Instructors

John Aunins

John Aunins, PhD
Executive Vice President of Bioprocess Development, Seres Health

John Aunins is a 24-year veteran in the biotech field, with deep experience in bioprocess development, manufacturing support, and project leadership. He led process and product development teams at Merck Research Laboratories for Vaqta®, Varivax®, Zostavax®, ProQuad®, Rotateq®, and Gardasil®. The Vaqta and Gardasil process teams were awarded with ACS Industrial Biotechnology Awards for innovation, contribution to bioengineering, and societal impact. He is a Fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering, and an adjunct Full Professor at the Instituto de Tecnologia Quimica e Biologica (ITQB) in Oeiras, Portugal. He is author of over 50 articles and book chapters, and has chaired five international conferences in vaccines and bioprocess technology. John obtained his PhD in Chemical Engineering from MIT in 1989 under Institute Professor Daniel C. Wang.

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Dan Barouch, MD, PhD

Dan Barouch, MD, PhD
Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School
Director, Center for Virology and Vaccine Research,
Beth Israel Deaconness Medical Center

Dan Barouch, MD, PhD, is director of the Center for Virology and Vaccine Research at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. He is also a professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School. In addition, he is a key part of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation Collaboration for AIDS Vaccine Discovery, the National Institutes of Health Center for HIV/AIDS Vaccine Immunology and Immunogen Discovery, and the Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT, and Harvard.

Dr. Barouch received his PhD in immunology from Oxford University and his MD from Harvard Medical School.

His laboratory focuses on studying the immunology and virology of HIV-1 infection and developing novel vaccine strategies. His laboratory has explored a series of novel vaccine technologies, including adjuvanted DNA vaccines, poxvirus vectors, and alternative serotype adenovirus vectors in both preclinical and clinical studies. In particular, he has advanced a series of novel adenovirus vector-based HIV-1 vaccine candidates from concept and design to preclinical testing to phase 1 clinical trials that are currently underway in both the US and sub-Saharan Africa.

Dr. Barouch is board certified in internal medicine and infectious diseases, and he is committed to mentoring students, clinical fellows, research fellows, and junior faculty and to providing clinical care to patients with infectious diseases.

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Barry C. Buckland

Barry C. Buckland, PhD
previously Merck

PhD in Biochemical Engineering at University College London obtained in 1974. Joined the Merck Research Laboratories (MRL) in 1980 and built a world class Bioprocess R&D group. Leader of process development of all biologically made product candidates within the MRL pipeline and manufacture of Clinical Supplies during a 20 year time frame. Products developed within this period include MEVACOR®, ZOCOR®, IVOMEC®, CANCIDAS®, RECOMBIVAX HB®, VAQTA®, VARIVAX®, COMVAX®, ROTATEQ® (Rotavirus vaccine), ZOSTAVAX® (shingles vaccine) and GARDASIL® (HPV vaccine).

External awards and appointments include being elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1997 and Fellow of University College London in 1998. Awards include the Donald Medal, UK Institute of Chemical Engineering in 2002, Prix Galien award: Member of team to receive Vaccine Award for Gardasil® in 2007, Merck Board of Directors Award for leading process development for licensure of four (4) new vaccines in 2007. Chaired two International Conferences on Cell Culture (Cell Culture Engineering IV and Cell Culture Engineering V) and co-chaired the first three International Conferences on Metabolic Engineering. Co-chaired the first two International Conferences on Vaccine Technology. Author or co-author of over 70 papers. Visiting Professor at University College London for past 15 years. In October 2008, named by AIChE as one of the “One Hundred Chemical Engineers of the Modern Era” (defined as from World War II to Present) as part of the AIChE Centennial Celebration in Philadelphia, USA and also awarded Marvin Johnson Award by ACS (American Chemical Society) for lifetime contribution to Biotechnology. Awarded PhRMA Discoverer of the Year award in April 2009 for development of the Merck HPV vaccine (along with Eliav Barr and Kathrin Jansen).

Starting in May 2009; CEO, BiologicB. Since this time have provided consultancy worldwide to a number of companies and not-for-profit institutions, in all areas of Biologics including Vaccines and Therapeutic Proteins. Member of Board of Directors for Ancora and Mucosis. Chair of Board for a not-for-profit organization, Engineering Conferences International. Continue as Visiting Professor at University College London. Founder and Board Member of start-up company Enumeral Biomedical. Head, Bioprocess Development at Protein Sciences. The first recombinant Shingles vaccine, Flublok, was licensed in January 2013.

