MIT's Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program (UROP)
MIT: Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Current Research: Project Openings

Below are currently advertised UROP projects available to MIT, CME and cross-registered Wellesley College undergraduates. All projects, regardless of mode (pay, credit, or volunteer) are expected to be worth MIT academic credit and be supervised by MIT faculty. Projects appear on this list in the order they have been received.

These projects do not represent all available UROPs as many faculty do not submit project listings for this site. Rather, they expect interested students to contact them based on their general research to discuss potential UROPs.

Available UROPs

UROP Project listings are posted for approximately one month before they are removed, unless we are asked to re-post.

9/27/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Media Laboratory
Faculty Supervisor: Ethan Zuckerman

Project Title: Creation of Large-Scale Data Visualizations To Reveal Patterns In News Media

Project Description: The Media Lab s Center for Civic Media has built a massive online news aggregator and tools to understand language use, media bias, and trends in how topics and controversies are talked about online. We have been running the project for close to a decade and have a huge and constantly updated data-set with which to ask questions about how the media operates. We are looking for two talented javascript developers / creative technologists to help us build out the web-based data visualization components of this project. This will involve working with 3D web graphics platforms to render data from our API, and allowing navigation through words, entities, and more.

Prerequisites: Strong working knowledge of Javascript, experience with WebGL, javascript graphics libraries. Strong experience with Three.js strongly preferred. Experience working with JSON APIs. Experience with network visualizations preferred. Strong design and aesthetic sense strongly desirable. Experience working with javascript web application frameworks such as Redux and React preferable. Enthusiasm for beautiful, intuative, interactive web projects!

Contact Name: Sands Fish
Contact Email: sands@mit.edu


9/27/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Civil and Environmental Engineering (Course 1)
Faculty Supervisor: Markus Buehler

Project Description: See PDF

Contact: Dr. Flavia Libonati, libonati@mit.edu


9/27/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Media Laboratory
Faculty Supervisor: Chris Schmandt

Project Title: DIY Conductive Temporary Tattoos

Project Description: We are creating a low-cost, DIY fabrication process for makers to create temporary tattoos that are conductive, enabling wearers to place circuitry on their skin. Resembling the aesthetics of decorative metallic jewelry tattoos, thetattoos are not only functional, but also decorative.

We are seeking a UROP with:

URL:duoskin.media.mit.edu

Contact: Please send resume/portfolio of your past work and projects showcasing your maker abilities to Cindy Sin-Liu Kao cindykao@media.mit.edu.


9/27/16
Fall 2016-IAP 2017
Department/Lab/Center: Brain and Cognitive Sciences (Course 9)
Faculty Supervisor: Ann M. Graybiel

Project Title: Understanding the neurobiology of the brain (projects available starting now)

Project Description: This is a project made for highly motivated students willing to learn and explore the functioning of the striatum, a brain structure involved in many cognitive processes such as memory, decision-making and motivation. This is a critical study as striatal dysfunctions appear to be central in multiple neuronal diseases such as Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, obsessive-compulsive disorder, Tourette syndrome, addiction and many others. In this project, you will be taught how to record and manipulate brain activity as well as how to evaluate cognitive capacities in transgenic mice models of Huntington s disease. The most stimulant part of this project is that you will have the opportunity to be involved in the evaluation of revolutionary therapeutic strategies based on the development of new and unique transgenic-mice lines. Depending on your background and your wishes, you may also perform neurosurgeries, build neuronal implants or perform data analysis.

Prerequisites: No prior experience is required, but you must be highly motivated, conscientious and detail oriented. Students majoring in Course 9 as well as those majoring in mathematics, physics, engineering, computer science are welcome. We will give preference to candidates who can commit to working at least 12 hours per week during fall and spring semesters for at least a year and at least 30 hours per week during IAP and summer. We can usually only provide academic credits (not payment) for new UROPs.

URL: http://graybiel-lab.mit.edu/

Contact Name: Sebastien Delcasso
Contact Email: delcasso@mit.edu


9/27/16
Fall 2016-IAP 2017
Department/Lab/Center: Media Laboratory
Faculty Supervisor: Hiroshi Ishii

Project Title: Tuning acoustic environments though sonic interaction design

Project Description: Seeking a UROP to work on a project developing mechanisms to adjust our sonic environment through tangible interactions. The research focuses on interaction design within our surrounding environment, with the aim to create devices that are tunable to alternate tones and frequencies. The research will be looking at the acoustic properties of materials, which we will attempt to tune by adjusting geometries, therefore experience in modeling and simulation is desired.

Prerequisites: Candidate must have experience in material science (specifically metameterials would be a bonus), modeling and simulation, and or EE/CS. The work will involve material research and engineering, and an interest in sound/music would be an extra plus.

Contact Name: Penny Webb
Contact Email:pewebb@media.mit.edu


9/27/16
Fall 2016-IAP 2017
Department/Lab/Center: Biological Engineering (Course 20)
Faculty Supervisor: Roger D Kamm

Project Title: Effects of the mechanical microenvironment on microfluidic models of vasculogenesis.

Project Description: Physical forces from the microenvironment, along with biochemical cues, affect the formation and remodeling of vascular networks during development and throughout human adulthood. Mechanical cues such as substrate stiffness, tension/compression, and shear flow effects have been shown to largely influence the behaviour of endothelial cell morphology, particularly in 2D planar microenvironments. There remains an incomplete picture of how these mechanical cues affect vascular network formation in 3D. Our group has developed a number of microfluidic devices which allow for the inclusion of embedded hydrogels and the study of both vasculogenesis and angiogenesis in 3D. Using these devices, we will subject vascular growth models to a series of changes in the mechanical microenvironment (substrate stiffness, and strain). This will allow us to characterize growth and functionality of these networks, in particular morphology and permeability measurements, providing a basis for vascularized tissue engineering approaches in the future. Under the supervision of a Post-Doc, the appointed student will learn the basics of microfluidic device fabrication, cell culture of primary cells, and confocal microscopy techniques. These skills will be combined to generate and characterize perfusable vascular networks embedded within 3D hydrogels. Moreover, the student will help to generate and analyze data using ImageJ and/or Matlab. An ideal applicant would have experience with cell culture and a keen interest in developing vascular models, with a particular focus on mechanics-based assays.

Contact Name: Kristina Haase
Contact Email: khaase@mit.edu


9/26/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Sea Grant Program
Faculty Supervisor: Chrys Chryssostomidis

Project Title: Micro-Scale Remote Sensing with an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle

Project Description: Satellite-based remote sensing (earth-looking cameras and sensors mounted on satellites) has revolutionized our ability to study the earth. Multispectral cameras, for example, enable us to study the health of forests and farm fields as well as map and monitor environmental threats such as the encroachment of seawater into arable land. Satellite-based remote sensing does have some major drawbacks: it cannot penetrate clouds, it is not available on demand to respond to episodic events such as hurricanes, it has limited spatial resolution (although that is always improving), and the sensor set on a satellite cannot be customized for individual scientists. Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs, commonly called drones) hold the key to solving many of the problems of satellite-based remote sensing. UAVs can be launched at a moment s notice to map and monitor the effects of transient events such as storms. The availability of tiny spectrometers and multispectral cameras that can be mounted on a low-cost UAV puts remote-sensing into the hands of individual scientists and their students. The sensor-suite of a UAV can be changed from flight to flight thus increasing the research scope of the UAV. Small UAVs can travel very close to the surface (compared to satellites and piloted airplanes) and obtain extremely high resolution images. Finally, a UAV can identify something interesting on the ground and land to take a sample and return it to the lab, something that is impossible with satellites. We are engaged in outfitting a commercially available UAV, the Phantom 3 Advanced quad-copter, with a miniature spectrometer and imaging camera with the goal of performing aerial surveys of eel grass in the bays and estuaries around Boston. Eel grass (aka turtle grass or sea grass) grows in extensive underwater meadows that serve as an incubator for thousands of marine species. It is also increasingly appreciated as an important carbon si! nk in coastal environments.

The UROP student will perform the following tasks: 1) determining the payload capacity of the Phantom, 2) designing and fabricating a mount to connect our miniature spectrometer and its objective lens to the Phantom, 3) programming a Raspberry Pi microcontroller to take spectrometer data upon receipt of user commands from the ground, and 4) testing (flying) the system.

Students with an interest in robotics, sensors, mechatronics or UAVs should find this project especially appealing.

Prerequisites: Experience that will help with this project includes: mechanical design with Solid Work, 3-D printing, programming and interfacing microcontrollers, and experience flying UAVs, especially quad-copters. The major requirements are enthusiasm and imagination; beginning-level students will be considered

Contact Name: Dr. Thomas R. Consi
Contact Email: consi@mit.edu


9/26/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Aeronautics and Astronautics (Course 16)
Faculty Supervisor: Olivier de Weck

Project Title: Development and Demonstration of Design for In-Space Additive Manufacturing

Project Description: Additive manufacturing technology has the potential to significantly change the way that space missions are designed and executed by enabling in-space manufacturing of useful components. Missions to Mars or other destinations could potentially become much less expensive and less risky when in-space manufacturing is available, and this capability may even enable missions that would not be possible before. The goal of this UROP is to investigate how additive manufacturing can be applied in an in-space manufacturing context in the most effective manner to support maintenance demands for long-duration missions, and to design, manufacture, and test a proof-of-concept component to examine how additive manufacturing implementations impact design choices. The undergraduate researcher(s) will work closely with ongoing graduate research into the application of additive manufacturing for space systems and the quantification of the benefits that this capability could provide. The goal is to inform technology and system design efforts and identify key application areas. Specifically, the UROP will identify space systems components for which in-space manufacturing would be useful and redesign those components to recreate their functionality while minimizing mass requirements and taking advantage of the unique opportunities afforded by in-space manufacturing. The UROP will define requirements, objectives, and a test plan for a specific, proof-of-concept component, develop a design, manufacture the component, and perform tests to characterize the results. Ideally, this design-build-test cycle will be iterated several times.

Prerequisites: Experience with CAD software, hardware design/manufacture/assembly, and additive manufacturing are preferred, but not required. Familiarity with spacecraft systems (particularly environmental control and life support) also preferred, but not required.

Contact Name: Andrew Owens
Contact Email: acowens@mit.edu


9/26/16
Fall 2016-IAP 2017
Department/Lab/Center: Department/Lab/Center: Mechanical Engineering (Course 2)
Faculty Supervisor: Chrys Chryssostomidis

Project Title: Development of Ship Design Software for Navy Ships

Project Description: Are you interested in helping design the next Navy ship? In the Design Lab of MIT Sea Grant, we develop methods and software for the design and analysis of Navy ships and ship systems. The significantly increased power requirements of new sensor and weapon systems coupled with the flexibility demanded by the integrated nature of shipboard control systems place new demands on the early-stage design of ships, and the Navy needs new design software to handle these demands. The objective of this UROP is to test in-development software for early-stage ship design and to develop simulation models of equipment and systems to be incorporated in the software.

Prerequisites: Knowledge of C++ desired

Contact Name: Julie Chalfant
Contact Email: chalfant@mit.edu


9/26/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Media Laboratory
Faculty Supervisor: Sepandar Kamvar

Project Title: Visualizing Cyclist Commuting Patterns Using Mobile Location Data

Project Description: Come experience the dynamic and exciting environment at the Media Lab! In this UROP project with the Social Computing group, we are looking for a student to develop a web application that collects and stores data from a location-tracking mobile app that is currently being used by participants in a study on urban transportation. The mobile app has a well-documented API, and the web-app the UROP develops does not need to be user facing; it is for research purposes and analysis. With the web-app in place, the UROP will have the opportunity to create geographic and graph-based data visualizations of this JSON-based user data.

Prerequisites: Candidates should be motivated and excited about data analysis and visualization. Experience with back-end and front-end web development is a must, experience with visualization technologies (e.g. D3) is a bonus. There will also be the opportunity to learn technologies and tools during your time as a UROP.

Contact Name: Caroline Jaffe
Contact Email: cjaffe@mit.edu


9/26/16
Fall 2016-IAP 2017
Department/Lab/Center: Architecture (Course 4)
Faculty Supervisor: Miho Mazereeuw

Project Title: Digital Toolkit for Incremental Housing in India

Project Description: Urban Risk Lab is working on an innovative approach for integrating the analysis of large datasets and on-the-ground surveys into urban decision-making tool for improving the housing supply in Indian cities. The project aims to improve the feedback loop between housing demand and supply in rapidly developing cities in India. We are developing a digital platform comprised of a housing demand data collection app and an analytics dashboard - These tools will not only provide a framework for government and private consultants to collaborate on individual projects but will drastically reduce the time and effort spent in the current process. The project will augment the urban design process by pairing appropriate housing types with socio-economic profiles of the users to ensure housing diversity to accommodate changing family needs.

Prerequisites: Programming skills (Python / JavaScript /Processing/D3) developing Android Apps, familiarity with GIS. Expected time commitment is 8-10 hours a week.

URL: urbanrisklab.mit.edu

Contact Name: Aditya Barve
Contact Email: asbarve@mit.edu


9/26/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (Course 6)
Faculty Supervisor: Joseph Paradiso

Project Title: Miniature on-body robots

Project Description: For the past several years we (Responsive Environments Group and Living Mobile Group at the Media Lab, and Stanford Mechanical Engineering) were developing micro robots that can move around human body. At current state we developed a small robot that can move freely on the clothing. We are working on improving the design, so anyone can experiment with the robots.

We are looking for someone with experience in the following areas: (1) Mechanical Engineering students to help design and test the locomotion mechanisms. We are doing a lot of CAD (SolidWorks) and rapid prototyping such as 3D printing and laser cutting (2) Electrical Engineering to help design the electronics and sensors. We are doing a lot of embedded electronics, control systems and microcontrollers. We are using Altium Designer to design circuit boards. (3) Computer Science.

Work on the autonomous operation and navigation software. You can dive deeply in any of those areas, or work on multiple areas to get more breadth. We open source all the designs and the code on GitHub. We value diversity and hope to foster a welcoming and inclusive (responsive) environment. We do not discriminate on the basis of race, religion, color, national origin, gender, sexual orientation, age, marital status, veteran status, or disability status.

Contact Name: Artem Dementyev
Contact Email: artemd@media.mit.edu


9/26/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Mechanical Engineering (Course 2)
Faculty Supervisor: H. Harry Asada

Project Title: Design of a mobile cart for use on a multi-track elevator system

Project Description: My research focuses on the design and implementation of a two-dimensional multi-track rail and cart system for use in distribution centers. With e-commerce companies strongly desiring to move into urban areas, they will need to re-think their current format of product retrieval from the stock shelves. Current shelves are often low to the ground and do not take full advantage of the vertical space available. In urban areas, floor space will be limited, thus the product storage architecture will be forced to expand vertically. The rail system I am designing will allow product-retrieval carts to traverse a network of rails that span the entire vertical and horizontal length of the stock shelves. I am seeking a student to assist with the redesign of the carriages used to traverse the rail systems. Significant improvements can be made to the carriages so that they may be better able to handle misalignment in the rail systems as well as sturdier architecture suitable for holding electronics. This position will require some mechanical design work, so experience in this field would be useful. This project will be a significant contribution to my work and it will provide great experience in 3D printing and mobile robot design.

Prerequisites: A mechanical design class or relevant experience (required) , Solidworks experience (preferred)

Contact Name: Rachel Hoffman
Contact Email: rachelmh@mit.edu


9/26/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Mechanical Engineering (Course 2)
Faculty Supervisor: H. Harry Asada

Project Title: Implementation of sensor network on multi-track rail system

Project Description: My research focuses on the design and implementation of a two-dimensional multi-track rail and cart system for use in distribution centers. With e-commerce companies strongly desiring to move into urban areas, they will need to re-think their current format of product retrieval from the stock shelves. Current shelves are often low to the ground and do not take full advantage of the vertical space available. In urban areas, floor space will be limited, thus the product storage architecture will be forced to expand vertically. The rail system I am designing will allow product-retrieval carts to traverse a network of rails that span the entire vertical and horizontal length of the stock shelves. The rail system consists of a network of 'roller-coaster' type rails and turntables at the rail intersections. The turntables rotate to connect different combinations of rail segments to facilitate direction changes of the carts. I am seeking a student to assist with the programming and electronic implementation of the turntables in the rail system. Currently, there are no electronics in place to alert a central computer that a carriage is approaching a turntable. I would like to implement a series of sensors onto the rails or turntables that will send information regarding carriage location on the rail system as well as turntable orientation. This project will provide significant experience with regards to sensor implementation and programming.

Prerequisites: Sensor (IR sensor, pressure sensor, etc) experience preferred. Some programming (either arduino, python, or c++) experience required.

Contact Name: Rachel Hoffman
Contact Email: rachelmh@mit.edu


9/26/16
Term: Fall, IAP, Spring
Department/Lab/Center: The Fluid Dynamics of Disease Transmission Laboratory
Faculty Supervisor: Prof. Lydia Bourouiba

Project Title: Fundamental fluid dynamics and disease transmission

Project Description: Seeking a motivated and driven UROP student interested in experimental and/or mathematical modelling to tackle problems at the interface of fluid dynamics and disease transmission. The goal is to evaluate how fluids shape disease transmission in various contexts and populations (human, animal, and plant diseases). Seeking students who are self-motivated, creative, and enthusiastic about 1) problem solving and hands on activities or 2) problem solving and mathematical modeling.

Prerequisites: Interests in art and photography, Matlab, latex, and ImageJ are considered to be a plus. A strong Physics or Math-Physics background and experience or courses in fluid dynamics will be also considered to be strong assets.

URL:https://lbourouiba.mit.edu

Contact: If interested, please send an updated CV, including list of courses taken and previous projects/UROPs experiences to Prof. Lydia Bourouiba (lbouro@mit.edu)


9/26/16
Fall 2016-IAP 2017
Department/Lab/Center: Materials Science and Engineering (Course 3)
Faculty Supervisor: Antoine Allanore

Project Title: Experimental Investigation of candidate electrolytes for molten sulfide electrolysis.

Project Description: The processing of sulfide ores is necessary to extract some commodity metals (copper, lead or nickel) as well as strategic metals such as molybdenum or rhenium as by-products. However, the pyrometallurgical approach unavoidably results in the production of SO2 as a by-product of smelting, and requires numerous steps from concentrate to high purity metal, resulting the overall process in large capital investments and significant environmental consequences. The Allanore Group is investigating an alternative strategy by direct decomposition of the sulfides ores into metal and elemental sulfur by electrolysis, which could selectively recovery the valuable metals present in the ore, and produce an environmentally acceptable S2 gas. For this novel electrolytic approach to recover metals from their sulfides, selection of a suitable candidate electrolyte is the key step. The selected student will have the opportunity to design, build and conduct experiments for electrochemistry in molten sulfides under the close guidance of a postdoc. No prior knowledge of electrochemistry is needed. Additionally, there will be opportunities to learn fundamental analytical techniques in materials science and chemistry such as SEM, EPMA, XPS, XRD, optical microscopy, etc.

Prerequisites: It will be helpful for the student to be majoring in materials science, chemical engineering or mechanical engineering. Previous experience with hands-on machining/fabrication is preferred. Having the creativity, motivation and persistence to tackle challenging experiments at high temperatures is a must. Rising freshmen or sophomores are preferred.

URL: allanore.mit.edu

Contact: Interested students should email Dr. Sulata K. Sahu (sulata@mit.edu) with the following information:


9/26/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Chemical Engineering (Course 10)
Faculty Supervisor: Jean-Francois Hamel

Project Title: Bioremediation of aromatic pollutants

Project Description: Contrary to the laboratory intensive growth cultivation, microbial populations are typically found at near zero growth (NZG) in nature due to the severe lack of nutrients. At NZG, Pseudomonas putida F1 has been shown to exhibit drastic changes in both cellular physiology and morphology. For example, up-regulation of self-degrading enzymes and formation of membrane vesicles have previously been observed. In this study, we aim to cultivate P. putida F1 under NZG conditions and continuous culture with cell retention (CCR) in efforts to investigate benzoate biodegradation kinetics. The results from this study can be potentially applied to future bioremediation projects focused on aromatic compound biodegradation.

Prerequisites: This project is open to students from any major and any year.

Contact Name: Dr. Hamel
Contact Email: jhamel@mit.edu


9/23/16
Fall 2016
Multiple Openings
Department/Lab/Center: Health Sciences and Technology (HST)
Faculty Supervisor: Jose Gomez-Marquez

Description: The Little Devices lab of researchers turns toys into medical devices for international and domestic healthcare systems using design strategies such as affordability, modularity and DIY. Our lab aims to design technology that is robust and economical, yet intelligent using advanced sensors and smart materials. Projects from the group have been launched in Germany, Ecuador, Nicaragua, Ethiopia and New Zealand. The work has been featured by the New York Times, Wired, CNN, and TED.

UROP positions for Fall 2016 are listed below. All positions have the option for pay or credit. There is a 2-day fabrication and design orientation to be scheduled upon assigment. You will be joining a fast paced, interdisciplinary group who focuses on hands-on ideation and prototyping.

Project #1: Tinkering with Chemistry

Description: Work at the intersection of materials science and chemical engineering on next generation therapy technologies. Build upon our work in MIT’s multiplexed zika and ebola diagnostics, portable sensing, and environmental testing using microfluidics. Contribute to our Open Diagnostic Initiative to enable anyone in the world to create rapid diagnostics for infectious diseases using lab-developed construction sets for dengue, zika, and other viruses. You will work on inventing new types of instruments and biosensors using ligand interactions and some clinical chemistry.

Prerequisites: Strong understanding of organic chemistry and biochemistry. Wet lab experience a plus. You will learn any digital fabrication skills required for the projects such as laser cutting, 3-D printing and robot programming.

___________

Project #2: Programming Biosensors for Digital Health Divides (Course 2, 6, 20, 4)

Description: Design and test a suite of biosensors for physiological and biological parameters. Successful designs will plug and play with the rest of our prototyping platform and will be easily embeddable into unconventional diagnostic systems.

Prerequisites: Experience with designing, prototyping (such as Arduino) testing and debugging electronic circuits (e.g. embedded systems combining analog circuitry, digital circuitry, microcontrollers and wireless communications). Experience with wireless sensors or protocols helpful (e.g. Bluetooth, WiFi)

___________

Project #3: Digital Fabrication and Design (Mechanical, Course 2, Course 10, Course 20, etc)

Description: Invent new ways of reusing over the counter electronics to make medical devices using digital fabrication tools. Create modular components for users to remix and customize these medical devices.

Prerequisites: Experience with Solidworks or other 3D modeling software, fabrication experience (machine tools, waterjet, laser-cutter).

___________

Project #4: Manufacting Plug and Play Diagnostics (Mechanical, Course 2, Course 10, Course 20, etc)

Description: Assist with the design and manufacturing of a modular point-of-care diagnostic system. The objective of the UROP project would be to manufacture the diagnostics through design and fabrication of molds and optimize the injection molding methods. Further opportunities for design and prototyping of medical devices and diagnostics are also available.

Prerequisites: 2.008 and/or experience with injection molding and CNC machining strongly recommended, but not required.

