MIT's Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program (UROP)
MIT: Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Current Research: Project Openings

Below are currently advertised UROP projects available to MIT, CME and cross-registered Wellesley College undergraduates. All projects, regardless of mode (pay, credit, or volunteer) are expected to be worth MIT academic credit and be supervised by MIT faculty. Projects appear on this list in the order they have been received.

These projects do not represent all available UROPs as many faculty do not submit project listings for this site. Rather, they expect interested students to contact them based on their general research to discuss potential UROPs.

Available UROPs

UROP Project listings are posted for approximately one month before they are removed, unless we are asked to re-post.

3/27/2017
Summer 2017 UROP Showcase info session
Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL)

You’re invited to the CSAIL Summer 2017 UROP Showcase info session! This is a chance to hear a few projects in the lab needing UROPs, some administrative details, and a chance to ask questions! First year UROPs and anyone that hasn’t done Summer term should definitely come! Snacks will be provided

When:
April, 6th 2017, 12:30-1:45 PM
Where: MIT Stata Center, 32-G449 (Patil Seminar Room)

Contact: Kyle Bettencourt, kyleb@mit.edu


3/27/2017
Term: Summer 2017
DLC: CSAIL, EECS, AeroAstro
Faculty supervisor: Brian Williams <williams@mit.edu>
Research group: Model-based Embedded and Robotics Systems
Contact: Andrew Wang <wangaj@mit.edu>

Project title: Chance-constrained Dynamic Scheduling

Project description: Scheduling is a pervasive problem in planning contexts, ranging from science exploration missions to airline operations, where mistakes and
missed deadlines are costly. It is often tricky to schedule because one doesn't know or can't control how long activities will take. Yet for small problems, humans are adept at adjusting their schedules in response to unexpected outcomes. (Overworked MIT undergraduates do this on a daily basis.) This work is about combining that kind of
dynamic scheduling with probabilistic models of activities' durations, so that in large-scale situations, we can control the likelihood of failing to meet complex deadlines. From a research perspective, the problem is to verify whether a plan can be dynamically scheduled within a high probability bound.

We are developing algorithms to solve this problem, and we need a student to help us implement and benchmark them. You would be working closely with a graduate student, and if the experiments are taken to completion, you would be listed as a co-author when the work is published. The code needs to be integrated with the group's code base and implemented in Common Lisp, although no previous knowledge of Lisp is required. However, some experience coding and working with version
control is preferred. Some knowledge of algorithms (6.006) or AI (6.034, 16.410) would also be helpful. Either way, this project would give you experience in software engineering and exposure to AI reasoning principles.

Contact: Andrew Wang
Contact Email: wangaj@mit.edu


3/27/2017
Term: Summer
Department/Lab/Center: Mechanical Engineering (Course 2)
MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Klavs Jensen
MIT Faculty Supervisor Email: Kfjensen@mit.edu

Project Title: Collaborative flow chemical synthesis robot

Project Description: (Mechanical, Course 2, Course 6, Course 10, Course 20, etc) We are developing a robotically reconfigurable chemical synthesizer utilizing microfluidics. The two unique capabilities are decentralized reaction modules for chemical synthesis monitoring and a novel fluidic manifold / reactor interface for robotic manipulation. This work is being carried out by a cross-disciplinary team ( mechanical engineering, electrical engineering, chemical engineering) focused on overcoming limitations of chemical synthesis through the design of reactor modules which have integrated control electronics and process analysis technology to collect data and optimize reactions. UROPs will be involved with the design and testing of new parts, electronic circuits, and components. We are also working on developing a new user interface for path planning and optimization reactor stacking. Tasks Include: Prototyping circuits for controlling process parameters (Arduino, PSoC) !
o Utilization of Bluetooth low energy o Control through PID o Othermill PCB boards Developing control interface for collaborative robot (UR3) in LabVIEW, Matlab, or Python Design and testing of new reactor designs The output of this projects is a robot that can make any pharmaceuticals on-demand.

Prerequisites: The major requirements are motivation and an eye the detail. Knowledge of (or interest in) programming an Arduino/PSoC, experience with LabVIEW/Matlab/Python for UI development, mechanical component design experience would also be helpful (solidworks, 3dp).

URL (if applicable): http://web.mit.edu/jensenlab/research/chemistry/

Contact Name: Dale Thomas
Contact Email: dt3@mit.edu


3/27/2017
Term: Summer
Department/Lab/Center: Brain and Cognitive Sciences (Course 9)
MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Josh H. McDermott
MIT Faculty Supervisor Email: jhm@mit.edu

Project Title: Perceptual compression of uninformative stimuli in the human auditory system

Project Description: Our work explores the hypothesis that the goal of the auditory system is to maximize information about the environment while minimizing energy expenditure. Initial evidence suggests that human listeners compress sounds originating from predictable sources and retain unexpected sounds with high accuracy. This project combines psychophysics and natural sound statistics. The tasks include running perceptual experiments, collecting recordings of natural auditory scenes and data analysis.
Prerequisites: Basic knowledge of data analysis / statistics and programming (preferably in Matlab) is a plus.

URL (if applicable): mcdermottlab.mit.edu

Contact Name: Wiktor Mlynarski
Contact Email: mlynar@mit.edu


3/23/17
Summer 2017
Multiple Openings
Department/Lab/Center: Health Sciences and Technology (HST)
Faculty Supervisor: Jose Gomez-Marquez

Project Overview: The Little Devices lab of researchers turns toys into medical devices for international and domestic healthcare systems using design strategies such as affordability, modularity and DIY. Our lab aims to design technology that is robust and economical, yet intelligent using advanced sensors and smart materials. Projects from the group have been launched in Germany, Ecuador, Nicaragua, Ethiopia and New Zealand. The work has been featured by the New York Times, Wired, CNN, and TED.

UROP positions for Summer 2017 are listed below. We will give you important challenges, guidance and autonomy and resources to surprise us with smart solutions. All positions have the option for pay or credit. There is a 2-day fabrication and design orientation to be scheduled upon assigment. You will be joining a fast paced, interdisciplinary group who focuses on hands-on ideation and prototyping.

Project #1: Tinkering with Chemistry

Description: Work at the intersection of materials science and chemical engineering on next generation therapy technologies. Build upon our work in MIT’s multiplexed zika and ebola diagnostics, portable sensing, and environmental testing using microfluidics. Contribute to our Open Diagnostic Initiative to enable anyone in the world to create rapid diagnostics for infectious diseases using lab-developed construction sets for dengue, zika, and other viruses. You will work on inventing new types of instruments and biosensors using ligand interactions and some clinical chemistry.

