Physics Spotlight  
Nuno F. Loureiro, Associate Professor of Nuclear Science and Engineering and Associate Professor of Physics "When we stimulate theoretically inclined minds by framing plasma physics and fusion challenges as beautiful theoretical physics problems, we bring into the game incredibly brilliant students," says associate professor of nuclear science and engineering Nuno Loureiro. Photo: Gretchen Ertl

Nuno Loureiro: Understanding turbulence in plasmas

Theoretical physicist's focus on the complexity of plasma turbulence could pay dividends in fusion energy.

Peter Dunn | Nuclear Science & Engineering
January 3, 2019

Difficult problems with big payoffs are the life blood of MIT, so it’s appropriate that plasma turbulence has been an important focus for theoretical physicist Nuno Loureiro in his two years at the Institute, first as a assistant professor and now as an associate professor of nuclear science and engineering.

New turbulence-related publications by Loureiro’s research group are contributing to the quest to develop nuclear fusion as a practical energy source, and to emerging astrophysical research that delves into the fundamental mechanisms of the universe.

Turbulence is around us every day, when smoke rises through air, or milk is poured into coffee. While engineers can draw on substantial empirical knowledge of how it behaves, turbulence’s fundamental principles remain a mystery. Decades ago, Nobel laureate Richard Feynman ’39 referred to it as “the most important unsolved problem of classical physics” — and that still holds true today. [Full article]