RaceSci
Syllabi
RaceSci

 

Science, Technology, and Medicine:  Global Knowledges?
HISC 250, Foundations in Science Studies, Winter 1999
Donna Haraway, Oakes 209, x4653, haraway@cats.ucsc.edu



All required books are at The Literary Guillotine, 204
Locust Street, Santa Cruz.  Phone: (831) 457-1195. Readers
for required assignments are at the Copy Center,
Communications Bldg on campus. All required and recommended
books and essays are also on reserve at McHenry.


BOOKS

Required:
Sandra Harding, Is Science Multicultural?  (Bloomington: 
  Indiana University Press, 1998)
  
Valerie Kuletz, Tainted Desert (Routledge)

Vandana Shiva, Biopiracy:  The Plunder of Nature and
  Knowledge  (Southend Press, 1997)
  
Helen Watson, with the Yolngu community at Yirrkala, and
  David Chambers, Signing the Land, Singing the Land
  (Deakin University Press, 1989, reprinted 1993. 
  Available from Deakin University, Geelong, Victoria
  3217, Australia.)
  
Thongchai Winichakul,  Siam Mapped   (Honolulu:  University
  of Hawaii Press, 1994)


Recommended (on reserve):
D. Arnold, ed., Imperial Medicine and Indigenous Society
  (Manchester University Press, 1989)
  
James Clifford, Routes: Travel and Translation in the Late
  Twentieth Century (Harvard University Press, 1997)
  
Susantha Goonatilake, Aborted Discovery.  Science and
  Creativity in the Third World (London:  Zed, 1984)
  
Richard H. Grove, Green Imperialism:  Colonial Expansion,
  Tropical Island Edens and the Origins of
  Environmentalism, 1600-1860 (Cambridge University Press,
  1995) ), chpt. 2, "Indigenous Knowledge and the
  Significance of South-West India for Portuguese and
  Dutch Constructions of Tropical Nature," and chpt. 7,
  "The Beginnings of Global Environmentalism: Professional
  Science, Oceanic Islands and the East India Company,
  1768-1838," pp. 73-94, 309-79
  
Donna Haraway, Primate Visions: Gender, Race and Nature in
  the World of Modern Science (Routledge, 1989)
  
Sandra Harding, ed., The 'Racial'Economy of Science (Indiana
  University Press, 1993)
  
David Hess, Science and Technology in a Multicultural World

Calestous Juma, The Gene Hunters:  Biotechnology and the
  Scramble for Seeds (Princeton University Press, 1989)

Roy MacLeod and Milton Lewis, eds., Disease, Medicine and
  Empire (Routledge, 1988)

Ashis Nandy, ed., Science, Hegemony and Violence:  A Requiem
  for Modernity (Delhi:  Oxford University Press, 1990)

Diane Paul, Controlling Human Heredity, 1865 to the Present 
  (Atlantic Highlands, NJ:  Humanities Press, 1995)

Patrick Petitjean, et al, Science and Empires:  Historical
  Studies about Scientific Development and European
  Expansion (Dordrecht:  Kluwer, 1992)

Mary Louise Pratt, Imperial Eyes:  Travel Writing and
  Transculturation (New York:  Routledge, 1992)

Nathan Reingold and M. Rothenberg, eds., Scientific
  Colonialism:  A Cross Cultural Comparison  (Smithsonian
  Institution Press, 1987)

Harriet Ritvo, The Animal Estate:  The English and Other
  Creatures in the Victorian Age (Harvard University
  Press, 1987), esp. chpt 5, "Exotic Captives," and Chpt.
  6, "The Thrill of the Chase," pp. 205-88, 323-36

Ziauddin Sardar, ed., The Revenge of Athena:  Science,
  Exploitation, and the Third World (London:  Mansell,
  1988)

Nancy Leys Stepan, The Idea of Race in Science, Great
  Britain, 1800-1960 (Hampden, CT:  Archon Books, 1982)

Megan Vaughn, Curing Their Ills:  Colonial Power and African
  Illness (Stanford University Press, 1991)


READER FOR REQUIRED ASSIGNMENTS

Arun Agarwaal, "Dismantling the Divide between Indigenous
  and Scientific Knowledge," Development and Change 26
  (1995): 413-39  (Blackwell Publ., 108 Cowley Rd., Oxford
  OX4 !JF, UK)

Warwick Anderson, "Excremental Colonialism:  Public Health
  and the Poetics of Pollution," Critical Inquiry 21
  (Spring, 1995): 640-69

Warwick Anderson, "The Trespass Speaks:  White Masculinity
  and Colonial Breakdown," American Historical Review 102,
  no. 5 (1997): 1343-70

Joan Fujimura, "Transnational Science:  Views of Genomics
  from Sites outside Euro-America,"  a grant proposal,
  1998

Donna Haraway, "Universal Donors in a Vampire Culture.  It's
  All in the Family. Biological Kinship Categories in the
  Twentieth-Cenbtury United States," in
  Modest_Witness@Second_Millennium (Routledge, 1997), pp.
  213-65, 309-15.