___________

Project #5: Android Studio / Swift Development

Description: Our research team works on hard to detect pathogens that require image recognition and processing algorithms to drive patient diagnostics. You will be working with a group of mechanical engineers, virologists, and chemists.

UROP Tasks will include: Join us our diagnostic team to work on mobile phone software using Android SDK, Java libraries, Javascript and database software. Working with medical engineering team to brainstorm new ways of interpreting images, pattern recognition of large data sets, and design for remote populations. An interest in global health will be rewarding but not a requirement. We want to you solve interesting problems.

Contact: Please send a statement of interest to littledevices@mit.edu


9/23/16
Fall 2016-IAP 2017
Department/Lab/Center: Chemical Engineering (Course 10)
Faculty Supervisor: Prof. Bob Langer

Project Title: Large dose drug delivery

Project Description: Here in Bob Langer's lab we have openings for talented undergrad UROPs. This project aims to develop novel devices for delivery of large doses of drugs for the treatment of tuberculosis, HIV, Malaria among other infectious diseases. The UROP joining the lab will be trained in the begining to deliver tasks. The project can involve any of these skills: device fabrication and testing, cleanroom/microfabrication, in vitro device evaluation, mathematical modeling, and ultimately in vivo device evaluation in small and large animal models. This is an amazing opportunity for a motivated student who likes to work in one of the most internationally well known and productive labs in the area of drug delivery and learn from multidisciplinary teams composed of chemists, chemical engineers and physicians.

At least 9 to 12 hours per week dedicated to project work for Fall and Spring 2016. sophomore, junior and senior students with Engineering/science background are welcome to apply.

Contact: Please send your resume/CV to Dr. Ali Beyzavi, beyzavi@mit.edu.


9/23/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Chemical Engineering (Course 10)
Faculty Supervisor: Prof. Klavs Jensen

Project Title: Design, testing and scale-up of chemical syntheses and purification platforms for integrated continuous manufacturing.

Project Description: We are developing integrated chemical manufacturing systems for an array of unit operations involved in the synthesis of Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients (API). The components are being deigned and tested to afford a marriage of chemical synthesis and purification/isolation in a new automated, chemical synthesis platform. The selected candidate will be involved in the design, testing and scale-up of the new unit operations methodologies.

Main tasks will include:

The successful candidate will be supervised and aided through their work and will be provided support with respect to project reports, specialized synthetic chemistry steps and trouble shooting exercises. This UROP will provide the candidate experience working within a large multi-disciplinary team and thus, they will be exposed to a plethora of chemistry & chemical engineering fundamentals that will stand to them independent of the candidates background.

Pre-requisites: A general understanding of modern synthetic chemical methods and/or a general chemical engineering background. The candidate will need to work both independently as well as part of a greater team. Problem solving and a positive, open mind are key attributes.

Contact: Dr. Luke Rogers, lrogers@mit.edu


9/23/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Sea Grant Program
Faculty Supervisor: Chrys Chryssostomidis

Project Title: Before, During, and After: Crisis Planning for Resilient Fishing Communities

Project Description: The RESCUES: Responding to Emergencies at Sea and to Communities Under Extreme Stress manual that was developed by the Fishing Partnership Support Services, Harvard School of Public Health and MIT Sea Grant targeted two Massachusetts fishing communities: New Bedford and Gloucester. We are now expanding the reach of this effort by adapting the RESCUE manual for fishing communities throughout New England. Fishing is consistently recognized as the first or second most dangerous occupation in the U.S. Despite improvements in safety equipment and training, losses of life, catastrophic injuries, and losses of vessels are all too common. Fishing also tends to be a family business, with close relatives often fishing and working together in support of the business. The loss of lives in fishing reverberates throughout the community, profoundly affecting all, regardless of the degree of separation from the individuals lost. Resilience of fishing communities, therefore, can be affected by accidents at sea.

Tasks: Vital information was gathered for this guidance document about how fishermen, their families and their communities could better prepare for crises, react to crises when they occur, and cope with the aftermath. While much of the information in the RESCUES manual is applicable to other fishing communities, as the pundits say, the devil is in the details. To adapt the document to new communities, we will have to conduct interviews with a few individuals in selected fishing communities, obtain available secondary data, analyze the information, and write up the results in a succinct format. We are currently considering adapting the manual for: Portland, Stonington, and Jonesport, Maine; Portsmouth, New Hampshire; Point Judith, Rhode Island; Stonington, Connecticut; and Montauk, New York.

Prerequisites: We would like to have someone who is well-organized and able to work independently join us on the project. Willingness to interview community leaders, hunt for secondary data, and check facts via telephone are essential. Familiarity with Nvivo 10 (text analysis software) would be fantastic. This is for UROP direct funding or credit.

URL:http://seagrant.mit.edu/press_releases.php?nwsID=568

Contact Name: Madeleine Hall-Arber
Contact Email: arber@mit.edu


9/23/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Chemical Engineering (Course 10)
Faculty Supervisor: Jean-Francois Hamel

Project Title: Using yeast and algae for bioenergy applications: bio-oil co-production and CO2 capture

Project Description: The UROP student will have the opportunity to do process and biological research in bioenergy, focusing on the production of lipids (bio-oil) from oleaginous yeast strains and microalgae, as a feedstock for commercial production of biodiesel. This project is part of a program for developing sustainable energy processes of industrial and manufacturing relevance. We are especially interested in both the co-production of a useful product (e.g., carotenoids) or the capture of atmospheric CO2, a Green House gas. The UROP will join an existing team and we will participate in developing a quantitative assay for bio-oil and study the organisms in the bioreactor, a well-instrumented culture vessel.

Prerequisites: Basic chemistry or biology lab techniques. Students from any major and year are welcome to apply.

Contact Name: Dr. Hamel
Contact Email: jhamel@mit.edu


9/23/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Economics (Course 14)
Faculty Supervisor: Frank Schilbach

Project Title: The impact of poverty on cognitive function, decision-making, and productivity

Project Description: Frank Schilbach is a faculty member in the MIT economics department. He is looking for one or two undergraduate research assistants to work on two research projects at the intersection of development and behavioral economics. The broad goal of these projects is to learn about the impact of poverty on cognition, decision-making, and work productivity through various channels, including sleep deprivation and physical pain.

Responsibilities: The UROP student will be working on developing measurements of cognitive ability among low-income individuals. This will require programming visual tasks that are commonly used in behavioral economics research using Unity or another game engine. The UROP will have the opportunity to learn about digital data collection, data analysis, and conducting economic research.

Project 1: The Impact of Physical Pain on Productivity and Cognitive Function Chronic physical pain is highly prevalent among low-income workers in developing countries, and it may have widespread negative consequences for individuals cognitive function, decision-making, and productivity. Yet physical pain has largely been overlooked in development research and policy. This project seeks to understand the causal impact of physical pain on the lives of the poor. Using novel pain-measurement techniques in a randomized controlled trial of 400 low-income participants in India we examine how pain-reducing medication affects individuals productivity and cognitive function.

Project 2: The Economic Effects of Sleep Deprivation Among the Poor Poverty and health are closely linked. We study sleep, an important health behavior and outcome, and its impact on decision-making, cognitive function, and economic outcomes among the urban poor in a developing country. The medical literature has demonstrated the adverse effects of sleep deprivation on health and cognitive function in the lab. Given the challenging sleep environments found in urban areas in developing countries, these effects could matter greatly for the poor in their everyday environments.

This study aims to: 1) measure the prevalence and causes of sleep deprivation among low-income individuals in India, 2) assess the effectiveness of interventions to alleviate sleep deprivation in a real-world environment, and 3) estimate the causal impact of reduced sleep deprivation on cognitive function, decision-making, including behavioral tendencies such as framing effects, and economic outcomes.

Prerequisites: A candidate must be highly motivated, detail-oriented, and able to meet deadlines. Candidates should have knowledge and experience using Unity or another game engine and/or be proficient using C# or Java. While not necessary, the ideal candidate should be familiar with RCTs and have an interest in development and behavioral economics.

Contact information: If you are interested in the position, please send an email to Frank Schilbach (fschilb@mit.edu) and Emma Dean (emmacboswell@gmail.com) including your CV and a brief description of your background and interest in the position. Please send your CV as soon as possible given our upcoming application deadline.


9/23/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Aeronautics and Astronautics (Course 16)
Faculty Supervisor: Prof. Leia Stirling

Project Title: GUI Development for Evaluating Human Motion

Project Description: Soldier performance is inherently challenging to understand, to monitor, and ultimately, to quantify. These challenges originate from the varied and complex tasks that the soldier performs, the underlying variability in human task performance, the environments in which they operate, and a limited knowledge of the measures that truly characterize task performance success. The objective of this UROP is to aid in the development of a tablet interface that can provide interaction with previously collected human motion data. The interface will be coded in Python.

URL: stirling.mit.edu

Contact Name: Prof. Leia Stirling
Contact Email:leia@mit.edu


9/22/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Broad Institute (BR)
Faculty Supervisor: Aviv Regev

Project Title: Functional interpretation of genomes using biological networks

Project Description: The rapid improvements in our ability to interrogate genomes for variation associated with diseases, has lead to an explosion in genomic data. Systematically assigning function to variants in these large datasets, and understanding how variation in different genes converge on functional molecular networks, remains a major challenge. This limits our progress towards biological insight and therapeutic intervention. The specific goal of this UROP project is to participate in a team that develops large-scale computational methods to functionally interpret genomic data using biological networks (i.e., networks in which genes are connected if they are functionally associated in some experimental system). A dozen biological networks exist in the public domain that have been generated by weaving together data from tens of thousands of experiments and the student will make quantitative comparisons of these networks. Moreover, he/she will incorporate these networks into a computational pipeline being built at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard for genome interpretation. The student will also be involved in testing the pipeline and running analyses on new genomic datasets. A pilot version of the pipeline is already being used widely in the genomics community and the student will have the opportunity to interact with computer scientists, computational biologists, software developers and researchers in areas such as cancer and psychiatric disorders where the pipeline is being implemented.

The project will be mainly supervised by Kasper Lage (Assistant Professor, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School and Associate Member of the Broad Institute); and co-supervised by Aviv Regev (Director, Klarman Cell Observatory, the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Associate Professor of Biology, MIT).

Prerequisites:

Contact: Kasper Lage (lage.kasper@mgh.harvard.edu) with a CV, your availability schedule, and a brief paragraph on your interests and expectation of the project.


9/22/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL)
Faculty Supervisor: Edward Adelson

Project Title: Robot tactile sensing

Project Description: We are developing a high-resolution tactile sensor, GelSight(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aKoKVA4Vcu0), which is able to measure the fine details of contact interaction. We will mount the GelSight sensor on a robot gripper and explore its capability in assisting with everyday tasks such as laundry sorting, fabric perception, and food manipulation. The UROP will help with running experiments and programming the robot, which includes implementing programs for a close-loop trajectory in the Robot Operating System (ROS) system.

Prerequisites:Passion for robots! Experience with programming (preferably Python); basic knowledge of kinetics and control. Experience with ROS will be highly desirable.

Contact Name: Wenzhen Yuan
Contact Email: yuan_wz@mit.edu


9/22/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Media Laboratory
Faculty Supervisor: Andy Lippman

Project Title: MedRec: Using Blockchain to empower patients with medical record access

Project Description: Interested in Bitcoin and blockchain technologies? Come work on MIT Media Lab project MedRec, which uses a modified Ethereum blockchain to provide access & permissioning rights to medical records. Our goal is to unify patient access to their medical information and empower Big Data healthcare analytics across doctors and treatment sites, using the blockchain as a comprehensive data access directory. This project is a real-world prototype and has been tested with Beth Israel Deaconess hospital in Boston. We are looking for a backend dev who can help us flesh out the APIs, improve the web app and blockchain architecture and get the codebase ready for serious partnerships with healthcare companies and hospital networks (Partners/MGH/Brigham, Pfizer, Kaiser Permanente, etc).

Benefits: This UROP is in Viral Communications-- our UROPs get access to our prototyping space, free lab meeting lunches, frequent hang-outs with Bitcoin devs (i.e. Cory Fields, Peter Todd, etc), collaboration with the MIT Digital Currency Initiative and several other Media Lab perks. We consider you part of our group and you get to join for as much or as little as you like (sailing trips, field trips to local hardware/software companies, etc). This particular project is young and highly publicized--this means you ll have a significant impact on the project and an opportunity to contribute to something that already has a highly interested user base and sponsorship.

Required: Extensive python and web backend experience; Familiarity with API design; Familiarity with blockchain tech (i.e. you understand generally how blockchains work, what mining is, what smart contracts are, etc); Prior experience playing around with blockchain code (i.e. the blockchain.info API, ethereum, etc)

Preferred: Familiarity with the Ethereum codebase; Experience designing asynchronous web applications; Experience with python crypto libraries for RSA, hashing, etc

URL: pubpub.org/pub/medrec

Contact: Email Ariel Ekblaw medrec@mit.edu with UROP Application in the subject line if you re interested in applying.


9/22/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Sea Grant Program
Faculty Supervisor: C. Chryssostomidis

Project Title: Effects of ocean acidification on calcification of marine organisms

Project Description: Atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide (pCO2) increases since the Industrial Revolution has caused the acidity of surface seawater to decrease by 30% or 0.1 pH units. As increased pCO2 is largely due to anthropogenic use of fossil fuels and deforestation, seawater pH will likely decrease 0.3 0.4 units more by the end of this century. This, in turn, will result in a nearly 50% reduction in the carbonate ion concentration of seawater, making it more difficult for many calcifying organisms to produce or maintain their shells and skeletons. This research seeks to advance our understanding of the combined effects of pCO2 and temperature on critical aspects of shell/skeletal mineralization during the juvenile stage for five economically and ecologically important species of mollusks found in Massachusetts waters. This area has among the highest sensitivity to the potential effects of ocean acidification in the US due to its economic dependence on the shellfish industry and strong use of shellfish resources. Thus, understanding the impact of acidification on the early life stages of the mollusks that support these shellfish industries is our primary interest. At this point, our focus is to identify properties from skeleton surfaces (roughness, mineral density, structural pattern) that can readily account for those effects in calcification. This is being targeted through image analyses of stereo-pairs collected with TESCAN scanning electron microscope. Thus, working in this project you will gain experience in these techniques. Additional lab training is possible in: carbonate chemistry analyses, maintenance of living organisms in seawater, 3-D stereomicroscopy (to measure shell morphometric parameters), TESCAN and petrographic microscope (for analysis of ultrastructure and of shell/skeletal thin-sections).

Prerequisites: The most important attributes are interest in the project, motivation and reliability. Prior image analysis or Matlab experience is preferred. The applicant should be able to allocate 6-10hrs a week on the UROP during the Fall semester.

Contact Name: Carolina Bastidas
Contact Email: bastidas@mit.edu


9/22/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Sea Grant Program
Faculty Supervisor: C. Chryssostomidis

Project Title: Assessing 20 years of mangroves productivity in the Caribbean

Project Description: The CARICOMP (Caribbean Coastal Marine Productivity) long-term program was developed to study processes at the land-sea interface and understand productivity, structure and function of the three main coastal habitats (mangroves, seagrasses and coral reefs) across the region. Together with biological monitoring, the CARICOMP network collected environmental data using standardized methods in these habitats, across the entire Caribbean basin. This environmental data was recently summarized and can be used to explore potentially associated changes in the productivity of mangrove communities during the past 20 years. Before this step, data quality assurance would be essential with further data visualization and basic analysis on seasonal and site productivity trends. This project would be appropriate for someone with interest in either gaining/expanding their knowledge on ecology and global changes, or in further developing skills in data processing and analysis that can be applied broadly.

Prerequisites: The most important attributes are interest in the project and reliability. Must have experience with handling and summarizing data in R or Matlab. The applicant should be able to allocate 6-10hrs a week on the UROP during the Fall semester, with possibility of extension through IAP, or expansion towards a senior project or equivalent requirement.

Contact Name: Carolina Bastidas
Contact Email: bastidas@mit.edu


9/22/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Sloan School of Management (Course 15)
Faculty Supervisor: Scott Stern

Project Title: REAP / Business Registration Records Data Processing

Project Description: This project is meant for students interested in the nexus of data science and economics, who would like to understand how to go from raw data to the creation of useful economic statistics. The basis for this work is the paper Guzman J, and Scott Stern. 2016. "The State of American Entrepreneurship: Evidence from 15 U.S. States 1988-2014" NBER Working Paper http://www.nber.org/papers/w22095. You will work with the team to develop regional economic statistics out of raw data of business registration across up to 50 U.S. states. Prior work resulting from this effort has been highlighted in The Economist, MIT News, and other outlets and we have an exciting and growing agenda on which your work will be a critical piece.

Prerequisites: Interest in coding in Stata.

Contact Name: Jorge Guzman
Contact Email: jorgeg@mit.edu


9/21/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Media Laboratory
Faculty Supervisor: Hiromi Ozaki

Project Title: Open Source Estrogen

Project Description: The Design Fiction research group is currently seeking dedicated course 5, 7, 10, or 20 students to contribute to our ongoing research on the extraction and detection of estrogen in our bodies and in the environment. Although many scientific protocols already exist, our challenge is to make them more low-cost and accessible for citizen science and citizen inquiry into the forces of this invisible yet pervasive molecule. Students will work on currently investigated technologies such as yeast estrogen biosensors and DIY column chromatography, as well as explore new, novel methods that can be developed into public workshops. Students with creativity, imagination, and enthusiasm are strongly preferred!

Prerequisites: Experience in genetic engineering, biosensors, biochemistry, solid phase extraction, column chromatography, toxicology, endocrinology, and environmental science

URL: http://maggic.ooo/CELL-FREE-ESTROGEN-BIOSENSOR-2015

Contact Name: Mary Maggic
Contact Email: maggic@mit.edu


9/21/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: MIT-Singapore University of Technology and Design Collaboration (MIT-SUTD)
Faculty Supervisor: John Brisson

Project Title: Electric Vehicle Data Analytics and Design

Project Description: This project will analyze vehicle and environmental data collected during a recent electric vehicle race (article). The objective will be to summarize and develop theories for the vehicle and driver's performance during the race. There will be other opportunities to work hands-on with electric scooters, motorcycles and/or cars

Prerequisites: Well suited for students interested in working on electric vehicles at Tesla, Google, BMW, Ford, etc. Must have some experience with data analytics software such as Matlab and/or Tableau.

Contact Name: Dr. Lennon Rodgers
Contact Email: rodgers@mit.edu


9/21/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Health Sciences and Technology (HST)
Faculty Supervisor: Prof. Elazer Edelman

Project Title: 3D aortic reconstruction

Project Description: The Edelman Lab at the institute for Medical Engineering and Science of MIT is analyzing the flow dynamics off diseased aortas and the influence of a new stent graft device which is implanted in the aortas. We use commercial software packages to extract anatomic volumes (3Dslicer, VMTKLab, Geomagic) and ANSYS Simulation Software to investigate the blood perfusion within the aorta after the stent implantation. We are looking for a student to work on the following: extract the desired 3D geometry from CT images. The student will get a chance to learn and work with the above mentioned software.

Prerequisites: A basic knowledge of a 3D processing software (i.e. Geomagic) is recommended, but not required.

URL: http://edelmanlab.mit.edu

Contact Name: Dr Lampros Athanasiou
Contact Email: lambros@mit.edu


9/21/16
Fall 2016-IAP 2017
Department/Lab/Center: Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL)
Faculty Supervisor: Daniela Rus

Project Title: Soft Robotic Fish Project at The Distributed Robotics Laboratory

Project Description: We are offering two UROP positions this fall in the field of soft robotics. The project is about the integration and testing of a novel pump drive and buoyancy mechanism for a soft robotic fish prototype. The project encompasses PCB design, microcontroller programming, vision-based control and testing tasks. The controllers are developed within the Robot Operating System (ROS) framework on a Raspberry Pi and also directly on an mbed microcontroller. Testing is done both in tanks and in the MIT swimming pools.

Prerequisites: Prototyping experience using 3d printing, lasercutting and electronics design, acquired through prior UROPs, internships or class work, is highly desirable. Please make mention of such in your resume.

URL: https://groups.csail.mit.edu/drl/wiki/index.php?title=Soft_Robotics

Contact Name: Robert Katzschmann
Contact Email: rkk@csail.mit.edu


9/21/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Mechanical Engineering (Course 2)
Faculty Supervisor: Mathias Kolle

Project Title: Prototyping an Integrated Microfluidic Imaging System.

Project Description: This project is aimed at creating a microfluidic, miniaturized imaging device using monodisperse tunable droplet-based micro-lenses. The lenses are formed from immiscible hydrocarbon and fluorocarbon emulsions that display dynamically tunable focal lengths. The tunable microlens array may provide a miniaturized, mobile, easily deployable imaging tool for visualizing phenomena related to particle streams, cell movement and fluid analysis in microfluidic devices. The project will entail using microfluidic channels to create mono-disperse emulsions, designing a microfluidic chamber to contain the emulsions and mounting the sample cell in front of a CCD or CMOS chip. Experience with Arduino or Raspberry Pi is recommended. No experience in optics or microfluidics is required.

Contact Name: Sara Nagelberg
Contact Email: snnagel@mit.edu


9/21/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Sloan School of Management (Course 15)
Faculty Supervisor: Mary Rowe

Project Title: The Work of Chaplains in Greater Boston

Project Description: Chaplains work in a range of organizations in the greater Boston area - from companies to the port to universities to healthcare organizations to the fire and police departments to prisons to the National Guard. Some has been written about chaplains in each of these areas but little is known about how the work of chaplains compares across different locations and types of organizations. This project seeks to map chaplains working in the greater Boston area and gather basic information from them about the nature of their work. The UROP joining this project will learn about work in a range of organizations in greater Boston and about the changing religious demographics of the city. They will also be exposed to institutional field mapping common in sociology and urban studies.

Pre-Requisites: Curiosity and a strong work ethic. Good organizational skills and ability to work well independently. Some telephone or in person interviews will be required so a comfort and/or interest in interacting with different kinds of people in a plus.

We are looking for someone to work for 9 hours per week ideally for the whole academic year but just the fall semester is ok. The work can be for credit or pay.

Contact: Wendy Cadge, wcadge@mit.edu


9/20/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL)
Faculty Supervisor: Julie Shah

Project Title: Human Detection and Tracking for Space Robotics Applications

Project Description: At the Interactive Robotics Group, we are developing robots that can work seamlessly with humans. To allow for close-proximity interaction between humans and robots, the robots must be able to accurately detect and track humans in their vicinity. The goal of the UROP research would be to assist in developing a system for real-time detection and tracking of people using data from a time-of-light depth sensor and fisheye lens camera and the Robot Operating System (ROS). This system has the potential to be used on a robot currently under development by NASA, scheduled to launch to the International Space Station in a few years.

