massachusetts institute of technology today's spotlight about
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The iconic MIT home page Spotlight features a daily-changing image and design that focuses on advances in research, technology and education taking place at the Institute. Though some Spotlights do run multiple days - for example Friday's spot usually runs through the weekend, we work very hard to maintain the daily-changing tradition. We've combed our servers and have compiled a digital archive of the Institute home page through the years - well over 2000 images. Enjoy!
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Great pumpkinsToday’s Spotlight features a photograph, taken by Michael Greshko, of pumpkins from the 2014 Great Glass Pumpkin Patch sale.

The Great Glass Pumpkin Patch is an annual installation of over 2,000 handblown glass pumpkins, created by artists from the MIT Glass Lab. Proceeds from this event benefit The MIT Glass Lab, where the MIT community can learn and practice the art of glassblowing.

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The MIT home page Spotlight showcases the research, technology and education advances taking place at the Institute every day.

What makes it as a Spotlight image is an editorial decision by the MIT News Office based on factors that include timeliness, promotion of MIT's mission, the balance of interest to both internal and external audiences, and appropriateness.

We do welcome ideas and submissions for spotlights from community members, but please note we are not able to accommodate all requests. We are unable to run event previews or promotions as spotlights; for those looking to promote an event, we are happy to include your listing as an event headline on the homepage (when space is available). For more information, e-mail the spotlight team.

Request a Spotlight or Event Headline, here.
Amphibious achiever

Amphibious achiever

Today’s Spotlight features an image, by Allegra Boverman, of MiKhai Edwards (left, hidden behind navigation bar), MIT senior Noam Angrist (center), and Brandon Bennett (right).

When he got his first-ever C on a history essay in high school, Noam Angrist stayed after school every day for the rest of the year, honing his writing with a teacher. When an unexpected injury cut short his rowing career, he started coaching. When a middle‑school student he was tutoring refused to learn the standard material, Angrist introduced him to The Economist.

Passionate about education, economics, crew and making the world a better place, Angrist’s drive and work ethic are matched by his creativity and unconventional methods. The MIT senior believes anyone can learn to do anything.

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