MIT Faculty Newsletter  
Vol. XXIII No. 1
September / October 2010
What Are We Willing to Pay for Clean Energy?
The Role of American Universities in
Large Disaster Management
Interview with New MIT Corporation
Chairman John Reed
The Year Ahead: Accelerating the
Pace of Innovation
MIT Ranked 7th in Latest U.S. News Poll
Pedagogic Scenarios: Where's the Metric?
Random Faculty Dinners
Approach 30th Anniversary
MIT150: Inventional Wisdom
MIT OpenCourseWare:
A Decade of Global Benefit
Institute Initiates Written Information
Security Program (WISP)
Michael S. Feld
Teaching this fall? You should know . . .
U.S. News & World Report: Best College Rankings for National Universities, 2002-2011
Printable Version

Teaching this fall? You should know . . .

Teaching this fall? You should know …
the faculty regulates examinations and assignments for all subjects.

Check the Web at for the complete regulations.
Questions: Contact Faculty Chair Tom Kochan at x3-6689 or

No required classes, examinations, exercises, or assignments of any kind may be scheduled after the last regularly scheduled class in a subject, except for final examinations scheduled through the Schedules Office.

First and Third Week of the Term
By the end of the first week of classes, you must provide a clear and complete description of:
• required work, including the number and kinds of assignments;
• an approximate schedule of tests and due dates for major projects;
• whether or not there will be a final examination; and
• grading criteria.

By the end of the third week, you must provide a precise schedule of tests and major assignments.

For all Undergraduate Subjects, Tests Outside Scheduled Class Times:
• may begin no earlier than 7:30 p.m., when held in the evening;
• may not be held on Monday evenings;
• may not exceed two hours in length; and
• must be scheduled through the Schedules Office.

No Testing During the Last Week of Classes
Tests after Friday, December 3, 2010 must be scheduled in the Finals Period.

Collaboration Policy and Expectations for Academic Conduct
Due to varying faculty attitudes towards collaboration and diverse cultural values and priorities regarding academic honesty, students are often confused about expectations regarding permissible academic conduct. It is important to clarify, in writing, expectations regarding collaboration and academic conduct at the beginning of each semester. This could include a reference tothe MIT Academic Integrity Handbook

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