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The iconic MIT home page Spotlight features a daily-changing image and design that focuses on advances in research, technology and education taking place at the Institute. Though some Spotlights do run multiple days - for example Friday's spot usually runs through the weekend, we work very hard to maintain the daily-changing tradition. We've combed our servers and have compiled a digital archive of the Institute home page through the years - well over 2000 images. Enjoy!
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Happy Thanksgiving!Today’s Spotlight features photographs, taken by Dominick Reuter, of Thanksgiving items made by MIT PhD student Dina El-Zanfaly. El-Zanfaly made 3-D printed turkeys, laser-cut leaves and a pumpkin “drawn” with a 3-D pen.

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The MIT home page Spotlight showcases the research, technology and education advances taking place at the Institute every day.

What makes it as a Spotlight image is an editorial decision by the MIT News Office based on factors that include timeliness, promotion of MIT's mission, the balance of interest to both internal and external audiences, and appropriateness.

We do welcome ideas and submissions for spotlights from community members, but please note we are not able to accommodate all requests. We are unable to run event previews or promotions as spotlights; for those looking to promote an event, we are happy to include your listing as an event headline on the homepage (when space is available). For more information, e-mail the spotlight team.

Request a Spotlight or Event Headline, here.
Built to last

Built to last

Today’s Spotlight uses an image and video, courtesy of the researchers, showing a side‑by‑side comparison of the performance of the new, more durable hydrophobic coating (on the right) with a currently available coating (left), when tested in an environment of 100-degree C. steam. The coating on the left quickly degrades, leading to formation of a film of water over the surface, which interferes with its thermal properties, while the new coating continues to promote the formation and shedding of small droplets, which leads to better heat transfer.

Steam condensation is key to the worldwide production of electricity and clean water: It is part of the power cycle that drives 85 percent of all electricity‑generating plants and about half of all desalination plants globally, according to the United Nations and International Energy Agency. So anything that improves the efficiency of this process could have enormous impact on global energy use.

Now, a team of researchers at MIT says they have found a way to do just that.

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