Prerequisites: Prior experience with programming (C++ or Python). Some experience with ROS is highly desirable. Basic experience with Linux

URL: http://interactive.mit.edu/

Contact Name: Pem Lasota
Contact Email: plasota@mit.edu


9/20/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Media Laboratory
Faculty Supervisor: Kevin Slavin

Project Title: Holobiont Urbanism

Project Description: We are looking for course 2, 4, and 6 students to contribute to our ongoing research to visualize the invisible world of microbes in cities! For the last year, we have been studying bees and their collective gut microbiome as a proxy for sampling the immediate environment. We have sampled beehives in Venice, Melbourne, Sydney, Tokyo, and New York and are beginning to explore new methods of visualization.Whether you are interested in data visualization, metagenomics, UI/UX, architecture, mechanical design, or game development, this position supports your interests in hope to develop new experiences in understanding microbes in the city. We are currently building a VR experience to explore space in new ways.

URL: miguelperez.cc

Contact Name: Miguel Perez
Contact Email: mperez4@mit.edu


9/20/16
Fall 2016-IAP 2017
Department/Lab/Center: Civil and Environmental Engineering (Course 1)
Faculty Supervisor: Saurabh Amin

Project Title: Statistical modeling of tropical cyclone wind fields

Project Description: Extreme weather such as tropical cyclones (TCs) poses a serious but poorly quantified risk on manmade infrastructure. The ability to predict the intensity and expected structure of storms is necessary in assessing the resilience of infrastructure networks such as urban transportation systems or power grids. To address this need, the Resilient Infrastructure Networks lab is building a statistical model that can generate synthetic wind fields for the purpose of quantifying expected TC risk in a given region. Our work builds heavily from spatial statistics, stochastic modeling, and inference techniques (theory and algorithms). We are looking for a UROP who will be involved in the development of our model - namely data collection, processing, and exploration; model development, execution, and testing; and post-processing of results for estimations and predictions. In addition, the UROP will be introduced to machine learning and statistics, particularly their application to modeling of spatial processes. Students interested in computational techniques, inference algorithms, statistical applications to atmospheric processes, and/or new developments in Civil and Environmental Systems engineering are especially encouraged to apply.

Prerequisites: Fluency in MATLAB. We will provide background in relevant subject areas, but familiarity with probability and statistics is preferred. The applicant should be able to allocate 8-10hrs a week on the UROP.

Contact: Please send your CV and a 1-2 paragraph statement of interest to Saurabh Amin (amins@mit.edu) and Derek Chang (changd@mit.edu).


9/20/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Media Laboratory
Faculty Supervisor: Kent Larson

Project Title: BikeBump: Bottom-Up Urban Design Platform

Project Description: This project is highly relevant as it will address various issues of dense urban places and is very important for the development of future cities. The Media Lab s Changing Places Group is exploring the impact of computational, design tools for urban intervention. The projects goal is to provide cutting edge participatory design tools for our backyard Boston Cambridge area. Specifically for bikers to improve bike lane security. The project is three folded, the project's starts to create a platform that can ask simple questions to each other tied with geolocated information. This is referred as "Geo-Fencing" assigning events once a user has entered a certain area. Not only reporting issues regarding cities, in the next stage the system will then ask for proposals with tradeoffs in a form that enables the participants collaborate and remix their proposals together. The third phase is the proposal validation process, where the systems attempts to create a decision making network utilizing a concept similar to liquid democracy.

UROP Position: During this UROP / temp position, students will gain a comprehensive understanding of technologies that support urban design processes coupled with participatory design. Development will cover both server and client side implementation.

Good to have skill-sets:

URL: http://cp.media.mit.edu/

Contact: Please send your application to Yasushi Sakai yasushis@mit.edu and Agnis Stibe agnis@mit.edu


9/20/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Media Laboratory
Faculty Supervisor: Iyad Rahwan

Project Title: Interactive Visualization of Large Datasets

Project Description: The Scalable Cooperation group at the Media Lab is working on analyzing a very large dataset that is being continuously updated, and is looking for an ambitious and driven software developer to help build an online public-use visualization tool that will allow users to explore this data in a structured and easy-to-use manner. We need back-end development for dataset file import and live update to database, data cube pre-computation for certain combinations of dimensions, and rapid-response serving of queries from the cubes and database. We need front-end development of an online interface for interactive, multi-dimensional visualization of filtered data served from the back-end. We are also looking at additional functionality to export reports to files for download, and a secure API for serving certain subsets of the data to authenticated clients. The UROP joining us for this project will help with implementation of this system in coordination with the group members, extending and optimizing the existing implementation.

Skills required: HTML, CSS, JS/AJAX, Python, SQL/NoSQL, database management, web application frameworks Skills to learn: d3, spark, data warehousing, OLAP, API development, caching, cluster computing

URL: http://scalable.media.mit.edu

Contact Name: Sohan Dsouza
Contact Email: dsouza@media.mit.edu


9/20/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Media Laboratory
Faculty Supervisor: Iyad Rahwan

Project Title: Machine Ethics Web Platform Development

Project Description: Earlier this year, the Scalable Cooperation Group at the Media Lab created Moral Machine (http://moralmachine.mit.edu), an online platform for crowdsourcing ethical decisions for autonomous vehicles while facilitating public participation in design and discussion of moral dilemmas. This platform received a tremendous amount of attention from the press, and became a viral phenomenon among the public. We are looking for an ambitious and driven software developer to optimize and rework a few existing features of this platform, and extend its functionality with a few new features, working in coordination with the group s members.

Required skills: HTML5, CSS, JS/AJAX, web application frameworks Skills to learn: meteor, mongodb

URL: http://scalable.media.mit.edu

Contact Name: Sohan Dsouza
Contact Email: dsouza@media.mit.edu


9/19/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Sloan School of Management (Course 15)
Faculty Supervisor: Prof. Christian Catalini

Project Title: Using Machine Learning and Big Data to Predict Startup Success

Project Description: The objective of this project is to develop new code and tools to predict startup growth. Students will have access to a unique, large-scale dataset of startup founding and growth events. They will also learn about the economics of early-stage entrepreneurship and startup fundraising (equity crowdfunding, angel financing, venture capital). If you are interested in getting hands-on experience in machine learning, economics research and data analysis as well as to understand the dynamics of startup success, this would be a great learning opportunity.

Prerequisites: Please only apply if you have strong programming skills in machine learning and python. Knowledge of SQL and basic statistics are a plus.

Contact Name: Prof. Christian Catalini
Contact Email: catalini@mit.edu


9/19/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Sloan School of Management (Course 15)
Faculty Supervisor: Prof. Christian Catalini

Project Title: Predicting Scientific Impact

Project Description: The objective of this project is to develop new code and tools to predict scientific impact (both positive and negative, e.g. retractions and breakthrough ideas). Students will have access to a unique, large-scale dataset of scientific articles, and will help gather and process the full text of the articles needed for the analysis from multiple sources (e.g. APIs, PDFs). They will also learn about the economics of science. If you are interested in getting hands-on experience in big data, economics research and data analysis as well as to understand the dynamics of scientific knowledge production and impact, this would be a great learning opportunity.

Prerequisites: Please only apply if you have strong programming skills in python and databases (e.g. MySQL). Knowledge of XML, natural language processing and machine learning are a plus.

Contact Name: Prof. Christian Catalini
Contact Email: catalini@mit.edu


9/19/16
Fall 2016-IAP 2017
Department/Lab/Center: Chemical Engineering (Course 10)
Faculty Supervisor: Chris Love

Project Title: Analytics for Biologics Manufacturing

Project Description: This project will provide an excellent introduction to the manufacturing of biologic drugs, from upstream production to downstream processing. The student will work with a team of graduate students, technicians, and undergrads to produce drug under different conditions and develop analytical techniques to improve the process. Duties will include, but are not limited to: cultivating yeast cells in shaken cultures, optimizing protocol for a metabolite quantification system, supporting development of chromatography methods, preparing standard solutions and cultivation samples for analysis, and analyzing data. This project requires a weekly commitment of 8-10 hours during typical working times (8am-6pm).

Prerequisites: Basic lab skills such as pipetting, preparing media and buffers. Strong communication skills. Highly motivated and interested in biomanufacturing.

Contact Name: Catie Bartlett
Contact Email: mcbart@mit.edu


9/19/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL)
Faculty Supervisor: Dr Amar Gupta

Project Title: Digital Health and Telemedicine for Global Health: A Multi-Pronged Approach

Project Description: The remote delivery of healthcare services and analytics, fueled by advances in communication and mobile health technologies, holds great potential to provide improved outcomes and quality at a reduced per-capita cost. In the wake of the Affordable Care Act, this shift motivates research into how the evolving technologies and processes can be deployed in developed and developing environments, how issues related to interoperability can be addressed, and how costs and benefits can be objectively compared between the conventional environments and the emerging ones. This UROP provides opportunity for multiple students to be involved to study technical, business, policy, and public health issues. Previous researchers have published their findings in technical, business, medical, and legal journals. The focus and scope of the UROP can be potentially tailored to the background and interest of the concerned student.

Potential UROP projects can focus on: Technical issues such as interoperability in hardware and software; Business issues such as analysis of costs and benefits, as well as nucleating startups; or Strategic Issues such as the deployment strategy.

Contact: Applications are invited from students at MIT and Wellesley College, with preference for individuals with demonstrated interest and background in the subject matter. Interested applicants should submit a recent resume to Dr. Amar Gupta at agupta@mit.edu. Please include the preferred number of hours you would like to devote each week to this activity.


9/16/16
Fall 2016-IAP 2017
Department/Lab/Center: Media Lab (MAS)
Faculty Supervisor: Hiroshi Ishii

Project Title: Heat-sealing Inflatable Shape-change Materials for Interaction Design

Project Description: This research proposes a mechanism to fold a sheet material into volumetric objects. Inspired by how protein fold itself from a single string into three-dimensional structure, the research looks at using heat sealable material to create air chambers in sheet form factor. We introduce a bending mechanism that creates multiple, programmable shape-changing behaviors with inextensible materials, including paper, plastics and fabrics. We developed a software tool that generates these bending mechanism for a given geometry, simulates its transformation, and exports the compound geometry as digital fabrication files. We show a range of fabrication methods, from manual sealing, to heat pressing with custom stencils and a custom heat-sealing head that can be mounted on usual 3-axis CNC machines to precisely fabricate the designed transforming material. We envision such mechanism can be useful for the future shape-changing material design, product design as well as in robotics field.

Role: Helping with developing the automatic control of the inflation and deflation. Selecting and testing different sheets material (paper, fabric, PVC, silk, etc. )Fabricating the sheet materials with air chambers. Designing transformable structure with the folding mechanism.

URL: pneuduino.org

Contact Name: Jifei Ou
Contact Email: jifei@mit.edu


9/16/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Media Laboratory
Faculty Supervisor: Pattie Maes

Project Title: Reality Editor - AR/IoT

Project Description: The Reality Editor is an augmented reality tool for intuitively connecting and controlling Internet of Things objects. Objects connected to our server can be recognized by the Reality Editor iOS app and controlled with direct-mapped AR user interfaces. The platform is built on Node.js, and all interfaces use Javascript and Web Standards. We are working to increase the range of applications for the Reality Editor to make it easier to connect objects to our system and to design user interfaces for objects. The platform is open source and can be integrated with any hardware. For this fall UROP we are targeting Lego Mindstorms as the hardware ecosystem to closely integrate with. We have built a 3500-piece Lego machine and we are looking for you to extend this work.

Check out the Reality Editor here: http://openhybrid.org/reality-editor.html

The Task: The first task would be to learn how the Reality Editor works with connected hardware, and to put the finishing touches on our code controlling kinetic functionality of the lego project using Node.js. Upon completing the first task you would then start to design the user interface for a standalone app that allows users to easily build and interact with Lego Mindstorms and the Reality Editor.

Skills:

URL: http://fluid.media.mit.edu/realityeditor

Contact Name: Valentin Heun
Contact Email: heun@mit.edu


9/16/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Brain and Cognitive Sciences (Course 9)
Faculty Supervisor: Laura Schulz

Project Title: Learning and Exploration in Early Childhood

Project Description: Our lab studies how infants and young children learn about the world. Specifically, our research projects investigate how young children learn about causal relationships through active exploration. In addition, we study other topics in cognitive development such as language and moral reasoning. We have a partnership with the Boston Children's Museum where most of our experiments take place. As a research assistant in our lab, you will be involved in the full research process, including recruiting families to participate in research, conducting behavioral experiments with young children, coding behavioral data, and building stimuli (toys!) for research projects. We are looking for UROPs who are curious and who would be comfortable interacting with children and their parents.

Prerequisites: 9.00 and 9.85 are preferred but not required

URL: eccl.mit.edu

Contact Name: Kary Richardson
Contact Email: karyrich@mit.edu


9/16/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (Course 6)
Faculty Supervisor: Una-May O'Reilly

Project Title: Visualizing a City by Mobile Calls and Demographics

Project Description: We are seeking a student to help develop software visualization of Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Our project aims to study the potential of a forthcoming metro system by understanding behavior patterns that would indicate metro traffic. Preferred working knowledge of Java D3 and Web development using HTML5.

Prerequisites: 6.0001 or equivalent 6.009/ 6.031 or equivalent 6.0005: preferred

Contact Name: Sarah alHumoud
Contact Email: soah@mit.edu


9/16/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Science, Technology, and Society (STS)
Faculty Supervisor: David Kaiser

Project Title: The Cosmic Bell Experiment / Extended Outreach: A Science Theater Project of Catalyst Collaborative @ MIT (CC@MIT), the MIT Museum, the MIT Department of Physics and the MIT Program in Science, Technology, and Society

Project Description: CC@MIT is a collaboration between MIT and Central Square Theater, dedicated to creating and presenting plays that deepen public understanding about science, while simultaneously providing artistic and emotional experiences not available in other forms of dialogue about science. CC@MIT is currently engaged in an ambitious Expanded Outreach project centered around a major experiment, Testing Bell’s Inequality with Astrophysical Observations (henceforth: Cosmic Bell Experiment, or CBE), being carried out by an international team of scientists, including MIT faculty Profs. David Kaiser and Alan Guth. The MIT Museum is leading a multi-component approach to public outreach that is complementary with the research.

The work program rests on a number of key assumptions: 1. The science communication challenges involved in engaging non-specialist audiences with CBE are considerable; 2. The key to success with CBE outreach efforts lies in developing content that enables target audiences to grasp the rationale and potential significance of CBE; 3. Grasping the rationale and potential significance of CBE depends upon having an intuitive understanding of key theoretical concepts - in astrophysics and cosmology, and in quantum mechanics.

To accompany the exhibition being planned by the MIT Museum, CC@MIT is creating an innovative 20-30 minute in-gallery Quantum Physics Show (QPS) that will physically engage museum visitors with the deeply puzzling phenomenon of quantum entanglement and give them a vivid sense of the particular aspects of this phenomenon that CBE is designed to explore. Successfully developed, QPS will allow museum visitors with no technical background in quantum mechanics to live the puzzle of quantum entanglement and the various alternative accounts of it that are to be subjected to experimental test in CBE. Though it is preferred that the same UROP assistant remain with the project for the entire process, that is not required.

Tasks for the UROP Research Assistant will include:
Fall 2016

Spring 2017

Prerequisites: Some experience in theater or other performing arts preferred, but not essential. Ability to articulate interest in exploring the useful synergy between theater and science. Ability to commit a minimum of 10 hours weekly.

Contact Name: David Kaiser
Contact Email: dikaiser@mit.edu


9/16/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Media Lab (MAS)
Faculty Supervisor: Chris Schmandt

Project Title: Time Travel in Virtual Reality

Project Description: We are working on a time travel Virtual Reality experience using the Samsung GearVR devices and/or Google Tango devices that will allow one or more users to be present in the same VR space for a shared experience. We are looking for someone who has experience in Unity and 3D modeling plus animation using Blender. If interested, please send an email, providing a short description of why you are the ideal candidate, stating relevant past or ongoing work (include links if applicable)

Prerequisites: Unity, Blender

Contact Name: Misha Sra
Contact Email: sra@media.mit.edu


9/16/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Media Lab (MAS)
Faculty Supervisor: Chris Schmandt

Project Title: Locomotion in Virtual Reality

Project Description: We are working on a locomotion mechanic in Virtual Reality using the HTC Vive that will allow one or more users to be able to walk in the real world to move in the virtual world. We are looking for someone who has solid experience in Unity and is excited about creating new ways of movement in Virtual Reality. If interested, please send an email, providing a short description of why you are the ideal candidate, stating relevant past or ongoing work (include links if applicable)

Prerequisites: Unity

Contact Name: Misha Sra
Contact Email: sra@media.mit.edu


9/16/16
Fall 2016-IAP 2017
Department/Lab/Center: Sloan School of Management (Course 15)
Faculty Supervisor: Catherine Tucker

Project Title: Viral Videos, Social Media Monitoring, and Policing

Project Description: In this research project, we are interested in understanding how social media monitoring by the crowd shape the subsequent behavior of professions and organizations. Specifically we are interested in understanding how the videos of police-public interactions that goes viral through social media platforms such as YouTube and Twitter impact emergency response and crime control processes and outcomes.

If you are interested in: (a) getting hands-on experience in analyzing high-volume and fine-granular big data (e.g., city-level 9-1-1 calls, YouTube videos, Twitter feeds) (b) developing data science skillsets through collecting data from multiple sources (e.g., crime reports, MTurk surveys, Twitter feeds, YouTube metadata), converting unstructured data into structured data etc. (c) participating in interesting and relevant social science research this research project would be a great learning opportunity.

Candidates with strong programming skills in scripting languages (such as Python) as well as some familiarity with using Mechanical Turk for data collection and validation will be preferred. Responsibilities include writing code to collect data from a variety of sources, converting unstructured data to structured data, and administering surveys using Mechanical Turk.

Prerequisites: Programming skills with scripting languages (Python or Ruby or Perl) Familiarity with Mechanical Turk (CLI and web-interface) Experience with Microsoft Excel

Contact Name: Arvind Karunakaran
Contact Email: arvindk@mit.edu


9/15/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Media Laboratory
Faculty Supervisor: Kent Larson

Project Title: Dynamic Transformable Furniture for Future Co-working Spaces: CITY-OFFICE

Project Description: The workplace of the future is urban. More than 50% of the world s population lives in cities. In the U.S. this number is 80%. Cities are once again hubs for innovation. This presents incredible opportunity, but there are challenges: Urban Space is at premium with supply outstripping demand and ever escalating rents. Additionally, millennials who will make up the majority of the workforce demand personalized workspaces and collaborative opportunities. These dilemmas mean the Workplace of the future will need to be hyper efficient AND responsive to users needs. City Office is a solution for small and medium sized enterprises that make up the majority of businesses and face these pressures most significantly.

The task: Design Architectural robotics enable a hyper-efficient, dynamically reconfigurable co-working space that accommodates a wide range of activities in a small area.

Be a part of the team that is going to think and design: i) The architectural space and transformation of typical office multifunction room (approx.46ft*29ft) to enable it to adjust its function effortless between to conference room separated meeting/board room space, team-work space, gala space and etc. ii) The mechanics of robotic furniture allows itself to fold, expand, move and connect with other furniture part, ideally with the use of actuator. iii) The sensor system that can allow the new furniture system to sense force, gesture, speech, distance and etc. iv) The computer vision system and user interface collaborating with the sensor system that enable furniture pieces to autopilot and users to control effortless.

Candidates profiles: We are looking at integrating 3-4 UROPs to the project. As mentioned above, our Ideal candidates should be proficient in at list one of following discipline: architecture, mechanical engineering, electrical engineering and computer science. And should be able to develop pragmatic and creative ideas on the mechanism, design and prototyping of this dynamically transformable co-working space system. You will be asked for previous experience, class projects, relevant courses, internships, etc. that support your knowledge and skills germane for this project.

Required Skills: i) architecture: Rhino+Grasshopper, Sketchup, 3DsMAX animation, After Effect, Adobe suite, AutoCAD and 3d printing. ADDITIONAL: Processing and Arduino IDE. ii) mechanical engineering: SolidWorks, Rhino, Sketchup, Proficient prototyping skill with waterjet, 3dprinting and casting. ADDITIONAL: C++, Python, Processing and Arduino IDE, MATLAB. iii) cs & ee: Computer Vision, Sensor and UI design. Processing, Arduino IDE, HTML, CSS, JS, Grasshopper. ADDITIONAL: JQuery, D3.js, Web Framework, Machine Learning.

Contact Name: Honghao Deng
Contact Email: honghaod@mit.edu


9/15/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Media Laboratory
Faculty Supervisor: Kent Larson

Project Title: Autonomous Shared Bike Platform (Multiple Roles)

Project Description: The Changing Places Group at the Media Lab is developing a new generation mobility platform for urban commuting and logistics. By combing robotics, electrification and vehicle-sharing, we aim to create a new category of vehicles that addresses the common last-mile commuting gap and is compatible with the pedestrian, car-lite urban environment of the future.

Roles include:

Join our team if you like the following

Prerequisites: FLEET SIMULATION Python and Javascript Programming. Experience with Data Structure, Algorithm, System Dynamics, Microscopic Modeling and Agent-Based Modeling a plus. HUMAN-COMPUTER INTERACTION UI architecture, interfaces, interaction flow, conception diagrams, visual mockups and basic embedded system programming. EMBEDDED & CONTROL SYSTEMS ROS, feedback control systems, estimation, filtering, Experience/interest in real-time systems, AI and Robotics applications, GPS, inertial system, low-level glue code and fault-tolerant systems analysis a plus COMPUTER VISION Obstacle detection, machine learning, point cloud processing numerical optimization, camera calibration, LIDAR and sensor fusion. Experience/interest in GPU programming, state estimation and visual/inertial integration is a plus.

URL: http://cp.media.mit.edu/pev/

Contact Name: Phil Tinn
Contact Email: ptinn@mit.edu


9/15/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Biology (Course 7)
Faculty Supervisor: ChoKyun Rha

Project Title: Bioinformatics Analysis of the Genetic Effects of Natural Phytochemical Compounds

Project Description: Seeking UROP student, preferably junior or senior, for a bioinformatics project for 10-15 hours per week. This project involves looking at the use of natural products, phytochemicals derived from the palm oil plant, and investigating their genetic effects on cells on regulatory networks and gene expression. Putative genes will be validated in cell culture using Microarrays, RNA-seq and Western blots. This project is ideal for a pre-med interested in holistic medicine.

Desirable Skills:

Prerequisites: familiarity with R, Bioconductor, Galaxy platform for RNA-seq, some cell culture experience, computational biology course

URL: http://csbi.mit.edu/people/rha.html

Contact Name: Dr Robert P Weinberg
Contact Email: rweinber@mit.edu


9/15/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Brain and Cognitive Sciences (Course 9)
Faculty Supervisor: Pawan Sinha

Project Title: Development of Face Processing in Children with Late Sight Onset

Project Description: The overall goal of Project Prakash is to provide treatment to curably blind children and study their subsequent visual development. In particular, we have been studying the development of object and concept formation following recovery from prolonged congenital blindness. Project Prakash uniquely allows us to investigate this developmental progression from the earliest stages both behaviorally and with brain imaging tools. In this study, we shall focus on face identification. Specifically, our goal is to develop a battery of standardized person identification tests that can be used to determine the developmental progression of recovering face, body and general person identification after sight onset. The UROP will contribute to planning and preparing behavioral and EEG experiments, as well as with the data analysis, using mostly photoshop, matlab and excel. The student will work closely with a post-doc in the lab, and will communicate closely with the India-based research team to ensure proper data collection. Additionally, the student will have substantial opportunity to work independently. This position is available for pay or credit.

