Richard Samuels

FACULTY  |  Richard Samuels

Richard Samuels is Ford International Professor of Political Science and director of the Center for International Studies. He has been head of the MIT Political Science Department, Vice-Chair of the Committee on Japan of the National Research Council, and chair of the Japan-US Friendship Commission. He has also been elected to the American Academy of Arts & Sciences and was awarded an imperial decoration, the Order of the Rising Sun, Gold and Silver Star by the Emperor of Japan and the Japanese Prime Minister. His study of the political and policy consequences of the 2011 Tohoku catastrophe, "3:11: Disaster and Change in Japan," was published by Cornell University Press in 2013. Samuels' Securing Japan: Tokyo's Grand Strategy and the Future of East Asia, was a finalist for the Lionel Gelber Prize for the best book in international affairs. Machiavelli's Children won the Marraro Prize from the Society for Italian Historical Studies and the Jervis-Schroeder Prize from the International History and Politics section of American Political Science Association. Earlier books were awarded prizes from the Association for Asian Studies, the Association of American University Press, and the Ohira Memorial Prize. His articles have appeared in Foreign Affairs, International Security, International Organization, Journal of Modern Italian Studies, National Interest, Journal of Japanese Studies, and Daedalus.

Research

Japan's Nuclear Weapons Option: Examination of the role of nuclear weapons in Japanese grand strategy and the impact of a possible Japanese nuclear program on the Japan-U.S. alliance and on regional and international stability.

Kidnapping Politics: Political captivity-- kidnapping, POWs, and hostage taking, inter alia—redirects and distorts politics and foreign policies. This project explores the politics of captivity across mass and elite behavior in the US (POW/MIA) and five of its democratic allies: Japan (youth abduction), South Korea (separated families), Italy (Aldo Moro), Colombia (the disappeared), and Israel (Gilad Shalit). It will focus on how emotion intervenes to affect: a) the media, b) the political class, c) civil society, and d) the state itself.

Japan and the United States in East Asia: With the rise of China and the end of the Cold War, the great power quadrilateral in East Asia has shifted. While the Japan-US alliance continues to anchor regional stability, the domestic politics that support it in both countries are also shifting. This project explores how security policy choices are constrained and enabled by changing security policy discourses in Washington and Tokyo.

Recent Publications

“Japan’s Nuclear Hedge: Beyond ‘Allergy’ and ‘Breakout’” chapter in Ashley Tellis, ed. Strategic Asia 2013-2014: Asia in the Second Nuclear Age. Seattle: National Bureau of Asian Research, 2013. With James Schoff. (pdf)

3.11: Disaster and Change in Japan. Cornell University Press, 2013.

"Tokyo's Transformation: How Japan is Changing and What it Means for the United States," Foreign Affairs, September/October 2011, pp.138-148.

"Kidnapping Politics in East Asia" Journal of East Asian Studies, Volume 10, No.3. November 2010.

"Prosperity's Children: Generational Change and Japan's Future Leadership," Asia Policy, Number 6. July 2008, pp.15-51. With J. Patrick Boyd.

"'New Fighting Power!': Japan's Growing Maritime Capabilities and East Asian Security" International Security Vol. 32, No. 3 Winter 2007/2008, pp. 84-112.

"Japan's Goldilocks Strategy" chapter in A.T.J. Lennon and A. Kozlowski, eds. Global Powers in the 21st Century. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2008.

Securing Japan: Tokyo's Grand Strategy and the Future of East Asia. Cornell University Press, 2007.

Subjects

17.486 Japan and East Asian Security
17.53 Rise of Asia (with Professors Fravel and Narang)
17.538 Politics and Policy in Contemporary Japan
17.541/17.543 Introduction to Japanese Politics and Society
17.591 Research Seminar in Applied International Studies