Prerequisites: Strong understanding of organic chemistry and biochemistry. Wet lab experience a plus. You will learn any digital fabrication skills required for the projects such as laser cutting, 3-D printing and robot programming.
___________

Project #2: Programming and Building Hardware: Biosensors for Digital Health Divides (Course 2, 6, 20, 4)

Description: Design and test a suite of biosensors for physiological and biological parameters. Successful designs will plug and play with the rest of our prototyping platform and will be easily embeddable into unconventional diagnostic systems.

Prerequisites: Experience with designing, prototyping (such as Arduino) testing and debugging electronic circuits (e.g. embedded systems combining analog circuitry, digital circuitry, microcontrollers and wireless communications). Experience with wireless sensors or protocols helpful (e.g. Bluetooth, WiFi)
___________

Project #3: Digital Fabrication, Design and Healthcare Robotics (Mechanical, Course 2, Course 10, Course 20, etc)

Description: Invent new ways of using mechatronic and robotic systems make medical devices using digital fabrication tools. Create modular components for users to remix and customize these medical devices. Final output will use robots for affordable health applications.

Prerequisites: Experience with Solidworks or other 3D modeling software, fabrication experience (machine tools, waterjet, laser-cutter) and basic robotic (paths, manipulation, transport).
___________

Project #4:
Manufacting Plug and Play Diagnostics (Mechanical, Course 2, Course 10, Course 20, etc)

Description: Assist with the design and manufacturing of a modular point-of-care diagnostic system. The objective of the UROP project would be to manufacture the diagnostics through design and fabrication of molds and optimize the injection molding methods. Further opportunities for design and prototyping of medical devices and diagnostics are also available.

Prerequisites: 2.008 and/or experience with injection molding and CNC machining strongly recommended, but not required.
___________

Project #5: Science Policy UROP: Exploring the Science and Policies of DIY Medical Technologies:

Description: Work closely with DIY medical device developers and assist in exploring the legal, ethical, and sociotechnical drivers that affect the development of informal medical device development. You will be part of a team analyzing and uncovering information from the MakerNurse project, our network of medical makerspaces, the Fair Trade medtech initiative, and the Open Diagnostics Project.

Contribute to our understanding of how underground networks of creators are changing medicine and biotech and learn about the tools that make it happen. We will measure disparities in access to life saving medical devices and the create scenarios involving real world tools developed in ours labs that can address them.

Prerequisites: An interest in medical device, maker culture, and democratized fabrication. Experience in literature reviews, data gathering and analysis, and an writing ideal.

Contact: Please send your CV and statement of interest to littledevices@mit.edu


3/23/17
Summer
Department/Lab/Center: Physics (Course 8)
Faculty Supervisor: Marin Soljacic

Project Title: Free electron radiation on Dirac cones in photonic crystals

Project Description: Dirac cones have become an important concept in many areas of condensed matter physics, such as graphene and topological insulators. In bosonic systems, our group have recently [1] shown how Non-hermitricity distorts a Dirac cone into a ring of exceptional points. For the summer and beyond, the UROP student that will be accepted to work with us will learn concepts of light-matter interaction, use the state-of-the-art electromagnetic simulation tools, and study how Dirac-like photonic bands tailor and enhance the radiation of free electrons, which could potentially give rise to ultra-strong short optical pulses.

[1] Zhen, Bo, Chia Wei Hsu, Yuichi Igarashi, Ling Lu, Ido Kaminer, Adi Pick, Song-Liang Chua, John D. Joannopoulos, and Marin Soljacic . "Spawning rings of exceptional points out of Dirac cones." Nature 525, no. 7569 (2015): 354-358.

Prerequisites:

Contact Name: Yi Yang
Contact Email: yiy@mit.edu


3/23/17
Summer
Department/Lab/Center: Sea Grant Program
Faculty Supervisor: T. Sapsis

Project Title: Assessing 20 years of mangroves productivity in the Caribbean

Project Description: The CARICOMP (Caribbean Coastal Marine Productivity) long-term program was developed to study processes at the land-sea interface and understand productivity, structure and function of the three main coastal habitats (mangroves, seagrasses and coral reefs) across the region. Together with biological monitoring, the CARICOMP network collected environmental data using standardized methods in these habitats, across the entire Caribbean basin. This environmental data was recently summarized and can be used to explore potentially associated changes in the productivity of mangrove communities during the past 20 years. Before this step, data quality assurance would be essential with further data visualization and basic analysis on seasonal and site productivity trends. This project would be appropriate for someone with interest in either gaining/expanding their knowledge on ecology and global changes, or in further developing skills in data processing and analysis that can be applied broadly.

Prerequisites: The most important attributes are interest in the project and reliability. Must have experience with handling and summarizing data in R or Matlab. The applicant is expected to work 40 h per week during the 10 week period during the summer, with possibility of expanding this work towards a senior project or equivalent requirement. Seeking applicants before April 13, 2017 unless interested in summer credits.

Contact Name: Carolina Bastidas
Contact Email: bastidas@mit.edu


3/23/17
Summer
Department/Lab/Center: Sea Grant Program
Faculty Supervisor: T. Sapsis

Project Title: Effects of ocean acidification on calcification of marine organisms

Project Description: Atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide (pCO2) increases since the Industrial Revolution has caused the acidity of surface seawater to decrease by 30% or 0.1 pH units. As increased pCO2 is largely due to anthropogenic use of fossil fuels and deforestation, seawater pH will likely decrease 0.3 0.4 units more by the end of this century. This, in turn, will result in a nearly 50% reduction in the carbonate ion concentration of seawater, making it more difficult for many calcifying organisms to produce or maintain their shells and skeletons. This research seeks to advance our understanding of the combined effects of pCO2 and temperature on critical aspects of shell/skeletal mineralization during the juvenile stage for three economically and ecologically important species of mollusks found in Massachusetts waters (oysters, scallops and mussels). This area has among the highest sensitivity to the potential effects of ocean acidification in the US due to its economic dependence on the shellfish industry and strong use of shellfish resources. Thus, understanding the impact of acidification on the early life stages of the mollusks that support these shellfish industries is our primary interest. At this point, our focus is to identify properties from skeleton surfaces (roughness, mineral density, structural pattern) that can readily account for those effects in calcification. This is being targeted through image analyses of stereo-pairs collected with TESCAN scanning electron microscope. Thus, working in this project you will gain experience in these techniques. Additional lab training is possible in: carbonate chemistry analyses, maintenance of living organisms in seawater, 3-D stereomicroscopy (to measure shell morphometric parameters), TESCAN and petrographic microscope (for analysis of ultrastructure and of shell/skeletal thin-sections).

