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The iconic MIT home page Spotlight features a daily-changing image and design that focuses on advances in research, technology and education taking place at the Institute. Though some Spotlights do run multiple days - for example Friday's spot usually runs through the weekend, we work very hard to maintain the daily-changing tradition. We've combed our servers and have compiled a digital archive of the Institute home page through the years - well over 2000 images. Enjoy!
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Time makes him tickToday’s Spotlight features a photograph, taken by Dominick Reuter, of Brad Skow.

We all know that time passes — or so it seems. But what do we think time is really doing? Is it moving by us? Standing still as we wade through it? Our inability to resolve this question is revealed by the indirect way in which we discuss the subject.

“When you ask people, ‘Tell me about the passage of time,’ they usually make a metaphor,” says Brad Skow, an associate professor of philosophy at MIT. “They say time flows like a river, or we move through time like a ship sailing through the sea.”

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The MIT home page Spotlight showcases the research, technology and education advances taking place at the Institute every day.

What makes it as a Spotlight image is an editorial decision by the MIT News Office based on factors that include timeliness, promotion of MIT's mission, the balance of interest to both internal and external audiences, and appropriateness.

We do welcome ideas and submissions for spotlights from community members, but please note we are not able to accommodate all requests. We are unable to run event previews or promotions as spotlights; for those looking to promote an event, we are happy to include your listing as an event headline on the homepage (when space is available). For more information, e-mail the spotlight team.

Request a Spotlight or Event Headline, here.
Paying it forward

Paying it forward

Today’s Spotlight features an illustration by Christine Daniloff/MIT.

Lower rates of asthma and other health problems are frequently cited as benefits of policies aimed at cutting carbon emissions from sources like power plants and vehicles, because these policies also lead to reductions in other harmful types of air pollution.

But just how large are the health benefits of cleaner air in comparison to the costs of reducing carbon emissions? MIT researchers looked at three policies achieving the same reductions in the U.S., and found that the savings on health care spending and other costs related to illness can be big — in some cases, more than 10 times the cost of policy implementation.

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