Gabrielle Hecht, "Colonialism and Postcolonialism in the
  Nuclear Age," paper from the conference Materializing
  Cultures:  Science, Technology, and Medicne in Global
  Context, Stanford University, May 1-2, 1998.

Aihwa Ong, "Making the Biopolitical Subject:  Cambodian
  Immigrants, Refugee Medicine and Cultural Citizenship in
  California," Soc. Sci. Med. (1994): 1-15 (published by
  Elsevier Science, Ltd.)

Nancy Peluso, "Whose Woods Are These? Counter-Mapping Forest
  Territories in Kalimantan, Indonesia," Antipode 274, no
  4(1995): 383-406

Michael Pollan, "Playing God in the Garden," New York Times
  Magazine, October 25, 1998, pp. 44-51, 62-63, 82, 92-93.

Gary Shaw, "Clearcut Identities:  Tracking Shapeshifters in
  Clayoquot Sound," manuscript for Warren Magnusson and
  Kara Shaw, eds., Rainforest Crunch, in press.

Ann Laura Stoller, "Making Empire Respectable:  Race and
  Sexual Morality in Twentieth-Century Colonial Cultures,"
  American Ethnologist 16 (1989): 26-51

Marilyn Strathern, "What Is Intellectual Property After?"
  paper for workshop Actor Network Theory and After, Keele
  University, July 1997

David Turnbull, "Local Knowledge and Comparative Scientific
  Traditions," Knowledge and Policy 6, nos. 3&4 (1993):
  29-54.

Helen Verran, "Investigating the Social Foundations of
  Mathematics," Social Studies of Science no. 20 (1990):
  283-312.

Helen Watson, with the Yolngu community at Yirrkala, and
  David Chambers, Signing the Land, Singing the Land
  (Deakin University Press, 1989, reprinted 1993. 
  Available from Deakin University, Geelong, Victoria
  3217, Australia.)

Helen Watson-Verran and David Turnbull, "Science and Other
  Indigenous Knowledge Systems," in Sheila Jasanoff,
  Gerald Markle, James Petersen, and Trevor Pinch, eds.,
  Handbook of Science and Technology Studies (Thousand
  Oaks, CA: Sage, 1995), pp. 115-39


selections from documents on the Internet from Rural
  Advancement Foundation  International (RAFI)

selections from documents for a conference on comparative
  knowledges in Clayoquot Sound in relation to
  environmentalisms, forestries, and ecologies


RECOMMENDED READINGS ON RESERVE

P. Palladino and M. Worboy, "Science and Imperialism," Isis
  (1993):  91-102.

Peter J. Taylor, "Re/constructing Socioecologies:  System
  Dynamics Modeling of Nomadic Pastoralists in Sub-Saharan
  Africa," in Adele Clarke and Joan Fujimura, eds., The
  Right Tools for the Job:  At Work in Twentieth-Century
  Life Sciences (Princeton:  Princeton University Press,
  1992), pp. 115-48

Peter Taylor and Frederick Buttel, "How Do We Know We Have
  Global Environmental Problems? Science and the
  Globalization of Environmental Discourse," Geoforum
  (1992):1-11

Helen Verran, Numbers, Judgment, and Certainty: 
  Storytelling about African Logics, in manuscript
  (University of Chicago Press, forthcoming), selections.


IMPORTANT WEB SITES

the Race-Science Web Site, a bibliography, teaching tool and
  forum for the History of Race in Science, Medicine and
  Technology.  This web page grew out of the Race and
  Science Workshop (Harvard and MIT). 
  http://stsfac.mit.edu/racesci/index.html

Rural Advancement Foundation International (RAFI), an
  organization that does watchdog and solidarity work on
  gene politics in the Third World.  See the web page on
  Monsanto's current effort to patent a gene crucial to
  proprietary control of genetically engineered seeds. 
  http://www.rafi.org/usda.html



SEMINAR SCHEDULE

Week 1.  Jan. 6.
Introduction.  Contexts, Contents, Methods, Readings.
Student Research Projects and Write-Ups.