Prerequisites: The most important attributes are interest in the project, motivation and reliability. Prior image analysis or Matlab experience is preferred. The applicant is expected to work 40 h per week during the 10 week period during the summer, with possibility of expanding this work towards a senior project or equivalent requirement. Seeking applicants before April 13, 2017 unless interested in summer credits.

Contact Name: Carolina Bastidas
Contact Email: bastidas@mit.edu


3/23/17
Summer
Department/Lab/Center: Chemical Engineering (Course 10)
Faculty Supervisor: K. Dane Wittrup

Project Title: Rational design of locoregional immunomodulating agents to potentiate anti-tumor immunity

Project Description: Immuno-oncology has great potential in the treatment of cancer. If properly activated, a patient s own immune system can be directed against tumors to induce long-lived cures in a subset of patients. But for reasons unclear, a fraction of cancer patients fails to respond to immunotherapy. Evidence suggests that the immune infiltrate signature in a tumor is indicative of therapeutic success. In hopes of expanding the fraction of patients capable of responding to immunotherapy, this work seeks to imitate responsive tumors by rationally and productively modulating the intratumoral immune microenvironment. Capitalizing on the protein engineering and kinetic modeling expertise of the Wittrup lab, we will design and evaluate novel immunomodulating proteins to potentiate anti-tumor immunity. This project is an exciting opportunity to learn and develop a diverse and marketable skillset. The undergraduate researcher will learn and actively participate in techniques involving molecular biology, protein engineering, macromolecular chemistry, immunology, in silico modeling and in vivo methods.

Prerequisites: None required. Strong preference will be given for students willing to work at least 10 hours a week for at least two semesters.

URL: http://kdw-lab.mit.edu/

Contact Name: Noor Momin
Contact Email: nmomin@mit.edu


3/23/17
Summer
Department/Lab/Center: Media Laboratory
Faculty Supervisor: Hiromi Ozaki

Project Title: Electrical Engineering for Mind Control Microorganisms Through Galvanotaxis

Project Description: Looking for passionate EE engineers to work on a project translating the EEG signals from the brain to a system used to control the movement of microorganisms through an electric felid. We are looking for an EE student to design a circuit that controls electric fields.

Prerequisites: Must be fluent in electrical engineering. Experience designing and fabricating PCBs a must. Experience with programming for wearable sensors a plus, familiarity with microorganisms a plus. Must be able to devote 5+ hours a week and meet weekly. UROP for credit only.

Contact Name: Ani Liu
Contact Email: wonder@mit.edu


3/20/17
Summer
Department/Lab/Center: Brain and Cognitive Sciences (Course 9)
Faculty Supervisor: Josh McDermott

Project Title: Interdisciplinary study of acoustical physics and human auditory perception

Project Description: We seek to understand how the human brain makes sense of natural sounds. To this end we will make a series of acoustic measurements including the sounds of everyday objects being struck, scraped, rolled, cracked and (occasionally) shattered. We will also video the motion of impacting objects, measure the vibrational resonances of objects and measure the acoustic reverberation of spaces (both indoor and outdoor). With these measurements, and synthetic sounds that we will create, we will design and run perceptual experiments to assess the ability of listeners to infer physical parameters from sound. Eventually we plan to use video presentation and virtual reality to investigate whether visual input alters human perception of sound. This is an interdisciplinary project that combines audio engineering, signal processing, physics and acoustics, perceptual psychology and cognitive science. The tasks include making recordings (audio, video and vibrational), analyzing and editing recordings, and testing and running perceptual experiments.

Prerequisites: There are no specific prerequisites other than an interest in perception and/or acoustics. Experience with audio recording, version control with git, Matlab, audio/video editing, human perceptual experiments, signal processing, physics engines, computer game design or the Oculus Rift Development Kit are a plus.

URL: mcdermottlab.mit.edu

Contact Name: James Traer
Contact Email: jtraer@mit.edu


3/16/17
Summer
Department/Lab/Center: CSAIL
Faculty Supervisor: Julie Shah

Project Title: AI monitoring of human planning dialogues

Project Description: The Interactive Robotics Group is currently looking for a highly motivated individual who can help us develop a novel team messaging software with an intelligent agent integration. The agent will monitor team planning dialogues and offer real-time planning support. The primary tasks of the UROP will consist of developing the novel team messaging software and collecting human planning dataset through Amazon Mechanical Turk.

Requirements:

Skills you will likely learn: Automated task planning, plan recognition, human-computer interaction, experimental design

Contact: Interested applicants should contact Joseph Kim (jokim@mit.edu). In your email, please include a resume (or a CV) and a few sentences describing your interests in this project.


3/16/17
Spring
Department/Lab/Center: Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (Course 6)
Faculty Supervisor: Polina Anikeeva

Project Title: Optogenetics for Bioelectronics: Developing brain and spinal cords implants using multifunctional flexible polymer fibers

Project Description: Optogenetics (the technique which controls the activity of neurons optically) is now an indispensable technique in neuroscience allowing electrophysiological and behavior experiments. Despite the rapid development of the molecular tools related it, there is still a need for reliable devices for practical application of optogenetics. Our lab is developing optoelectronic neural interface probes that take advantage of optogenetics and applied them to brain mapping, spinal cord modulation, and peripheral nerve regeneration. Specifically, our fiber device consists of an optical waveguide (for optical stimulation with a blue laser), six electrodes (for recording neural activity) and two microfluidic channels (for gene and drug delivery) in 200 &#956;m diameter, which allow opto-electrophysiological investigation during behavioral experiments. Fabricated solely from polymers and polymer composites, these flexible probes minimized tissue response to achieve chronic multimodal interrogation of brain circuits with high fidelity. As a UROP, you will fabricate 1 cm length, 0.5 g weight tiny devices using our multifunctional fibers. After finishing fabrication processes, you can have the opportunity to apply your devices to the real neuroscientific experiments including animal surgery (optional), behavioral experiments, and immunostaining of brain slices.

Reference:
1. http://news.mit.edu/2017/multifunctional-tiny-fibers-brain-0221 (MIT News article about our research)
2. http://www.nature.com/neuro/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/nn.4510.html (Recent paper published in Nature Neuroscience)
3. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A9a2P30sDl4 (Supplementary video: What is Optogenetics?)

Prerequisites: Department requisites: 2, 6, 9, 10, and 20. Welcome to the person who loves to make hands-on devices and has an enthusiasm for the biological research. Higher priority will be given to the person who can spend at least 8 hours per week for this semester (excepting for exam seasons), and do the internship in this summer.

