Lunchtime Seminars


 

Seminar Details

Tuesdays 12:00 PM

All seminars are hybrid

   https://mit.zoom.us/j/97546892955
Building 26, 414 (Kolker Room)

 

Committee: Ronald Garcia Ruiz ~ Michael Williams ~ Prajwal MohanMurthy


Spring 2024

 

 


Seb Jones  

The QTNM collaboration: a project for absolute neutrino mass measurement

Abstract:
The observation of neutrino oscillations provides proof of non-zero neutrino masses, something which was not predicted in the minimal Standard Model. However, these same neutrino oscillation experiments do not provide information on the absolute scale of the neutrino masses, which remain unknown. The neutrino masses are most directly accessed through those experiments which measure the shape of the beta-decay energy spectrum. In particular, a technique known as Cyclotron Radiation Emission Spectroscopy (CRES) offers the opportunity to measure neutrino masses lower than the current upper mass limit of 0.8 eV achieved by the KATRIN collaboration. The Quantum Technologies for Neutrino Mass (QTNM) collaboration aims to utilise CRES, along with recent breakthroughs in quantum technologies, to build a demonstrator apparatus for measuring the neutrino mass. It is hoped that this demonstrator will make significant contributions towards an experiment with a neutrino mass sensitivity of O(10 meV). I will present an overview of the principles of neutrino mass measurement as well as the QTNM collaboration

 

 

No Talk - Rescheduled

 

 

 

 


Gianfranco Bertone  

Gravitational wave probes of dark matter  

Abstract:
I will start with an overview of the status of dark matter searches and of the prospects for uncovering its nature in the next decade. I will then focus on the interplay between dark matter, black holes, and gravitational waves, and discuss the prospects for characterizing and identifying dark matter using gravitational waves, covering a wide range of candidates and signals. Finally, I will present some new results on the detectability of dark matter overdensities around black holes in binary systems, and argue that future interferometers may enable precision studies of the dark matter distribution and particle properties.

 

 


Silviu Udresu

Precision spectroscopy studies of radioactive molecules for fundamental physics

Abstract:
Molecules are unique quantum systems for fundamental physics studies. Possessing a large sensitivity to nuclear effects and violations of the fundamental symmetries of nature, they can enable precision tests of the Standard Model and the possibility to probe energy scales beyond tens of TeV. Molecules containing octupole-deformed nuclei, such as radium monofluoride (RaF), are expected to be particularly sensitive to symmetry violating nuclear properties. In this talk, I will present the results obtained from a series of laser spectroscopy experiments performed on short-lived RaF molecules at the ISOLDE facility at CERN. The vibrational structure of (223-226,228)RaF and the rotational and hyperfine structure of 226RaF and 225RaF were measured with high precision. This allowed us to establish a laser cooling scheme for these molecules and to investigate the effects of electroweak nuclear properties on the molecular energy levels. These results are the first of their kind performed on radioactive, short-lived molecules, opening the way for future precision studies and new physics searches in these systems. I will then discuss the current status of a novel experiment aiming to measure hadronic parity violation using molecular ions inside a Penning trap. Our method should allow measurements over the entire nuclear chart, providing enhancements in the sensitivity to the sought for signals of more than 12 orders of magnitude compared to atoms. Finally, I will present the developments of a highly sensitive experimental setup for precision laser spectroscopy studies of very short-lived isotopes (lifetime < 1 ms), produced in small amounts (< 1/minute) in hot environments, without the need for cooling techniques. Such nuclear systems are of paramount importance to guide our understanding of nuclear matter and connect our description of nuclei with the underlying theory of the strong force.

 

 


Marta Babic 

Probing the Secrets of Matter Creation with LEGEND

Abstract:
The LEGEND experiment seeks to detect lepton-number violation and shed light on neutrino masses by hunting for neutrinoless double beta decay. The experiment employs high-purity germanium detectors enriched in $^{76}$Ge and an active liquid-argon shield to minimize background events. In its initial phase, utilizing ~200 kg of germanium crystals, LEGEND targets a half-life discovery sensitivity of 10$^{27}$ years. The cosmic quest continues in the second phase, deploying ~1000 kg of detectors to push the discovery sensitivity beyond 10$^{28}$ years. Renowned for its superior energy resolution and ultra-low background levels, LEGEND promises a quasi-background-free search, unveiling an unambiguous signature at the 2039 keV decay Q-value. Join us on this journey as LEGEND ventures into the depths of neutrino exploration, pushing the boundaries of discovery and expanding our understanding of the universe. In this presentation, I will explain the importance of 0νββ to the fields of neutrino and beyond the Standard Model physics, as well as discuss the current status and the plans of the LEGEND-200 and the LEGEND-1000 experiments, respectively.

 

 


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Gregor Eberwin

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No Talk - Spring Break

 

 

 


Michael Doser

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Raghav Kunnawalkam Elayavalli

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Darcy Newmark 

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