massachusetts institute of technology today's spotlight about
Close
Spotlight image Spotlight image
The iconic MIT home page Spotlight features a daily-changing image and design that focuses on advances in research, technology and education taking place at the Institute. Though some Spotlights do run multiple days - for example Friday's spot usually runs through the weekend, we work very hard to maintain the daily-changing tradition. We've combed our servers and have compiled a digital archive of the Institute home page through the years - well over 2000 images. Enjoy!
Close
Engineering independenceToday’s Spotlight image is a photograph, taken by Allegra Boverman, of MIT senior Priyanka Saha.

For as long as she can remember, MIT senior Priyanka Saha has been fascinated by the complex workings of life.

“When I was really little, maybe 4, I remember visiting the science museum and coming home with my prized souvenir, which was a children’s book on the human body,” Saha, a biology major, says with a smile.

Read full article.
The MIT home page Spotlight showcases the research, technology and education advances taking place at the Institute every day.

What makes it as a Spotlight image is an editorial decision by the MIT News Office based on factors that include timeliness, promotion of MIT's mission, the balance of interest to both internal and external audiences, and appropriateness.

We do welcome ideas and submissions for spotlights from community members, but please note we are not able to accommodate all requests. We are unable to run event previews or promotions as spotlights; for those looking to promote an event, we are happy to include your listing as an event headline on the homepage (when space is available) and you are free to submit an Of Note to the MIT News office. For more information, e-mail the spotlight team.

Request a Spotlight, Of Note or Event Headline, here.
Shifting sands

Shifting sands

Today’s Spotlight features a video clip produced by Christine Daniloff and Lucy Lindsey of MIT News.

Sand in an hourglass might seem simple and straightforward, but such granular materials are actually tricky to model. From far away, flowing sand resembles a liquid, streaming down the center of an hourglass like water from a faucet. But up close, one can make out individual grains that slide against each other, forming a mound at the base that holds its shape, much like a solid.

Sandís curious behavior — part fluid, part solid — has made it difficult for researchers to predict how it and other granular materials flow under various conditions. Read more.