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Lunchtime Seminars

Tuesdays ~ 12pm ~ Kolker Room, 26-414

 

Committee:
Gunther Roland, Chair ~ Doug Hasell~ Paolo Zuccon



February 7, 2017

 

Zhili Weng, MIT

Precision Measurement of Elementary Particle Fluxes in Cosmic Ray with AMS

The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer, AMS, is a particle physics detector operating on the International Space Station since May 2011 to conduct a unique long duration mission of fundamental physics research in space.


Precision measurements of all elementary charged cosmic ray particles have been performed by AMS using cosmic ray events collected during the first five years of operations. The latest AMS results on the fluxes and flux ratios of charged elementary cosmic ray particles show unique features and indicate new source of these particles in cosmic rays. Meanwhile, precision measurements from AMS on cosmic ray nuclei provide invaluable input in understanding cosmic ray acceleration and propagation.


The accuracy and characteristics of the AMS data require a comprehensive model to ascertain the origin of cosmic ray charged elementary particles, be it from dark matter collision, astrophysical sources, acceleration mechanisms or a combination.

 

time:    Noon
place:   Kolker Room (26-414)

(Lunch will be served at 11:50.)



February 14, 2017

 

Rebecca Russell, MIT

Results from the OLYMPUS Experiment

 

Elastic electron-proton scattering has long been used to study the form factors of the proton. However, more recent experiments using polarized elastic electron-proton scattering have yielded results that contradict the conclusions from unpolarized measurements. In 2012, the OLYMPUS experiment ran at DESY to precisely measure the electron-proton to positron-proton elastic scattering cross section ratio. This ratio is sensitive to the two-photon exchange contribution to the elastic cross section, a possible explanation of the discrepancy. The recently-released results of this experiment will be discussed.

time:    Noon
place:   Kolker Room (26-414)

(Lunch will be served at 11:50.)

 


 

 


February 21, 2017

 

Reyco Henning, University of North Carolina- Chapel Hill

Recent results and future plans for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR

The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR (MJD) is a 44-kg array of low-background germanium detectors of which 30kg is made from detectors enriched to 88% in 76Ge. MJD is operating a mile underground in the Sanford Underground Research Laboratory in Lead, SD. Its main purpose is to search for the neutrinoless double-beta decay of 76Ge and to demonstrate the technical feasibility of a tonne-scale Ge-based neutrinoless double-beta decay experiment. It is also capable of direct searches of a variety of dark matter candidates and other physics beyond the Standard Model. In this talk I will review the motivation, design and construction of the MJD, as well as recent results for a the search for bosonic dark matter using commissioning data taken in 2015. I will also discuss the current status of MJD and conclude with a discussion of future plans for MJD and a proposed tonne-scale Ge-based experiment, LEGeND.

 

time:    Noon
place:   Kolker Room (26-414)

(Lunch will be served at 11:50.)


 


February 28, 2017

 

Elena Long, University of New Hampshire

Tensor Polarization: A New Window into Nuclear Structure

Whenever technological advancements provide access to a new degree of freedom, previously inaccessible quantities can be measured. Currently, we are seeing the beginning of a renaissance of experiments utilizing a tensor polarized target to probe the structure of the deuteron. This is due to two recent developments: the JLab 12 GeV upgrade, and a high-luminosity, high-tensor-polarized target. Experiments utilizing these new capabilities can explore aspects of the nature of matter that have so far proven elusive, some for decades: from 6-quark hidden-color effects in the DIS region to the short-range and high-momentum components of the deuteron wavefunction in the x>1 SRC region, and beyond. This seminar will discuss the first two experiments already approved to measure the tensor b1 and Azz observables, recent advances in tensor target development, and future opportunities to better understand nuclear and nucleon structures that are only accessible through experiments utilizing tensor polarized targets.

 

time:    Noon
place:   Kolker Room (26-414)

(Lunch will be served at 11:50.)



March 7, 2017

 

Corey Reed, StubHub

From Physics to Data Science

In 2012, the Harvard Business Review called data science the sexiest job of the 21st century. Questionable adjectives aside, demand for qualified individuals to help organizations make data-driven choices and optimize their operations is extremely high. The argument will be made that physicists are particularly well suited to such positions. A recent example of transitioning from physics research to working in commercial data science will be described. Some additional skills physicists need to contribute productively to data science will be discussed. Several real-world examples of data science projects will be presented.

 

Corey earned his PH.D. in physics at M.I.T. working with Dr. George Stephans

 

time:    Noon
place:   Kolker Room (26-414)

(Lunch will be served at 11:50.)