URL: http://www.rle.mit.edu/bioelectronics/

Contact Name: Seongjun Park
Contact Email: sj_park@mit.edu


3/16/17
Summer
Department/Lab/Center: Biological Engineering (Course 20)
Faculty Supervisor: George Church

Project Title: Methods for Generalizable and Efficient Genome Editing using Viral Proteins

Project Description: Although CRISPR/Cas systems have achieved a lot of recognition for their ability to catalyze genome editing, the usefulness of those systems are limited by the repair machinery of the host. Cas9 acts like a pair of scissors, it can be used to cut the genome at a designed location and the cell uses it's own machinery to repair the cut, creating mutations, or precise changes if you supply template DNA. In many cases the repair machinery isn't efficient enough to introduce your desired template however, so having more efficient recombination proteins would be desirable to improve genome editing efficiency. From lambda phage, there are two proteins (Beta and Exo) that work together to efficiently catalyze DNA recombination in E. coli. They are commonly used in E. coli genetics to produce mutations and insertions, and even assist with genome reconstruction. However, these proteins are non-functional in most other bacteria or eukaryotic cells. I'm working on methods to study these proteins and expand their breadth of activity to allow them to be used across many other organisms and expand the repertoire of genome engineering tools.

Prerequisites: No course requirements. Passion about innovation, good work ethic, willingness to take risks.

Reference: http://www.nature.com/news/beyond-crispr-a-guide-to-the-many-other-ways-to-edit-a-genome-1.20388

URL: http://arep.med.harvard.edu/

Contact: Please email Gabriel Filsinger (filsinger@g.harvard.edu) with your CV and a brief introduction to apply.


3/16/17
Summer
Department/Lab/Center: Laboratory for Manufacturing and Productivity (LMP)
Faculty Supervisor: A. John Hart

Project Title: Direct-write self-assembly of colloidal materials for energy applications

Project Description: We are developing an additive manufacturing technique direct-write assembly that is capable of assembling micro- and nanoparticles into macroscopic three-dimensional objects. We are starting to publish our first results on direct-write assembly, and are looking for enthusiastic undergraduates to help us branch this work out toward energy applications. In particular, we are interested in fabricating three-dimensional colloid-based porous materials and exploiting their high surface area, porosity, and microstructural order for novel device concepts in energy storage and sensing. The UROP student will work with a graduate student with experience in mentoring interns in an industrial R&D lab, and whose former interns have won international accolades in venues such as the Google Science Fair.

Prerequisites: The project is open to all relevant engineering majors. The time commitment is 40 hours a week in the summer. Please email Alvin Tan to schedule an interview as soon as possible.

URL: http://mechanosynthesis.mit.edu/

Contact Name: Alvin Tan (Course 3 Ph.D. Student), Prof. John Hart (Course 2 faculty)
Contact Email: alvintan@mit.edu, ajhart@mit.edu


3/16/17
Spring
Department/Lab/Center: Health Sciences and Technology (HST)
Faculty Supervisor: Jonathan Polimeni, PhD

Project Title: 3D Brain Surface Modeling Software for Neuroimaging Data Analysis

Project Description: Our neuroimaging laboratory is looking for a student with experience in computer science and an interest in neuroscience to port software for 3D brain surface mesh creation, manipulation, and visualization from MATLAB to C/C++. The student will have access to neuroscientists and software developers who are familiar with the detailed goals of the project. The software created during this project will be used by our lab to guide neuroimaging experiments and analyze the resulting imaging data. Although flexible, we would ideally start this project as soon as possible (Spring or Summer 2017, with the opportunity to continue if interested).

Time Commitment: 8 hours per week.

Prerequisites: Knowledge of MATLAB and C/C++ programming is required. A background in software development and computational geometry are highly desired.

Contact Name: Ned Ohringer
Contact Email: Ned.Ohringer@MGH.HARVARD.EDU


3/16/17
Summer
Department/Lab/Center: Physics (Course 8)
Faculty Supervisor: Marin Soljacic

Project Title: Physics inspired new AI and its applications

Project Description: Deep learning techniques have achieved great success in the past few years but it's still not well understood how this black box works. Physicists are now trying to understand why neural networks are so powerful and efficient as a new type of matter. We try to use physics intuition to learn properties of AI as well as design new types of neural network models. We also apply neural networks to numerous fields including both computer science tasks and physics puzzles.

Prerequisites: General Physics. Programming in machine learning and deep learning. (python, tensorflow or theano or torch)

Contact Name: Li Jing
Contact Email: ljing@mit.edu


3/16/17
Summer
Department/Lab/Center: Physics (Course 8)
Faculty Supervisor: Marin Soljacic

Project Title: Using artificial intelligence (AI) for learning complex physical rules/intuitions

Project Description: Artificial intelligence is reshaping every corner of our society nowadays, and have helped people finding patterns and understand the world in many fields. Physics is essentially a study of nature's pattern. In this project, students will use recent artificial intelligent tools (such as machine learning and deep learning) to help discover hidden physics rules and pattern, and use AI systems to help design new physical systems that serve for various application purposes. Since our group has a special focus on optics, the example of the physical system we pick will likely (but not necessary) be related to optics. This project is a healthy combination of AI, physics and optics, students who have passion in both fields are welcomed.

Prerequisites: Basic knowledge of linear algebra, general physics and computer programming are required. Machine Learning (encouraged), Deep Learning (encouraged), Optics (encouraged)

Contact Name: Yichen Shen
Contact Email: ycshen@mit.edu


3/16/17
Summer
Department/Lab/Center: Engineering Systems Division (ESD)
Faculty Supervisor: Olivier de Weck

Project Title: Sustainable Water Supply Planning Under Uncertainty

Project Description: How can we help policymakers ensure that people have access to reliable and sustainable water supplies in the future? Our research project combines tools from systems engineering, hydrology, and social science to identify key challenges and uncertainties facing water planners. These uncertainties include climate change, population growth, variability in rainfall, poor measurement in groundwater availability, and food policy. We are designing flexible and adaptive water supply infrastructure and policy to help mitigate the impacts of these uncertainties. We have created a multi-objective optimization tool that compares different planning alternatives on key performance metrics developed in consultation with government stakeholders.

The UROP will work on one or more of the following tasks, depending on interest and background:

The UROP will be closely mentored by a PhD student and have regular meetings with the project PI.

Prerequisites: Candidates should have a strong interest in water and sustainability and the ability and willingness to learn new skills. Background in environmental engineering, mechanical engineering, desalination technology, or programming in MATLAB or Python is helpful but not required.

Contact: Please email Sarah Fletcher (sfletch@mit.edu) with your resume to apply.