Prerequisites: The ideal candidate will have a strong interest in face processing and/or development, as well as previous experience in MATLAB and photoshop, and strong analytical skills. Must be able to commit 6-10 hours per week during the fall semester. A background in computer science, engineering, brain and cognitive sciences, or related field is desired.

Contact Name: Sharon Gutnick
Contact Email: sharongu@mit.edu


9/15/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Mechanical Engineering (Course 2)
Faculty Supervisor: Irmgard Bischofberger

Project Title: Jam these fingers!

Project Description: The spontaneous emergence of patterns is ubiquitous in nature and leads to systems of extraordinary beauty (consider for example the magnificent structure of river networks or the symmetry of snowflakes). One particularly spectacular example of a pattern forming system is the viscous fingering instability, in which the displacement of a more viscous fluid by a less viscous one between two parallel plates leads to the formation of complex fingering structures. What would happen if the more viscous fluid transforms into a solid as a result of the growth of the fingers? This remarkable transition can be induced in a suspension of solid particles suspended in a liquid; such a system has the remarkable property of turning into a jammed (solid-like) state under the application of a stress. Such a jammed state can form dynamically, starting from a small perturbation and propagate through the entire system. A propagating jamming front will form naturally in front of a growing finger. Moreover, as multiple fingers penetrate the system, a jammed front will inevitably collide and interact with a neighboring one. How will these interactions alter the patterns? In this experimental project you will investigate the novel patterns that form in a jammed system and the dynamics of their growth.

URL: mitfluidslab.com

Contact Name: Irmgard Bischofberger
Contact Email: irmgard@mit.edu


9/15/16
Fall 2016-IAP 2017
Department/Lab/Center: Media Laboratory
Faculty Supervisor: Pattie Maes

Project Title: Physiological Interventions through Adaptive Materials

Project Description: Several advanced architectures and transitional implementations have been proposed for sensorial systems of the human body. However, there aren t many precedents on augmentations through skin beyond sensing and monitoring. The skin serves as an interface to physiological processes, has key sensory channels for transduction and space for well-integrated control interfaces.

We are currently researching and prototyping:

UROP Responsibilities - We are looking for a motivated UROP for the following tasks:

Prerequisites - We expect the UROP to have:

URL: fluid.media.mit.edu

Contact Name: Harpreet Sareen
Contact Email: sareen@media.mit.edu


9/15/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Chemical Engineering (Course 10)
Faculty Supervisor: Yuriy Roman

Project Title: Synthesis and reactivity of perovskites for catalytic deoxygenation of biomass derived compounds to fuels

Project Description: Our lab works on developing a technology for catalytic conversion of biomass to fuels and chemicals. Our recent work is focused on using perovskites for these applications. We are looking for a UROP student to assist us in this project. The UROP will be responsible for synthesis, scale-up, characterization, and analysis of reactivity these materials.

Tasks: Will include wet chemical synthesis of these perovskites, characterization using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and surface area measurements, reactor operation and data analysis. Opportunity to continue into IAP/Spring.

Prerequisites: Chemical Engineering or Materials Science major with a willingness to learn new concepts and deliver. Any prior experience with wet-chemistry, or analytical techniques such as XRD will be be great. UROP will be trained on the synthesis, characterization and reactivity measurements and analyses.

Contact Name: Manish Shetty
Contact Email: m_shetty@mit.edu


9/15/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Media Laboratory
Faculty Supervisor: Kevin Slavin

Project Title: Develop a massively-multiplayer video game with industry pioneers

Project Description: We're looking for software developers in EECS or the arts to rethink multiplayer games at the Media Lab. If you love League of Legends, CS:GO, Hearthstone, come join us! Playful Systems studies the mechanics, dynamics and aesthetics of massively-multiplayer games. This UROP position involves researching and developing procedurally generated content in competitive games. The objective is to design a game where players are part of each other's journeys through unconventional mechanics. 6.UAP eligible! Will help with proposal. Contact berman@mit.edu for futher info. Prior UROPs in this position now work at Snapchat and Google. About us: Playful Systems studies games, working with everyone from the Dalai Lama Center to the Mori Building Co. in Tokyo. The team has experience as executives, designers and developers in the video game industry.

Prerequisites: Completion of a 10-15 minute simple programming quiz

URL: benberman.com

Contact Name: Benjamin Berman
Contact Email: berman@mit.edu


9/15/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Mechanical Engineering (Course 2)
Faculty Supervisor: David Wallace

Project Title: Teaching STEM & Confidence with IoT and Wearables

Project Description: Girls in middle and high school often have little connection to engineering. But here is a research project that’s concerned with how we this can be changed! We are investigating what makes middle school girls tick and developing a platform that empowers young people to build and program their own cloud-connected wearable electronic devices. Our hypothesis: A STEM activity has to have a purpose and relevance in order to significantly increase middle school girls’ self-efficacy.

For this fall, we are planning experimental workshops with local schools and clubs (e.g. BB&N, Big Sister Boston and more) and help is needed to (1) plan and (2) run those workshops, as well as (3) develop scientific tools to investigate the impact of the learning experience on teens’ self-identity and other “soft” factors. If you’re passionate about teaching, psychology, or social science, you will have the chance to be part in a research project of national interest.

Also, we will complete the cloud-connected toolkit by (4) designing and building a new interface to wirelessly interface with the wearable hardware. We will use Node-Red to play with the cloud. If you like Xcode (or tools like React Native), you could (5) take the lead on creating an iOS app. And finally, we will (6) design and build custom boards for our wireless hardware. If you are passionate about electrical engineering or computer science, you will be excited to hear that we are finding new applications for technologies that are not even established yet, making this a very intense research project.

We are looking for 2-3 undergraduate students, who can commit time throughout the semester, to play a vital role in contributing to this research and potentially publish their work.

Prior experience in computer science, electrical engineering, product design, teaching, sociology, or psychology is helpful, but not necessary.

Contact: If you are interested, please email Larissa Nietner (nietner@mit.edu) and attach your resume.


9/14/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (Course 6)
Faculty Supervisor: Justin Solomon

Project Title: Mathematical Analysis of Helical Structure in Cryo-EM Images

Project Description: Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) is gaining attention in the world of structural biology for directly imaging molecules at near-atomic resolution. After cryo-EM data is obtained from an electron microscope, mathematical algorithms are needed to extract molecular shape in the presence of high noise and uncertainty. This can become particularly challenging when the molecule has helical or other types of symmetry. With collaborators at MIT, Princeton, and UCSF, you will formulate and implement algorithms for extracting information about helical molecules from cryo-EM images. The main challenge will be finding and extracting the repeating structure in the backbone of a helix given its projection into the imaging plane of the microscope. You will need to make use of image/signal processing techniques, as well as optimization algorithms to find the "best fit" molecular parameters.

Prerequisites: Candidates must be mathematically oriented and comfortable with linear algebra and multivariable calculus, preferably with knowledge of the Fourier transform. Experience with numerical methods and/or optimization is preferred.

Seeking UROPs supported by direct funding or course credit; applications must be sent by September 29.

Contact Name: Justin Solomon
Contact Email: jsolomon@mit.edu


9/14/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Biological Engineering (Course 20)
Faculty Supervisor: Paul Blainey

Project Title: Microfluidic sample preparation for sequencing of clinical pathogen samples

Project Description: The Blainey lab is looking for a motivated UROP to work on a microfluidics project involving next generation sequencing at the Broad Institute. This project aims to perform genetic analysis on pathogen samples from hospitals to determine the efficacy of treatment protocol on infected patients. In this project, microfluidic devices will be used to extract DNA from bacterial cells and prepare the DNA for sequencing. The student will work closely with a graduate student on this project and will learn techniques in microfluidic fabrication, microbial DNA extraction, and sequencing preparation. Interested candidates should submit (1) CV with past research experience, (2) short description of why they would be a good fit for this project, (3) tentative fall 2016 class list, and (4) fall schedule availability.

Prerequisites:

Contact Name: Georgia Lagoudas
Contact Email: lagoudas@mit.edu


9/14/16
Fall 2016-IAP 2017
Department/Lab/Center: Program in Writing and Humanistic Studies (Course 21W)
Faculty Supervisor: Suzanne Lane

Project Title: METALOGON 2.0: A TOOL TO SUPPORT ORAL PRESENTATION FEEDBACK

Project Description: Writing, Rhetoric, and Professional Communication (WRAP) recently received funding from the MIT Alumni Funds to develop a multi-layered video annotation tool, called Metalogon, aimed at supporting rhetorical instruction, feedback and evaluation of oral presentations. Specifically, we aim to address the problem of specific and actionable feedback on oral presentations by having students upload videos of their presentations into the Metalogon environment. These videos can then be made available to instructors and TAs for feedback and comments through annotations, falling under course-specified categories, and will be tagged for rhetorical features. Although a prototype of Metalogon already exists, our goal is to redesign and more fully develop a prototype to be used in academic year 2016-17, with a beta version planned to be deployed to multiple subjects in the Spring of 2017.

Responsibility: You will work with the directors of WRAP, a technical lead and a front-end developer to design Metalogon, following the already existing back-end framework. As the UI designer, your role will be to think through and implement key design points such as ease of use (e.g. fewer clicks to key functionality), an intuitive interface (e.g. avoiding guesswork or excessive messaging, making it easy to understand), and a minimalist approach (e.g. avoiding too many interaction points in any single view, focusing on key objects on each view).

Commitment: Part-time, depending on your availability through the fall semester and, possibly, during IAP.

Familiarity with key design concepts and processes:

Contact Name: Andreas Karatsolis
Contact Email: karatsol@mit.edu


9/14/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Chemical Engineering (Course 10)
Faculty Supervisor: Michael Strano

Project Title: Biomolecular sensing based on single walled carbon nanotubes

Project Description: We are a group specialized in using the near IR fluorescence of carbon nanotubes to transduce signals for analyzing and detecting molecules of interest, especially for biomedical and pharmaceutical applications. Different chemistry and mechanisms are employed for this purpose with a common ground that the fluorescence of carbon nanotubes are very sensitive to the environment. We are looking for motivated undergraduate researchers. As long as you are interested, and want to learn about research and the science, you are encouraged to contact us. Prefer long term commitment. You will get in touch with a lot of research tools (both experimental and mathematical) and learn knowledge about surface chemistry, protein chemistry, nano material fabrication, fluorescence spectroscopy and so on.

Contact: Juyao (Ivy) Dong juyao@mit.edu with your resume.


9/14/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Egerton Center (EC)
Faculty Supervisor: Daniel Sweeney

Project Title: Low-cost remote air quality sensor for household air pollution monitoring

Project Description: Household air pollution from inefficient,indoor biomass combustion is a major and growing global environmental and health problem. To address this problem, D-Lab works with in-country manufacturers of cookstoves and alternative fuels to improve their product lines and scale production. The burnlab at D-Lab is developing low-cost, remote sensor technology to use in evaluating performance and adoption of locally manufactured stove technology. Sensors are connected to low-power dataloggers and placed in homes over long-durations to monitor stove usage and impacts on air quality. This project involves designing a low-power circuit and sampling routine for an electrochemical carbon monoxide (CO) sensor. Tasks for this position include: using a development circuit to perform sensor functional testing, selecting components for, assembling and testing a prototype circuit, calibrating the sensor against a lab gas analyzer, and designing a board to be installed in the household air pollution monitor. Interested students should have experience with circuit design and debugging including instrumentation amplifiers.

Prerequisites: Experience in circuit design is required for this position.

URL: http://d-lab.mit.edu/research/biomass-fuels-cookstoves

Contact Name: Daniel Sweeney
Contact Email: dsweeney@mit.edu


9/14/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Egerton Center (EC)
Faculty Supervisor: Daniel Sweeney

Project Title: A laboratory/field setup for evaluation of solid fuel cooking appliances

Project Description: The Biomass Fuel & Cookstoves group at D-Lab partners with community-based producers of fuel and cookstove technology to address technical challenges with product performance, adoption and scale. The burnlab facility at D-Lab is used for performing comprehensive tests to determine efficiency, emissions, safety and durability performance of stove products. It is primarily used for evaluating stove products in the lab setting, but can also be transported and assembled in a household environment. This project focuses on improving the burnlab's data acquisition system to streamline product testing, and documenting the design so that other similar labs around the world can benefit and use a similar system.

Tasks Include:

Prerequisites: Interested students should have experience with electronics (selecting, installing and debugging circuit components), data acquisition and basic fabrication skills

URL: http://d-lab.mit.edu/research/biomass-fuels-cookstoves

Contact Name: Daniel Sweeney
Contact Email: dsweeney@mit.edu


9/14/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Media Laboratory
Faculty Supervisor: Kent Larson

Project Title: Applied machine learning of big data for the future of Andorra

Project Description: This is a rather unique collaboration project between the Media Lab and Andorra's government, largest private companies (e.g., energy and telecom), and academic institutions The overarching paradigm of our work is the application of machine learning on Andorra's big data and data visualization for enabling an understanding of the country's dynamics on tourism and commerce, economy, human mobility and transportation systems, energy and environmental impact; as well as to shed light on technological and systems innovation towards radical improvements in these domains. The specific project involves exploring how mixing, diversity and communications of people spark innovation and improve economy at a macro level. Besides, how wellness and happiness level of the local communities and tourists are improved with these mixings at a microlevel. An academic paper will be come out of the project and you will be co-authored.

Skills you need to already have:

What you will get out of the UROP experience:

URL: http://cp.media.mit.edu/city-simulation/

Contact: Luis Alonso (alonsolp@media.mit.edu) or Yan Leng (yleng@mit.edu) with a short description of your background or resume


9/14/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: The MIT Energy Initiative (MITEI)
Faculty Supervisor: John Reilly

Project Title: The impact of climate policy in South Korea on emissions, economic growth and competitiveness.

Project Description: The successful candidate will work with researchers at the Joint Program and the Science and Policy of Global Change (Joint Program) to evaluate the South Korea Emissions Trading System (KETS), which was launched on January 1, 2015. Tasks will include summarizing climate and energy policies in South Korea, qualitatively evaluating the likely impacts of the KETS based on the Joint Program s previous research, and assisting with the qualitative evaluation of the KETS using the MIT Economic Projection and Policy Analysis (EPPA) model.

Prerequisites: A background in economics and knowledge of the Korean language are desirable.

URL: http://globalchange.mit.edu/

Contact Name: Niven Winchester
Contact Email: niven@mit.edu


9/14/16
Fall 2016
Department: STS
Faculty Supervisor: Louis Bucciarelli

Project Title: Values Encoded in Engineering Narrative

Project Description: Work with Prof. Bucciarelli on research and development of online content of "modules" meant to integrate exemplary engineering subject matter with studies in the humanities and social sciences. Three modules have been posted on the edX Edge platform. Prof. Bucciarelli is working on a fourth that will focus on how values and particular ways of seeing the world are encoded in the narratives of engineering problem sets and textbooks, e.g., in computer science. Source materials, including primary and secondary source materials - video clips, exercises, etc., must be sought out, evaluated, reshaped and formatted for posting online.

Prerequisites:

Contact: Louis Bucciarelli, llbjr@mit.edu


9/13/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Urban Studies and Planning (Course 11)
Faculty Supervisor: Dennis Frenchman

Project Title: (Course 6 Student Needed) Healthcare data science: Examining the geographic distribution of medical professionals

Project Description: We are looking to examine the geographic distribution of medical professionals in the United States in order to identify underserved areas and examine how this distribution evolves as the healthcare industry undergoes changes and consolidation. This project will familiarize you with some of the tools and techniques used in the data science world, including scraping and cleaning public datasets, geocoding, storing and retrieving results from an SQL database, and presenting your analysis using state-of-the-art GIS tools.

Prerequisites: Required: Python programming experience Desired: SQL, GIS

Contact Name: Alden Edwards, alden.edwardsjr@gmail.com


9/13/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Media Laboratory
Faculty Supervisor: Kent Larson

Project Title: CITY I/O - CLOUD BASED, AUGMENTED REALITY URBAN SIMULATION

Project Description: The Media Lab s Changing Places Group is exploring the impact of computational, tangible and intangible design tools for urban intervention. cityI/O project goal is to provide cutting edge public-participation tools for cities and communities that are undergoing major redevelopment process. Using cityI/O, users could design, comment, analyze and visualize urban interventions in real-time, offering a new platform for urban decision making. During this UROP / temp position, a student will gain a comprehensive understanding of technologies that enable augmentation and visualization of urban design processes and public participation. Key topics include server and client side computing, augmented reality and tangible user interfaces (TUIs), likely in Python/Unity3D/Processing. The bulk of the work will entail the design and implementation of cityI/O server side and AR platform, with focus on developing cross-language protocols for communicating data. This position is for pay.

Prerequisites: Experience with the Unity3D gaming engine Understanding on communication protocols such as UDP and TCP Programming skills C# as well as Python (JavaScript /Processing a plus) Structuring data using JSON

URL:cp.media.mit.edu/cityio/

Contact: Please email Ariel Noyman (noyman@mit.edu) Include "UROP application" and your name in the title of the email. Include a link and or attachment with examples of previous projects and your CV/resume. Please specify your availability during the fall term.


9/13/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Sloan School of Management (Course 15)
Faculty Supervisor: Georgia Perakis

Project Title: Data-Driven Personalized Bundle Recommendation and Pricing

Project Description: The online market for retail goods has grown enormously over the past decade. According to a forecast released by Forrester Research in 2014, U.S. e-commerce retail sales are expected to grow from $263 billion in 2013 to $414 billion in 2018, an increase of 57%. The availability of handheld devices and tablets, as well as a growing population raised with this technology, will continue to push e-commerce in this rapid expansion. As a result of this growing trend in online shopping, the development of a more sophisticated product recommendation system can provide the necessary competitive edge for any Internet retailer, making the difference on the order of billions in profits. Approaching this problem from a new angle, we have been working on developing a model that recommends a discounted product that balances profits and inventory goals for the retailer, while selecting products that are also relevant to the consumer's preferences. We are interested in further expanding this model to incorporate new algorithms that run in real-time in order to incorporate demand learning. Given new customers and new products not previously offered, we would like to accurately and efficiently learn consumer preferences in order to enhance the quality of the personalized recommendations.

Prerequisites:

Contact Name: Anna Papush, apapush@mit.edu


9/13/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Media Laboratory
Faculty Supervisor: Pattie Maes

Project Title: Body Ownership Illusion in Virtual Reality

Project Description: Virtual reality can provide immersive experiences by letting people develop the illusion of owning or being inside the avatar body. This body ownership illusion (BOI) is key for building empathy and developing intuitive control of the avatar. In this project, we will seek to achieve BOI over non-humanoid avatar body through various tactile sensation. Previous work in VR has found out that when a first person perspective is provided over an avatar body that is not highly realistic, sole visuoproprioceptive cues are no longer sufficient. Congruent visuotactile cues are critical for eliciting a vivid ownership. Imagining, being a bird to fly in the high sky, being a tree to witness the beauty of slow changes in a forest, being a deer to witness the brutal hunting behavior by human, etc. Users will be encouraged to develop empathy through a virtual body, see problem from different angle and reexamine their perceptions, thoughts and behaviors.  

UROP Responsibilities: Designing, modeling 3D components and create the interactive VR experience. UROP will also work on the integration of tactile feedback in VR.

Prerequisites: We are looking for medium-high level skills in 3D animation (C4D or Maya) and various level of programming in Unity. Prior game design experience with Unity, Oculus and Leap Motion is a big plus. We are interviewing students who are interested in working for the Fall semester. You are expected to show previous projects or portfolios that showcase your skills for this project.

URL: http://fluid.media.mit.edu

Contact Name: Xin LIU, xxxxxxin@mit.edu


9/13/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Biological Engineering (Course 20)
Faculty Supervisor: Alan Jasanoff

Project Title: Voltage-sensitive MRI probes for the detection of neural activity

Project Description: This project involves highly innovative interfacing between live neurons and nano-fabricated probes for the magnetic resonance imaging of neural activity. The project includes primary neural cell culturing on nano-fabricated devices and magnetic measurements of cells. The student's role involves performing the neuron culture growth on the devices, participation in magnetic recordings and modeling. Nano-fabrication is also a possibility for motivated students.

URL: http://web.mit.edu/jasanofflab/

Contact Name: Aviad Hai, aviadhai@mit.edu


9/13/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Sloan School of Management (Course 15)
Faculty Supervisor: Andrew W. Lo

Project Title: Decision-Making under Risk - An Analysis in the Context of Poker

Project Description: In this project, we aim to gain a better understanding of decision-making under risk conditions in the context of online poker. We will examine how players react to extreme losses and gains, whether they engage in any path-dependent behavior, and what we can infer about their risk preferences based on their betting behavior.   

If interested, please send copy of resume, unofficial grade transcript, whether you would prefer to work for credit or pay, and a short description of why you would be a good candidate to Jayna Cummings at jcummin@mit.edu.

Prerequisites:

Contact Name: Jayna Cummings, jcummin@mit.edu


9/13/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Media Laboratory
Faculty Supervisor: Joe Paradiso

Project Title: Scalable Infrastructure for Environmental Sensor Data

Project Description: For the past several years we (the Responsive Environments Group at the MIT Media Lab) have been developing interfaces to sensor networks that allow users to visualize and sonify data in novel ways. We’ve also developed an open-source hypermedia API that supports both HTTP interactions as well as real-time steaming using WebSockets. We've deployed these systems at Tidmarsh Farms, an active wetland restoration project that we are monitoring in real-time. We currently have several billion datapoints and some parts of our database infrastructure are starting to creak a little under the weight. We also want to add flexibility to how we can query the data. We're looking for someone with experience in and passion for databases and/or server-side development. You'll dive into our system and build out the future of sensor network databases. This is a position that goes as deep as you want to go, whether you're interested in database efficiency, API design, or data pipelines. In addition to back-end infrastructure, API design, and database experience, you will also practice modern software development tools like test-driven development, git, and docker. All the resulting code is open-source. We value diversity and hope to foster a welcoming and inclusive (responsive) environment. We do not discriminate on the basis of race, religion, color, national origin, gender, sexual orientation, age, marital status, veteran status, or disability status. 

Prerequisites: You should have some experience with databases and programming, but enthusiasm and a willingness to learn can make up for lack of prior experience. Our system is in python, but backend programming experience of any kind is great.

URL: https://github.com/ResEnv/chain-api

Contact Name: Spencer Russell, sfr@media.mit.edu


9/13/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Biological Engineering (Course 20)
Faculty Supervisor: K. Dane Wittrup

Project Title: Sso7d Fusion Proteins as Novel EGFR Antagonists

Project Description: The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a receptor tyrosine kinase involved in the regulation of cellular functions such as proliferation, migration and apoptosis. Dysregulated EGFR signaling contributes to the development and progression of a variety of different cancers. Protein antagonists such as antibodies represent an important class of therapeutics, but clinical efficacy is limited. Thus, novel inhibitors with superior potency would represent a significant advance. This project aims to design novel protein antagonists based on a small, hyperstable, evolvable binding scaffold, Sso7d. We are designing new fusion proteins, which incorporate these engineered binding domains, and exploring the mechanisms by which these constructs can potentiate EGFR signaling inhibition compared to treatment with standard-of-care antibodies alone. Students will help with the construction and screening of this new class of targeted therapeutics and will learn and develop a variety of skills including molecular biology and protein engineering techniques, in vitro assay design and tissue culture.