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Charles L. Cooney

Charles L. Cooney
Robert T. Haslam (1911) Professor of Chemical Engineering, Emeritus, Department of Chemical Engineering; Faculty Director, Emeritus, Deshpande Center for Technological Innovation, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Charles L. Cooney received his BS in chemical engineering from the University of Pennsylvania in 1966, and the SM (1967) and PhD (1970) in biochemical engineering from MIT. After a short post-doc at the Squibb Institute for Medical Research, he joined the MIT faculty as an assistant professor in 1970, becoming full professor in 1982.

Cooney’s honors include the 1989 Gold Medal of the Institute of Biotechnological Studies (London); the Food, Pharmaceutical, and Bioengineering Award from the American Institute of Chemical Engineers; the James Van Lanen Distinguished Service Award from the American Chemical Society’s Division of Microbial and Biochemical Technology; election to the American Institute of Medical and Biochemical Engineers and a Fellow of the American Chemical Society.

A consultant to multiple biotech and pharmaceutical companies, Cooney sits on the boards of Polypore International, Biocon, Ltd. (India) and multiple private companies (GreenLight Bioscience, Mitra Biotech, Pronutria Biosciences, Boyd Technologies, enEvolve, Inc., Levitronix). His research and teaching interests span many aspects of biochemical engineering and pharmaceutical manufacturing and accelerating technological innovation.

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Mathew Downham
AstraZeneca

Bio to come.

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Mark Feinberg
IAVI

Bio to come.

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Adrian Hill
Oxford

Bio to come.

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Kolodziej

Stephen A. Kolodziej, PhD
Associate Research Fellow-Group Leader, Pfizer, Inc.

Steve has been an Associate Research Fellow in the Conjugation and Polytides Process Development group at the Pfizer-St. Louis site since 2010, where his team has focused on process development of polysaccharide-protein and other protein conjugates as biotherapeutic drug candidates for vaccine (prophylactic and therapeutic), oncology and cardiovascular indications. Prior to this position, he spent 16 years in the Discovery Medicinal Chemistry groups of Searle, Pharmacia, then Pfizer developing novel small molecule candidates as potential therapies for inflammatory diseases, as well as developing novel approaches to PK modulation via protein conjugation. Steve has a BA and a PhD in Organic Chemistry from the University of Missouri.

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J. Christopher Love, PhD

J. Christopher Love, PhD
Professor of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

J. Christopher Love is an associate professor in chemical engineering and member of the Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research at MIT. In addition, Chris is an associate member at the Eli and Edythe L. Broad Institute, and at the Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT, and Harvard. Dr. Love received his PhD in 2004 in physical chemistry at Harvard University. He extended his research into immunology at Harvard Medical School from 2004-2005, and at the Immune Disease Institute from 2005-2007. His research centers on using simple microsystems to measure and correlate multiple phenotypic and functional characteristics of individual lymphocytes, and from these single-cell data, generate quantitative, system-wide profiles of immune responses. Current areas of research in the lab include

i) multiplexed, functional profiling of lymphocytes from HIV+ patients,
ii) clonal analysis of autoreactive T cells and B cells in type 1 diabetes and multiple sclerosis, and
iii) development of quantitative, cell-based diagnostics for allergy testing.

In addition, his lab is understanding how to engineer microbial strains for manufacturing therapeutic antibodies. Dr. Love was named a Dana Scholar for Human Immunology and a Keck Distinguished Young Scholar in Medical Research in 2009, as well as one of Popular Science’s Brilliant 10 in 2010. Chris is also a Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar.

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Tarit Mukhopadhyay, EngD

Tarit Mukhopadhyay, EngD
Lecturer, Department of Biochemical Engineering, University College London

Tarit is a lecturer in the Department of Biochemical Engineering at University College London. For the past ten years he has been working in the field of vaccine bioprocess development on a range of bacterial and virus vaccines. His early work with the Health Protection Agency, involved working on 2 vaccines of commercial interest, a novel Meningitis B vaccine based upon the outer membrane proteins of N.lactamica and the UK licensed Anthrax vaccine. In both cases scale-down tools were used to improve the manufacturing process of these vaccine and in the case of the anthrax vaccine, half the manufacturing time.

Since then his research targets include the upstream and downstream processing of conjugate vaccines and virus vectors such as adenovirus, AAV and lentivirus. These include thermo-stable formulation of lentiviruses, novel chromatographic separation techniques for AAV and high-cell density production of adenoviruses.

In 2014, Tarit joined the EU funded (FP7) FLUTCORE consortium to utilise virus like particles to create a universal influenza vaccine expressed in Pichia pastoris. The idea is to create a platform manufacturing process that is independent of antigen switching.

A main focus of his research is scale-down and scale-up. The primary methodology is to create scale-down models that mimic the processing environment to determine CQA/CPP that can be accurately applied to the commercial scale. The obvious benefits of this are reducing time to market and cost.