3/16/17
Summer
Department/Lab/Center: Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research (MKI)
Faculty Supervisor: Herman Marshall

Project Title: Operating the X-ray Polarimetry Beamline

Project Description: The student will be trained to reconfigure, align, and operate the MIT X-ray Polarimetry Beamline in NE83. The beamline is used to validate components and optical design to be used in a rocket-based instrument to measure the X-ray polarization of astrophysical sources. The instrument is the first of its kind, which could determine the uniformity and direction of magnetic field in the jet emanating from a blazar, which has a supermassive black hole at its core. The student will learn to operate the X-ray source, the vacuum system, the X-ray detector, and its associated computer control system. Some data analysis and some hardware disassembly and reassembly will be involved as well.

Prerequisites: Experience with python and the linux operating system or with computer controlled mechanical systems are desirable.

URL: http://space.mit.edu/~hermanm/polarimeter/

Contact Name: Herman Marshall
Contact Email: hermanm@space.mit.edu


3/16/17
Summer
Department/Lab/Center: Brain and Cognitive Sciences (Course 9)
Faculty Supervisor: Josh McDermott

Project Title: Examining the interaction between pitch and memory in music and speech

Project Description: We plan to conduct a set of experiments examining how individuals use different pitch cues when remembering speech prosody, musical tones, intervals, and melodies. Previous studies in our lab have provided evidence for two or three distinct mechanisms responsible for what has conventionally been couched as pitch perception . Pilot studies we have run suggest that these various pitch mechanisms are differentially impacted by memory load. During the first half of the summer, we will be running several pitch perception and memory experiments to further explore these results. During the second half of the summer we will analyze the results, design, and implement follow-up experiments. This is an interdisciplinary project combining psychophysics, memory, music cognition, and speech processing.

Prerequisites: (1) An interest in perceptual psychology (2) Basic understanding of MATLAB (3) An interest in working with human subjects (4) Basic understanding of Western music/harmony is useful but not necessary

Contact Name: Malinda J. McPherson
Contact Email: mjmcp@mit.edu


3/10/17
Spring
Department/Lab/Center: The MIT Energy Initiative (MITEI)
Faculty Supervisor: Christopher Knittel

Project Title: Energy Efficiency in Commercial Buildings

Project Description: Commercial buildings continue to operate each day with numerous heating ventilation and air conditioning ( HVAC ) faults that waste energy and can go unnoticed for years. With the help of sensors, communication systems, and new algorithms, a new field of fault detection and diagnostics is emerging to help identify and alert facilities personnel of these hidden faults. This research project aims to evaluate the effectiveness of this software in identifying faults and attributing energy loss to each fault.

Prerequisites: Experience in programming with R is required. Preferred but not necessary: experience with machine learning techniques. The time commitment is 8 hours a week for a five week period with weekly meetings.

Contact Name: Danielle Dahan
Contact Email: dsdahan@mit.edu


3/10/17
Summer
Department/Lab/Center: Chemical Engineering (Course 10)
Faculty Supervisor: Daniel Anderson

Project Title: Nanoparticles for Glucose Responsive Insulin Delivery

Project Description: Diabetic patient compliance is low due to the need for constant blood glucose monitoring and insulin injection. The goal of this project is to create a self-regulated, glucose responsive insulin delivery system that can be injected once daily. This will be achieved by encapsulating insulin and enzymes in pH responsive polymers. The enzymatic conversion of glucose to gluconic acid lowers the pH of the microenvironment, causing the particles to degrade, and the insulin to be released. The main goal of this UROP is to optimize the formulation of these particles - for example, encapsulating various buffering agents that will buffer out the acid under normal glycemic conditions but will allow the particles degrade under elevated glucose levels. The UROP will be responsible for testing different formulations, synthesizing and characterizing nanoparticles, and performing release studies to determine the kinetics of glucose responsiveness. The UROP will have the opportunity (if desired) to interface with and present their work to large pharmaceutical sponsors.

Prerequisites: Preferred candidates will be in Course 10 or 20, have previous research experience, be interested in continuing to UROP in the fall, and have the ability to learn new skills quickly and work independently.

Contact Name: Lisa Volpatti
Contact Email: volpatti@mit.edu


3/10/17
Spring
Department/Lab/Center: Chemistry (Course 5)
Faculty Supervisor: Timothy M. Swager

Project Title: Building Filter Prototypes for Effective Removal of Lead from Drinking Water

Project Description: Water distribution networks carry drinking water into U.S. households. Many of these piping networks contain lead pipes, or pipes that contain lead soldering. The lead contamination crisis in Flint is not an isolated case. Recently, drinking water systems at 300 Massachusetts schools were tested; 164 reported high lead levels. To tackle this problem, our group has recently developed a novel polymer that can selectively and effectively remove lead contaminants from water, and we hope to develop a water filter prototype to demonstrate its efficacy. The purpose of this project is to design, prototype and test different filter prototypes with our novel polymer incorporated. Key design criteria include scalable manufacturing and tunable water flow rate. The ultimate goal of this project is to develop a water filter incorporating our novel polymer to ensure safe, lead-free drinking water for all. The UROP will participate in the design, prototyping and performance testing of the water filters. For that, the UROP should be comfortable with designing and building prototypes with appropriate Computer-Aided Design (CAD) and maker tools.

Prerequisites: Proficiency in CAD tools (e.g. AutoCAD) and rapid prototyping with 3D printing, milling and molding. Great attention to detail. Creativity. Comfortable with independent work. Must be willing to commit at least 6-8 hours/week. Preferred majors in Course 2 or equivalent experience. We expect the project to start as soon as possible (H2 Spring and Summer 2017).

Contact Name: Wen Jie Ong
Contact Email: wjong@mit.edu


3/10/17
Summer
Department/Lab/Center: Health Sciences and Technology (HST)
Faculty Supervisor: George Church

Project Title: High-Efficiency Genome Editing

Project Description: This is a posting for a Summer research position in which the student will help with the isolation of proteins that are involved with high-efficiency genome editing. The prospective student will spend time in the lab designing and constructing protein variant libraries and screening the libraries for functional members. Other related tasks will involve strain editing in bacteria, preparing next-generation sequencing libraries, screening libraries via flow cytometry, and reading of the literature to understand recombineering in bacteria. Bioinformatics experience is a plus.

Prerequisites: Basic biology laboratory experience is preferred.

