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The iconic MIT home page Spotlight features a daily-changing image and design that focuses on advances in research, technology and education taking place at the Institute. Though some Spotlights do run multiple days - for example Friday's spot usually runs through the weekend, we work very hard to maintain the daily-changing tradition. We've combed our servers and have compiled a digital archive of the Institute home page through the years - well over 2000 images. Enjoy!
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AeroAstro marks a centuryToday’s Spotlight is a slideshow of photographs featuring faculty and alumni of MIT AeroAstro. In order of appearance are: Dava Newman, David Mindell, Sheila Widnall, Ian Waitz, Mark Drela, Kerri Cahoy, Paulo Luzano, and Jamie Peraire, all photographed by Len Rubenstein. The last photograph, of Greg Chamitoff, is courtesy of Chamitoff.

Aeronautics and astronautics has come a long way in the past 100 years. The Institute pioneered the nation’s first aeronautical engineering course in 1914, and many say MIT defined the field. Today, the department is the top-ranked graduate and undergraduate program of its kind in the country, and faculty are preparing for a fantastic future ...

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The MIT home page Spotlight showcases the research, technology and education advances taking place at the Institute every day.

What makes it as a Spotlight image is an editorial decision by the MIT News Office based on factors that include timeliness, promotion of MIT's mission, the balance of interest to both internal and external audiences, and appropriateness.

We do welcome ideas and submissions for spotlights from community members, but please note we are not able to accommodate all requests. We are unable to run event previews or promotions as spotlights; for those looking to promote an event, we are happy to include your listing as an event headline on the homepage (when space is available). For more information, e-mail the spotlight team.

Request a Spotlight or Event Headline, here.
Today’s Spotlight uses an image courtesy Gregory A. Voth, University of Chicago. Cells infected with HIV produce tiny, spherical viral particles that can infect other cells. Each virus is coated with a capsid made of many molecules of the Gag protein, which fan out from the center like spokes in a bicycle wheel. The natural association of Gag into bundles of six molecules produces a distinctive pattern on the surface of the new viruses. Image: courtesy Gregory A. Voth, University of Chicago.

Decades of research and three large‑scale clinical trials have so far failed to yield an effective HIV vaccine, in large part because the virus evolves so rapidly that it can evade vaccine‑induced immune responses.

Researchers from the Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT and Harvard University have now developed a new approach to vaccine design that may allow them to cut off those evolutionary escape routes.

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