Prerequisites: Prior lab experience preferred, previous exposure to basic molecular biology techniques a plus. Must have a strong desire to learn and ability to work independently. Time commitment of 10 hours/week is expected for fall semester; ideal applicants will be interested in pursuing a longer-term project spanning multiple semesters. Sophomore or higher.

Contact Name: Alison Tisdale, atisdale@mit.edu


9/13/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Materials Science and Engineering (Course 3)
Faculty Supervisor: Prof. Chris Schuh

Project Title: Transparent Ceramic Single Crystals

Project Description: We are developing a bulk ceramic material that is optically transparent that has uses in optics as well as precision consumer/industrial parts. The project involves fabrication of bulk single crystals followed by characterization of the quality and orientation of the crystals. Mechanical and optical tests will also be carried out to determine the strength and optical properties. We are looking for a student who is comfortable working in the lab and curious to learn a variety of experimental techniques. We will introduce the student to many materials analysis techniques that are critical for modern materials scientists such as optical and electron microscopy, composition spectroscopy, x-ray and electron diffraction methods, and general metallurgical sample preparation. This project will provide a solid basis for many of the most common techniques and concepts in materials science but we are also looking for an independent student who can provide their ideas and input and who can take initiative when needed. There is potential for this project to continue into IAP or spring semesters.  

Prerequisites: Prior experimental laboratory experience a plus. Work hours are flexible but ideally looking for at least 10h/week.

Contact Name: Alan Lai, alanlai@mit.edu


9/13/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Chemical Engineering (Course 10)
Faculty Supervisor: T. Alan Hatton

Project Title: Understand the physics of powdered oil formation

Project Description: Powdered oil (PO) is a very interesting structure that is of huge interest to food, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical industries. It is a core-shell structure with an oil phase in the center and a solid phase on the outside. Under certain conditions, the powder will be solid-like but contains oil that weights more than 70%wt. In collaboration with the MIT Tata Center for Technology and Design, we are working on a project to convert ready-to-use therapeutic food (RUTF), which is used to treat severe acute malnutrition, to a PO structure to achieve a wide adoption in India with improved palatability and transportability and lower cost. While most engineering issues are already resolved and a pilot scale manufacturing facility is already under design, there are several fundamental questions relating to this PO structure that has not yet been well understood. In particular, we are interested in the physics for the low-energy, spontaneous formation of this structure via surface interactions. This is dramatically different from the forced structuring strategy such as spray-drying, which we have adopted as a large-scale manufacturing solution.   

Students involved in this project will learn how to use chemical methods to modify the surface and flexibly tune the surface energy of particles, and use these modified particles to form the desired PO structure. Students will also learn a very interesting characterization technique called gel-SEM to determine the relationship between the spontaneity for PO formation and the water-particle-oil triphasic contact angle. 8-10 hrs/week of work is expected. Credits or pay may be available. The student must apply through the UROP Direct Funding for financial support.

Prerequisites: Basic chemistry lab skills and physiochemical concepts on interfacial phenomena

Contact Name: Tonghan Gu, tgu@mit.edu


9/13/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Brain and Cognitive Sciences (Course 9)
Faculty Supervisor: Josh McDermott

Project Title: Cross-Cultural Music Perception Studies

Project Description: Our lab is involved in cross-cultural music perception experiments conducted in remote areas of Bolivia. The purpose of the experiments is to characterize the similarities and differences between listeners in developed Western cultures and those of remote indigenous societies, to better understand the effect of culture on how we appreciate music. We are looking for a UROP to assist in these studies by conducting behavioral experiments at MIT in the fall and spring as a precursor to studies in Bolivia this summer, and to travel to Bolivia this summer to assist with experiments there. For the latter, fluent Spanish is essential, as is a willingness to travel in a developing country in less than luxurious conditions. Experience with programming (preferably matlab) is also essential, and experience with audio recording would be a plus. We are looking for someone who could get involved in the project this fall and spring, and continue through the summer. This position is available for pay or for credit. When responding to this ad, please indicate programming experience, Spanish fluency, and any travel/camping experience.

Prerequisites: Programming experience (preferably Matlab), fluency in Spanish.

URL: http://mcdermottlab.mit.edu/

Contact Name: Josh McDermott, jhm@mit.edu


9/13/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Chemical Engineering (Course 10)
Faculty Supervisor: T. Alan Hatton

Project Title: Electrochemically mediated separations

Project Description: Our lab is developing a technology for electrochemical separations of gases, small molecules and nanoparticles. We have demonstrated the separation of CO2 from gas streams and its subsequent concentration using electroactive species, and would like to explore the separation of other molecules and nanoparticles. The goal of this project is to develop various redox materials, ionic liquid electrolytes, and engineer separation units for purification and environmental remediation.  

The project is multipronged and involves:  Electrochemical separation and concentration of CO2; Electrochemical separation of small molecules and nanoparticles; Separation of metals via electrochemically mediated regeneration of ionic liquids.   

The tasks include:  Organic synthesis (optional); Synthesis and functionalization of nanoparticles; Chemical characterization; Electrochemical techniques; Microscopy; Modelling; Data analysis.
 
Prerequisites: Prior engineering or chemistry lab/research experience (UROP, lab course or otherwise). Basic understanding of organic chemistry and electrochemistry (preferred). Juniors and seniors are preferred.

Contact Name: Sahag Voskian, svoskian@mit.edu


9/9/16
Fall 2016
Department: Brain and Cognitive Sciences (Course 9)
Faculty Supervisor: Matthew A. Wilson

Project Title: Use of Video Analysis to Study Sleep Architecture.

Project Description: Sleep and wakefulness are examples of the brain states that neural circuits switch to in order to perform various computations. Wakefulness is predominantly directed at active interaction with the external world, but during the two main sleep stages (REM and non-REM), neural circuits remain active and can further process the information acquired during wake. Scientists often use electrodes to study both REM and non-REM sleep based on brain activity; this is a highly precise method, but it is not always efficient or practical, and it limits the state detection to the times that the recording equipment can be plugged in. Developing a state tracking method based on video analysis would allow neuroscientists to study sleep architecture wirelessly, and for much longer periods of time. This approach would have important applications in sleep research and technology, including studies in rodents and humans.
We are looking for students that are interested in applying computational techniques (video analysis) to neuroscience. One of the basic goals of this project is to use matlab analysis to test the feasibility of using video to track sleep architecture.
As part of this project, you will learn about behavioral and computational neuroscience, the sleep-wake cycle and, more generally, brain state changes. You will also explore other techniques used in the lab (primarily electrophysiology).
This UROP opportunity is a great introduction to computational and behavioral neuroscience. If you have a strong interest in these topics this could be a great match.

Prerequisites: Strong matlab skills. Dedication of at least 10h/week, with the possibility of extending through IAP and the Spring semester.

Contact: Please submit resume and a brief paragraph commenting on how your skills and background could be helpful to this project. Let me (Carmen Varela) know when you would be available for an interview. carmenv@mit.edu


9/9/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (Course 6)
Faculty Supervisor: James Fujimoto

Project Title: Evaluation of fluorescent contrast agents and tissue marking inks for surgical imaging

Project Description: The assessment of cancerous tissue and other pathology during surgical excision is a pressing clinical challenge. Confocal or multiphoton imaging during surgery requires selection of contrast agents (for imaging pathology) and tissue-marking inks (for labeling tissue locations) that do not interfere with one another. This project would involve assessment of surgical contrast agents and tissue marking inks on a commercial confocal microscopy and/or a custom built lab multiphoton microscope. A student would work with graduate students to learn confocal and multiphoton imaging, working with surgical tissue, and spectroscopic analysis. The project would involve characterizing the emission of contrast agents in tissue and/or marking inks applied to fixed tissue.

Prerequisites: Some matlab, imaging or biolab skills preferred but not required.

Contact Name: Michael Giacomelli
Contact Email: mgg6@mit.edu


9/9/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Chemical Engineering (Course 10)
Faculty Supervisor: Allan Myerson

Project Title: Pharmacy on Demand, continuous manufacturing.

Project Description: The overall aim for this project is to develop, design, build and fully automate an innovative, miniaturized, self-contained, continuous end-to-end pharmaceutical drug manufacturing unit. This research is part of the DARPA Pharmacy on Demand project. Role: We are looking for one or more students to work with our engineering team to conduct various tasks, including: -Designing, fabricating, debugging, and working with automated systems. -Creating and following experimental procedures, gathering and compiling data and product information -Automated process development

Possible projects include:
1) Proof-of-concept testing and process development of an automated system to dispense, weigh, and transfer powders with a range of material properties. Work could include experimental testing, mechanical assembly, wiring and Labview programming (motion control, serial communication with devices, data acquisition, control logic, and user interface)

2) Proof-of-concept testing of an automated powder dosing and tableting operation. Work could include experimental testing, mechanical assembly, wiring, and Labview programming (similar to above)

3) Testing, and test development, for proposed tableting quality control techniques including NIR and tablet stability testing

Prerequisites: Experience with data analysis, attention to detail, and proficiency in Microsoft Office suite. Experience with Labview, prototyping, or electro-mechanical systems is a plus.

Contact Name: David Brancazio
Contact Email: dbrancaz@mit.edu


9/9/16
Fall 2016-IAP 2017
Department/Lab/Center: MIT Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research (MKI)
Faculty Supervisor: Herman Marshall

Project Title: Operating the X-ray Polarimetry Beamline

Project Description: The student will be trained to operate the MIT X-ray Polarimetry Beamline in NE83. The beamline is used to validate components and optical design to be used in a rocket-based instrument to measure the X-ray polarization of astrophysical sources. The instrument is the first of its kind, which could determine the uniformity and direction of magnetic field in the jet emanating from a blazar, which has a supermassive black hole at its core. The student will learn to operate the X-ray source, the vacuum system, the X-ray detector, and its associated computer control system. Some data analysis and some hardware disassembly and reassembly will be involved as well.

Prerequisites: Experience with the linux operating system is desirable, as well as experience with computer controlled mechanical systems.

URL: http://space.mit.edu/~hermanm/polarimeter/

Contact Name: Herman Marshall
Contact Email: hermanm@space.mit.edu


9/9/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Brain and Cognitive Sciences (Course 9)
Faculty Supervisor: Tomaso Poggio

Project Title: MIT CBMM Machine Learning Team

Project Description: Interested in Deep Learning, AlphaGo, TensorFlow, and inceptionism? Or are you passionate about software engineering, web development, functional programming, and continuous integration? The Center for Brains Minds and Machines is developing a research model in artificial intelligence based on large engineering teams like those at Facebook and DeepMind, with close collaboration between students interested in engineering and various areas of ongoing CBMM research. Our work will lead to open-source, well-maintained projects and functional web interfaces. Team members should have some familiarity with AI and programming, and be comfortable learning new technologies. We will collaborate primarily via Github.

Responsibilities: will include interfacing with AI and CogSci researchers, implementing algorithms and web applications, and developing documentation and interactive teaching materials.

To learn more about our research: look at the CBMM website (http://cbmm.mit.edu). For more about the CBMM Corps projects, look through what we have here on CBMM @ GitHub. See what Specialist Teams and research tools we have in mind.

Contact: If this sounds like something you want to be involved in, let's work together! Send your resume or github handle to Greg Hale greghale@mit.edu with a brief (one or two paragraphs) description of your learning goals.


9/9/16
Fall 2016
Multiple Openings
Department/Lab/Center: Media Laboratory
Faculty Supervisor: Joi Ito

Project #1: OpenAg Initiative | Heads-Up-Display for Robotic Adaptive Environment Agriculture

Project Description: OpenAg is developing Food Computers robotic adaptive environments for agriculture that monitor and control plant growth. Advances in open hardware and software have recently made it possible to develop open source robotic farming tools that anyone can build, hack and improve upon. The purpose of this project is to build a heads-up-display for Food Computers can show status and be used for configuration. While building the heads-up-display, you will work hands-on with open hardware like Raspberry Pi and Arduino, develop REST APIs, and help build and adapt UI controls.

Prerequisites: The UROP should be comfortable with experimental work. Previous experience with JavaScript, Python, GTK or other UI development tools is highly recommended. Experience with HTTP APIs and Git is recommended. Applicants should be excited to learn and build things.

___________

Project #2: OpenAg Initiative | Characterization of Vegetation Structures with Depth Image Sensors

Project Description: At the OpenAG group we are developing controlled-environment agriculture devices using robotic systems to control and monitor plant growth. Recent advancements in computer vision and image processing have the potential to assist plant optimization methods, achieving more autonomous, efficient and intelligent plant growth models. The purpose of this project is to conduct research on depth image sensor integration (e.g. Microsoft Kinect) to obtain quality-related metrics such as plant biomass or plant structure. To obtain these metrics, the UROP will participate in the design of the computer vision models as well as the testing and implementing phases in real-hardware.

Prerequisites: The UROP should be comfortable with experimental work. Previous experience in OpenCV, ROS, Python/C++, PCL and Matlab is highly recommended. Applicants should be self-motivated and pay great attention to experimental details.

___________

Project #3: OpenAg Initiative | Closing Environmental Control Loops in a Cyber-Physical System

Project Description: At the OpenAg initiative we are developing controlled-environment agriculture devices using robotic systems to control and monitor plant growth. Recent advancements in open source hardware and software communities have made automation technologies available to a wider audience. The purpose of this project is to conduct research on the integration of environmental control loops that extend the range of programmable environmental conditions in food computing devices. To extend device capabilities, the UROP will participate in the design of robotic control loop(s) as well as the testing and implementation phases in real-hardware.

Prerequisites: Creating programmable environments blurs the line between software and hardware so having the ability to reason about both cyber and physical systems is required. Experience with hardware fabrication tools (standard machine shop equipment), open source hardware technologies, and programming in C++ is highly recommended. Applicants should be self-motivated and pay great attention to detail.

___________

Project #4: OpenAg Initiative | Machine Learning for Plant Growth Optimization

Project Description: At the OpenAg group we are developing controlled-environment agriculture devices using robotic systems to control and monitor plant growth. Recent advancements in computer vision and machine learning have the potential to assist plant optimization methods, achieving more autonomous, efficient and intelligent plant growth models. The purpose of this project is to conduct research on different machine learning techniques (e.g., deep learning, SVM, genetic algorithms, etc.) in order to optimize the different environmental conditions applied during plant growth (a.k.a climate recipes) as well as the early-detection of possible diseases or plant stress symptoms. To obtain this information, the UROP will participate in the design and implementation phases of these machine learning models as well as the testing in real-hardware.

Prerequisites: The UROP should be comfortable with experimental and statistical work. Previous experience in OpenCV, Python/C++, R and Matlab is highly recommended. Applicants should be self-motivated and pay great attention to experimental details.

___________

Project #5?: OpenAg Initiative | Backend Developer

Project Description: At the OpenAg Initiative we are developing controlled-environment agriculture devices for investigating the effects of different environmental conditions on plant growth. We are looking for a backend developer to interface with the hardware through Arduino code, define control loops for maintaining given environmental conditions, process the data in ROS, store it in a database, and facilitate retrieval of the data for post-processing and visualization.

Prerequisites:

- Experience programming in Python and Arduino
- Familiarity with ROS
- Ability to work independently

___________

Project #6 Title: OpenAg Initiative | Virtual Reality Farm

Project Description: The MIT Open Agriculture project is seeking a Unity dev to help build a Virtual Reality Farm. We build robotic shipping container farms that monitor and stream live sensor data about plant health and environment. We want YOU to help define a virtual reality experience that lets farmers monitor and interact with the farm environment remotely, in real time.

Help bring detailed Rhino CAD architectural models to life with Google Cardboard, Unity, sensor readouts and interactivity.

Prerequisites:

- Experience programming in Unity
- A passion for VR
- Experience playing with Google Cardboard and CAD programs

URL: openag.mit.edu

Contact Name: Hildreth England
Contact Email: hildreth@media.mit.edu


9/8/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Media Laboratory
Faculty Supervisor: Kent Larson

Project Title: Big data and Sociologic research in Andorra. Social network data gathering, data analysis data visualization.

Project Description: This is a rather unique collaboration project between the Media Lab and Andorra's the sociologic research center of Andorra (IEA, http://www.iea.ad/). The IEA has as main objective to realize and disseminate studies in order to better understand Andorran society. In this aim, they have had used quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods to achieve these studies. With the collaboration, we want to introduce new methodologies to complement this know-how. In this way, the collaboration looks for to create new studies topic to our current investigation lines such as immigration and cross border relations, the poverty, education, tourism, among others.

The task: The goal of the collaboration is to establish synergies to explore the potential of social networks data and others sources to improve our knowledge of the Andorran reality. Therefore, the main objective will be to obtain and to provide information about tourist persons and local residents in economic, tourist and social areas. However, we would collect possible indicators about way of life in the country, and to give a social interpretation around of specifics events taking place in Andorra. As a first step, part of the scope of work will be analyze the information about the available databases and information about Andorran territory that the IEA has, as well as to explore the methods used to explore these datasets. In the next step, we need to gather data from different social networks in order to find a sociological interpretation of the explored databases, the social network data, and other results from the Andorra MIT project.

Candidates profiles: Ideal candidates will have knowledge on sociology, social networks. Also will have sharpened data science skills (2+ years computer science), and should be able to develop a thoughtful and creative understanding on how the models, analysis and visualizations can generate value in the contexts of Andorra s tourism and commerce, social issues, etc. We need candidates with medium-high level skills in webscript, Java, and Processing.

Interest or experience in the aforementioned domains is required: Tourism and commerce, human mobility and transportation systems, energy and environmental impact. We are looking at integrating more than one UROP to the project. It is OK for candidates to have skills focusing on either machine learning, data processing and analysis, or on data visualization and communication. We also welcome candidates that have particular interests and/or experience in one of the aforementioned domains. You will be asked for previous experience, class projects, relevant courses, internships, etc. that support your knowledge and skills germane for this project.

URL: http://cp.media.mit.edu/city-simulation/

Contact Name: Luis Alonso
Contact Email: alonsolp@mit.edu


9/8/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Biology (Course 7)
Faculty Supervisor: Barbara Imperiali

Project Title: Preventing bacterial infections in humans via small molecule inhibitors of disease-relevant glycans: new tools to investigate the roles of protein glycosylation in bacterial virulence. Exploring new antibiotic pathway.

Project Description: The study of microbial pathogens has demonstrated the prevalence of highly modified saccharides as constituents of bacterial N- and O-linked glycoproteins which interact with the host to enable virulence of many medically significant Gram-negative bacteria, including N. meningitides, N. gonorrhoeae, and C. jejuni. Therefore, small molecule inhibitors of bacterial glycosylation may suppress pathogenic virulence by disallowing these interactions. As the targeted pathways are not essential for survival, this tactic will likely evade the rapid resistance development which plagues current antibiotics and potentially introduce new therapeutic approaches to address infectious diseases. We are currently pursuing a structure-based approach, using X-ray co-crystallization (inhibitors bound to targets), as well as quantitative luminescence and fluorescence assays, to improve inhibitor potency and chemical properties. The student will perform organic synthesis to make new structural analogs using a wide variety of reactions such as click chemistry and palladium cross coupling. The compounds will then be evaluated for their ability to inhibit the activity of the bacterial acetyl transferase enzymes. Besides synthesis and in vitro assays, there is the opportunity to learn solid phase synthesis, protein expression and purification, enzymatic carbohydrate synthesis, X-ray crystallography, and other biochemistry techniques. If interested, the student can also learn some Maestro and Pymol basics.

Prerequisites: Basic organic synthesis skills required; 5.36 module 6, 5.37 module 7 OR previous laboratory experience. Strong preference for students who can commit to at least 10 hours per week for at least two semesters, starting as soon as possible. Open to a longer-term commitment.

Contact Name: Amael Madec
Contact Email: madec_am@mit.edu


9/8/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Biological Engineering (Course 20)
Faculty Supervisor: Daniel Anderson

Project Title: Development of novel siRNA-targeting ligand conjugate therapeutics

Project Description: In brief: Drug delivery lab looking for a highly-motivated undergraduate to aid in the development of a novel class of drugs to treat previously untreatable diseases with new targeted therapies.

siRNA is a nucleic acid therapeutic that can knock down any gene in a specific manner. It has the potential to change the way disease is treated. However, getting these nucleic acids into the correct cells is still a major challenge. Currently, siRNA therapeutics in clinical trials only target liver hepatocytes. Recent advances in RNA stabilization have made targeted siRNA-ligand conjugate delivery systems clinically viable. One such conjugate (for a fatal genetic liver disease) is already in clinical trials. We are developing novel techniques to deliver siRNA to target brain cancers, metastasis of other cancers, kidney, muscle, and other tissues. Success in this endeavor will result in new classes of medicines for cancers and genetic diseases previously considered untreatable. We are looking for 1-2 highly motivated undergraduate researchers to help with this project.

The undergraduate researcher(s) selected for this project will work closely with a graduate student in the testing and development of these delivery agents. This UROP will involve performing in vitro cell culture, RNA quantification, PCR, and also some organic synthesis, depending on background. You will work with an interdisciplinary team of experts and learn a great deal from this opportunity. Good performance and continuation in this UROP (1 year) may result in authorship in high-profile papers as well as great reference letters from Professors Robert Langer and Daniel Anderson.

Prerequisites: General laboratory experience (either molecular biology or organic chemistry) is preferred. Ability to perform simple dilution (e.g. 10x to 1x) and unit conversion (e.g. grams to nanograms, moles to grams, etc.) calculations is required. Passion for learning, willingness to read literature, and ability to work independently are also required. Anticipated workload is from 5-15 hours depending on candidate availability.

Contact: Please send your CV to Hok Hei Tam tamhok@mit.edu.


9/6/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Comparative Media Studies (21 CMS)
Faculty Supervisor: Eric Klopfer

Project Title: TaleBlazer: Location-based Augmented Reality on Mobile Devices (Android/iOS)

Project Description: Interested in location-based technology? Interested in games? Want to play with mobile devices? Apply to work on TaleBlazer for credit as a UROP! TaleBlazer is a location-based Augmented Reality game creation platform. Game designers build interactive games using the TaleBlazer Editor web application. Similar to Starlogo TNG, Scratch or AppInventor, the TaleBlazer Editor includes a blocks-based programming environment that allows the game designer to specify the game logic. Game players use the TaleBlazer mobile application to download and play TaleBlazer games on GPS enabled smartphones (Android or iOS). As the players move around the real world, they meet virtual characters or objects in the game world that the game designers have built for them. TaleBlazer is intended for educational purposes the players explore subject matter in a new and exciting way in a real world context. We have worked with zoos, schools, after-school clubs, etc. to design and launch various professionally developed games with science, math, and history content. The TaleBlazer Editor can also be a valuable teaching and learning tool for student game designers, who learn programming skills and game design, while delving deeply into subject matter to create games about specific topics.