Contact Name: Tim Wannier
Contact Email: timothy_wannier@hms.harvard.edu


3/8/17
Spring 2017
Department/Lab/Center: Mechanical Engineering (Course 2)
Faculty Supervisor: Prof. Nicholas Fang

Project Title: Manipulating levitated objects using ultrasonic transducer arrays

Project Description: Acoustic wave can generate radiation forces and form spots where all forces converge, allowing the trap of particles with different sizes and materials. The purpose of this project is to design an ultrasonic transducer array that can trap, levitate, and manipulate small particles in its sound field. Programmable phase delays used to drive the array will be designed to generate optimum manipulation spots at target positions in 3D space. The ultimate goal of this project is to find application of ultrasound in cell manipulation, targeted drug delivery, tangible displays, and even the levitation of living things.

The UROP will participate in the design of the transducer arrays, control circuits, as well as the design and optimization of the driven phase delay signal. For that, the UROP should be comfortable with experimental work and be familiar with the laboratory equipment: oscilloscope, signal generator, amplifier, acoustic transducer, and microphone. Matlab and SolidWorks might be used for the design.

Requirements: Previous lab experience in Arduino, Matlab, Labview, and proficient prototyping skill with waterjet, 3dprinting and casting. Great attention to detail. Comfortable with independent work. At least 12 hours per week dedicated to project work.

Preferred majors in Course 2, 6, 8, or equivalent experience.
We expect the project to start as soon as possible (Summer and Fall 2017).

URL: http://web.mit.edu/nanophotonics/research.htm

Contact: Interested students are asked to email Prof. Nicholas Fang (nicfang@mit.edu) or Chu Ma (machu@mit.edu) with your CV.


3/7/17
Spring
Department/Lab/Center: Media Laboratory
Faculty Supervisor: Kent Larson

Project Title: Autonomous Shared Bike Platform (Seniors continuing onto master degrees)

Project Description: The Changing Places Group at the Media Lab is developing a new generation mobility platform for urban commuting and logistics. By combing robotics, electrification and vehicle-sharing, we aim to create a new category of vehicles that addresses the common last-mile commuting gap and is compatible with the pedestrian, car-lite urban environment of the future.

Join our team if you like the following:

Qualifications (multiple roles):

Experience/interest in GPU programming, state estimation and visual/inertial integration is a plus.

Prerequisites: Senior

URL: https://www.media.mit.edu/projects/mod/overview/

Contact Name: Phil Tinn
Contact Email: ptinn@media.mit.edu


3/7/17
Spring
Department/Lab/Center: Health Sciences and Technology (HST)
Faculty Supervisor: Hugh Herr

Project Title: Optogenetics in Peripheral Nerve Diseases

Project Description: We are interested in studying optogenetics for peripheral motor systems and neuromuscular diseases. We will be investigating the use of optical stimulation as a therapy for diseases like ALS. Electrophysiology, histology, cell culture, and behavioral assays will be used for assessment. Students will gain first hand experience in carrying out experiments and analyzing data. For this multidisciplinary project, work will take place in the Media Lab and animal facilities with a team of mechanical, biomedical and electrical engineers, and clinicians.

Prerequisites: Preference for students with animal handling, cell culture and/or histology experience. Must be willing to commit more than 6-8 hours/week. Please email with resume, course, and availability for interview.

URL: http://biomech.media.mit.edu/#/portfolio_page/neural-interface-technology-for-advanced-prosthetic-limbs/

Contact Name: Shriya Srinivasan
Contact Email: shriyas@mit.edu


3/7/17
Summer
Department/Lab/Center: Biology (Course 7)
Faculty Supervisor: Amy E. Keating

Project Title: Computational structural analysis to guide the design of protein interaction inhibitors

Project Description: Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) play a crucial role in cell homeostasis and make good potential therapeutic targets because they are often misregulated in disease. Computational structural analysis can help with the complex problem of designing new molecules that can block PPIs. We are interested in designing new peptides or proteins to inhibit PPIs, and we recently compiled hundreds of examples of structures of known protein-protein complexes. We are planning an analysis of the types of biochemical interactions that enhance binding affinity and specificity in these known complexes, using statistical approaches and machine learning. Our goal is to develop tools that can automatically identify as-yet unknown interaction sites in other protein structures.

Prerequisites: 7.05 or equivalent background in biochemistry, including familiarity with protein structure, is essential. Programming experience in Python is also essential. Prior coursework or experience with machine learning, and/or experience with molecular graphics programs such as PyMol, is highly desirable.

URL: https://keatinglab.mit.edu/

Contact Name: Vincent Frappier
Contact Email: vfrap@mit.edu


3/7/17
Spring
Department/Lab/Center: Biological Engineering (Course 20)
Faculty Supervisor: Roger Kamm

Project Title: Microfluidic skeletal muscle models for regenerative medicine and biological robots

Project Description: Skeletal muscle tissue engineering could be a promising therapy for millions of people worldwide suffering from general trauma, postoperative damage, cancer ablation, congenital defects, and degenerative myopathy. Most current methods of tissue engineering suffer from 2 main issues: the lack of sufficient force generation (2 orders below native skeletal muscle) and the lack of scale (most tissue engineered scaffolds are micro-scale and lack a vasculature). In this project, the student will work with researchers in the Kamm Mechanobiology lab to solve both these problems by analyzing a novel mechanism of amplifying skeletal muscle strength and building blood capillaries inside muscle tissues. Our system could lead to novel skeletal muscle regenerative therapies as well as be used to fundamental "holy-grail" scientific questions in muscle biology as such how the muscle transmits it's force to the surroundings.

Student's role: Depending on interest, past experience and motivation, the student will learn tissue engineering techniques to form in-vivo like 3D skeletal muscle in the lab, fabricate and test biological robot function using engineered skeletal muscle, learn micro-biomechanical testing of skeletal muscle function, use arduinos/linear actuators to mechanically stimulate micro-tissues, develop image processing based high-throughput drug-screening algorithms, build micro-fluidic models of blood capillaries in muscle tissues and be involved in writing a scientific paper.

Prerequisites: The ideal applicant would have prior experience in cell culture and/or image processing. An interest in tissue engineering, regenerative therapies, biological robots and/or microfluidics would be a big plus.

Contact Name: Vivek Sivathanu
Contact Email: vsiva@mit.edu


3/7/17
Spring
Department/Lab/Center: Health Sciences and Technology (HST)
Faculty Supervisor: Jose Gomez-Marquez

Project Title: Science Policy UROP: Exploring the Science and Policies of DIY Medical Technologies:

Lab Details: The Little Devices lab of researchers turns toys into medical devices for international and domestic healthcare systems using design strategies such as affordability, modularity and DIY. Our lab aims to design technology that is robust and economical, yet intelligent using advanced sensors and smart materials. Projects from the group have been launched in Germany, Ecuador, Nicaragua, Ethiopia and New Zealand. The work has been featured by the New York Times, Wired, CNN, and TED.

