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The iconic MIT home page Spotlight features a daily-changing image and design that focuses on advances in research, technology and education taking place at the Institute. Though some Spotlights do run multiple days - for example Friday's spot usually runs through the weekend, we work very hard to maintain the daily-changing tradition. We've combed our servers and have compiled a digital archive of the Institute home page through the years - well over 2000 images. Enjoy!
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One year strongerToday’s Spotlight uses photographs, taken by Dominick Reuter, of events and tributes marking the one-year anniversary of the death of MIT Officer Sean Collier.

On Friday, April 18, MIT will mark the first anniversary of the Boston Marathon bombings and the subsequent death of MIT Police Officer Sean Collier, who was killed in active service to our community.

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The MIT home page Spotlight showcases the research, technology and education advances taking place at the Institute every day.

What makes it as a Spotlight image is an editorial decision by the MIT News Office based on factors that include timeliness, promotion of MIT's mission, the balance of interest to both internal and external audiences, and appropriateness.

We do welcome ideas and submissions for spotlights from community members, but please note we are not able to accommodate all requests. We are unable to run event previews or promotions as spotlights; for those looking to promote an event, we are happy to include your listing as an event headline on the homepage (when space is available) and you are free to submit an Of Note to the MIT News office. For more information, e-mail the spotlight team.

Request a Spotlight, Of Note or Event Headline, here.
Fish pics

Fish pics

Today’s Spotlight uses an animated three‑dimensional rendering, by Carlos Pardo, of the cartilage that forms the skull of a five‑day‑old zebrafish larva. The size of the skull is about 1 millimeter long

Zebrafish larvae — tiny, transparent and fast‑growing vertebrates — are widely used to study development and disease. However, visually examining the larvae for variations caused by drugs or genetic mutations is an imprecise, painstaking and time-consuming process.

Engineers at MIT have now built an automated system that can rapidly produce 3‑D, micron‑resolution images of thousands of zebrafish larvae and precisely analyze their physical traits.

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