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Lunchtime Seminars

Tuesdays ~ 12pm ~ Kolker Room, 26-414

 

Committee:
Gunther Roland, Chair ~ Doug Hasell~ Paolo Zuccon



September 13, 2016

 

William Barletta, MIT/USPAS & Martin Breidenbach, SLAC

Accelerator Research in the U.S. for High Energy Physics:
A biased perspective

The U.S. could move boldly toward increasing the pace of transformational accelerator research for high-energy physics. Profound questions remain to be answered in particle physics; recent discoveries reconfirm the value of continued investments. However, going beyond the present generation of high energy accelerators will require changing the capability-cost curve of accelerators, which can only happen through an aggressive, sustained, and imaginative R&D program aimed at building the future accelerators at a dramatically lower cost. Both of us were members of Department of Energy panel that recently studied the potential structure of such a research program. We participated fully in the process and approve the report.  Nonetheless, our experience led us to continue and extend our analysis of the issues that will drive accelerator research aimed at future accelerators for high-energy physics with the aim of informing interested physicists from all disciplines, not just accelerator experts. Broadly, we will look at prospects for proton-proton colliders and electron-position colliders – all interlaced with our biases and (and perhaps not so politically correct) opinions.

The talk will be given by W. Barletta

 

 

time:    Noon
place:   Kolker Room (26-414)

(Lunch will be served at 11:50.)



September 20, 2016

 

Dr. Karoline Schäffner, INFN/GSSI

The COSINUS project: development of new NaI-based detectors for direct dark matter search

 

Dark matter remains one of the central open questions in astroparticle physics. Although modern astronomical observations and particle physics experiments are providing precision data in uncovering its true nature, experimental evidence of dark matter still today solely relies on gravitational interaction. Among a long list of hypothetical new particles WIMPs (Weakly Interacting Massive Particles) provide compelling arguments as they provide for a relic density that matches observation. Direct dark matter searches use different detector technologies, all aiming to observe dark matter particles via the process of elastic scattering off atomic nuclei in their earth-bound detectors.

 

At present the situation in the sector of direct dark matter detection is controversial. Several experiments (CDMS-Si, Cogent, DAMA) detect events above the known background level, which allows us to infer properties of a dark matter particle. In particular, the DAMA/LIBRA collaboration observes in more than 13 annual cycles a statistically robust modulation signal in their sodium-iodide (NaI) target crystals.

 

The COSINUS R&D project started in 2016 and aims to develop a cryogenic scintillating calorimeter using undoped NaI as target. Thanks to the two-channel detection approach (heat signal and light signal) possible signal events (nuclear recoils) can be discriminated from common background (electrons/gammas) by the ratio of light to heat signal. The event-by-event based particle-identification renders the detection technique of COSINUS unique among other NaI-based detectors as it offers the possibility of identifying any target-specific particle interactions and to suppress background. If the performance of the proposed NaI calorimeter can be proven to be comparable to already existing scintillating bolometers, as e.g.~used in the CRESST dark matter search, such NaI detectors have the potential, to give an answer on the particle interaction channel participating in the DAMA/LIBRA modulation signal with higher sensitivity due to the explicit lower energy threshold and within a very moderate exposure of few 10 kg-days. 

time:    Noon
place:   Kolker Room (26-414)

(Lunch will be served at 11:50.)

 


 

 


September 27, 2016

 

Rachel Carr, MIT

Data points from a year as a Congressional Science Fellow

Each year, a number of scientific organizations give scientists and engineers the opportunity to engage with the federal government as Congressional Science Fellows. The experience puts fellows directly into the offices of members of Congress or congressional committees, where they offer technical and analytical perspective and learn about the legislative process. In this talk, I will share highlights from my year working on energy and technology policy in the Senate through a fellowship sponsored by the American Institute of Physics and the Acoustical Society of America.

 

time:    Noon
place:   Kolker Room (26-414)

(Lunch will be served at 11:50.)


 


October 4, 2016

 

TBA

TBA

TBA

 

time:    Noon
place:   Kolker Room (26-414)

(Lunch will be served at 11:50.)



October 11, 2016

 

TBA

TBA

TBA

 

time:    Noon
place:   Kolker Room (26-414)

(Lunch will be served at 11:50.)



October 18, 2016

 

Alex Barbieri, MIT

Latest boson-jet results in Heavy Ion collisions at the LHC from CMS

Boson-jet studies are a "golden channel" to study the properties of the Quark Gluon Plasma, as they offer a way to cleanly measure both the initial and final states of probes which pass through the strongly interacting medium. With the higher statistics data at 5.02 TeV collected during the Fall 2015 LHC heavy ion run with the CMS detector, we are able to show quantitative measurements of Z-jet correlations in heavy ion collisions and significantly improved, highly differential photon-jet measurements as well. Jet quenching without significant deflection is observed, and can help differentiate phenomenological models of the QGP.

 

time:    Noon
place:   Kolker Room (26-414)

(Lunch will be served at 11:50.)



October 25, 2016

 

TBA

TBA

TBA

 

time:    Noon
place:   Kolker Room (26-414)

(Lunch will be served at 11:50.)

 


 


November 1, 2016

 

TBA

TBA

TBA

 

time:    Noon
place:   Kolker Room (26-414)

(Lunch will be served at 11:50.)



November 8, 2016

 

Jakob Salfield, Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Measurements of W and Z boson production

TBA

 

time:    Noon
place:   Kolker Room (26-414)

(Lunch will be served at 11:50.)


November 15, 2016

 

Diana Gooding, MIT

TBA

TBA

 

time:    Noon
place:   Kolker Room (26-414)

(Lunch will be served at 11:50.)


 

November 22, 2016

 

G. Hagen, ORNL

TBA

TBA

 

time:    Noon
place:   Kolker Room (26-414)

(Lunch will be served at 11:50.)


November 29, 2016

 

Charles Epstein, MIT

Interplanetary defence

TBA

 

time:    Noon
place:   Kolker Room (26-414)

(Lunch will be served at 11:50.)


December 6, 2016

 

TBA

TBA

TBA

 

time:    Noon
place:   Kolker Room (26-414)

(Lunch will be served at 11:50.)


December 13, 2016

 

Sally Seidel, University of New Mexico

TBA

TBA

 

time:    Noon
place:   Kolker Room (26-414)

(Lunch will be served at 11:50.)