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The iconic MIT home page Spotlight features a daily-changing image and design that focuses on advances in research, technology and education taking place at the Institute. Though some Spotlights do run multiple days - for example Friday's spot usually runs through the weekend, we work very hard to maintain the daily-changing tradition. We've combed our servers and have compiled a digital archive of the Institute home page through the years - well over 2000 images. Enjoy!
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Computer vision gains groundToday’s Spotlight features a photo-illustration by Christine Daniloff/MIT with images courtesy of the researchers. A team of MIT neuroscientists has found that some computer programs can identify the objects in these images just as well as the primate brain.

For decades, neuroscientists have been trying to design computer networks that can mimic visual skills such as recognizing objects, which the human brain does very accurately and quickly. Until now, no computer model has been able to match the primate brain at visual object recognition during a brief glance. However, a new study from MIT neuroscientists has found that one of the latest generation of these so-called “deep neural networks” matches the primate brain.

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The MIT home page Spotlight showcases the research, technology and education advances taking place at the Institute every day.

What makes it as a Spotlight image is an editorial decision by the MIT News Office based on factors that include timeliness, promotion of MIT's mission, the balance of interest to both internal and external audiences, and appropriateness.

We do welcome ideas and submissions for spotlights from community members, but please note we are not able to accommodate all requests. We are unable to run event previews or promotions as spotlights; for those looking to promote an event, we are happy to include your listing as an event headline on the homepage (when space is available). For more information, e-mail the spotlight team.

Request a Spotlight or Event Headline, here.
MIT honors its veterans

MIT honors its veterans

Today’s Spotlight features photographs, taken by M. Scott Brauer, of veterans from across the MIT community. They are, in order of appearance:
Lt. Col. Leo McGonagle, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 1987-2008 (retired). McGonagle is the executive director of the Gordon Engineering Leadership Program at MIT.
DiOnetta Jones Crayton, Air Force. Jones Crayton is the associate dean for undergraduate education and director of the Office of Minority Education.
Al Pierce, Army. Pierce is captain and chief of staff of the MIT Police Department.
Phillip Clay, Army. Clay is a professor in the Department of Urban Studies and Planning at MIT.
Melanie Parker, Army. Parker is the executive director of MIT Global Education and Career Development.
Billy Boulter, Navy (active duty). Boulter is detective in charge of special services for the MIT Police Department.
Isadora Choute, Army Reserve. Choute is an administrative assistant for MIT’s Open Course Ware.
Richard Sullivan, Army. Sullivan is a sergeant aide to patrol commander for the MIT Police Department.
John Ryan Collins, Army. Collins is a technician in the Office of Environment, Health and Safety at MIT.

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