Technology: The TaleBlazer Mobile application is built using Appcelerator Studio, a 3rd party toolkit which allows the programmer to write a single codebase in JavaScript that is then compiled into native iOS and Android applications. The TaleBlazer website is based on a CakePHP/MySQL backend with a JavaScript/HTML/CSS fronted.

Requirements: While these positions require a strong programming background, experience with specific programming languages is not required.

Single semester UROP projects (available for credit) for the Fall semester 2016 include:
- Improvements to UI design on the Mobile
- Adding game features to the platform

Projects are suitable for a variety of levels of coding experience.

URL: http://education.mit.edu/portfolio_page/taleblazer/

Contact: If you are interested in any of the above positions, please send an email to tep-jobs@mit.edu and include:
* an overview of your programming experience (specific references to relevant courses and other development and programming projects would be very helpful) including any pertinent URLs
* a summary of any previous UROP and work experience (attach a resume if you have one)
* a short description of why you are interested in working on this project
* Please put TaleBlazer UROP" in the subject line


9/6/16
Term: Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Media Laboratory
Faculty Supervisor: Kent Larson

Project Title: Big Data -- Applied Machine Learning for an Innovative Future in Andorra

Project Description: This is a rather unique collaboration project between the Media Lab and Andorra’s government, largest private companies (e.g., energy and telecom), and academic institutions (please see this link for more context). The overarching paradigm of our work is the application of machine learning and data science methodologies on Andorra’s big data, for enabling an understanding of the country s dynamics on tourism and commerce, human mobility and transportation systems, energy and environmental impact; as well as to shed light on technological and system s innovation towards radical improvements in these domains.

Data: this is a unique opportunity to work on a rich dataset that includes pseudonymized mobile phone records (CDRs) of the entire country, spatially specified logs to the national network of public WIFI, disaggregated energy consumption data from the national utility company, pollution and environmental data from the national network of environmental sensors, etc.

Tasks: Overall, we work both on conceptualizing and implementing high value data analysis, data processing, exploration, modeling, prediction, supervised and unsupervised learning tasks, etc.; as well as on high value data visualization and communication to project s stakeholders and Andorran citizens! For the latter task we use CityScope, a physical interactive platform for information visualization and exploration.

Academic papers will be elaborated on selected topics along this project. UROPs are welcomed to participate and co-author. These will be discussed on an ad hoc basis depending on student’s interests, skills, and availability. Please see this link for examples on the line of exciting research we are interested on

Candidates profiles: Ideal candidates will have sharpened data science skills, and should be able to develop a thoughtful and creative understanding on how the models, analysis and visualizations can generate value in the contexts of Andorra s tourism and commerce, human mobility and transportation systems, energy and environmental impact.

Interest or experience in the aforementioned domains is required: tourism and commerce, human mobility and transportation systems, energy and environmental impact.

We are looking at integrating more than one UROP to the project. It is OK for candidates to have skills focusing on either machine learning, data processing and analysis, or on data visualization and communication. We also welcome candidates that have particular interests and/or experience in one of the aforementioned domains.

You will be asked for previous experience, class projects, relevant courses, internships, etc. that support your knowledge and skills germane for this project.

Added Value for You:

URL: http://cp.media.mit.edu/city-simulation/

Contact Name: Luis Alonso
Contact Email: alonsolp@mit.edu


9/6/16
Term: Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Media Laboratory
Faculty Supervisor: Kent Larson

Project Title: Augmented reality data visualization, and data visualization analysis for Urban Dynamic Innovation

Project Description: This is a rather unique collaboration project between the Media Lab and Andorra's government, largest private companies (e.g., energy and telecom), and academic institutions The overarching paradigm of our work is the application of augmented reality data visualization, data visualization analysis, and data science methodologies on Andorra's big data, for enabling an understanding of the country's dynamics on tourism and commerce, human mobility and transportation systems, energy and environmental impact; as well as to shed light on technological and system s innovation towards radical improvements in these domains. Data: this is a unique opportunity to work on a rich dataset that includes mobile phone records (CDRs) of the entire country, spatially specified logs to the national network of public WIFI, disaggregated energy consumption data from the national utility company, pollution and environmental data. We are seeking a UROP for the Fall term, with the possibility of continuing during following terms.

The task: Be a part of the team that is going to think and design an Innovation District, a Dynamic Square and a Smart Street based on the Andorran needs and the their big data, integrating the main lines of the CP Group research: big data Urban Planning (physical 3D model with data projection), PEV (Autonomous Electric Vehicle), etc. Help in the diagram and representation of the Andorra big data environmental, energy, mobility flows, etc. in dynamic presentations. To model, in 2D and 3D, urban and commercial events, urban elements, urban areas, dynamic maps, etc. in order to provide a base for modeling with Java, Processing (Grasshopper or other), dynamic presentations of Andorran flows (mobility of cars, people, energy, goods, etc.), and for plugging it in the CityScope (a physical interactive platform for information visualization and exploration) Academic papers will be elaborated on selected topics along this project. UROPs are welcomed to participate and co-author. These will be discussed on an ad hoc basis depending on student s interests, skills, and availability.

Candidates profiles: Ideal candidates will have sharpened data science skills (2+ years computer science), and should be able to develop a thoughtful and creative understanding on how the models, analysis and visualizations can generate value in the contexts of Andorra s tourism and commerce, human mobility and transportation systems, energy and environmental impact. We need candidates with medium-high level skills in Java, and Processing. Interest or experience in the aforementioned domains is required: tourism and commerce, human mobility and transportation systems, energy and environmental impact. We are looking at integrating more than one UROP to the project. It is OK for candidates to have skills focusing on either machine learning, data processing and analysis, or on data visualization and communication. We also welcome candidates that have particular interests and/or experience in one of the aforementioned domains. You will be asked for previous experience, class projects, relevant courses, internships, etc. that support your knowledge and skills germane for this project.

Necessary Skills: Java, 2+ years computer science and Processing.

Other important skills: HTML,CSS,JS, JQuery,D3.js, Database, Web Framework, Grasshopper

Additional: (Open CV) Computer Vision, Machine Learning

About us: Changing Place is exploring the impact of tangible design tools for urban city planning.

URL: http://cp.media.mit.edu/city-simulation/

Contact: Please send us your resume/portfolio and a short paragraph on your interest in the project to alonsolp@mit.edu. Thanks for your interest!!


9/6/16
Term: Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Urban Studies and Planning (Course 11)
Faculty Supervisor: Eric Klopfer

Project Title: Building Technical Capacity for Native App Development

Project Description: At the Teaching Systems Lab, we develop new learning experiences using approaches like games and simulations, and some of these are software products. In addition to working with UROPs interested in game design, product design and product engineering, we re also interested in improving our lab s technical capacity to execute on these ideas. This is similar to groups like Facebook’s Product Infrastructure group, and would involve creating tooling that would make product engineers more efficient and effective. Example projects might include building development, testing, deployment and monitoring workflows for cross-platform native app development.

Specific goal by end of semester: An end-to-end software development workflow for cross-platform app development, including testing, deployment and monitoring.

Sponsored research funding available.

Contact: If you are interested in any of the above positions, please send an email to tsl.mit.jobs@gmail.com and include:


9/6/16
Term: Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Urban Studies and Planning (Course 11)
Faculty Supervisor: Eric Klopfer

Project Title: Improved Discussion Forums for Online Courses

Project Description: In collaboration with the STEP lab, TSL has developed an improved discussion forum for use with its EdX online courses. In particular, it includes features for creating groups and for more intuitive navigation of discussion threads. This prototype has been deployed successfully for several courses, and we re interested in using this for additional courses and potentially with other partner organizations that also run EdX courses. This project could involve either a) investigating modern application deployment tools (e.g., Heroku, Docker, Kubernetes) and creating a self-serve experience for course developers or b) integrating an existing open-source discussion forum projects (eg., Discourse) into EdX courses. This would allow course developers to use improved forums with students in their classes, and improve accessibility and access for all users.

Specific goal by end of semester: An end-to-end workflow for using an improved discussion forum in EdX courses, that course developers can use in a self-serve manner.

Sponsored research funding available.

Contact: If you are interested in any of the above positions, please send an email to tsl.mit.jobs@gmail.com and include:


9/6/16
Term: Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Urban Studies and Planning (Course 11)
Faculty Supervisor: Eric Klopfer

Project Title: Affordances of Adapting In-person Games to Online Games

Project Description: In collaboration with the STEP lab, TSL has created Committee of N, a card game for exploring school design in the context of educational history and policy. Teacher candidates work in teams to build school elements (bell schedules, classroom designs, graduation requirements, etc.) constrained by randomly selected "values cards" that represent a variety of beliefs about pedagogy, theories of intelligence, and purposes of education (elite college preparation, behaviorism, flipped learning, etc.). We re interested in adapting this to an online form, and researching the different affordances that online games provide. This work would involve product design, game design, software engineering, research and analysis, and user research and testing with in-service teachers or pre-service teacher candidates.

Specific goal by end of semester: Storyboards and wireframes of the game experience that can be tested with teachers. For students with software engineering experience, the goal would be a playable prototype that teachers use during lab playlists.

Sponsored research funding available.

Contact: If you are interested in any of the above positions, please send an email to tsl.mit.jobs@gmail.com and include:


9/6/16
Term: Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Urban Studies and Planning (Course 11)
Faculty Supervisor: Eric Klopfer

Project Title: Prototype and Research Chatbot-based Learning Experiences

Project Description: In collaboration with the STEP lab, TSL has prototyped learning experiences based on role-playing in online chat. We re interested in exploring this further, and in exploring the affordances of chat and chatbots for teacher education.

Possible projects based on this might be: prototyping existing in-person group games on chat platform, creating role-play games with chatbots acting as non-playing characters, or using chatbots to orchestrate turn-taking between players in asynchronous online games. This work would primarily involve software engineering work integrating to an existing chat platform (eg., Slack, HipChat). We re particularly interested in integrating with existing chat and bot platforms (eg., Slack, Hubot) to move quickly in prototyping ideas for new learning experiences.

Specific goal by end of semester: Either adapting an existing in-person game to work in an asynchronous online setting, or developing a new game that takes advantages of the affordances of chat and chatbots.

Sponsored research funding available.

Contact: If you are interested in any of the above positions, please send an email to tsl.mit.jobs@gmail.com and include:


9/6/16
Term: Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Urban Studies and Planning (Course 11)
Faculty Supervisor: Eric Klopfer

Project Title: Creating Practice Spaces for Teacher Education

Project Description: Mentors: Kevin/ Meredith/ YJ One of the active lines of research and development at the MIT Teaching Systems Lab is to create new genres of practice spaces for teachers, drawing on models from games and simulations. Game designer Sid Meier has characterized engaging games as a series of interesting decisions, and we believe that games and simulations can provide learning experiences that help novice teachers rehearse for important interesting decisions in teaching when to ask a question versus when to clarify, when to provide help and when to insist upon independence, when to act and when to listen. Our work builds upon existing research into role-playing, simulations, and other forms of approximation in teacher education.

Specific goal by end of semester: This could be either a) helping research, conceive, design, prototype and playtest a new game that focuses on a key area of teacher practice or b) helping take existing projects forward and improve their engagement, usability or effectiveness as learning experiences. Experience with product design and software development is preferred, and past experience with game development is required.

Prerequisites: Students who have taken CMS.610/6.073, CMS.611, CMS.590/11.127, CMS.608, CMS.301, and CMS.615 are strongly encouraged to appl

Sponsored research funding available.

Contact: If you are interested in any of the above positions, please send an email to tsl.mit.jobs@gmail.com and include:


9/6/16
Term: Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Urban Studies and Planning (Course 11)
Faculty Supervisor: Eric Klopfer

Project Title: STEM Education Research

Project Description: Work closely with TSL research scientists to synthesize best practices in STEM education, the preparation of STEM teachers, and better understanding online and face to face learning environments. Apply research in the development of the Woodrow Wilson Academy (WW Academy), which has a partnership with the TSL.

Specific end of summer goal: Synthesize literature on one or more of the following topics into a well written report: best practices in STEM education, mathematics education, and chemistry education, teacher professional development through games.

Sponsored research funding available

Contact: If you are interested in any of the above positions, please send an email to tsl.mit.jobs@gmail.com and include:


9/6/16
Term: Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Urban Studies and Planning (Course 11)
Faculty Supervisor: Eric Klopfer

Project Title: Learning Experience Design and Testing

Project Description: Design student-centered learning experiences with an emphasis on visual thinking. Work with experienced learning designers to (1) design engaging learning materials, (2) research high quality resources, (3) visualize instructional graphics, and (4) conduct user testing and revise the materials according to the testing results (5) document design process for future referral.

Specific goal by end of semester: Create learning materials, resources, integrate into a thematic challenge unit, participate in user testing, document results of design process and user testing, modify unit as needed.

Sponsored research funding available.

Contact: If you are interested in any of the above positions, please send an email to tsl.mit.jobs@gmail.com and include:


9/6/16
Term: Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Health Sciences and Technology (HST)
Faculty Supervisor Name: Jonathan Polimeni, PhD

Project Title: Neuroimaging Technique Development and Analysis (MRI)

Project Description: Our neuroimaging laboratory is looking for a student with an interest in neuroscience and engineering to work on several ongoing projects related to human MRI and functional MRI software development. Specifically, we are developing cerebral cortical reconstruction and modeling software in the Freesurfer environment for use with high-resolution ultra-high field MRI data.

Prerequisites: Knowledge of MATLAB and/or C/C++ programming is required. A background in signal processing or computational geometry would be highly desired.

Contact Name: Ned Ohringer
Contact Email: nohringer@mgh.harvard.edu


9/6/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (Course 6)
Faculty Supervisor: Pete Szolovits

Project Title: Deep Convolutional Networks for Drug Prediction

Project Description: The Biomedical Cybernetics Laboratory of Harvard/MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology is looking for a students to contribute to the recently opened machine learning project. As a part of the team you will be training deep convolutional neural networks to address the issue of protein flexibility and drug-induced conformational change. You will have 3D images of drug-protein complex, snapshots, in which every atom is a pixel as an input. Your task will be to create a regression model that can take images and convert them into binding energies. Earlier efforts of using deep learning for drug prediction performed by Google, Atomwise, and Merck brought excellent results. With this project you will be a part of World s first attempt to combine molecular dynamics and deep learning to find new drugs.

About us: We are the Biomedical Cybernetics Laboratory. You will be working under the supervision of Principal Investigator, Dr. Gil Alterovitz who is an assistant professor in Harvard/MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology. The other members working on the project are a postdoc, and a mix of graduate and undergraduate students. The project is grant-funded. Previous similar scale efforts resulted in high-impact publication in Nature journals.

Workload: 10-12 hours/week or more. If you have to leave early or stay at home to study at the time of high class workload, we will understand. At the same time we expect you to contribute most of your free time during the semester to the project. There will be a lab-paid opportunity to present at conferences and pitch your ideas to the pharmaceutical collaborators in Boston.

About you: While some experience programing machine learning applications in python and basic understanding of molecular biology might be a valuable asset, if you are exceptionally qualified candidate from other area and feel motivated to learn deep learning with TensorFlow, you are welcome to apply.

Contact: Please, email Dr. Gil Alterovitz gil@mit.edu with your CV, and depending on time we might set up a skype conversation, or a time for you to drop by the lab.


9/6/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Media Laboratory
Faculty Supervisor: Kent Larson

Project Title: BikeBump: Bottom-Up Urban Design Platform

Project Description: This project is highly relevant as it will address various issues of dense urban places and is very important for the development of future cities. The Media Lab’s Changing Places Group is exploring the impact of computational, design tools for urban intervention. This projects goal is to provide cutting edge participatory design tools for our home ground Boston Cambridge area. Specifically for bikers to improve bike lane security. The project's goal is to create a platform that can ask simple questions to each other tied with geolocated information. This is referred as "Geo-Fencing" assigning events once a user has entered a certain area. Not only reporting issues regarding cities, the system will ask for proposals to citizens with a real tradeoff simulating professional situations.

UROP Position During this UROP / temp position, students will gain a comprehensive understanding of technologies that support urban design processes coupled with participatory design. Development will cover both server and client side implementation.

Required skill-sets (apply when having at least one):
- comfortable on using git

1. Mobile Application Development
- intermediate programming skill using java
- Android development experience will be a plus

2. Web Application Development (Client and Server)
- programming skill using javascript
- backend development using Node.js
- DB using Mongo
- API development to hand information to different clients.

3. Physical Computing
- familiar on using Android IDE
- (basic knowledge on ESP8823)

URL: http://cp.media.mit.edu/

Contact: Please send your application to: Yasushi Sakai yasushis@mit.edu and Agnis Stibe agnis@mit.edu


9/6/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Edgerton Center
Faculty Supervisor: Richard Fletcher

Project Title: Mobile Technologies for Drug Addiction

Project Description: Substance abuse and self-injury are enormous public health problems around the world as well as in US. Drug overdose has become the leading cuase of accidental death, surpassing car accidents. Our group develops mobile tools that can be used to support substance abuse treatment. In the past we have worked with military veterans with a drug addiction issues, but currently we are involved in alcohol addiction research together with a partner lab at NIH/NIDA. Our group has experience building mobile apps, wearable sensors, and other sensing technologies to monitor health and provide feedback. We have a patented system that Dr. Fletcher developed for some interventions as well (US patent 8,655,441). We are looking for a student who would be interested to help support this research and be part of our research team and be included in the papers that we publish. We are currently seeking a UROP student to help support an ongoing clinical study on alcohol addiction to help with analysis of data from a variety of physiological sensors.

Prerequisites: Student should have strong experience with data analysis and basic signal processing (filtering, peak detection, etc.) and preferrably experience with statistical analysis as well (stnadard deviation, calculating ROC curves, etc.). Experience with MATLAB or other analysis software is preferred. No prior biomedical experience is necessary, but we are looking for students who also have a personal interest in this work, and are motivated to build technologies that can help people. The ideal candidate would have some background in Psychology(Course 9) and also have some clinical experience. At this time we are interviewing students who are interested in working for the Fall term and open to the possibility of continuing beyond the fall semester.

Pay or credit is available, or UAP project consideration.

URL: www.mobiletechnologylab.com

Contact Name: Richard Fletcher
Contact Email: fletcher@media.mit.edu


9/6/16
Fall 2016-IAP 2017
Department/Lab/Center: Edgerton Center
Faculty Supervisor: Richard Fletcher

Project Title: Augmented Reality for Health Applications

Project Description: Augmented reality provides powerful new ways to represent and display information on mobile phones and tablets. We have several mobile health applications in both global health as well as consumer apps here in the US, where augmented reality could provide an innovative solution to make the user interface more intelligent and simple to use. Applications include home healthy monitoring, point of care diagnostics, and maternal and child health in India. Our group is working with several different clinical partners in India, as well as in US. We are currently seeking a UROP students to help develop augmented reality applications using the Qualcomm Vuforia SDK for Android. (https://developer.vuforia.com/) This powerful SDK enables a wide variety of useful augmented reality functions (see for example: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IP5le6lZ_bw).

Prerequisites: We are looking for students with good experience with either Android or iOS, with preference given to Android. Prior experience with augmented reality, or image processing is a plus. No biomedical experience or knowledge is necessary, but of course, a general interest in creating technologies to help people is desirable. The student should be able to work independently, and attend weekly team meetings to check on progress. At this time we are interviewing students who are interested in working for the Fall term and open to the possibility of continuing beyond the fall semester.

Pay or credit is available, or UAP project consideration.

URL: www.mobiletechnologylab.com

Contact Name: Richard Fletcher
Contact Email: fletcher@media.mit.edu


9/6/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Health Sciences and Technology (HST)
Faculty Supervisor: Roger Mark

Project Title: Sana Mobile Global Health Informatics

Project Description: Global health care is in crisis, with rampant escalating costs and overburdened systems. Limited resources are strained, exacerbated by emergent humanitarian and public health emergencies. Underlying this, medicine is inherently complex traditionally requiring huge budgets, seemingly restricting the power to change the face of healthcare was in the hands of the few. MIT Sana is driven to facilitate a new era of locally derived innovation for sustainable impact, leveraging the power and ubiquity of mobile technologies to bring digital health solutions to communities around the world.

We have several projects and learning opportunities for undergraduate interns or graduate fellows in a variety of roles:
- Open source software engineering (Android, Python/Django, Javascript)
- Human centered design (UI/UX)
- Clinical operations
- Evaluation and Monitoring
- Hackathons

Current project located in Haiti, Lebanon, India, Uganda, and more, covering a diversity of front-line health conditions. Opportunities for international travel (Thailand, Colombia, Mexico, Taiwan, Australia) for committed students.

URL: http://sana.mit.edu

Contact Name: Kenneth Paik
Contact Email: kepaik@mit.edu


9/6/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Engineering Systems Division (ESD)
Faculty Supervisor: Stan Finkelstein, Roy Welsch

Project Title: Toward a New Paradigm for Drug Development: Using Large National Observational Clinical Data and Big-Data Analytics to Find New Lives for Old Drugs

Project Description: There has been much interest in the possibility of identifying new clinical indications for drugs that are already approved and marketed for other clinical uses. According to Francis Collins, the NIH Director, molecular mechanisms have now been worked out for more than 4000 disorders, yet barely 250 have safe and efficacious drug treatments. Thus, there should be great scientific potential to identify additional new clinical uses for drugs already on the market. In addition, finding such opportunities can also offer benefits, in terms of shortening the discovery and development processes, given the steep rise in the cost of developing new drugs, especially when a full complement of clinical trails is to be required. Only in recent years have large datasets from electronic health records offered potential to gain these kinds of insights, and new analytic methods, developed to be used on big data also become available. We are collaborating with colleagues at the Imperial College Medical School and Business School in London. Students will work on systematic reviews of the medical literature and also literature on big data analytic methods potentially applicable for our work. We anticipate being able to access a large UK electronic health records dataset during the coming fall and will then begin work to analyze it and test our research hypotheses.

Prerequisites: Interest in data analysis and facility with use of computational analytic methods.

Contact Name: Stan Finkelstein
Contact Email: snf@mit.edu


9/6/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Chemical Engineering (Course 10)
Faculty Supervisor: Robert Langer

Project Title: Designing a Novel Oral Drug Delivery Device

Project Description: This project aims to develop devices that deliver a broad range of molecules to the body via the gastrointestinal tract. Work will involve microfabrication, development of novel formulations, in vitro release kinetics studies, and in vivo evaluation in large animal models. In order to master the technical expertise required to embark on such a project, one will learn how to craft polymer mixtures, perform laser cuttings and manipulations, design swine experiments, and explore microfabrication techniques. I will clearly explain the science and methods so that the UROP will be able to take these skills with them wherever they go. A UROP will quickly take on their own responsibilities and projects such as designing surface modifications, performing needle characterization experiments, and modeling drug elution profiles.

