MIT Faculty Newsletter  
Vol. XXIII No. 3
January / February 2011
Clarifying MIT's International Agenda
MIT's Approach to International Engagement
MIT's Sputnik Moment
Student Engagement at MIT: A Path Forward
Education: America's Achilles Heel
Faculty and Student Diversity at MIT:
Facts and Figures
MIT Professional Education Short Programs: Linking Academia and Industry
Sanyl, Schuh, Verghese, and Winston Named 2011 MacVicar Faculty Fellows
Teaching this spring? You should know . . .
Campus International Sponsored Research
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Teaching this spring? You should know . . .

Teaching this spring? You should know …
the faculty regulates examinations and assignments for all subjects.

Check the Web at for the complete regulations.
Questions: Contact Faculty Chair Tom Kochan at x3-6689 or

No required classes, examinations, exercises, or assignments of any kind may be scheduled after the last regularly scheduled class in a subject, except for final examinations scheduled through the Schedules Office.

First and Third Week of the Term
By the end of the first week of classes, you must provide a clear and complete description of:
• required work, including the number and kinds of assignments;
• an approximate schedule of tests and due dates for major projects;
• whether or not there will be a final examination; and
• grading criteria.

By the end of the third week, you must provide a precise schedule of tests and major assignments.

For all Undergraduate Subjects, Tests Outside Scheduled Class Times:
• may begin no earlier than 7:30 p.m., when held in the evening;
• may not be held on Monday evenings;
• may not exceed two hours in length; and
• must be scheduled through the Schedules Office.

For subjects in which there is testing during the final examination period, no assignment may fall due after Friday, May 6.

For subjects in which there is no testing during the final examination period, at most one assignment may fall due between May 6 and the end of the last scheduled class period in the subject.

Collaboration Policy and Expectations for Academic Conduct
Due to varying faculty attitudes towards collaboration and diverse cultural values and priorities regarding academic honesty, students are often confused about expectations regarding permissible academic conduct. It is important to clarify, in writing, expectations regarding collaboration and academic conduct at the beginning of each semester. This could include a reference tothe MIT Academic Integrity Handbook

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