Week 2.  Jan 13.
Universal Knowledge ?  Comparative Knowledges, Indigenous
Knowledges, Scientific Knowledges:  What Are They?  What
Claims Are Made and By Whom?  Why Does It Matter?  Part I.  

Reading: 
Sandra Harding, Is Science Multicultural?  (Indiana
  University Press, 1998)


Week 3. Jan 20.
Universal Knowledge?  Comparative Knowledges, Indigenous
Knowledges, Scientific Knowledges. Part II.

Required Readings: Arun Agarwaal, "Dismantling the Divide
  between Indigenous and Scientific Knowledge,"
  Development and Change 26 (1995): 413-39

David Turnbull, "Local Knowledge and Comparative Scientific
  Traditions," Knowledge and Policy 6, nos. 3&4 (1993):
  29-54.

Helen Verran, "Investigating the Social Foundations of
  Mathematics," Social Studies of Science no. 20 (1990):
  283-312.

Helen Watson-Verran and David Turnbull, "Science and Other
  Indigenous Knowledge Systems," in Sheila Jasanoff,
  Gerald Markle, James Petersen, and Trevor Pinch, eds.,
  Handbook of Science and Technology Studies (Thousand
  Oaks, CA: Sage, 1995), pp. 115-39

Recommended Readings: Helen Verran, Numbers, Judgment, and
  Certainty:  Storytelling about African Logics, in
  manuscript (University of Chicago Press, forthcoming),
  selections.

Nathan Reingold and M. Rothenberg, eds., Scientific
  Colonialism:  A Cross Cultural Comparison  (Smithsonian
  Institution Press, 1987)

P. Palladino and M. Worboy, "Science and Imperialism," Isis
  (1993):  91-102.

Patrick Petitjean, et al, Science and Empires:  Historical
  Studies about Scientific Development and European
  Expansion (Dordrecht:  Kluwer, 1992)


Week 4.  Jan 27.
A Case Study: Crafting the Categories, Crafting the
Interface:  Ecosystem Ecology, Traditional Ecological
Knowledge, Forestry, and Clayoquot Sound

Required Readings: selections from documents for a
  conference on Clayoquot Sound in relation to comparative
  knowledges, environmentalisms, forestries, and ecologies

Gary Shaw, "Clearcut Identities:  Tracking Shapeshifters in
  Clayoquot Sound," manuscript for Warren Magnusson and
  Kara Shaw, eds., Rainforest Crunch, in press.

Recommended Readings: Richard H. Grove, Green Imperialism: 
  Colonial Expansion, Tropical Island Edens and the
  Origins of Environmentalism, 1600-1860 (Cambridge
  University Press, 1995), especially ), Chpt. 2,
  "Indigenous Knowledge and the Significance of South-West
  India for Portuguese and Dutch Constructions of Tropical
  Nature," and chpt. 7, "The Beginnings of Global
  Environmentalism: Professional Science, Oceanic Islands
  and the East India Company, 1768-1838," pp. 73-94,
  309-79

Peter J. Taylor, "Re/constructing Socioecologies:  System
  Dynamics Modeling of Nomadic Pastoralists in Sub-Saharan
  Africa," in Adele Clarke and Joan Fujimura, eds., The
  Right Tools for the Job:  At Work in Twentieth-Century
  Life Sciences (Princeton:  Princeton University Press,
  1992), pp. 115-48

Peter Taylor and Frederick Buttel, "How Do We Know We Have
  Global Environmental Problems? Science and the
  Globalization of Environmental Discourse," Geoforum
  (1992):1-11


Week 5.  Feb 3.
Categories, Boundaries, Nations, and Peoples.  Mapping the
World

Required Readings: Nancy Peluso, "Whose Woods Are These?
  Counter-Mapping Forest Territories in Kalimantan,
  Indonesia," Antipode 274, no 4(1995): 383-406

Helen Watson, with the Yolngu community at Yirrkala, and
  David Chambers, Signing the Land, Singing the Land
  (Deakin University Press, 1989, reprinted 1993. 
  Available from Deakin University, Geelong, Victoria
  3217, Australia.)

