He has also studied survey research methodology, judicial politics, the political economy of the global energy industry, and the institutional underpinnings of democratization.

Recent Publications


"Measuring Constituent Policy Preferences in Congress, State Legislatures and Cities." Journal of Politics. April 2013. 75(2). (with Chris Tausanovitch).

"How Should We Measure District-Level Public Opinion on Individual Issues?" Journal of Politics. January 2012. Volume 74(1). (with Jonathan Rodden).

"The Political Economy of Expropriation and Privatization of National Oil Companies." Oil and Governance: State-owned Enterprises and the World Energy Supply. David G. Victor, David Hults, and Mark Thurber, eds. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 2012.

"Democratization and Countermajoritarian Institutions: The Role of Power and Constitutional Design In Self-Enforcing Democracy." Comparative Constitutional Design. Tom Ginsburg, ed. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 2012. (with Susan Alberts and Barry R. Weingast).

Subjects

17.30J Making Public Policy