The Wallace Shed

picture of shed interior, looking north

The shed building (1982) is located south of the main building and houses four pier-mounted telescopes. For observing the shed's roof rolls open onto supported rails toward the north. The roof peak of the south wall of the building is hinged and able to fold down to provide a wider view of the southern sky for Pier 4 at the south end of the building.

picture of observer's worktable, telescope #1

When observing in the shed...

Pier 1 "Byers Mount"

picture of telescope 1

This fork-mounted 14-in telescope is an f/11 with a focal length of 3910 mm. It has manual slew with manual clamps in right ascension and declination. The original Celestron motor drives were replaced with Byers C14 retrofit drives, and both axes are equipped with motors controlled by a hand paddle for set and guide speed motions. Track rates available are sidereal, lunar, and solar. It has manual setting circles for both right ascension and declination.

A finder scope is mounted to the telescope tube. A handle is mounted at the rear of the telescope for positioning during manual moves. Do not attempt to move the telescope by grabbing the finder. This misaligns the finder and makes finding target fields much more difficult.

Part of the northern sky is blocked for this telescope because the shed roof can't roll past the north end of the building.

 

Pier 2: "Byers Mount"

picture of telescope 2

This fork-mounted 14-in telescope is an f/11 with a focal length of 3910 mm. It has manual slew with manual clamps in right ascension and declination. The original Celestron motor drives were replaced with Byers C14 retrofit drives, and both axes are equipped with motors controlled by a hand paddle for set and guide speed motions. Track rates available are sidereal, lunar, and solar. It has manual setting circles for both right ascension and declination.

A finder scope is mounted to the telescope tube. A handle is mounted at the rear of the telescope for positioning during manual moves. Do not attempt to move the telescope by grabbing the finder. This misaligns the finder and makes finding target fields much more difficult.

Pier 3

Pier 4

Exoplanet transit data taken using pier 4

History