UROP positions for Spring 2017 are listed below. All positions have the option for pay or credit. There is a 2-day fabrication and design orientation to be scheduled upon assigment. You will be joining a fast paced, interdisciplinary group who focuses on hands-on ideation and prototyping.

Project Description: Work closely with DIY medical device developers and assist in exploring the legal, ethical, and sociotechnical drivers that affect the development of informal medical device development. You will be part of a team analyzing and uncovering information from the MakerNurse project, our network of medical makerspaces, the Fair Trade medtech initiative, and the Open Diagnostics Project.

Contribute to our understanding of how underground networks of creators are changing medicine and biotech and learn about the tools that make it happen. We will measure disparities in access to life saving medical devices and the create scenarios involving real world tools developed in ours labs that can address them.

Prerequisites: An interest in medical device, maker culture, and democratized fabrication. Experience in literature reviews, data gathering and analysis, and an writing ideal.

Contact: Please send your CV and statement of interest to littledevices@mit.edu


3/3/17
Spring
Multiple Openings
Department/Lab/Center: Research Lab for Electronics (RLE)
Faculty Supervisor: Stefanie Shattuck-Hufnagel

Project #1: How Speakers Gesture

Project Description: Speakers often move their hands, eyebrows and torsos when they speak, and the contribution of these speech-accompanying gestures to the act of communicating is not yet well understood. This project involves learning to label these movements, and analyze the results to test hypotheses about the role of gesture in speech, and about how to model gesture planning as part of the speech planning process.

Candidates with overlapping interests in Course 6, Course 9 and/or Course 24 are particularly appropriate. Spring UROP with summer possibilities. Requires a commitment of 8-10 hours per week (at $11.50 per hour) during the term; some possibility for an extension to a half-time summer position.
___________

Project #2: Experiments in Spoken Meter and Rhythm

Project Description: Models of the human speech production process include a cognitive planning element, but the operation of these processes at the level of how the words of a spoken utterance will be pronounced (i.e. phonology and acoustic/articulatory phonetics) is not well understood. This project involves several experiments aimed at determining how words are grouped into larger units (e.g. metrical feet), and how the timing/duration of sounds is controlled.

Responsibilities include: recruiting participants, running the experiment, analysing results and potentially helping to write up the work for publication. Candidates with overlapping interests in Course 6, Course 9 and/or Course 24 are particularly appropriate. Spring UROP with summer possibilities.

Requires a commitment of 8-10 hours per week (at $11.50 per hour) during the term; some possibility for an extension to a half-time summer position. Candidates in Course 6, Course 9 and/or Course 24 are particularly appropriate.
___________

Project #3: Repetition and rhythm in speech and music

Project Description: The ability to find the beat in a stream of auditory events varies from one person to another and from one circumstance to another. This UROP involves an experiment which tests listeners' ability to entrain motor actions to a simple auditory stimulus, i.e. a series of clicks, and further experiments related to rhythm in speech and music. We prefer an applicant who has some familiarity with recording sound, and an interest in rhythm perception.

Responsibilities include: recruiting participants, running the experiment, analysing results and potentially helping to write up the work for publication. Requires a commitment of 8-10 hours per week (at $11.50 per hour) during the term; some possibility for an extension to a half-time summer position. Candidates from Course 6, Course 9 and/or Course 24 are particularly appropriate.
___________

Project #4: Understanding the music of language

Project Description: Spoken language has rhythm and timing, as well as intonation (i.e. systematic variations in pitch), and these prosodic characteristics signal the grouping of words and their prominence patterns, which communicate different meanings (compare "It broke, out in Washington", with "It broke out, in Washington"). This UROP involves learning a system for transcribing the prosodic structure of speech (https://ocw.mit.edu/courses/electrical-engineering-and-computer-science/6-911-transcribing-prosodic-structure-of-spoken-utterances-with-tobi-january-iap-2006/index.htm), using this system to label a sample of conversational speech, and analyzing the results for use in an automatic speech analysis system.

Candidates from Course 6, Course 9 and/or Course 24 are especially appropriate. Requires a commitment of 8-10 hours per week (at $11.50 per hour) during the term; some possibility for extension to a half-time summer position.

Contact: Dr. Stefanie Shattuck-Hufnagel, Speech Communication Group, sshuf@mit.edu.


3/3/17
Summer
Department/Lab/Center: Chemical Engineering (Course 10)
Faculty Supervisor: Patrick Doyle

Project Title: Hydrogel micropatterning for cancer bioanalysis

Project Description: Despite the availability of many types of therapy, many cancers remain deadly and a challenge to classify and treat. Many cancer patients are intrinsically resistant to treatment or develop drug resistance within a few months. One challenge is the existence of extensive tumor cell heterogeneity and the lack of adequate pathological and biomarker tests for personalized treatment strategies. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as sensitive and robust markers for cancer diagnosis and prognosis. There is a technological gap, however, for miRNA probing technologies that can quantitatively assess tumor heterogeneity in a manner that is relevant to pathologists. The broad goal of this project is to develop a miRNA quantification platform that can be applied to cancer cells and tumor sections in an effort to develop a better understanding of tumor heterogeneity as well as develop more reliable diagnostic and prognostic tests for cancer patients. More specifically, the project will involve the use of micropatterning techniques to develop arrays for parallel miRNA detection using hydrogel-based technology from the Doyle Group. The research at the Doyle Group is highly interdisciplinary, and will involve learning about microfabrication, microfluidics, image analysis, polymers, biological assays, microscopy, and more!

Prerequisites: The ideal candidate should have some experience in working in wet labs (either through laboratory courses or prior research experience). Prior research experience and/or coursework in mass transport related courses are a plus (10.302, 20.330, etc.). The position is open to all relevant engineering majors (2, 3, 10, 20, etc.). Interest in continuing to do research in the group after the summer is also a plus. Candidate should possess good communication skills, good work ethic, and ability to work as part of a team or independently.

URL: https://doylegroup.mit.edu/

Contact Name: Augusto Tentori
Contact Email: atentori@mit.edu


3/3/17
Spring
Department/Lab/Center: Edgerton Center
Faculty Supervisor: Elizabeth Hoffecker Moreno

Project Title: Development of Low-Cost Oil Production Method for Rural Farmers in Tanzania

Project Description: The International Development Innovation Network (IDIN) at D-Lab is supporting a local innovation process taking place in Tanzania to develop a viable and affordable process for extracting oil from avocados, which in this region are a currently under-utilized resource. As part of this effort, there is a team of MIT students (Voca) working to optimize a method of low-cost oil extraction which can be used by the local project partners in Arusha, Tanzania, who are developing a community-based enterprise around avocado oil production. Voca has received a Student Innovation Grant and will be using their grant funds this semester to conduct R&D on effective methods of extracting oil from avocados which can be replicated in the context of Tanzania. The team is looking to include a UROP in the research process, who could collaborate on experiments and contribute to developing solutions to several technical challenges which have been identified in the current processing method.