March 14, 2017 CANCELLED

 

Joseph Formaggio, MIT

Ricochet (a neutrino experiment in three courses)

The process of coherent neutrino scattering, sometimes known as CEvNS, is a remarkable blend of the ideas of quantum mechanics and neutrino physics. Despite the idea being proposed over forty years ago, the mechanism remains to be experimentally detected. Recently, technological advancements in cryogenic bolometers finally places the process within experimental reach. In my talk, I will discuss a new experimental approach in detecting CEnNS (called Ricochet), which uses metallic superconductors as an ideal detector and uses a nuclear reactor as its primary neutrino source. Detection of coherent neutrino scattering opens a myriad of doors for both pure and applied science, including understanding the properties of neutrinos, looking for new physics, and even for remote monitoring of nuclear reactors.

time:    Noon
place:   Kolker Room (26-414)

(Lunch will be served at 11:50.)



March 21, 2017

 

No talk this week

 

 


 


March 28, 2017

 

Spring break- no talk this week

 

time:    Noon
place:   Kolker Room (26-414)

(Lunch will be served at 11:50.)



April 4, 2017

 

Camelia Mironov, MIT

A Light Story with Heavy Quarks: Charm and Beauty in Pb+Pb Collisions at the LHC

The unprecedented centre-of-mass energy available at the LHC offers unique opportunities for studying the heavy charm and beauty quarks in a strongly-interacting QCD matter, at extreme temperatures and energy densities. Particles containing heavy quarks, whether quarkonium states (QQbar) or mesons made of heavy-light quark-antiquarks (Qqbar), are considered key probes of the medium they traverse, as the short formation time of the heavy quarks allows them to probe all stages of the medium evolution. In this talk, the latest experimental results on the heavy flavor production in relativistic heavy-ion collisions at the LHC will be presented. They will be used to assess the status of the understanding of heavy quarks phenomenology in a high-density colored partonic medium.

 

 

time:    Noon
place:   Kolker Room (26-414)

(Lunch will be served at 11:50.)


April 11, 2017

 

John Goett, LANL

Fun with Particle Beams and High Explosives: pRAD at LANSCE

Los Alamos scientists have used high energy protons for precision radiography for over a decade. The proton radiography (pRAD) project has used 800 MeV protons, provided by the LANSCE accelerator facility at LANL, to diagnose over 650 dynamic experiments in support of stockpile stewardship programs as well as basic materials science. Through this effort significant experience has been gained in using charged particles as direct radiographic probes to diagnose transient systems. Here we will present the basics of proton radiography, some notable experiments enabled by this technology, as well as the current developmental programs for medical and time-of-flight imaging.

 

time:    Noon
place:   Kolker Room (26-414)

(Lunch will be served at 11:50.)


 

April 18, 2017

 

Patriots Day schedule alteration- no talk this week


April 25, 2017

 

Kalyan Allada, MIT

Study of 3D partonic structure of nucleon with SoLID at JLab

Semi-inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering (SIDIS) is powerful tool to study 3-d structure of nucleon in the momentum space. Using an electron beam and polarized/unpolarized nucleon target one can study various transverse-momentum dependent parton distribution functions (TMDs) that appear in the SIDIS cross-section. TMDs provide a description of nucleon structure in terms of parton's transverse momentum and its transverse spin, which enables us to study the quark orbital angular momentum effects in the nucleon. Several SIDIS experiments have been proposed at Jefferson Lab that plan to use the upgraded 11 GeV beam and polarized/unpolarized nucleon targets. In this talk I will describe our recent studies for the future precision experiments at JLab using polarized proton/helium-3 targets and the proposed Solenoidal Large Intensity Device (SoLID) in Hall A. These experiments will cover a wide range of kinematics in all four dimensions (x,Q^2,p_T,z) which is very crucial for extracting TMDs.

 

time:    Noon
place:   Kolker Room (26-414)

(Lunch will be served at 11:50.)


May 2, 2017

 

Livia Soffi

TBA

TBA

 

time:    Noon
place:   Kolker Room (26-414)

(Lunch will be served at 11:50.)


May 9, 2017

 

TBA

TBA

TBA

 

time:    Noon
place:   Kolker Room (26-414)

(Lunch will be served at 11:50.)

 



May 16, 2017

 

Joseph Formaggio, MIT

Ricochet (a neutrino experiment in three courses)

The process of coherent neutrino scattering, sometimes known as CEvNS, is a remarkable blend of the ideas of quantum mechanics and neutrino physics. Despite the idea being proposed over forty years ago, the mechanism remains to be experimentally detected. Recently, technological advancements in cryogenic bolometers finally places the process within experimental reach. In my talk, I will discuss a new experimental approach in detecting CEnNS (called Ricochet), which uses metallic superconductors as an ideal detector and uses a nuclear reactor as its primary neutrino source. Detection of coherent neutrino scattering opens a myriad of doors for both pure and applied science, including understanding the properties of neutrinos, looking for new physics, and even for remote monitoring of nuclear reactors.

time:    Noon
place:   Kolker Room (26-414)

(Lunch will be served at 11:50.)