Electron Probe Micro-Analysis

Massachusetts Institute of Technology | Earth, Atomospheric & Planetary Sciences (EAPS) | EAPS Research Facilities
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MIT Electron Microprobe Facility

Department of Earth, Atmospheric & Planetary Sciencessmall logo
Building & Room: 54-1221; 54-1214
Cambridge, MA 02139
Phone: (617) 253-9678, or (617) 253-9677
Fax: (617) 253-7102
e-mail: e-probe-www@mit.edu

Introduction

The Electron Microprobe, also known as the Electron Probe X-ray Microanalyzer (EMPA), is a powerful and well established analytical tool that provides non-destructive, in-situ and complete quantitative chemical analysis of a flat solid surface with a spatial resolution of ~2 micron through X-ray emission spectrometry. It also provides high-resolution scanning electron and elemental X-ray images (concentration maps) showing spatial distribution of elements. A variety of earth, extraterrestrial and artificial materials including minerals, glasses, ceramics, metals and superconductors can be analyzed. Below is an illustration of the JXA-733. The basic components of the JXA-8200 and the JXA-733 are similar. Click on the image below for details:

Qualitative analysis: quick phase identificationElectron Beam and X-ray microanalysis
Quantitative analysis and X-ray mappingQualitative analysis: quick phase identificationLight and cathodoluminescence imaging
Quantitative analysis and X-ray mappingSample stage and electron detectors

Our JEOL JXA Superprobes are equipped with:

  • Up to five wavelength dispersive spectrometers (WDS) working simultaneously and providing quantitative analysis of all elements with atomic number >4 (B to U) and minimum detection limits of ~10 ppm under favorable conditions. We have a large standard collection for analysis of most elements.
  • The WDS can also be used to obtain X-ray maps showing elemental distributions.
  • Energy dispersive spectrometer for quick qualitative analysis.
  • Back-scattered electron detector for high resolution compositional imaging.
  • Secondary electron detector for high resolution topographic imaging.
  • An orthogonal translational stage that can hold up to nine 1-inch diameter sample mounts or a large sample (up to 80 mm x 80 mm) of irregular shape.
  • Photomultiplier for cathodoluminescence imaging.
  • Our sample preparation facility includes diamond wafering blades, polishing grits and papers, lap-wheel units, automatic polishers, optical microscopes and carbon coaters.
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