Prerequisites: This student must be able to communicate well with people outside of their major, as this project is extremely interdisciplinary. I am looking for a student who is interested in pursuing a long term project over the course over several semesters. Sophomore or above.

Contact Name: Alex Abramson
Contact Email: aabram@mit.edu


9/6/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Brain and Cognitive Sciences
Faculty Supervisor: Matthew Wilson

Project Title: Brain Activity During Sleep and Memory

Project Description: Are you curious about what brain does during sleep, and how sleep relates to learning and memory? In this project, we study the functions of the cerebral cortex and other brain areas in learning and memory, and the role of sleep in memory consolidation in rodents.

You will assist us in performing experiments, training animals, building devices for recording brain activity, perform surgeries, and recording and/or manipulating brain activity and behavior in mice. Students with strong programming and mathematics skills may also assist in data analysis. This is an excellent UROP for students seeking laboratory experience in preparation for a research PhD program or medical school.

Prerequisites: No prior experience is required, but you must be highly motivated, conscientious and detail oriented, and willing to work with rodents. We will give preference to candidates who can commit to working 7 to 10 hours per week during fall semesters with the possibility to continue during spring semester and beyond. We can usually only provide academic credits (not payment) for new UROPs.

URL: http://web.mit.edu/org/w/wilsonlab/

Contact: Please send your resume to mjgalazo@mit.edu. Please include in brief description of your background and how it may be useful for the project.


9/2/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Urban Studies and Planning (Course 11)
Faculty Supervisor: Carlo Ratti

Project Title: Adaptive Traffic-Light model (Human centric intersection)

Project Description: The Senseable City Lab is partnering with Philips to research the applications of distributed sensors embedded in smart street lighting systems. One of the projects is to create an adaptive traffic-light model that change cycles according to vehicular traffic, presence of pedestrians, and emissions levels at intersection. The goal is to create a model of the adaptive traffic-light model, and simulate it in a network of traffic intersections.

Role/Tasks:

Skills:

Contact: Fábio Duarte / fduarte@mit.edu


9/2/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Urban Studies and Planning (Course 11)
Faculty Supervisor: Carlo Ratti

Project Title: Underworlds

Project Description: Underworlds is a smart-sewage platform being developed at the Senseable City Lab (DUSP) together with the Alm Lab (Bio Engineering) and Distributed Robotics Lab (CSAIL). The platform consists of sensor-enabled network system, computational tools, and data analytics to monitor and detect pathogens in city’s sewage network. One of the main challenges is to build a cyber-physical system for remote sensing and sampling of sewage. We aim at developing a robotic sensor network that is capable of sensing environmental data from sewage, streaming data to a central server, and autonomous decision making for discreet sewage sampling. Successful candidates will have a unique opportunity to work in a highly multi-disciplinary project funded by the Kuwait-MIT Center for Natural Resources and the Environment.

Role/Tasks: We are looking for 1-2 students who will work on 1) integrating environmental sensors – temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen sensors, etc. – into an existing sewage monitoring platform; and 2) designing a new pumping system for collecting sewage samples. Experience with any of the following is a plus:

Experience in Arduino development environment

Experience in design and fabrication

Learn more about the project: underworlds.mit.edu

Contact: Shinkyu Park / shinkyu@mit.edu


9/2/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Urban Studies and Planning (Course 11)
Faculty Supervisor: Carlo Ratti

Project Title: Deep reinforcement learning for traffic lights control

Project Description: Adaptive traffic control is currently based on very rough heuristics and still requires constant human intervention.

This project explores the idea of applying deep reinforcement learning techniques to traffic management and aims at building a centralized autonomous entity able to manage traffic lights at the city level. It exploits an existing traffic simulator (SimMobility) developed in the department of civil engineering. The simulator will be used to train the agent (a deep-Q learner) to optimally decide the green phase durations of all the road network intersections.

Role/Tasks:

Contact: Remi Tachet / rtachet@mit.edu


9/2/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Urban Studies and Planning (Course 11)
Faculty Supervisor: Eric Klopfer

Project Title: Engagement Across Political Difference in MOOC Discussion Forums

Project Description: In this study, we examine the promise of MOOCs to host civil discourse about controversial topics in an age of hyper-partisanship. An MIT-Harvard-Princeton research team is developing a series of computational measures to evaluate the degree and quality of engagement across political differences in MOOCs with controversial topics. In order to develop these computational measures, we are conducting a variety of human scoring exercises in MOOC forums to validate our computational measures. Researchers on this project will examine, evaluate, and score comments and threads from several online courses. As the research advances, UROPs will help to develop new approaches to measuring engagement across difference. UROPs will have the chance to work with researchers at Harvard, Princeton, and MIT. There are no pre-requisites beyond an interest in education, education research, political science, online learning or related fields. Work can be done remotely and on a highly flexible schedule. Previous UROPs have made substantive contributions to the intellectual direction of this project.

Interested students should reply with CV and short cover letter. An introductory paper about our research can be found at: http://scholar.harvard.edu/files/dtingley/files/civicmooc.pdf

Contact Name: Justin Reich
Contact Email: jreich@mit.edu


9/2/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Materials Science and Engineering (Course 3)
Faculty Supervisor: Antoine Allanore

Project Title: Characterization of a new type of mineral fertilizer

Project Description: We are recruiting one student to work in the laboratories headed by Prof. Antoine Allanore within the department of Materials Science and Engineering. We work in collaboration with a mining company, with the ultimate goal to provide local sources of fertilizers to agriculture-intensive countries in the southern hemisphere. More specifically the candidate will be involved in the characterization (and possibly synthesis) of a new type of fertilizer material. Experimental techniques might include X ray diffraction (XRD) with interpretation and analysis of crystal structures, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), surface area and porosimetry analysis and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS). Students from Materials Science and Engineering, Chemistry, Chemical Engineering, and possibly Mechanical Engineering (with prior chemistry experience) are welcome to apply. This UROP will be paid or used for credits depending on the student choice. This UROP can be extended full time into IAP and the spring semester next year.

Prerequisites: Students from Materials Science and Engineering, Chemistry, Chemical Engineering, and possibly Mechanical Engineering (with prior chemistry experience) are welcome to apply. This UROP will be paid or used for credits depending on the student choice. This UROP can be extended full time into the summer break.

URL: http://allanore.mit.edu/WebsiteAllanoreGroup/Global_Challenges.html

Contact: Interested candidates please send a CV and a short cover letter expressing your interest for one of the position to Dr. Davide Ciceri (ciceri@mit.edu).


9/2/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Political Science (Course 17)
Faculty Supervisor: Evan Lieberman

Project Title: Mining Digital Media in a Study of African Democratic Governance

Project Description: We are looking for a UROP to assist in a longitudinal study tracking a cohort of several thousand South African politicians. This individual would primarily work on the development of tools for web-based and social media scraping and tracking, and would be involved in the cleaning, management, and analysis of data collected. This would be a nice opportunity for a student interested in exploring new strategies for studying politics and development. We are looking for someone with solid programming skills, especially in Python.

Contact Name: Meghan Perdue
Contact Email: mperdue@mit.edu


9/1/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Architecture (Course 4)
Faculty Supervisor: John Ochsendorf

Project Title: Database of Embodied Quantity Outputs, Environmental Impact of Structures Research

Project Description: This research proposes a framework for a worldwide, transparent and interactive database where architects, engineers and other stakeholders can input data about their building projects, more precisely about the material quantities and embodied carbon in their building structures. The structures include both buildings and bridges. The existing interface was created with HTML, PHP, MySQL and overhauled with Django and Python, so that users can access this interface online, input data on their projects, and make different queries.

We are looking for civil engineering majors with interest in programming / programmers with an interest in civil engineering to improve the current database. During this UROP / temp position, a student will gain a comprehensive understanding of structural design, material choices and their environmental impacts in terms of greenhouse gas emissions or Global Warming Potential. The student will also improve skills to augment and visualize results in civil engineering in close collaboration with industry leaders such as Arup and Thornton Tomasetti. The bulk of the work will entail the collection of data from structural engineering companies, implement in the existing database and improve the design and implementation of the user interface in Django/Python/HTML.

This position will apply for direct funding from Capstone UROP, Freshmen UROP, SuperUROP or other programs. Therefore, the students will be interviewed in the first two weeks of September. The current length of the project is the entire 2016-2017 academic year (primarily fall and spring terms). Current expected work is 5-10 hours a week.

About us: Prof. John Ochsendorf and PhD Candidate Catherine De Wolf of the Structural Design Lab http://web.mit.edu/structuraldesign/

Required Skills:

Preferred Skills:

Contact Name: Catherine De Wolf
Contact Email: cdewolf@mit.edu


9/1/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Industrial Performance Center (IPC)
Faculty Supervisor: Dr. Elisabeth Reynolds

Project Title: Innovation Ecosystems in Emerging Economies

Project Description: MIT's Industrial Performance Center (IPC) engages in research on industrial transformation and systems of innovation, whether within firms, industries or regions and countries (http://ipc.mit.edu). The IPC draws faculty, researchers and students from across MIT to work on multi-disciplinary research projects. We are seeking a UROP for the Fall of 2016 to assist in research on national and regional innovation ecosystems particularly as they relate to Brazil and other emerging economies. Accelerating Innovation in Brazil is a five-year research project in Brazil examining how to increase innovation capacity in the country (http://ipc.mit.edu/research/innovation/accelerating-innovation-brazil).

The UROP will work with senior researchers and graduate students on the project to support research on Brazilian institutions, industries and policies related to innovation. Research may include benchmarking particular economic development policies and practices in Brazil with other countries, reading and summarizing papers and developing literature reviews. The UROP will also participate in Skype interviews and assist in writing up notes, in particular on the role of universities in supporting applied R&D within firms and industries.

Prerequisites: Skills required include comfort working in and across large databases. Strong analytic, writing and interpersonal skills also required.

URL: http://ipc.mit.edu/research/innovation/accelerating-innovation-brazil

Contact Name: Laura Guild
Contact Email: lguild@mit.edu


9/1/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Media Laboratory
Faculty Supervisor: Kent Larson

Project Title: Data Science and Data Visualization: Mining Tourism Patterns with Telecom and Social Media Data

Project Description: The overarching paradigm of our work is the application of data visualization, and data science methodologies on social media data and Call Detail Record Data, for enabling an understanding of the country's dynamics on tourism and commerce, human mobility and transportation systems, energy and environmental impact; as well as to shed light on technological and system s innovation towards radical improvements in these domains. We are seeking a UROP for the Fall term, with the possibility of continuing during following terms. Benefits: Academic papers will be elaborated on selected topics along this project. UROPs are welcomed to participate and co-author. These will be discussed on an ad hoc basis depending on student s interests, skills, and availability.

The tasks:
1. Predict Next Location Based on Call Detail Record This project was a machine learning investigation to find the best algorithms for learning the travel patterns of tourists to predict their future travel plans, in order to provide recommendations based on their past behavior. In this project, We applied Naive Bayesian, Random Forest, SVM and Neural Network, on individual behavior patterns from call detail records (CDR) data in order to predict tourists future stops.

2. Mining Tourism Patterns using Natural Language Processing- MIT Media lab Andorra is a small central European country on the border between France and Spain that heavily depends on tourism. Our project aimed to determine factors affecting tourist perceptions during their visits, in order to make recommendations to Andorran tourism authorities so they can further improve their industry. Our idea was to apply Computer Vision and Natural Language Processing to Social Media reviews of tourist attractions and restaurants in Andorra. Besides our recommendations to Andorran tourism authorities, this study validated our approach to use sentiment analysis on social media data to discover tourism patterns.

Candidates profiles: Ideal candidates will have sharpened data science skills (2+ years computer science), and should be able to develop a thoughtful and creative understanding on how the models, analysis and visualizations can generate value in the contexts of Andorra s tourism and commerce, human mobility and transportation systems, energy and environmental impact. We need candidates with medium-high level skills python or javascript. Interest or experience in the aforementioned domains is required: tourism and commerce, human mobility and transportation systems, energy and environmental impact. We are looking at integrating more than one UROP to the project. It is OK for candidates to have skills focusing on either data science, or on data visualization. We also welcome candidates that have particular interests and/or experience in one of the aforementioned domains.

Required Skills: Python, SQL, HTML,CSS,JS, JQuery,D3.js, Web Framework

Additional: (Open CV) Computer Vision, Machine Learning

Contact: Please send us your resume/portfolio and a short paragraph on your interest in the project to naichun@mit.edu. Thanks for your interest!!


9/1/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Sloan School of Management (Course 15)
Faculty Supervisor: David Keith

Project Title: Automaker strategies for electric and autonomous vehicle technologies

Project Description: Multiple emerging technologies threaten to fundamentally transform the automotive industry in the 21st century, including electric drive powertrains, autonomous vehicles and on-demand mobility services. The objective of this UROP is to develop a timeline for each major player in this market, from Big 3 automakers such as Ford to automotive entrants such as Tesla and Google, documenting key strategic decisions they have made to position themselves if and when fundamental disruption of the incumbent gasoline/internal-combustion regime occurs. As well as collecting data, the opportunity exists to develop a novel web-based solution to organize the data.

Prerequisites: An interest in automotive / transportation / energy issues is essential. R and/or web programming skills is an advantage.

URL: dkeith.scripts.mit.edu

Contact Name: David Keith
Contact Email: dkeith@mit.edu


9/1/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Brain and Cognitive Sciences (Course 9)
Faculty Supervisor: Joshua B. Tenenbaum

Project Title: Web Game Development for Atari-style Games

Project Description: How do humans learn to play video games?

This project focuses on human exploration and theory-learning. We are looking at how humans explore unknown environments, build accurate models, and then use these to plan and produce adaptive behavior; this behavior is contrasted with that of top artificial-intelligence models on the same tasks.

The UROP student will design and build a series of Atari-style web games and will automatically collect data using Amazon Mechanical Turk. In particular, the task will involve putting new and existing VGDL games (https://github.com/schaul/py-vgdl) online using Javascript. There may also be opportunities to work on building models of human-like artificial intelligence and on applying existing models to these tasks.

Prerequisites/requirements: Experience with web development is required. Interest in cognitive science or artificial intelligence is preferred. This position is for Fall 2017, and may continue into further semesters.

Contact: To apply, send your CV/Resume and a brief description of previous web-development experience (coursework or otherwise) to Pedro Tsividis at tsividis@mit.edu.


9/1/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Mechanical Engineering (Course 2)
Faculty Supervisor: Maria Yang

Project Title: theDesignExchange

Project Description: theDesignExchange is a comprehensive online repository of over 300 design thinking methods for a range of disciplines. theDesignExchange aims to organize and develop an ontology, facilitate multidisciplinary communication about design methods, and develop a community of profession designers, practitioners, educators and students. The typical design course only has a limited amount of time to teach students design methods and skills and provide feedback an interactive repository such as theDesignExchange presents an opportunity to expose students to a larger range of design methods beyond the classroom. As a part of this project, you can join by helping develop method content, particularly videos, for use in a classroom setting.

Prerequisites: Students with video-editing experiences preferred, such as Adobe After Effects

Contact Name: Maria Yang
Contact Email: mcyang@mit.edu


9/1/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Media Lab (MAS)
Faculty Supervisor: Chris Schmandt

Project Title: Makeup as wearable chemical sensing platform

Project Description: We are creating a wearable chemical sensor inspired by cosmetic form factors, such as makeup powders and lotions. We will be experimenting with various chemical reactions and matrix to create prototypes. We are seeking urops with chemical and/or material science backgrounds with the capacity to perform iterative experiments.

Requirements:
- Chemical engineering and/or material science background or experience
- Conduct experiments in chemical pollution/environmental sensing (reverse engineering from existing chemical sensors)
- Colormetric experiments
- Testing chemical sensors in various matrix
- Literature review on possible methods to explore

Contact: If interested, Please send CV and outline relevant experience to Cindy Kao cindykao@media.mit.edu


9/1/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Brain and Cognitive Sciences (Course 9)
Faculty Supervisor: Ann M. Graybiel

Project Title: Experiments on brain activity and behavior (projects available starting now)

Project Description: Help us do experiments to solve the mysteries of the brain! In this project, you will assist us in performing experiments manipulating and/or recording brain activity and behavior in rodents using cutting-edge techniques such as optogenetics and calcium imaging. You may help us run experiments, perform neurosurgeries, train animals and/or build micro-devices for manipulating and recording neural activity. Students with strong programming and mathematics skills may also assist in data analysis. This is an excellent UROP for students seeking laboratory experience in preparation for medical school or a research PhD program. Students majoring in Course 9 as well as those majoring in mathematics, physics, engineering, computer science, and other majors are welcome.

In this project, our goal is to understand the functions of the striatum, cortex, and other brain areas in behavioral tasks performed by rodents. The striatum is a key part of the basal ganglia, receiving input from midbrain dopamine neurons, cortex, and thalamus. It is thought to be centrally involved in evaluation, selection, motivation, and decision making, not only at the level of movements but also at the level of goals, strategies, thoughts, emotions, and sensory interpretations. It is implicated in movement disorders like Parkinson s disease, Huntington s disease, and dystonia, as well as addiction, depression, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), Tourette syndrome, autism spectrum disorders, aspects of schizophrenia, and other disorders.

Prerequisites: No prior experience is required, but you must be highly motivated, conscientious and detail oriented. We will give preference to candidates who can commit to working at least 12 hours per week during fall and spring semesters for at least a year and at least 20 to 40 hours per week during IAP and summer. We can usually only provide academic credits (not payment) for new UROPs.

URL: http://graybiel-lab.mit.edu/

Contact: Please send your resume to Leif Gibb, PhD (lgibb@mit.edu)


8/31/16
Fall 2016-IAP 2017
Department/Lab/Center: Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research (WI)
Faculty Supervisor: Terry Orr-Weaver

Project Title: Computational analysis of RNA structure in neurons

Project Description: The Rouskin Lab at the Whitehead Institute has an open UROP position for an undergraduate with strong computational background to work on cutting edge data analysis of RNA structure and RNA structure changes, which leads to various diseases such as neurodegeneration and dementia. Background in biology is not required. The selected student will have the opportunity to immerse the field of RNA biology and develop computational approaches for discovery of RNA structures that control gene expression in neurons.

Prerequisites: python

URL: http://wi.mit.edu/people/fellows/rouskin

Contact Name: Silvia Rouskin
Contact Email: srouskin@wi.mit.edu


8/31/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Chemical Engineering (Course 10)
Faculty Supervisor: William Tisdale

Project Title: Synthesis of Perovskite Nanoplatelets for Nanoscale Energy Transport Studies

Project Description: The Tisdale lab studies nanoscale energy transport in nanomaterials and we are currently interested in perovskite nanoplatelets. Perovskite nanoplatets are a 2D material with tunable light absorption and emission with high quantum yield. Their emission is believed to be directional and their emission lifetime is in a few nanosecond regime. With these properties, it is a promising candidate of next-generation LEDs. We are looking for a student to work on developing a synthetic method to produce the nanoplatelets with well-defined thickness and micrometer lateral size for single-molecule studies. The project will mainly involves air-free synthesis with Schlenk line, and absorption and photoluminescence spectroscopy.

By working on this project, the student will gain experience and skills as listed below:
- Air-free synthesis with Schlenk line
- Air-sensitive-compound handling with glovebox
- UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy
- Photoluminescence spectroscopy
- Drop casting and spin coating
- Recrystallization

Prerequisites: Enthusiastic students with interests in Chemical Engineering and Chemistry. Freshman students are encouraged to apply.

Contact Name: Watcharaphol Paritmongkol
Contact Email: wparit@mit.edu


8/31/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Brain and Cognitive Sciences (Course 9)
Faculty Supervisor: Gloria Choi

Project Title: Deciphering circuit dynamics underlying associative learning using optogenetics and CRISPR/Cas9

Project Description: Help us to understand how neuromodulation shapes the brain s ability to learn! We would like to take on motivated and enthusiastic UROPS with strong work ethic and interest in neuroscience to assist in our experiments. This project involves a range of cutting edge techniques including optogenetics and CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing. You may help us with many aspects of our experiments including running behavioral experiments, performing neurosurgeries, molecular cloning, virus production, and much more. This is an excellent opportunity for students seeking research experience in preparation for graduate or medical school. We study the piriform cortex, a site of associative learning in the olfactory system. Sensory representations within this brain region can be flexibly coupled to stimuli in the environment such that, after learning, an odor may come to predict the presence of a reward or a threat. We are interested in understanding how this association occurs at the circuit and molecular level through the use of optogenetics and genome editing technology. We ask that you work for school credit 10 hours per week during the academic year for at least one year. This will be a very enriching experience for UROPs interested in long term research in neuroscience.

For more information about the lab please visit our website: http://www.gloriachoi.org/

Contact: If you are interested and want more details about the research/project, please email Michael Reed (m_reed@mit.edu) with your CV and a brief message about yourself.


8/30/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Sloan School of Management (Course 15)
Faculty Supervisor: Dean Eckles

Project Title: Strategies for seeding behaviors in social networks

Project Description: Can we increase the spread of a behavior in networks by using information about network structure to target a seed set of adopters? That is, perhaps we can target "influencers" identified by their position in the network. Recent work has begun to test targeting strategies through field experiments. Many of these targeting strategies are nondeterministic (i.e. random) because they rely on a diffusion process starting from a random set of vertices. For example, some strategies try to exploit the "friendship paradox" by picking random neighbors of random members of a network. We are working on methods for making data collection about these strategies more valuable. You can join by helping us develop simulations and software for these methods. We are applying these techniques to data from social networks in rural Honduras, rural China, and online networks.

Prerequisites: Programming experience. Experience with simulations or R / Python / Julia is excellent. Prior training in probability and statistics, graph theory, or algorithms is very helpful but not strictly necessary.

URL: http://deaneckles.com

Contact Name: Dean Eckles
Contact Email: eckles@mit.edu


8/30/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Sloan School of Management (Course 15)
Faculty Supervisor: Dean Eckles

Project Title: Measuring habits in behavioral data and consequences of habit disruption

Project Description: Psychologists see habits as behaviors that occur repeatedly and relatively automatically in response to cues in the performance environment. New large data sets describing human behavior (e.g., fitness trackers, online behavior, purchase data) afford new ways of quantifying how regularly a person performs a behavior in everyday circumstances. We are using unsupervised machine learning techniques to extract the predictable components of people's behavior in order to measure habits. We are then using this to study what happens when aspects of the performance environment (i.e. the situation someone usually performs the behavior in) is changed. We have predicted that people should become more affected by social influence (e.g., more likely to copy what their peers are doing) during periods when their performance environment is disrupted. As part of the this project, you could contribute to processing large data sets using these ML techniques and developing heuristics for finding people who experience a disruption to their habits. In particular, there are opportunities to work with a large data set describing people's purchases of products, but also potentially fitness tracker data.

Prerequisites: Programming experience. Experience with matrix computations in R or Julia is a plus. Prior training in probability and statistics, algorithms, or machine learning is of course helpful, but is not necessary.