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Derek O’Hagan

Derek O’Hagan
Global Head of Vaccine Chemistry & Formulation, GSK

Derek O’Hagan, BPharm, MRPharmS, PhD, is the Global Head of Vaccine Chemistry and Formulation for GSK, based in Cambridge, MA. He manages research teams both in Cambridge and Siena, Italy. He is a qualified pharmacist from the UK, and a former academic researcher, who has worked on vaccine delivery in the industry since 1993. He was formerly a Lecturer in Drug Delivery at the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Nottingham, UK, and received research funding from the World Health Organization, The Wellcome Trust and the Medical Research Council. He was recruited into the US in 1993, and moved to progress basic research into clinical evaluation. He subsequently worked on several vaccine delivery systems that were evaluated in the clinic, including novel adjuvants, nucleic acid vaccines and needle free vaccines. In the mid 1990’s, he worked on the novel emulsion adjuvant MF59, which is now included in a licensed flu vaccine in more than 40 countries and is progressing towards licensure in the US. He is the author of >120 original research publications, >60 book chapters and reviews and is a named inventor on >50 filed patents. He was awarded the Conference Science medal of the Royal Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain in 1997, and the Young Investigator Research Achievement Award of the Controlled Release Society in 1999. He was also named as the ‘most inventive scientist’ in Chiron in 2004 and was the lead author on the most cited paper in ‘Vaccine’ 2008-10. He has served on the Board of Scientific Advisors for the Controlled Release Society and is a Fellow of the American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists.

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Alain Pralong

Alain Pralong, PhD
previously GlaxoSmithKline

Alain Pralong obtained his doctorate in molecular and cellular biology at the University of Berne in 2000. His research into apoptosis was conducted jointly between the University and Novartis, where all laboratory-based investigations were carried out. From 2000 to 2004 he worked on manufacturing Adenovaccine clinical trial material at Schering-Plough. Following a move to Roche in 2004, he managed their transfer of Avastin process manufacturing from Genentech. From 2007 to 2008, he worked at Merck-Serono in the manufacturing of hormones used in treatment of infertility. Since 2008, Alain has been Vice President at Crucell where he led the Global Process Development Department working on various monoclonal antibodies and vaccines until the take over of Crucell by Johnson & Johnson in 2011. Alain worked then worked ad interim as consultant for Pharma-Consulting ENABLE GmbH. Since November 2011, Alain works at GSK Biologicals in Belgium as Vice President for New Product Introduction.

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David Robinson
previously Merck

Bio to come.

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Stephen Savarino
sanofi pasteur

Bio to come.

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Stacy L. Springs, PhD

Stacy L. Springs, PhD
Director, Biomanufacturing Program; Executive Director, Consortium on Adventitious Agent Contamination in Biomanufacturing, Center for Biomedical Innovation, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Dr. Stacy L. Springs is the Director of the Biomanufacturing Program (BioMAN) and the Executive Director of the MIT Consortium on Adventitious Agent Contamination in Biomanufacturing (CAACB) at the MIT Center for Biomedical Innovation. BioMAN is a collaborative research and educational program in biotherapeutic manufacturing that involves biopharmaceutical manufacturers, vendors, regulators, other government stakeholders and academics. The objective of this program is to develop new knowledge, science, technologies and strategies for advancing the safe manufacture and global delivery of high quality biopharmaceuticals. The CAACB was established to share information around adventitious agent contamination and risk mitigation for the benefit of the biopharmaceutical manufacturing industry and the patients receiving medications produced from cell culture.

Dr. Springs holds a PhD in Chemistry from the University of Texas at Austin and gained postdoctoral training in protein and biophysical chemistry at Princeton University. Prior to joining MIT, Stacy was a Senior Scientist and Director of Collaborative Projects at Tetralogic Pharmaceuticals, an oncology drug discovery company based in Malvern, PA.

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Bob Sitrin
PATH

Bio to come.

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Martin Wisher

Martin Wisher, PhD
Senior Director, Quality Assurance & Regulatory Affairs, BioReliance

Dr. Wisher has more than 30 years of experience in biosafety testing and validation. He has worked for BioReliance, UK since the company was founded in Stirling in 1990, acting as Scientific Director since 1993. He has extensive experience in the technical, scientific, quality and regulatory aspects of the development of biological products including vaccines and viral vectors and provides consultancy in these areas. Prior to joining BioReliance, Dr. Wisher worked for Inveresk Research as Manager of Immunology, responsible for biosafety services. He obtained a PhD in membrane biochemistry from the National Institute for Medical Research, London and prior to moving to the contract research industry was involved in research on membrane receptors, monoclonal antibodies and recombinant vaccines.

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MIT CBI