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The iconic MIT home page Spotlight features a daily-changing image and design that focuses on advances in research, technology and education taking place at the Institute. Though some Spotlights do run multiple days - for example Friday's spot usually runs through the weekend, we work very hard to maintain the daily-changing tradition. We've combed our servers and have compiled a digital archive of the Institute home page through the years - well over 2000 images. Enjoy!
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Hello, Class of 2018!Today’s Spotlight features photographs, by Dominick Reuter of members of the MIT Class of 2018. Top row, from left to right: Jin Kim, Alaisha Alexander, Amelia Bryan, John Peurifoy and Monica Valcourt.

Every member of MIT’s incoming freshman class has at least one thing in common: they all survived the stressful, competitive, and often soul-searching process of applying to college.

While most of his current classmates were likely toiling over essays and prepping for interviews, John Peurifoy was making a business of getting into college.

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The MIT home page Spotlight showcases the research, technology and education advances taking place at the Institute every day.

What makes it as a Spotlight image is an editorial decision by the MIT News Office based on factors that include timeliness, promotion of MIT's mission, the balance of interest to both internal and external audiences, and appropriateness.

We do welcome ideas and submissions for spotlights from community members, but please note we are not able to accommodate all requests. We are unable to run event previews or promotions as spotlights; for those looking to promote an event, we are happy to include your listing as an event headline on the homepage (when space is available) and you are free to submit an Of Note to the MIT News office. For more information, e-mail the spotlight team.

Request a Spotlight, Of Note or Event Headline, here.
Today’s Spotlight uses a photograph, taken by Pierre Bouilhol, showing a view towards the north of the Karakoram Range, with the village of Khardung in the foreground. Karakoram represents the former Eurasian margin prior to the collision of India and Asia.

The peaks of the Himalayas are a modern remnant of massive tectonic forces that fused India with Asia tens of millions of years ago. Previous estimates have suggested this collision occurred about 50 million years ago, as India, moving northward at a rapid pace, crushed up against Eurasia. The crumple zone between the two plates gave rise to the Himalayas, which today bear geologic traces of both India and Asia. Geologists have sought to characterize the rocks of the Himalayas in order to retrace one of the planet’s most dramatic tectonic collisions.

Now researchers at MIT have found that the collision between India and Asia occurred only 40 million years ago — 10 million years later than previously thought.

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