Prerequisites: Strong interest in international development and appropriate technology for rural settings; an interest in methods of drying and dehydration would be a plus Experience in iterative design processes and in designing, conducting, and analyzing experiments; attention to detail and proactive in identifying solutions to technical challenges Familiarity with shop tools and preferably prior D-Lab shop training (though this can be obtained this semester if needed) Experience with sensors and Arduino a plus Willing and able to dedicate at least 6 hours a week to the project (for a 6 credit UROP; additional credit hours possible if the student has time)

Contact Name: Elizabeth Hoffecker Moreno
Contact Email: ehm@mit.edu


3/3/17
Spring
Department/Lab/Center: Urban Studies and Planning (Course 11)
Faculty Supervisor: Carlo Ratti

Project Title: Treepedia

Project Description: We've developed a metric the Green View Index by which to evaluate and compare canopy cover in cities around the world. In collaboration with the World Economic Forum, we're growing this database to span the globe. To do this, we need your help! Come work on an exciting project that's getting a lot of media attention (just Google Treepedia!). With your help, we want to continue to scale to build a global platform mapping the urban canopy.

Prerequisites: Looking for 1-2 student(s) in computer science or urban studies and planning (or relevant field), proficient in GIS and python. An interest in urban ecology is a plus.

URL: senseable.mit.edu/treepedia

Contact Name: Newsha Ghaeli
Contact Email: ghaeli@mit.edu


3/3/17
Summer
Department/Lab/Center: Political Science (Course 17)
Faculty Supervisor: Charles Stewart

Project Title: Election Data and Science Lab

Project Description: This summer, the MIT Election Data and Science Lab will begin assembling a set of election-related data sets that will form the core of the Lab's common data resource. The Lab would like to employ a UROP student to help discover, download, and prepare election-related data sets for inclusion in the Lab's website. Some experience programming required, with a preference for students who already have used Stata, R, or Python in prior work (classes or UROPs).

URL: http://electionlab.mit.edu/

Contact Name: Charles Stewart
Contact Email: cstewart@mit.edu


3/3/17
Spring
Multiple Openings
Department/Lab/Center: Mechanical Engineering (Course 2)
Faculty Supervisor: Amos Winter

Project Title: Three UROP Projects Available on Drip Irrigation for Global Development

Research background: Drip irrigation is a method of irrigation that delivers a steady, controlled flow of water directly to a plant s roots. Drip irrigation is advantageous it reduces water consumption by up to seventy percent while increasing crop yield by up fifty percent compared to traditional flood irrigation methods. Drip irrigation can enable farmers to grow crops under conditions where they could not otherwise do so (e.g. with strict water constraints or in dry seasons), allow farmers to crow a wider array of crops, increases crop yield, and saves on labor and fertilizer costs. Yet, despite its benefits, drip irrigation has very low adoption rates in India and other developing countries, with less than one percent of land in India cultivated using drip. The high cost of drip irrigation systems is a major barrier to adoption of drip systems. For farmers without access to grid electricity, the energy requirements of drip irrigation make off-grid drip cost prohibitive. There is an urgent need for high-performance, low-power, low-cost drip irrigation systems. All projects are in the Global Research and Engineering Laboratory, run by Prof. Amos Winter. All projects will be supervised by Jaya Narain (jnarain@mit.edu)

Project #1: Socio-economic research and modeling

We are working on developing a software tool that models all aspects of drip irrigation, from hydraulics to agronomics to the socio-economics. We are looking for a UROP student to help collect socio-economic data and integrate it into our systems level model.

The UROP student will be responsible for:

Skills desired: strong interest in global engineering and development, some experience with MATLAB preferred, but can be taught to an enthusiastic student

Timeline: spring semester, with possibility for continuation into summer Available for credit in the spring semester, sponsored funding may be possible upon discussion.
__________

Project #2: CAD modeling of inline emitters

We are developing a database of CAD for commercially available inline drip emitters. We are looking for a UROP student to carefully measure emitters (sub-mm level of resolution) and create CAD models of the emitters. The UROP student will also help manufacture and test emitters in the laboratory. This project has the potential to develop into/include CFD simulations of flow through the emitters.

The UROP student will be responsible for:

  • Working in the laboratory to test the pressure vs. flow rate of different emitter designs

    Skills desired: proficiency in SolidWorks, some hands-on experience with testing/manufacturing preferred

    Timeline: spring semester, with possibility for continuation into summer working on additional projects Available for credit in the spring semester, sponsored funding may be possible upon discussion.
    __________

    Project #3: Scaling of flow through inline emitters

    Drip emitters are relatively small devices. Their sizes impose limitations on flow testing and visualization. This project is to design and test larger scale versions of drip emitters. We would like to develop a system where we can easily visualize flow through emitters (using dyes, etc.) and collect measurements on relevant data (e.g., pressures, flow rates, etc.)

    The responsibilities of this UROP include:

    Skills desired: experience with fluid mechanics (preferable 2.005 and 2.006 or equivalents) to understand dimensionless parameters and scaling behavior; experience with manufacturing, sensors, and data collection

    Timeline: spring semester, with possibility for continuation into summer Available for credit in the spring semester, sponsored funding may be possible upon discussion

    URL: gear.mit.edu

    Contact Name: Jaya Narain
    Contact Email: jnarain@mit.edu


    3/3/17
    Spring
    Department/Lab/Center: Institute for Data, Systems and Society (IDS)
    Faculty Supervisor: Richard Charles Larson


    Project Title: Leaks in the STEM Gender Pipeline

    Project Description: Working under a NIH grant, our research attempts to identify the various factors that discourage women from pursuing education or career in STEM fields. These factors may be socioeconomic or cultural factors; they may also be specific points during women’s educational or occupational timeline (for example, 1st year college and university STEM classes). We are looking for a student skilled in computer graphics who can help us create a graphical visualization to present our data. As of now, we envision our final product to look something like a pipeline that contains several leaks, with each leak providing information on a factor that we’ve identified as discouraging women from pursuing STEM.

    Contact: Please send email to Kelly Cho (kellycho@mit.edu) with your CV/resume and/or a description of relevant experiences.


  • Visit the Research section of the MIT website