URL: http://deaneckles.com

Contact Name: Dean Eckles
Contact Email: eckles@mit.edu


8/30/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Urban Studies and Planning (Course 11)
Faculty Supervisor: Chris Zegras

Project Title: Technologies for Participatory Public Transport Planning

Project Description: The Mobility Futures Collaborative (http://mfc.mit.edu) is looking for individuals to work on developing and piloting open-source web-based tools (CoAXs: http://coaxs.mit.edu/) designed to enhance community engagement for public transport planning.

Specifically, we are looking for capabilities in:

1. Front-end development: The ideal candidate would have experience working with react and/or angular. Responsibilities include extending various tools (e.g. https://github.com/conveyal/taui/, https://github.com/mitTransportAnalyst/CoAXs/tree/nsrl-demo) to show custom scenarios for a Boston-based project, and organizing/documenting the code for more general reuse by transit stakeholders in different contexts. Experience with java web apps and online mapping would be pluses.

2.Partner engagement in Chile. The main responsibility would include working closely with partners at a Chilean University (Catholic University of Chile) to configure a context-relevant demonstration data (e.g. spatial data on employment, demographics, transport networks, etc.), scope improvements (e.g. improved visualization features, optimization tools, etc.), and do user testing of CoAXs.

The ideal candidate would have experience running user tests/focus groups with stakeholders in international contexts, and an interest in developing tools for collaborative land-use/transportation planning and project appraisal. Spanish language skills would be a huge plus. The ideal candidate would bridge both capability areas, but we are willing to entertain multiple positions if necessary.

Prerequisites: react; angular; java web apps; online mapping

URL: http://mfc.mit.edu/; http://coaxs.mit.edu/; https://github.com/conveyal/taui/; https://github.com/mitTransportAnalyst/CoAXs/tree/nsrl-demo

Contact Name: Chris Zegras
Contact Email: czegras@mit.edu


8/30/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Chemical Engineering (Course 10)
Faculty Supervisor: T Alan Hatton

Project Title: Conductive Polymeric Materials for (1) Electrochemically Modulated Separations, and (2) Energy Storage.

Project Description: Conducting polymers (polypyrrole, polyaniline, polythiophene, etc) are electroactive materials that exhibit hierarchical porosity and mechanical flexibility. They have the potentials towards a variety of applications such as energy storage and catalysis, and particularly of our interest, electrochemically mediated separations of organic compounds from water for environmental remediation. In this project, the student will gain hands-on experience of electrochemical and chemical synthesis of conducting polymers. The student will also learn important material/electrochemical characterization techniques and data analysis methods to assist the engineering design of devices incorporating the polymeric materials. The main applications we are exploring using these functional materials include liquid phase separation in batch and flow systems, and energy storage in super capacitors.

We are seeking a highly motivated and self-driven UROP to join this project. Prior polymer or electrochemistry knowledge is not required, but the student should have the desire to learn new concepts and deliver in a fast paced environment.

Contact Name: Yinying Ren
Contact Email: yren@mit.edu


8/30/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Chemistry (Course 5)
Faculty Supervisor: Barbara Imperiali

Project Title: Directed protein evolution of synthetic antibodies against glycan biomarkers

Project Description: The power of antibodies lies in their specificity and affinity, as the ability of these molecules to recognize and bind their protein antigens is unparalleled. This lock and key behavior protects humans from disease threats and furthers research into hundreds of fields through techniques that use antibodies, such as cancer screening, FACS, Western Blotting, affinity chromatography, histology, analytical chemistry, therapeutics and so many more. In short, antibodies are an irreplaceable tool for sensing and manipulating targets. However, there is a class of molecule that plays a vital role in healthy and diseased cell and tissue behavior that has no effective antibodies against them: oligosaccharides. Complex glycans on cell surfaces and on proteins facilitate everything from neurochemical behaviors to cancer cell metastasis to bacterial and viral infections. We find it criminal that no proteins that tightly and specifically bind the over 7,000 unique human glycan structures exist and we aim to change that. We are currently pursuing a structure-based approach, using directed evolution on yeast, chemoenzymatic protein engineering, FACS, genetic manipulation and quantitative fluorescence assays to engineer proteins that specifically and tightly bind glycan biomarkers of human cancers. These binders will be developed as tools for the laboratory and possible therapeutics for the clinic. The student will learn and perform various duties related to this project, with the goal of effectively learning new skills to further this project. Besides protein expression, purification, and chemoenzymatic reaction, there will be opportunities to learn moderate bioorganic synthesis, compound purification, fluorometry and many other biochemistry techniques.

Prerequisites: 5.36 module 6, 5.37 module 7 OR previous laboratory experience. Basic organic synthesis skills a strong plus. A strong desire to be a significant part of something world-changing is required. Strong preference will be given for students who can commit to at least 10 hours per week for at least two semesters, starting as soon as possible. Open to a longer-term commitment. Chemistry majors with strong biological interests are encouraged to apply, but biological Engineering or biochemistry majors would also be particularly suited.

Contact Name: Dr. Cristina Zamora
Contact Email: zamorac@mit.edu


8/30/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Sloan School of Management
Faculty Supervisor: Wanda Orlikowski

Project Title: Big Data/Predictive Analytics for Emergency Coordination

Project Description: Emergency management organizations play an important role in the functioning of a city. Specifically, these centers manage the coordinated dispatch of police, fire, and emergency medical services, among others. The emergency communication call-takers and dispatchers act as the “first” first responders to emergencies of various kinds. They do this through answering 911 calls and other requests for help, quickly gathering the required data from callers and other real-time information technologies, synthesizing the data to make sense of what is going on, categorizing the incidents and entering information into the Computer Aided Dispatch (CAD) system, and coordinating various activities during emergency response.

Despite the importance of dispatch and emergency communications centers, very few research studies have examined the coordination and decision-making challenges and complexities involved in this work. Moreover, the 911 emergency field is undergoing several changes due to shifts in the technological and institutional regime. With the profusion of mobile phones in the United States, the volume, type, and pattern of 911 calls have significantly increased (including a significant increase in the % of redundant calls, prank calls, missed dials, and non-emergency requests) which is impacting both the staffing and management of these emergency centers as well as increasing the percentage of time that police officers and EMTs spend in responding to 911 calls for service.

Therefore, the motivating question for this research is to understand how does one organize a 24x7 emergency center in the digital age, where the constant connectivity of mobile devices and social media are changing public expectations regarding response times and service levels?

As a part of this research, we will be analyzing “big data” related to 911 call logs and Utilization data to understand the volume, type, and the flow of calls across multiple cities and years. We will also be building models to predict call-volume and call-patterns, which could in turn help the centers to organize accordingly and plan their staffing & patrol deployment.

If you are interested in (a) getting hands-on experience in collecting and analyzing high-volume data (e.g., city-level 9-1-1 calls, crime reports) (b) convert unstructured data into structured data and do analysis, (c) participate in interesting and relevant social science research, this would be a great learning opportunity.

UROP will closely participate in research related to a number of questions related to the application of big data/analytics to the field of emergency response. Specifically, we have three types of UROP positions:

Position 1: Candidates with strong programming skills in scripting languages (such as Python), Responsibility for this position include writing code to collect data from a variety of sources, converting unstructured data to structured data, data management, and a sincere interest in the phenomena of big data and analytics.

Prerequisites for Position 1:
* Programming skills with scripting languages (Python or Ruby or Perl)
* Experience with Microsoft Excel

Position 2: Candidates with knowledge of intermediate statistics (e.g., regression analysis), and experience with statistical tools (such as STATA or R). Responsibility for this position include managing and analyzing data using statistical software. The ideal candidate is a highly motivated student with strong background in statistics/econometrics and with good data analysis skills.

Prerequisites for Position 2:
* Intermediate Statistics (including STATA or R)
* Experience with Microsoft Excel (Macros, VBA)
* Good data analysis skills

Position 3: Candidates with good data management skills – someone who can cleanse and improve the quality of both quantitative and qualitative data.

UROP type: Paid, For Credits, as well as Volunteer.

Contact: Please email Arvind Karunakaran (arvindk@mit.edu) with a brief intro (or with a resume/CV). Also, please include which UROP position you are most interested in, your availability to meet and number of hours per week to work.


8/30/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Media Lab (MAS)
Faculty Supervisor: Alex `Sandy' Pentland

Position: Embedded / Hardware developer

Project Title: OpenBadge - developing a wearable device for studying and collecting social interaction data

Project Description: Innovative work is gradually shifting towards collaborative efforts by larger, multi-disciplinary teams, making team efficacy an increasingly important field of study. Our group’s prior studies show that team performance can be predicted based on non-verbal social signals, such as turn-taking, response patterns, and conversation balance.

We are now looking for student who can help us develop the next generation of a wearable device for collecting interaction data. This will include improving the design, adding new sensors such as an ultra-low energy accelerometer and dual digital microphones for improved audio, and improving overall power consumption.

Skills you need to already have: Considerable experience with Arduino and/or C/C++ for embedded devices. Reasonable familiarity with Python.

Optional skills:

Other prerequisites: We are looking for students that are able to contribute a minimum of 10 hours of work a week. Priority will be given to a student who can continue working with us during IAP and/or the Spring

Contact: Oren Lederman (orenled@media.mit.edu) or Akshay Mohan (akshay.mohan@alum.mit.edu) with a short description of your background or resume


8/26/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research (WI)
Faculty Supervisor: Rick Young

Project Title: Gene expression regulation across tissues

Project Description: The Corradin lab is looking for motivated biology students with an interest in computational genomics. This project is offered for Fall term with opportunity for continuation. UROP student will perform comparative analysis of DNA and RNA sequencing results across cell types, tissues and species. This will involve applying computational skills to the evaluation of large datasets. Quantitative and spatiotemporal regulation of gene expression is essential to defining the diverse cell types that comprise the human body. Noncoding regulatory elements, termed transcriptional enhancers, play a crucial role in dictating gene expression programs that enable functional diversity spanning neurons to immune cells. As such, disruption of enhancer function is a frequent contributor to human disease. Advances in genome sequencing have facilitated the identification of enhancer elements. However, there remains a considerable discrepancy between the ability to identify enhancers and the ability to identify the specific genes that they regulate. This project will involve computational prediction of gene targets through comparative analysis of enhancer and gene activity across cell types.

Prerequisites: Candidates with a background in biology or computer science are encouraged to apply. Preference will be given to candidates with prior experience with at least one of the following: Unix/Bash, R, Perl and/or python.

Contact Name: Olivia Corradin
Contact Email: corradin@wi.mit.edu


8/26/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Urban Studies and Planning (Course 11)
Faculty Supervisor: Larry Susskind

Project Title: Enhancing Public Awareness and Engagement of Climate Change through Online Games

Project Description: The MIT Impact Science Collaborative has developed a series of games face-to-face role-play simulations -- to help enhance public literacy regarding climate change related risks. We want to compare the relative advantages and disadvantages of using online games to try to achieve the same objectives. We are looking for a student who can work with us to develop a web-based game in Javascript. Some prior game development experience would be desirable. We will also need to collect data about various users from a number of databases; so some familiarity with database management is preferable. This is a fantastic opportunity to program for a good cause. You will produce a tangible product during your UROP term and help to deal with climate change at the same time.

Hours: 10 hours per week Pay: $15/hour; can also offer credit.

Prerequisites: Javascript; database management; online game development experience preferred.

URL: https://scienceimpact.mit.edu/cambridge-climate-change-impacts-and-public-health-risks

Contact Name: Please email Ella Kim ella@mit.edu if you are interested, including a resume, list of relevant coursework, and links to any relevant projects you have worked on.


8/26/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Architecture (Course 4)
Faculty Supervisor: Larry Sass

Project Title: Home Delivery: Design, 3D Printing and Prototyping of Multi-Unit Housing

Project Description: Our research lab studies how to produce real buildings directly from 3D CAD models. Within our lab group we are constantly trying to understand the fundamental mechanisms needed to design and 3D print/digitally fabricate housing. We have had two discoveries since targeting housing ten years ago. First, we discovered that it is possible to digitally fabricate a small house directly from a 3D model of interlocking plywood components. Second, we have also discovered new software systems that allow us to decompose 3D shape models into 2D elements ready for laser cutting and assembly. Both discoveries work well for the production of small individual houses. We are currently investigating ways to digitally fabricate multi-story, multi-unit housing of larger, casted interlocking concrete components. Answering this question would provide critical insight how we can digitally fabricate multi-unit housing post disaster or energy free housing as perfectly fabricated instruments. A great experience for a UROP student is one were the students learns some design but mostly learns ways to instantly produce their ideas as physical products larger than any 3D printer can fabricate directly from their laptops. Our expectation is that you will have a willingness to learn Architectural Design, building detailing in 3D with Rhino Modeling Software, laser cutting, and plaster casting and 3D printing.

We have three goals this term:
1. Design and create a set of structural elements in CAD that can be assembled by rules.
2. 3D Print a few prototypical designs of elements
3. Test the system with 3D models and see if any shaped building can be decomposed into the proposed element.

UROP Responsibilities: Designing, modeling and printing/casting components

Required Skills: 3D Modeling in Rhino or Solidworks Location: International Design Center, located on the 3-floor of N51.

Time Commitment: 10-15 hours per week, [Monday] Sept 12 - Dec [Friday]

URL: ddf.mit.edu

Contact: Please email Prof. Larry Sass sass@mit.edu. Include your name in the title of the email. Include a link Examples of previous projects and your CV/resume Please specify your availability during the rest of the summer/fall term


8/26/16
Fall 2016-IAP 2017
Department/Lab/Center: Brain and Cognitive Sciences (Course 9)
Faculty Supervisor: Ann Graybiel

Project Title: Test for motivational circuits in mouse models of Huntington's disease

Project Description: We are seeking a student to help with histological and/or behavioral studies of mouse models of Huntington's disease. We have generated mice in which we can control specific circuits of the forebrain that are thought to control motivation and movement. The position available involves studying whether manipulation of these putative motivation circuits can modulate behavior and molecular phenotypes in Huntington s disease models. The experiments require a significant amount of training and dedicated time in the laboratory and so we are seeking a student who will be able to continue research in the Graybiel laboratory for longer term.

URL: http://graybiel-lab.mit.edu/

Contact Name: Jill Crittenden
Contact Email: jrc@mit.edu


8/26/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Materials Science and Engineering (Course 3)
Faculty Supervisor: Thomas Eagar

Project Title: Nano-Toxicity of Chromium Particles

Project Description: Microscopic evaluation of nanoparticles containing chromium oxide to determine the effect of particle size on valence state. The toxicity of the hexavalent state of chromium oxide is of interest to occupational health and medicine. Prior training in electron microscopy is preferred but not required.

Prerequisites: Sophomore, Junior, or Senior.

Contact Name: Neil Jenkins
Contact Email: rood@mit.edu


8/26/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Media Lab
Faculty Supervisor: Alex `Sandy' Pentland

Project Title: Rhythm: an Open-Source platform for quantifying and improving in-person and distributed team collaboration

Project Description: Team efficacy is becoming an increasingly important field of study as the nature of work shifts to larger, multi-disciplinary teams.. Studies conducted by our group show that team performance can be predicted based on non-verbal social signals, such as turn-taking, response patterns, and conversation balance.

We are now developing a platform for quantifying, analyzing and improving team collaboration outside the lab in real-life situations. The system is composed of a variety of components, including wearable devices for quantifying face-to-face meetings, a web-based tool for measuring team behavior during video chats (e.g. Google Hangout, WebRTC), data-analysis core, and visual “coaching” tools that help people and teams adopt better behavior.

This summer, we collected hundreds of hours of meeting data from distributed and in-person meetings as well as team performance measures. We are now looking for exceptional people to help us analyse these data and extract new insights on teamwork and performance.

Skills you need to already have:
-
Python
- Experience with data analysis using Python
- R and/or Matlab.

Optional skills:
- Python Pandas (optional, but a strong plus)
- Data visualization
- Matplotlib / Python Bokeh

What you will be doing: depending on your exact skills, you will study the relationship between team behavior and performance, implement and test relevant behavioral models, and improve voiced-unvoiced detection.

Other prerequisites: we are looking for students that are able to contribute a minimum of 10 hours per week.

Contact: Oren Lederman (orenled@media.mit.edu) or Akshay Mohan (akshay.mohan@alum.mit.edu) with a short description of your background or resume


8/26/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Brain and Cognitive Sciences (Course 9)
Faculty Supervisor: Pawan Sinha

Project Title: Characterizing dynamic object interactions in autism spectrum disorders

Project Description: Difficulty interacting with dynamic objects represents a salient, yet understudied, feature of the autism phenotype. These difficulties can present grave consequences for autistic individuals. Motivated by a theory we have recently proposed (Sinha et al., 2014), the overarching hypothesis guiding this project is that difficulties in interacting with moving objects may be an outcome of impaired prediction of the trajectory of moving objects as they unfold over time. In collaboration with the ActionLab at Northeastern University, this project aims to investigate these abilities across a range of motor tasks to test whether the difficulties seen clinically result from an underlying impairment in temporal prediction. The project uses motion capture and virtual/screen-based games to collect quantitative data regarding movement of individuals relative to the objects in the environment. Deeper knowledge of the issue holds relevance for adapting environments for autistic children and adults, as well as for designing interventions that acknowledge and address potential underlying neurocognitive issues (e.g., prediction), and not merely the manifestation of the underlying impairment (e.g., difficulty in catching a ball).

Position Description: The UROP will contribute to programming experimental interfaces and performing computational analysis of 3D motion capture and virtual game data. The student will work closely with others as part of a team, with substantial opportunity to work independently. This position is available for pay or credit.

Prerequisites:

· The ideal candidate will have previous experience in Python, C, or other programming languages, MATLAB, engineering, and strong analytical skills.
· Able to commit 6-10 hours per week during the fall semester.
· Background in computer science, engineering, brain and cognitive sciences, or related field.
· Ability to travel occasionally to Northeastern University for training, data collection, or meetings also desirable.

Application and Deadlines: The deadline to apply through the UROP office for direct funding is September 29; however, we recommend that you contact us as soon as possible if you wish to apply. We will begin reviewing applications on a rolling basis starting now until the position is filled. Visit the UROP website for details about UROP requirements: http://web.mit.edu/urop/apply/deadlines.html

To apply: please e-mail Annie Cardinaux, Technical Associate at anniec@mit.edu, and include your Resume/CV and a letter describing your interest in and qualifications for the project. Please specify whether you would like to do the UROP for pay or credit.


8/26/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Brain and Cognitive Sciences (Course 9)
Faculty Supervisor: Pawan Sinha

Project Title: Characterizing Habituation and Prediction in autism spectrum

disordersProject Description: Sensory sensitivities are a commonly occurring feature in individuals with autism. These difficulties can present considerable challenges for autistic individuals, in addition to the social-communication impairments and repetitive behavior that are typical of the autism phenotype. Motivated by a theory we have recently proposed (Sinha et al., 2014), the overarching hypothesis guiding this proposal is that difficulties in prediction may cause differences in sensory habituation. This project aims to investigate habituation profiles across a range of sensory modalities. Ultimately, we seek to understand whether the sensory difficulties observed clinically result from an underlying impairment in habituation and prediction. The project uses the tools of electroencephalography (EEG) and electrodermal activity (EDA) to obtain rich quantitative data regarding physiological response to repetitive stimuli. Deeper knowledge of the issue holds relevance for more accurate diagnosis, the provision of environments that are more tolerable for autistic individuals, as well as the design of interventions that acknowledge and address potential underlying neurocognitive issues (e.g., prediction, habituation), and not merely the manifestation of the underlying impairment (e.g., sensory sensitivities).

Position Description: The UROP will contribute to electrophysiological data collection and analysis using MATLAB or Python, using sophisticated signal processing methods. The student will work closely with others as part of a team, with substantial opportunity to work independently. This position is available for pay or credit.

Prerequisites: The ideal candidate will have previous experience in Python, C , or other programming languages, MATLAB, engineering, and strong analytical skills. Must be able to commit 6-10 hours per week during the fall semester. A background in computer science, engineering, brain and cognitive sciences, or related field is desired.

Application and Deadlines: The deadline to apply through the UROP office for direct funding is September 29; however, we recommend that you contact us as soon as possible if you wish to apply. We will begin reviewing applications on a rolling basis starting now until the position is filled. Visit the UROP website for details about UROP requirements: http://web.mit.edu/urop/apply/deadlines.html

To apply: please e-mail Annie Cardinaux, Technical Associate at anniec@mit.edu, and include your Resume/CV and a letter describing your interest in and qualifications for the project. Please specify whether you would like to do the UROP for pay or credit. If you are selected and wish to complete the UROP for pay, you will need to create a project proposal for review by a member of our research team several days in advance of the September 29 deadline.

*If you are selected and wish to complete the UROP for pay, you will need to create a project proposal for review by a member of our research team several days in advance of the September 29 deadline.


8/26/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Mechanical Engineering (Course 2)
Faculty Supervisor: Ahmed Ghoniem

Project Title: UROP for renewable energy and rural development

Project Description: In many parts of the developing world, agricultural and other biomass waste is simply burned in the open air, creating much toxic pollution. Thermochemical treatment is a process whereby this waste can be converted into solid fuel. This has the potential to provide renewable energy, create new income and jobs, reduce waste, and in some cases cut down pollutions and greenhouse emissions. You will help carry out chemical and thermal analyses of the fuel and prototype reactor operation to help determine the optimal reactor conditions. You will learn the fundamental process of engineering design, and laboratory experimental techniques that are widely applicable to other areas of engineering. Successful projects will have potential follow-on travel opportunities (India, Kenya, etc.) to test viable prototypes.

URL: http://tatacenter.mit.edu/portfolio/torrefaction-reactor/

Contact: Please send CV to Kevin Kung kkung@mit.edu in case of interest.


8/26/16
Fall 2016
Department/Lab/Center: Sloan School of Management (Course 15)
Faculty Supervisor: Michael Siegel

Project Title: Developing a management simulation game on building cybersecurity capabilities

Project Description: Cybersecurity is rapidly becoming a critical issue for any organization. In the business context, it is highly challenging for managers to allocate their resources to invest in cybersecurity capabilities development. In an attempt to help managers experience such complexities, we have designed a management simulation game (so called a flight simulator ). The game is based on our system dynamics simulation model and runs online in an interactive environment. However, it is in initial versions and has much room for improvement. You will be involved in improving the game particularly enhancing and validating its mechanisms by reviewing the literature and conducting informal interviews with experts. You can also contribute in conducting experiments using the game to analyze players behavior. This project can enhance your critical thinking, simulation modeling, and data analysis skills. Required skills include attention to details, as well as excellent reading, writing, and communication skills. Familiarity with cybersecurity and system dynamics or other simulation modeling techniques is a plus but not required.

Required skills: include attention to details, as well as excellent reading, writing, and communication skills. Familiarity with cybersecurity and system dynamics or other simulation modeling techniques is a plus but not required. We are particularly interested in working with motivated and organized students who are committed to doing research.

Selected candidate(s) can join the project immediately. You will be working with the MIT (IC)3 (http://ic3.mit.edu) at the Sloan School of Management, working with Stuart Madnick, Michael Siegel, and Mohammad Jalali.

Contact: Please email Mohammad Jalali (jalali@mit.edu) with your CV, and feel free to ask if you have any questions.

Visit the Research section of the MIT website