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The iconic MIT home page Spotlight features a daily-changing image and design that focuses on advances in research, technology and education taking place at the Institute. Though some Spotlights do run multiple days - for example Friday's spot usually runs through the weekend, we work very hard to maintain the daily-changing tradition. We've combed our servers and have compiled a digital archive of the Institute home page through the years - well over 2000 images. Enjoy!
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Historic seasonToday’s Spotlight features photographs of the 2014 MIT football team. The first five photographs were taken by David Silverman; the last photograph of the team holding the trophy was taken by the author of the story, Phil Hess.

Last Saturday, with a 24-13 victory over the U.S. Coast Guard Academy, the MIT football team made history, achieving its first-ever nine-game undefeated regular season.

This weekend, the Engineers attain another first: their first postseason game in MIT history, with a game against 8-1 Husson University in Bangor, Maine.

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The MIT home page Spotlight showcases the research, technology and education advances taking place at the Institute every day.

What makes it as a Spotlight image is an editorial decision by the MIT News Office based on factors that include timeliness, promotion of MIT's mission, the balance of interest to both internal and external audiences, and appropriateness.

We do welcome ideas and submissions for spotlights from community members, but please note we are not able to accommodate all requests. We are unable to run event previews or promotions as spotlights; for those looking to promote an event, we are happy to include your listing as an event headline on the homepage (when space is available). For more information, e-mail the spotlight team.

Request a Spotlight or Event Headline, here.
Caught in the act

Caught in the act

Today’s Spotlight image features a scanning tunneling microscope image, by Michael Crommie, showing an artificial atomic nucleus on graphene, consisting of five pairs of calcium atoms (slightly darker circles at center), in an electron cloud that is on the verge of collapse.

Atomic collapse, a phenomenon first predicted in the 1930s based on quantum mechanics and relativistic physics but never before observed, has now been seen for the first time in an “artificial nucleus” simulated on a sheet of graphene. The observation not only provides confirmation of long‑held theoretical predictions, but could also pave the way for new kinds of graphene‑based electronic devices, and for further research on basic physics.

Read full article.