MIT Student Financial Services Financial Aid

SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS

Introduction

In order for MIT undergraduate and graduate students to receive federal student financial aid, they must be making satisfactory academic progress (SAP) in accordance with federal rules.

Federal SAP rules are required to be the same as, or stricter than, the institutionís academic progress rules. Given MITís academic rigor, the Institute uses its rules to measure federal SAP, taking into account federal requirements as regards GPA, pace of progression and maximum time to degree.

Federal Financial Aid Programs

Federal financial aid for MIT undergraduates includes:

  • Federal Pell Grants
  • Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants
  • Iran and Afghanistan Service Grants
  • Teacher Education Assistance for College and Higher Education Grants
  • Federal Perkins Loans
  • Federal Direct Subsidized Stafford Loans
  • Federal Direct Unsubsidized Stafford Loans
  • Federal Direct PLUS Loans for Parents
  • Federal Work-Study

Federal financial Aid for MIT graduate students includes:

  • Teacher Education Assistance for College and Higher Education Grants
  • Federal Perkins Loans
  • Federal Direct Unsubsidized Stafford Loans
  • Federal Direct PLUS Loans for Graduate and Professional Degree Students
  • Federal Work-Study

Satisfactory Academic Progress Requirements

To maintain SAP, an MIT undergraduate must:

  • Maintain a minimum cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 3.0 on MIT’s 5.0 scale; and
  • Meet the pace requirement by passing at least 67% of the cumulative units attempted; and
  • Complete a degree program in a maximum timeframe of 12 terms.

To maintain SAP, a graduate student must:

  • Maintain a minimum cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 4.0 on MIT’s 5.0 scale; and
  • Meet the pace requirement by passing at least 67% of the cumulative units attempted; and
  • Make satisfactory progress in his/her academic milestones, as evaluated by his/her graduate program; and
  • Complete a degree program in a maximum time frame of five terms if a Masterís candidate or 13 terms if a PhD or ScD candidate.

GPA

GPA is calculated in accordance with MITís GPA calculation and unit conversion, including rules regarding freshman grading.

Transfer credit, which carries no grade, is not included in the GPA calculation.

Grades for dropped subjects are not included in the GPA calculation.

Incomplete grades are not included in the GPA calculation.

All grades for repeated subjects are included in the GPA calculation.

Pace

Pace is calculated in accordance with federal rules by dividing the cumulative number of units passed by the cumulative number of units attempted.

The number of transfer units credited is included in the pace calculation.

Dropped subjects are not included in the pace calculation.

Incomplete subjects are included in the pace calculation as units attempted.

Repeated subjects only count as one subject in the pace calculation.

Maximum Time Frame

Transfer credit subjects are included in the maximum time frame calculation.

Undergraduates pursuing a double major are expected to graduate within the maximum time frame of 12 terms.

The maximum time frame may be extended as part of the CAP and GAPG review of a student’s academic progress and plan.

Monitoring and Appeals

At the end of each academic term, the relevant faculty committees (CAP for undergraduates and GAPG for graduate students) meets with representatives of all academic programs to review the records of any student eligible for federal financial aid who has not met all SAP requirements during that term.

Students have an opportunity to consult their advisors and departmental/program representatives and bring forward any information regarding mitigating circumstances, such as but not limited to, death or major illness within the immediate family, or personal illness or injury.

Consideration of the mitigating circumstances brought forward by the advisors and department/program officers, in addition to input students are encouraged to provide to their departments/programs, constitutes the appeal process for federal financial aid eligibility.

After hearing any relevant information, the respective faculty committee determines the appropriate action. If either CAP or the GAPG places a student eligible for federal financial aid on academic warning, Student Financial Services (SFS) concurrently places that student on either:

  • Federal financial aid warning – if the student was not on academic warning the prior term
  • Federal financial aid probation – if the student was on academic warning the prior term

Students eligible for federal financial aid who are placed on academic warning receive two communications – one from either CAP, or the Dean for Graduate Education on behalf of GAPG, and one from SFS. SFS sends an electronic notification to the student’s official MIT email address.

Federal Financial Aid Warning

The status of federal financial aid warning is assigned to students who were not on academic warning in the prior term, but are now placed on academic warning by either CAP (for undergraduates) or the Dean for Graduate Education (for graduate students).

Students on federal financial aid warning may continue to receive federal financial aid for the term of federal financial aid warning.

Federal financial aid warning status does not appear on a student’s internal academic record or permanent transcript, nor does it affect the amount of financial aid a student is eligible to receive from MIT, the federal government, or any other source during the federal financial aid warning term.

A student on federal financial aid warning who fails to make satisfactory academic progress during this warning term may not be placed on federal financial aid warning for a consecutive term. These students may be placed on federal financial aid probation for the consecutive term after a successful appeal (see below). Students are allowed to receive an unlimited number of non-consecutive terms of federal financial aid warning.

Federal Financial Aid Probation

The status of federal financial aid probation is assigned to students who were on academic warning in the prior term and continue to be placed on academic warning by either CAP (for undergraduates) or GAPG (for graduate students) for their next term of enrollment.

Federal rules mandate that students may not be placed on federal financial aid probation unless their college or university has a process for reviewing and granting appeals.

At MIT, the CAP review of an undergraduate’s academic progress and plans constitutes the required appeal process. MIT graduate students on academic warning are encouraged to engage with and provide relevant information to their academic programs during the GAPG review of the students’ academic progress; this constitutes the required appeal process. Any decision by CAP and GAPG other than requiring the student to withdraw from MIT constitutes approval of the appeal.

Students on federal financial aid probation may continue to receive federal financial aid for the federal financial aid probation term.

Federal financial aid probation status does not appear on a student’s internal academic record or permanent transcript, nor does it affect the amount of financial aid a student is eligible to receive from MIT, the federal government, or any other source during the federal financial aid probation term.

There is no limit to the number of times a student may be placed on federal financial aid probation, however, the student’s academic progress and plan must be approved by either CAP or GAPG before the student continues on federal financial aid probation for the next term. This review constitutes the required appeal process.

Important Sites Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA)
When you complete the FAFSA online, be sure that you and your parents obtain PIN numbers to sign electronically or submit the signature page as instructed. MIT's FAFSA Code is 002178.

CSS Profile
Apply online at the College Board website. MIT's CSS code is 3514. MIT receives your profile data electronically from CSS so you do not send copies or printouts of your application to MIT.

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