Thongchai Winichakul,  Siam Mapped   (Honolulu:  University
  of Hawaii Press, 1994)

Recommended Readimg: James Clifford, Routes: Travel and
  Translation in the Late Twentieth Century (Harvard
  University Press, 1997)

Mary Louise Pratt, Imperial Eyes:  Travel Writing and
  Transculturation (New York:  Routledge, 1992)


Week 6.  Feb. 10.
Mapping Nuclear Worlds

Readings: Gabrielle Hecht, "Colonialism and Postcolonialism
  in the Nuclear Age," paper from the conference,
  Materializing Cultures:  Science, Technology, and
  Medicne in Global Context, Stanford University, May 1-2,
  1998.

Valerie Kuletz, Tainted Desert (Routledge, 1998)

selections from documents on Pacific anti-nuclear politics

get web sites


Week 7.  Feb. 17.
Medicine and Empire:  Sexuality, Race, Class, and Disease

Required Readings: Warwick Anderson, "Excremental
  Colonialism:  Public Health and the Poetics of
  Pollution," Critical Inquiry 21 (Spring, 1995): 640-69

Warwick Anderson, "The Trespass Speaks:  White Masculinity
  and Colonial Breakdown," American Historical Review 102,
  no. 5 (1997): 1343-70

Aihwa Ong, "Making the Biopolitical Subject:  Cambodian
  Immigrants, Refugee Medicine and Cultural Citizenship in
  California," Soc. Sci. Med. (1994): 1-15

Ann Laura Stoller, "Making Empire Respectable:  Race and
  Sexual Morality in Twentieth-Century Colonial Cultures,"
  American Ethnologist 16 (1989): 26-51.

Recommended Readings: D. Arnold, ed., Imperial Medicine and
  Indigenous Society (Manchester University Press, 1989)

Roy MacLeod and Milton Lewis, eds., Disease, Medicine and
  Empire (Routledge, 1988)

Megan Vaughn, Curing Their Ills:  Colonial Power and African
  Illness (Stanford University Press, 1991)


Week 8.  Feb 24.
Traveling Genes:  Questions of Property, Questions of
Rhetoric

Required Readings: Michael Pollan, "Playing God in the
  Garden," New York Times Magazine, October 25, 1998, pp.
  44-51, 62-63, 82, 92-93.

Vandana Shiva, Biopiracy:  The Plunder of Nature and
  Knowledge  (Southend Press, 1997)

Marilyn Strathern, "What Is Intellectual Property After?"
  paper for workshop Actor Network Theory and After, Keele
  University, July 1997

Rural Advancement Foundation International (RAFI),
  documents.  RAFI is an organization that does watchdog
  and solidarity work on gene politics in the Third World.
   See the web page on Monsanto's current effort to patent
  a gene crucial to proprietary control of genetically
  engineered seeds.  http://www.rafi.org/usda.html

Recommended Readings: Calestous Juma, The Gene Hunters

Visitor:  Cori Hayden, graduate student, Antrhopology Dept.,
  UCSC, dissertation:  Biomass for Biotech:  Negotiating
  the Value of Mexican Biodiversity


Week 9. March 3.
Classifying Human Diversity:  Nineteenth-Century and Early
Twentieth-Century Racial Science, Late Twentieth-Century
Genetics

Readings: Joan Fujimura, "Transnational Science:  Views of
  Genomics from Sites outside Euro-America,"  a grant
  proposal, 1998

Donna Haraway, "Universal Donors in a Vampire Culture.  It's
  All in the Family. Biological Kinship Categories in the
  Twentieth-Cenbtury United States," in
  Modest_Witness@Second_Millennium (Routledge, 1997), pp.
  213-65, 309-15.

web sites on human genome projects

web site on human germ line genetic engineering: 

http://www.ess.ucla.edu:80/huge/report.html the Race-Science Web Site, a bibliography, teaching tool and forum for the History of Race in Science, Medicine and Technology. This web page grew out of the Race and Science Workshop (Harvard and MIT). http://web.mit.edu/racescience/ Recommended Reading: Sandra Harding, ed., The 'Racial'Economy of Science (Indiana University Press, 1993) Diane Paul, Controlling Human Heredity, 1865 to the Present (Atlantic Highlands, NJ: Humanities Press, 1995) Nancy Leys Stepan, The Idea of Race in Science, Great Britain, 1800-1960 (Hampden, CT: Archon Books, 1982) Visitor: Joan Fujimura, Stanford University, Anthropology Department Week 10. March 10. Conclusions and Projects.

Home page